M. G. TROUP.

                                              Tisdale Township and Winfield.

Kansas 1875 Census, Winfield Township, Cowley County, March 1, 1875.

Name                           age sex color          Place/birth Where from

M. G. Troup                 34  m     w                  Ohio           Iowa

Carrie Troup                25    f      w                  Indiana Indiana

Ira Troup                        2  m     w                  Kansas

Blanche Troup        4m   f      w                  Kansas

TISDALE TOWNSHIP 1873:

M. G. Troup, 32; spouse, C., 21.

TISDALE TOWNSHIP 1876:

M. G. Troup, age not given; spouse, Carrie, age not given.

WINFIELD 1874:

M. G. Troup, 33;spouse, Carrie, 23.

WINFIELD 1878:

M. G. Troup, 37; spouse, Carrie, 26.

WINFIELD 1880:

M. G. Troup, 39; spouse, Carrie, 29.

WINFIELD DIRECTORY 1885:

                                             COWLEY COUNTY OFFICER.

                                                       Auditor: M. G. Troup.

Jennings & Troup, attorneys at law, 903 Main

                                               FROM THE NEWSPAPERS.

[ANNOUNCEMENTS: WINFIELD COURIER, AUGUST 14, 1873.]

M. G. TROUP OF TISDALE IS GIVEN BY REPUBLICANS AS A CANDI­DATE FOR COUNTY CLERK...TROUP FROM TISDALE TOWNSHIP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 25, 1873.

                                                         For County Clerk.

RECAP: A citizen from Wilson County wrote supporting M. G. Troup, formerly of that county, who was running as a candidate before the Republican County Convention for the office of Cowley County Clerk.

“Mr. Troup came to this county from the state of Iowa several years ago and settled on a claim in Fall River Township, where he succeeded by energy and perseverance in making a com­fortable home, but health failing, he changed his location and business and removed to Tisdale, Cowley County, and embarked in the mercantile business, which he still follows with the same energy that characterized him as a farmer. His character for integrity has never been questioned, and as he has qualifications of a high order, he will if elected be the right man in the right place. Wilson County Citizen.

[ANNOUNCEMENTS.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 25, 1873.

W. W. WALTON: Candidate for the office of County Surveyor.

John Irwin: Register of Deeds.


E. B. Kager: Re-election as County Treasurer. Backers: S. H. Myton, Wm. Orr, Geo. W. Baily, S. W. Green, W. P. Duncan, J. H. Finch.

N. C. McCulloch, Beaver Tp., Register of Deeds.

L. Lippman: Sheriff.

John Gayman, Maple Township, Sheriff.

R. L. Walker: Sheriff.

A. B. Odell, Ninescah Township, Register of Deeds.

James F. Paul, re-election as Register of Deeds.

A. T. Shenneman: Sheriff.

J. B. Noffsinger, Maple Township, Register of Deeds.

Ruben Rogers, Winfield Township: Sheriff.

M. G. Troup, Tisdale, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 2, 1873.

                                                   REPUBLICAN TICKET.

For Representative: JAMES McDERMOTT.

For County Commissioners—

1st District: JOHN MANLY.

2nd District: J. G. TITUS.

3rd District: R. F. BURDEN.

For County Clerk: M. G. TROUP.

For County Treasurer: E. B. KAGER.

For Register of Deeds: N. C. McCULLOCH.

For Sheriff: R. L. WALKER.

For County Surveyor: W. W. WALTON.

For Coroner: S. S. MOORE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 2, 1873.

INFORMATION ON SOME OF THE CANDIDATES PUSHED BY EDITOR:

M. G. Troup, of Tisdale, is a man of business, and knows how to attend to it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 13, 1873.

                                            County Commissioners’ Proceedings.

The Board of County Commissioners of Cowley County met in the County Clerk’s office November 7th, 1873. Present: Frank Cox and O. C. Smith.

Proceeded to canvass the votes of the election held Nov. 4th, 1873, which resulted in the election of the following officers who were declared duly elected.

For representative of 75th district: William Martin.

For County Clerk: M. G. Troup.

For County Treasurer: E. B. Kager.

For Register of Deeds: N. C. McCulloch.

For Sheriff: R. L. Walker.

For Coroner: Sam Moore.

For County Surveyor: W. W. Walton.

For Commissioner, first district, John Manly.

For Commissioner, second district. M. S. Roseberry.

For Commissioner, third district, R. F. Burden.


Winfield Courier, November 20, 1873.

Mr. Troup, the newly elected County Clerk, has sold his store in Tisdale, and is going to move to Winfield to take charge of his office.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1874.

See notice in another column inviting bids for twenty cords of wood.

NOTICE. Notice is hereby given that I will accept bids for furnishing 20 cords of wood for the county, to be delivered at the Courthouse. Please make your bids for hard and soft wood of merchantable quality. Bids to be opened and contract let on the 24th day of January.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield, Jan. 13, 1874.

[COUNTY COMMISSIONERS’ PROCEEDINGS.]

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1874.

The new Board of County Commissioners met in the clerk’s office.

Present: R. F. Burden, M. S. Roseberry, John Manley, who had been duly elected and qualified.

Moved by M. S. Roseberry, and seconded by John Manley, that R. F. Burden act as permanent chairman of the Board.

Road Petition of Wm. Steele received and granted, the same being in accordance with law.

Ordered that the Sheriff be allowed the sum of $1.33½ each per diem, for boarding and taking care of prisoners until further action in the matter by the board.

E. B. Kager appeared and asked the board to provide a safe for the safekeeping of the funds in his possession. Matter laid over.

The county clerk was authorized to advertise for responsible bids for 20 cords of wood.

Ordered that the county clerk have the sheriff hunt up all the county property that can be found, and invoice the same to said sheriff who shall receipt for said county property.

The county clerk was also instructed to have bolts put on jury-room doors, and sash stops put on all the windows of the courthouse.

Board adjourned until 8 a.m. tomorrow.

Board met at 8 o’clock a.m., January 13th, 1874. All present.

The following bills were presented and allowed.

Joseph Stewart, road damages: $10.00

George Stewart, road damage: $5.00

J. M. Young, jailor: $8.05

A. A. Jackson, County Clerk: $110.10

James Parker: $4.00

R. F. Burden, Commissioner: $10.00

M. S. Roseberry, Commissioner: $8.00

John Manley, Commissioner: $8.00

Bill of G. Black was presented for medical services rendered pauper, and laid over for further information.

Board adjourned to meet again at regular April term.

                                             R. F. BURDEN, Chairman, Board.


M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, January 30, 1874.

The Board of County Commissioners held a special meeting yesterday for the purpose of examining the condition of the County Clerk’s books as left by A. A. Jackson. Although no order was made against Mr. Jackson, yet the Board was unanimously of the opinion that a worse kept set of books would be hard to find within the limits of the state of Kansas. Their examination corroborated the statements made by the COURIER of last week in regard to the matter. The Commissioners decided that the trouble was due more to carelessness and ignorance than to wilful dishon­esty, although of course that doesn’t exonerate Mr. Jackson from blame. The Commissioners will appoint a special committee to help Mr. Troup, the present Clerk, put the books in shape.

Winfield Courier, February 20, 1874.

                                                                  A Card.

ED. COURIER: Some pigheaded galoot whom I dare say pretends to belong to the genius homo, but one who, if he has a right to claim a place among the “species” certainly obtained that right through the latitude of the Darwinian theory, has seen fit to abuse me this week through the columns of the Telegram. Now the facts are these. This man with more initials than brains em­ployed me to make, and acknowledge a deed, for all of which service I charged him two dollars—which, I believe, is the usual price for such service. Now I have no objection to this many initialed individual employing some other attorney to do his business, but I don’t want him to assert through the public prints that I have charged illegal fees for service as County Clerk, or I shall certainly have him verify his statements.

Now in conclusion I have this to say to Mr. W. F. M. Lacy: I hope to do the business of my office in an efficient manner, and expect to charge the legal fees for my services. In the meantime if Mr. Lacy or anyone else gets me to make a deed, or any other legal paper, I shall expect to charge the fees that any other attorney would charge for the same services.

Yours, M. G. TROUP.

Winfield Courier, April 24, 1874.

                                                 Commissioner’s Proceeding.

                                              COWLEY CLERK’S OFFICE,

                                        Cowley County, Kan., April 16th, 1874.

The following is a list of bills allowed by the Board of County Commissioners at their last regular meeting, showing the amount to whom allowed, and for what purpose.

                                       Bill: M. G. Troup, for land abstract: $72.95.

                             M. G. Troup, County Clerk: $90.15; $135.20; $108.60.

Winfield Courier, May 22, 1874.

                                          County Commissioners Proceedings.

                                              M. G. Troup, Co. clerk: $144.40.

Winfield Courier, June 5, 1874.

                                                           THE REPORT.


We publish in another place the report of the committee of investigation. It will be seen that the report brings Mr. Short and Mr. Kager several thousand dollars behind. Mr. Short claims that he holds receipts to, nearly or quite, cover the amount charged against him, and we have Mr. Kager’s word for it, that he has in his hands, even more money than the committee found against him. However this may be, we have no comments or criti­cisms to make until these gentlemen have had an opportunity to settle with the county board. We cannot however close this article without saying a word for the committee. They, we believe, have discharged their duty faithfully and conscientious­ly, and their report shows with what ability that work was done. We will have more to say of this when we have looked the field all over. Let this suffice for the present.

                                        REPORT OF THE COWLEY COUNTY

                                             INVESTIGATING COMMITTEE.

WE, your Committee appointed to examine the books and accounts of the County Clerk and County Treasurer, beg leave to submit the following report as the result of our investigation. In instituting the examination, we first took the books and accounts from the organization of the County up to the 16th day of July, 1872, at which time J. P. Short, Deputy County Treasur­er, turned the office over to E. B. Kager, the present incumbent of the office. On examination of the books and accounts of A. A. Jackson as County Clerk, and John Devore as Treasurer, under the management and control of J. P. Short, Deputy, we found the books and accounts in a very confused and tangled condition, the Treasurer not having made a settlement of his accounts during his term of office, and turned the office over to his successor without paying over moneys in his possession.

After due deliberation as to the best method of instituting the examination, we concluded to take the Tax-roll as it was furnished the Treasurer, by the County Clerk for collection, as a basis for our settlement and hold the Treasurer for all moneys coming into his possession by virtue of his office.

In making up the roll we found many mistakes for and against, but these, we consider merely the result of incompetency and inexperience on the part of the County Clerk.

In our report, $3,075.47 stands charged to Mr. Short, on account of the County which in reality is covered by county warrants which have been canceled on account of Short, but have not been destroyed or ordered applied on his account by the County Commissioners.

The tax-roll of 1872 is the greatest complication of figures and erasures that we ever saw, and we regard it as a matter of impossibility to arrive at just conclusions in every particular in making up the accounts, but we have made our figures from the most reasonable conclusions in the premises always giving Mr. Kager the benefit of the doubts. Mr. Kager has not made a settlement of his accounts since he came in possession of the office of County Treasurer, and reference to our report reveals the fact that he had a large sum of money in his possession on the first day of July, 1873, at which time the law requires him to make his annual settlement, and at which time most of the funds in his possession should have been paid out.


The accounts in both the County Clerk’s and County Treasurer’s ledgers, in most instances show clearly to our minds that the original charges have been erased and figures changed. In making up the account of School Land Sales, we took the County Clerk’s and Treasurer’s accounts in connection, from which to base a settlement; even then there may be, and doubtless is, discrepancies. We are informed that persons have made payments on school lands and have taken the Treasurer’s receipt therefor but failed to have it countersigned by the County Clerk and charged to the Treasurer as the law requires, and in other instances parties have made payments on School Lands for which neither Treasurer nor Clerk have given the proper credit.

We would recommend that notice be given through the papers of the County to parties who have purchased School Lands to examine the records and see if any such irregularities exist.

On comparing our School Land sales account with an abstract of school land sales received from the Auditor of State, we found Mr. A. A. Jackson had made an error in addition of the school land sales reported on account of Mr. Short in favor of the County Treasurer to the amount of $400.00, and $1,252.26 remained unreported. The same error occurs in his report to the Auditor of State of school land sales on account of E. B. Kager to amount of $2,260.20, and $97.80 remained unreported.

Mr. Kager says he has money in his possession that he does not know where to apply, but when he finds the proper place for it he is ready to pay the same over. This admission of the County Treasurer seriously involves his competency, in our opinion, for the faithful and efficient discharge of the duties of the office.

In justice to ourselves we must say that we have prosecuted the investigation under very unfavorable circumstances. There has been a continual disposition on the part of those directly interested in the settlement, and our County Clerk, M. G. Troup, to cover up and withhold information that would lead to a solu­tion of the complications connected with the work, hence it has been very tedious and discouraging to the Committee.

We found many irregularities in the accounts, particularly in the manner of making them up, and entering the same on their books. We have brought the best order out of the confused mess that we could and feel safe in saying that we have arrived at a good state of perfection in making up our accounts, and now submit the following figures as the result of our investigation, showing the amount collected on each fund, the amount paid out on the same, and the amount remaining in the hands of the Treasurer, up to the date of each settlement as the exhibit will show. LUCIUS WALTON, W. H. GROW, S. M. FALL. COMMITTEE.

                                             Winfield, Kansas, May 30th, 1874.

Report of the Committee of the financial condition of the County; Showing the gross amount collected on each fund and the amount paid out on the same; also the amount due the different funds at the expiration of the official term of J. P. Short as deputy County Treasurer, up to the time (July 16, 1872) E. B. Kager took possession of the office.

                                                       RECAP OF TOTALS:

Amount collected:         $14,658.81

Amount Paid out:                $  8,903.80

Remains Unpaid:                 $  5,759.08

Overpaid:                           $         4.07

Report of the Committee on the financial condition of the County from the 15th day of July, 1872, at which time J. P. Short, Deputy County Treasurer, turned the office over to E. B. Kager, County Treasurer, to July 1st, 1873; showing the net gross amount due each fund, the amount paid out on the same, and the amount remaining in the treasury on the first day of July 1873.


                                                       RECAP OF TOTALS:

Due Fund:                          $44,572.70

Paid out:                             $34,066.12

Remaining in Treasury:  $10,604.11

Overpaid:                           $       97.53

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1874.

                                                           Communicated.

                        OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK, Winfield, June 6th, 1874.

Much as I dislike the task of replying to every “fist” who sees fit to assail me, yet the report which lies before me, namely, the report of the late Investigating Committee, coming from the source that it does, is perhaps worthy of notice on my part. I dare say the people fancy this “good state of perfec­tion” report, from a committee appointed to investigate the affairs of this county, ought at least to be accurate, reliable, and truthful. But I am sorry that truth compels me to say it is neither of the three.

I wish to say a word as to the history of this investiga­tion. When I first came into office, I ascertained that the accounts of a former treasurer, who had been out of office nearly two years, were still open, and apparently unsettled. I wrote to the chairman of the board and apprized him of the fact, and saying I would like to have himself, and the balance of the board, at an early day, examine the records of my office. The board came to my office, examined the records, and concluded to appoint a committee to assist the Clerk, Treasurer, and County Attorney to straighten, and close up, the accounts of the county.

Now mark you, this committee was to assist the proper officers to do this business, or, as was suggested at the time, to see that the records were properly investigated, in all fairness to all parties concerned. I, of course, cheerfully acquiesced in the action of the board, and met the committee in all candor and frankness. The same civilities were observed on my part throughout the entire investigation. But not so with the committee. They soon began to feel the importance of their position, and began to run the investigation with an eye to their own welfare. I now come to the place where I suppose this “good state of perfection” committee took umbrage at my course in this matter. I say I suppose the difficulty arose from what I shall now mention, for in all candor and seriousness, I cannot for the life of me tell why this committee should throw dirt on my unoffending head.

After the committee had prosecuted their labors to a certain point, I meekly suggested to them and to the chairman of the board that it was a useless expenditure of the county’s funds to carry the investigation any farther.

About that time the committee began to look wise, whisper mysteriously, and to shun me. Now mark you, I did not like said committee to go about the streets of this city, look wise, and insinuate sly malicious slanders against any of the parties interested, but I went to the chairman of the board direct, and told him that it was certainly bad policy to prosecute the investigation any farther as it was certainly spending money that would result in no pecuniary benefit to the county.


The sequel shows I was right and hence the “ire” of this committee. But the board saw fit to listen to the malicious insinuations of this office seeking committee rather than take the advice of your humble servant, and what is the result. The county has squandered several hundred dollars for a report by which, if the county would settle, it would lose several hundred more. This committee, after arriving at a “good state of perfec­tion,” declare Mr. Kager had on hand, on the 1st day of July, 1873, a certain sum of money. I suppose it never occurred to these wiseacres to ask Kager whether he had that amount at the time specified or not. If they had done so, it would certainly have prevented them from making such asses of themselves as they have done. No, that would not do, they must needs rush into print, and say he ought to have had that much money, and leave the impression on the minds of the public that he did not have the money. Bah! Gentlemen, is that what you call a fair, honest,  and impartial way of doing things?

Perhaps men who will resort to the same tricks that two-thirds of this committee practiced last fall to secure the offices they were investigating might call that an honest way to treat a fellow creature, but I hardly think the public will think so. Suppose Mr. Kager admits the amount they claim as correct, the county will have squandered several hundred dollars, and have its labor for its pains. But suppose Kager says he has more money on his hands than they claim, what a grand farce the whole thing is, and what asses this trio of chronic office seekers have made of themselves. And let me say right here that the latter supposition is the true one.

The treasurer had more money on the 1st day of July, 1873, than this “good state of perfection” claimed he had. But I beg pardon for intruding myself on the public in this matter. In fact, it is not my corpse. But since the committee, with the same degree of maliciousness that characterizes their entire report, have seen fit to say I threw especial obstacles in the way of their investigation, I should like to have them state publicly and positively what those obstacles were. If they had not willfully and falsely, and without any cause, threw the first dirt, I should not have said a word. But when I am so unjustly assailed as I have been in this case, I deem it a duty to defend myself.

If this investigation had been properly conducted with a view to perfecting the records of the county, it would have been a good thing. But since it was prosecuted wholly for the purpose of blasting the reputation of a few persons, and not for the purpose of closing the accounts of the county, as was intended, it can result in no good. A word about the records of the county, and I am done for this time. The records are in exactly the same condition they were, ere this committee was appointed. This office knows just as much as it did before. The accounts are still all open, and some future officer may want them closed, which will necessitate more investigating. Yours, M. G. TROUP.

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1874.

                                                                  A Card.


MR. EDITOR: I settled as the board of County Commissioners ordered, and have their certificate that I did make a settlement August 16th, 1873, and the proceedings of the County Commission­ers will show the same. I did not make the settlement in July because I was making my settlement with the State Treasurer as the law directs, and I could not make myself “numerous.” Most of the funds in my hands July 1st, 1873, were township and school district funds, and could not be paid out until the treasurers demanded them, and as they had not demanded the money, it re­mained in my hands and some of the same money is in my hands now. Figures in our books were often changed because the board would change so many taxes. Still I am free to confess it would be much better to have done otherwise.

I had more money in my hands on the 1st day of July, 1873, than the committee charged  me with having, and if the board of County Commissioners will settle by that statement and give me bonds that I will not have the balance in my hands to pay, I will make Cowley County a present of several hundred dollars. The committee must think me incompetent because I did not keep still and put the money in my pocket or divide with them.

The only attempt I ever made to withhold anything from the committee, was, I refused to let them have a receipt book, as I thought they were too careless with our books. But I offered to let them have the book if they would use it in my office. I showed them mistakes to the amount of $200 or $300 made by them against me. The others interested can answer  for themselves. Yours, etc. E. B. KAGER, Co. Treas.

Winfield Courier, June 19, 1874.

                                                      COMMUNICATED.

                                        LAZETTE, KANSAS, June 15th, 1874.

BRO. KELLY: In answer to an article which appeared in your paper June 12th, written by one M. G. Troup, we would say that the spirit of his piece is not good, and any man to read it carefully can see that it is a boastful, headstrong, lengthy, labored article.

Said committee considered it would be much better, and give more general satisfaction to be governed by instruction and advice from the County Commissioners, than a swell headed County Clerk, who repeatedly refused to let us have paper, pencils, receipts, etc., which we were justly entitled to in the prosecu­tion of the work.

If we had prosecuted the work in a way that Mr. Troup wanted us to, instead of the Commissioners, we would have been first rate fellows.

But because he could not run the committee and Commissioners to whitewash the thing and have it said that he is the Grand Mogul of the whole concern, he became impudent and sulky.

A man that undertook to find a delinquent list and upon trial couldn’t find a correct one, and yet swore he knew he was right and the committee a set of fools, and did not know anything about it, this committee has no use for.

I would suggest that brother Troup part his hair in the middle, take county scrip, and buy a new plug hat, let Cowley County furnish him a gold headed cane, in order that he may walk about the city, put on style, and be more in his natural element.

I do not wish to enter into a long personal dispute or quarrel in this matter, but if brother Troup don’t go a little slow, he will be shown up in a more minute and particular manner at no very distant day. Respectfully, S. M. FALL.

Winfield Courier, June 26, 1874.

                                                      COMMUNICATED.

                               OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK, June 22nd, 1874.

ED. COURIER: Again, and for the last time, on this, to me, unpleasant subject, I ask the privilege of saying a few words.


The late investigating committee charge me with hindering their investigation and trying to cover up the records, etc. And after I publish a reply in your columns, they in turn through the same source, in a silly article written by one of their number, call me “pet names,” and threaten if I don’t go slow, they will show me up in a more minute and particular manner.

Now I don’t know what the gentleman of legislative aspira­tions meant by said threat. If he intended it to frighten me, I am not his man. I don’t scare worth a cent. If he meant what he said, I shall be most happy to have him proceed with his “show;” and I would most respectfully suggest that he at once tell the public all he knows about my official conduct, that is dishonor­able, or unbecoming to an officer or gentleman.

But please, Mr. Fall, do “speak your piece,” in a straight forward business way, and don’t “slop” over, in the same silly style you did last week.

These gentlemen make certain charges against me, and I declare those charges to be false, and I shall now leave the public to decide which of us should be believed. But allow me to make one suggestion to the public before they form their verdict. Watch us all closely in our dealings with you, and then form your own conclusions. As for me, I will say I am here as the tool of no man, or set of men, but am here as the servant of the people of Cowley County, and whenever I don’t perform my duties in an honest, gentlemanly manner, with any citizen who is entitled to fair treatment at my hands, I will thank him to tell me so, and I shall willingly make him ample restitution.

I am ready to stand or fall by my own official acts, only asking the people of this county not to judge me by what S. M. Fall may say about me, but render your verdict according to your own personal observations and I shall cheerfully accept your decision whatever it may be.

I am now done with this disagreeable subject, and the gentlemen of that committee are at liberty to occupy the field. In fact, if their effort last week is a sample of the ability, anything they may offer in the future will be beneath the notice of an intelligent mind. But be that as it may, I shall not again be provoked into a reply on this subject but shall now bid it farewell, trusting to an intelligent public for a verdict on the side of truth and right.

                                              Yours respectfully, M. G. TROUP.

Winfield Courier, July 17, 1874.

                                    Statement of the Expenses of the Old Board

                                                  Of County Commissioners.

The following is a statement of the expenses of Cowley County for all purposes during the year commencing July 1st, 1873, and ending July 1st, 1874. Showing the amount expended during the last half of 1873, and the amount expended by the new board for the first half of 1874. Also the receipts of the year and the liabilities of the county at the beginning and end of the year.

Note: Lengthy and complicated statement skipped. Giving totals only.

Expended by Old Board: $20,305.70

Expended by New Board: $5,499.89

Total Expended For the Year: $25,805.59

Old Board spent $10,600.69 for courthouse and $670.03 for furniture for it.

New Board spent $129.19 for courthouse furniture.

New Board spent $222.00 for investigating committee.

Statement had other pertinent entries:

Amount of scrip afloat July 1st, A. D. 1873, $16,971.17.


Total expenditures for the year: $25,805.59

Receipts for the year: $15,151.59.

Amount of scrip afloat July 1st, 1874: $27,625.07.

I, M. G. Troup, County Clerk of the board of County Commis­sioners, hereby certify that the above is a correct statement of the expenditures, receipts, and indebtedness of Cowley County for the year ending July 1st, 1874.

Witness my hand and official seal this 14 day of July, A. D. 1874.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, September 18, 1874.

                                                Commissioners’ Proceedings.

Board met pursuant to adjournment. Present: R. F. Burden and M. S. Roseberry.

The following bills were presented and acted on as follows.

J. J. Williams, courthouse repairs: $33.00

J. W. Strickland, courthouse repairs: $9.50

Stewart & Simpson, courthouse repairs: $26.00

M. Miller, courthouse repairs: $14.62

S. H. Myton, courthouse repairs: $2.17

Road Viewers: $2.00—Lucius Walton, James Van Orsdal.

Road Chainmen: $1.50—F. J. Jones, L. D. Randall, J. M. Midkiff.

Surveyor: W. W. Walton—$8.00

A. H. Green, drugs for prisoners: $15.00; $14.47.

T. G. Peyton, phy. for pris.: rejected.

[Skipped the rest of bills presented and acted on.]

Ordered that the County Clerk notify the trustees of each township to furnish this office a statement of the necessities of their townships with a view to furnish the Legislature the necessary data upon which to disburse relief.

Report of J. I. Mitchell, Township Trustee, presented and approved by the Board.

Board adjourned to meet at 9 o’clock tomorrow.

                                                     SEPTEMBER 10, 1874.

Board met pursuant to adjournment, R. F. Burden and M. S. Roseberry, present.

The contract made between A. H. Green and the Board for medicine for prisoners, is this day revoked, and it is agreed between Dr. G. W. Graham and this Board that Graham shall have the sanitary care of the prisoners of Cowley County, and Graham shall furnish his own medicines until further ordered.

In the matter of boarding the prisoners of Cowley County made by this Board with the Sheriff, is this day revoked.

The County Clerk is ordered by this Board to prepare a list of all the mortgages on the records of this county on the 1st day of March, 1874, and submit the same to the board at its next meeting for the tax roll, in accordance with law, all mortgages not returned by the assessor.


In the matter of the personal property assessment of the Cowley County Bank, it is ordered by the Board that the assess­ment shall be increased to the amount of capital stock of said bank as published in the annual statement of the bank by the cashier, during the month of July, 1874, in the Arkansas City Traveler.

On motion the Board adjourned to meet on the first Monday of October, 1874.

                                                    M. G. TROUP, Co. Clerk.

                                               THE POST OFFICE “RING.”

                                        WHAT IT DID, AND TRIED TO DO!

                                     HOW TO KEEP A RASCAL IN OFFICE.

                                        The Men Who Control the Opposition.

                                                  Chapter of Sound Reading.

The readers of the COURIER will bear witness to our patience under the slanderous misrepresentations of the Telegram and its allies, for two years past. We have hoped in forbearance to avoid a conflict with the “ring” that keeps that paper on its legs. Long since the people of the county withdrew their support from it on account of its personal abuse and unreliability. For more than a year it has been kept running by desperate make­shifts, by moving from room to room, and from garret to cellar about town because it could not pay rent. By paying its employ­ees with promises, by borrowing material, by taking continuances in court against creditors who were trying to compel it, or its editor, to pay their honest debts, and with the aid of all the subterfuges, practiced only by scoundrels, backed by a ring that we hereafter describe in detail, it has succeeded in maintaining a sickly existence.

The ostensible purpose of its being is reform in politics and abuse of Manning. The real purpose of its being is the maintenance of the “Post Office ring” in Winfield. This ring has no influence in the country whatever except through it organ, the Telegram.

  If a democrat in Pleasant Valley wants an office, he knows he must get it without the aid of the republican party—hence he comes to town, joins the post office ring in the abuse of the republican party, and says that Manning runs it. This is report­ed to the Telegram and at once Mr. Democrat is called a hardy son of toil, and a good man for some office. No questions are asked about his qualifications in reading, writing, or spelling, nor is his past character looked into. It is enough to know that he is opposed to Manning.

If a bull-head from Tisdale Township wants an office, whose ignorance and stupidity makes him a failure as a farmer, and who cannot get an endorsement from any intelligent man in the county, he at once seeks the P. O. ring, puts in some heavy anathemas against the Republican party in general and Manning in particu­lar, and he is at once reported to the Telegram as a good man from Tisdale to work up the reform ticket in that locality.

If a bummer of Arkansas City, who has been kicked out of the Republican party for incompetency, ignorance, and rascality, wants an office, he writes an abusive article about Manning specially, and the Republican party generally, signs himself “Republican” or “farmer,” sends it to the Telegram for publica­tion, whereupon the P. O. ring set him down as one of the “good, noble, and true,” men of Creswell Township who are disgusted with conventions and party lines, and who will make a good candidate on the “reform” ticket for some office.


Now and then a man who has voted for the Republican ticket for years from principle, is proposed for some office, and is beaten in convention because some other man is thought to be better, and he in a fit of passion and disappointment will fall to berating the Republican party or some of its members, whereupon the P. O. ring and Telegram fall to besliming him and convincing him that he was beaten by a trick, and that merit has no show in the Republican organization, and his only hope is to be a “reformer.”

When the creditors of Allison or the Telegram press too hard upon the concern for pay, postmaster Johnston, or M. L. Read, step in with either cash or security and give relief. They can’t afford to have the thing go down. Thus the P. O. “ring,” by management, and the Telegram by blowing, have made and are making perpetual war on:

1st. The Republican party of Cowley County.

2nd. On the financial interests of Cowley County.

3rd. On the material development of Cowley County.

4th. On the business prosperity of Winfield.

Now we propose to show how it is done, and to show up the men who are doing it.

As to the first charge: the Republican party of Cowley County is or should be composed of men who adhere to the princi­ple and policy of the national party, and carrying its principles and policy into Cowley County affairs, they demand that honest, competent, and honorable men be put in office, and that the public money be economically used, and strictly accounted for. That manufactories be fostered and markets for produce be estab­lished. To this end has the COURIER labored. To this end have the active members of the party devoted their energies political­ly. We challenge from anyone a successful contradiction of this statement.

The P. O. ring and the Telegram, have done for two years, and are still doing their best, to destroy the Republican party, and to defeat its noble mission. Two years ago this fall the

P. O. ring opposed the Republican nominees and worked up the liberal ticket and supported it. Capt. McDermott, the Republican nominee, was elected to the House in spite of them. As a member of the legislature from Cowley County he sent forty copies of the Commonwealth every week during the session, to the Winfield post office for distribution among the people here that they might know what the action of their representative was. Postmaster Johnston did not distribute those papers, but destroyed them, and Capt. McDermott knew nothing of it until his return. Not one word of reproach can be raised against Capt. McDermott while a member of the legislature.

Nor can one word of reproach be truthfully said against any of the county officers elected by the Republican party two years ago, save it be some acts of the county board.

Now we declare that neither the Republican party nor any of its active members were responsible for the actions of the board which were subject to criticism. The county board was composed of two men, Messrs. Cox and Maurer, who were elected by the Republican party, and Mr. Smith, the other, was elected on the liberal ticket. There are but one or two acts of that board that can by any stretch of the imagination be subjected to justifiable censure. One is the erection of the courthouse, without authori­ty from the people, another was extravagance in purchasing books and blanks for the county officers.

For the first act, Col. J. M. Alexander and the P. O. ring are responsible. They are the parties who more than anyone persuaded Mr. Cox to make the contract with the city of Winfield to build a courthouse and jail.


Mr. Maurer, one of the Republican commissioners of the county, never consented to the movement. This action of the board was taken, too, in the face of a protest against it, signed by several prominent Republicans of Cowley County, E. C. Manning among the number.

The Telegram at the time endorsed the action of the board, and ridiculed the protest. This action of the P. O. ring cost the county $12,500.

For the second act A. A. Jackson, a Democrat, elected on the “people’s” ticket, is responsible. He was familiar with the wants of the various county officers, and ordered books and blanks at pleasure. He obtained the confidence of the board and either recommended all the books and blanks that were ordered or else ordered them himself, and afterwards obtained the sanction of the board by stating that they were necessary. Jackson made a certain percent on all the books and blanks ordered by him by special arrangement with the various firms from which he ordered them. Jackson was one of the Telegram’s pets at that time and a howler against the Republican party, and of course that paper had no word of censure for him. By this arrangement the county lost several thousand dollars.

The two acts above mentioned are all that could in any fairness be censured, unless it be claimed that the salaries allowed some of the county officers be considered too high. This may be true, but no party is to blame for that. Col. Alexander and other pets of the Telegram told the board that the salaries allowed the County Attorney and Probate Judge ought to be al­lowed, and several Republicans, among the number, E. C. Manning, discountenanced all these propositions, and Col. Manning de­clined to accept one half of the salary of the Probate Judge, notwithstanding he was entitled to it under the terms of his partnership association with Judge Johnson. He told Judge Johnson at the time that the salary was too large and he would not have a cent of any such money. So much for Colonel Manning, who we think deserves this mention at our hands, in passing, as he has been accused by the Telegram and its snuffers with being at the head, or bottom, of all the rascality ever perpetrated in the county.

An examination of County Clerk Jackson’s books, which was demanded by the COURIER and Mr. Troup, the Republican County Clerk, who succeeded Mr. Jackson, developed the fact that Jackson’s books, through incompetency, criminality, or both, were in a scandalously incorrect condition, and that J. P. Short, Deputy County Treasurer, had embezzled several thousand dollars of public money. Short was not a Republican elect, but was a member of the P. O. “Ring,” a pet of the Telegram, and a howler against the Republican party.

An investigating committee of three, two of whom, the Chairman and one other member, opposed the Republican party last fall, has thus far failed to find anything wrong with the affairs of the Republican county officers although they have been in session several months.

The Telegram is for anybody or anything that will keep T. K. Johnston in the Post Office at Winfield, and serve the interests of its masters, Read & Robinson, and Alexander & Saffold.


When the COURIER expressed the sense of the Republicans of Cowley County, by reproaching Judge Lowe, our member of Congress, for his vote in favor of the salary gain  bill, the Telegram made haste to endorse Judge Lowe, and the P. O. Ring sent Lowe a marked copy of each paper. About that time there was an effort made to put Johnston out and put in somebody else, but it failed through Lowe’s influence. Lowe was told that all the Republicans wanted was a man in harmony with the party, no one was particular about the individual. But the COURIER had incurred Mr. Lowe’s displeasure for denouncing him in common with the other salary grabbers. This coupled with the “Ring” endorsement of him saved T. K. At the present hour, after abusing the Republican adminis­tration, national, state, and county, for two years, the Telegram hoists the Republican State ticket because it knows it will be elected anyway. This is done to get Governor Osborn’s endorse­ment to keep Johnston in the Post Office. It then hoists J. K. Hudson’s name, a newspaper publisher, as a candidate for Congress because he is a “farmer,” and hoists R. B. Saffold’s name for State Senator because he is a “reformer,” and opposed to the Republican party; while H. C. St. Clair, the Republican nominee, is a practical farmer and a patron of husbandry.

Now the Telegram and the “ring” are moving everything to organize an opposition to the Republican party of Cowley County this fall. Why? Because the Republican party won’t endorse Johnston, a man bitterly obnoxious to the public, and notoriously dishonest, as postmaster; won’t give the carpet-bagger from Leavenworth, Alexander, an office; won’t favor the bonding of the County debt so as to enable Read & Robinson, and a few non-residents, to convert the several thousands of dollars of Co. scrip that they hold, into cash. These are the real reasons, no matter what their pretended reasons are. This disposes of charge No. 1.

Now for charge No. 2.

                                  “War on the financial interests of Cowley County.”


At the time the County Board let the Courthouse contract, Read & Robinson, bankers, were behind the scenes with the money bags. No one would take the contract unless the scrip could be cashed. Read & Robinson, bankers (known as M. L. Read), took the scrip at 65 cents on the dollar. They got it all. In August of last year, the Telegram “Ring” tried to hold a “farmers” politi­cal meeting at Winfield. They partially failed of their purpose. Rev. William Martin was one of the speakers of the occasion. The “ring” saw that Martin was the kind of stuff to make an available candidate out of, for the Legislature. He was just about stupid enough to be “above suspicion.” So T. K. Johnston went out to the old man’s home shortly after the meeting to interview him. He found the old man “sound,” found him possessed of that quali­fication without which no “reformer” in Cowley County is consid­ered sound, that is, he was opposed to Manning (that he didn’t know why he should be, doesn’t matter), and were he not a Reverend, might be induced to curse him, which would make him the more desirable. Anyway, he would oppose him and that was a good start in the right direction (although Manning was an invalid in the state of New York at that time and had been all summer, but at last accounts he was alive and consequently dangerous); then he would keep T. K. in the Post Office, and favor bonding Read & Robinson’s scrip, and besides was “above suspicion.” But the old man didn’t want to be the representative, or said he didn’t, nor would he consent to run. T. K. came back gloomy. The horizon about the Post office was beginning to get somewhat cloudy. By a little strategy, however, by representing to the old man that the people considered him “above suspicion,” and demanded that he make the sacrifice, the old man yielded. “Reform” delegates were worked up in Martin’s interest, and he was nominated. By Tele­gram falsehoods he was elected, and almost the first thing he did was to try to bond the scrip. The Telegram, backed by Read & Robinson, at home, and Allison at his elbow at Topeka, helped him. But the COURIER and the people opposed the measure and he failed.

Last week the Legislature met in extra session to relieve the destitute. Martin went to Topeka. Just before he went to take his seat, he had an interesting interview with members of the “ring.” We understand they went in a carriage to his resi­dence in the country and what took place at that interview, of course we can’t tell, except by what the Hon. William did when he reached Topeka. The second bill introduced into the House was “House bill No. 2 by William Martin to bond the debt of Cowley County.” It is no measure of relief, no stay of  law, no postpone­ment of taxes, no appropriation for the needy, no act of any kind for the relief of the poverty stricken of Cowley County, but an act to convert the scrip of Read & Robinson, Geo. L. Thompson, J. C. Horton, et al, into Cowley County bonds. This, too, in the face of the well known opposition of the taxpayers of Cowley County to bonds of any kind.

Charge No. 3: they make “war on the material inter­ests of Cowley County.” To this we say, that by stirring up strife, by seeking to promote personal ends, by detracting from the influence of those who would work unselfishly for the welfare of the whole county, they prevent that material development that awaits us if our people would work and counsel together.

The one overshadowing interest to Cowley County, after the distress of the present hard times is provided for, is the building of a railroad through the Indian Territory. The Republican party is turning its attention to this question.

The P. O. ring and the Telegram are too busy looking after county bonds and “available men” who are “above suspicion” to pay any attention to it. The “ring” delegates to the “reform” congressional conven­tion (Allison and A. Walton) did not go to Emporia and demand a recognition of the interests of Cowley County in that convention. They remained at home still looking for available men who were “above suspicion,” and to help Johnston watch the post office for fear Manning might steal it in their absence.

Cowley was not represented in the convention that nominated J. K. Hudson. What did these fellows care about a market for the farmer’s produce so long as they could get their votes? On the other hand, the Republicans sent active, able men to represent them, in the Republican convention at Emporia. Those delegates demanded that the candidates should be pledged to a railroad direct to Galveston, through the Indian Territory. The majority of the delegates in that convention lived on railroads that already lead to Galveston, and defeated the Cowley County resolu­tions offered by Col. Manning.

Now the Telegram jeers those delegates for their failure. The Telegram and the P. O. ring sneers at the efforts made to wake the people of Cowley up to the importance of this question.

As to the fourth charge, “war on the business prosperity of Winfield.”


The P. O. ring, and the Telegram, in order to divert atten­tion from their real designs, must abuse and malign someone, and these are generally the best men in town and county. A. T. Stewart, J. B. Fairbanks, C. M. Wood, Rev. Parmelee, C. A. Bliss, W. M. Boyer, and others, together with all the county officers it could not control, have suffered calumny at its hand. The people of the county are taught that the citizens of Winfield are thieves and cutthroats. This drives people away from the town. This divides our people among themselves. It prevents a coopera­tion among the citizens of the place in any laudable endeavor, either charitable, educational, religious, moral, or social, or for the general prosperity of the place. No one can deny this.

The COURIER has endeavored to establish good feeling among our own people, and to show to the people of the county that there was no cause for bad blood between town and country. It and its friends have received nothing but abuse in return.

The cabal that backs the Telegram in its baseness has its head and front in Alexander & Saffold, Read & Robinson, and T. K. Johnston. This “ring” is what Alexander calls the “respectable faction in the Republican party.”

We have written what we have written in calmness, after carefully considering the whole subject. We have no desire to make personal assaults on any man. But we have come to the conclusion that longer submission to the assaults of this “ring” upon us, through their mouth-piece, would be cowardly. And in the interests of the people of Cowley County, who have  so long been mislead by the misrepresentations of this “ring,” we here­with fire our first shot.

[COMMUNICATION FROM “REPUBLICAN” - TISDALE.]

Winfield Courier, November 19, 1874.

                                                  TISDALE, Nov. 16th, 1874.

In the Traveler of the 11th inst., the editor speaking of the result of our county election, says:

“It has taught there is a power that effectually holds the balance of power, and speaks through the ballot box rather than through party politics. That power lies in the sense and judg­ment of intelligent reasoning men, who cherish principles rather than politics.”

Mr. Scott infers by this, the city in which he resides, alone of all our county contains intelligent reasoning men, and men who cherish principles. Now as Mr. Scott holds out to the people the idea that he is one of that number, let us notice briefly some of the principles which he cherishes.

When the Independent convention met at Tisdale on the 12th of October, Mr. Scott was there, endeavoring with might and main to secure the nomination of C. R. Mitchell as a candidate for  the office of County Attorney on the Independent ticket, saying to members of that convention that Mr. Mitchell was a straight out independent man. Failing to force his man upon the Indepen­dent ticket, he had the impudence to attempt to secure his nomination on the Republican ticket, claiming that his man was a straight Republican, and that he would not have accepted the nomination of the Independents if he had received it. But Mr. Scott’s pet was too well known to be acceptable to the republi­cans, and he failed there. After this failure Mr. Scott was one of the first to congratulate the successful candidate, Mr. Webb, and say, “I have been trying to beat you, but now I will help elect you.” In the next issue of his paper, he says that Webb is the best criminal lawyer in Southern Kansas, and yet he failed to support him.

In a former issue he said he would support the best man regardless of petty spite, local prejudice, or personal ill-will. Let us see.


The Creswell delegation claimed to favor the nomination of S. S. Moore for the office of Probate Judge, and attempted to secure the support of the Tisdale delegates to C. R. Mitchell thereby, but when they failed to get the Tisdaleites to support a man whom they deemed unworthy, the support of the Republican party, or the people, Scott bolted the ticket and claimed that Moore was incompetent. If Moore was incompetent after the convention, why wasn’t he incompetent before the convention? Why? Simply because he could not be induced by a political trickster to vote in a Republican convention contrary to the wishes of his constituents.

Mr. Moore has certainly reason to be proud of the vote he received outside of the immediate vicinity of the Traveler. In his own township, which gave a majority of 46 last fall against one of the best men in the county, at the late election gave Moore a majority of 21. a gain of 67 votes over Mr. Troup’s vote of last fall. Again, which I dare say, no other man could have obtained.

Then take for example the two precincts laying between him and his opponent, where both candidates were well known, and let them decide whether or not Scott’s support was “regardless of petty spite or personal ill-will.” It is a fact well known to every delegate in the Republican convention that the Traveler’s disaffection was caused wholly—as far as C. M. Scott was con­cerned—by local prejudice and personal ill-will. If these principles are the principles that “intelligent reasoning men” cherish, God deliver us from such principles.

                                                            REPUBLICAN.

Winfield Courier, December 3, 1874.

At a stated communication of Adelphi Lodge No. 110, held last Tuesday evening, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year:

Leland J. Webb, W. M.; W. G. Graham, S. W.; J. E. Saint, J. W.; J. C. Fuller, Treas.; M. G. Troup, Sec.; J. Newman, Chaplain; Perry Hill, S. D.; J. D. Cochran, J. D.; I. L. Comfort, Tyler.

[TISDALE NEWS.]

Winfield Courier, December 10, 1874.

The Independent Order of Good Templars held their exhibition in the schoolhouse last evening, and was, upon the whole, a grand success. We noticed among the number present, our efficient County clerk, M. G. Troup and wife, with the interesting little face of the younger Troup, Cap. Harrelson, Dr. Thompson and daughters, and J. A. McGuire and family, and many others too numerous to mention.

Winfield Courier, January 21, 1875.

                                                        A NEW FEATURE.

For the year 1875 we shall publish a list of all the strays taken up in Cowley, Howard, Sumner, Butler, and Greenwood coun­ties. We believe this will be of great benefit to those who may have stock to stray off.

                                         Cowley County—M. G. Troup, Clerk.

HORSE. Taken up by W. R. Watkins, Tisdale tp., a roan horse, right hand foot white, right fore foot white, small white spot on forehead, about 14 hands high, branded on left shoulder UH, supposed to be three years old next spring. Valued $20.

MARE. Also, one iron gray mare, right fore leg very light, white in forehead, inside of left front foot part white, about three years old past, about 13 hands high, brand like UH on left shoulder. Both very wild and unbroken. Mare valued $25.

Winfield Courier, April 1, 1875.


                                                       ESTRAY NOTICES.

                                         Cowley County—M. G. Troup, Clerk.

HORSE. Taken up by Joseph Bertach, of Beaver Township, one horse, 15 hands high, color between bay and roan, 6 years old, saddle marks, branded U D on left shoulder, valued at $25.

ALSO: One horse 14 hands high, color bay, star in forehead, white nose, white hind feet, 8 or 9 years old, no brands, value $15.

Troup: city councilman...

Winfield Courier, April 8, 1875.

At the city election held here last Monday, the following city officers were elected.

Mayor: D. A. Millington.

Police Judge: W. M. Boyer.

Councilmen: Charles C. Black, James M. Dever, Jonathan Newman, N. H. Powers, and M. G. Troup.

The contest was very close, there being a tie for Mayor, which was decided by lot for Millington.

Winfield Courier, April 8, 1875.

                                                     To Township Trustees.

                                                  WINFIELD, April 6, 1875.

I have at my office for distribution garden seeds donated by John Kern, seed man of St. Louis. Please call and get your township’s quota. M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, April 15, 1875.

                                                   City Council Proceedings.

The City Council met at the office of Curns & Manser, April 12th, 1875, at 7½  o’clock, in pursuance of a call. Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; Jonathan Newman, James M. Dever, M. G. Troup, Chas. C. Black, Councilmen; J. W. Curns, City Clerk.

Ordinance No. 50, fixing the times of holding the regular meetings of the Council was read, and on motion adopted by section as read.

The vote on the final passage of said Ordinance resulted as follows: Yeas—Chas. C. Black, Jonathan Newman, James M. Dever, M. G. Troup—total 4. Nays—none.

On motion Council adjourned. J. W. CURNS, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, April 22, 1875.

                                                       Council Proceedings.

                                                          April 19th, 1875.

The Council met at Curns & Manser’s office at the usual hour. Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, C. C. Black, James M. Dever, Councilmen.

The minutes of the called meeting of April 12th were read and approved. M. G. Troup was placed in nomination and duly elected as president of the Council for the ensuing year.

It was moved and carried that the Mayor be empowered to appoint a finance committee for the ensuing year. M. G. Troup, C. C. Black, and James M. Dever were appointed as said finance committee.


It was moved and seconded that the council agree to pay four dollars per month for the use of the upper room of the building situate on lot 6, in block 102, from this date until April 1st, 1876, to be used as a council room. Motion carried.

An ordinance in relation to extending the city limits on the east was presented and read. On motion said ordinance was duly adopted by sections. The vote on the final passage of said ordinance was as follows:

Yeas—M. G. Troup, C. C. Black, James M. Dever. Nays—none.

Winfield Courier, April 29, 1875.

                                                   City Council Proceedings.

The Council met at Council room, April 26th, 1875. A quorum being present, and there being no fire in said room, on motion adjourned to meet immediately at the office of Curns & Manser.

The Council met at the office of Curns & Manser in pursuance of adjournment.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; J. M. Dever, M. G. Troup, C. C. Black, N. M. Powers, Councilmen; J. W. Curns, Clerk.

Joseph Likowski and Reinhardt Ehret made application by petition for a dram shop license. Said petitions were read and on motion were referred to a special committee of three, appoint­ed by the Mayor, to report on said petition to this Council at an adjourned meeting to be held on Friday evening next. J. M. Dever, M. G. Troup, and N. M. Powers were appointed on said committee.

It was moved and seconded that the Council go into the committee of the whole to consider the Ordinances in relation to license. A motion was made to amend by inserting the words “with the Mayor in the chair,” which carried. The question recurring on the original motion with the amendment was carried.

After duly considering the subject of licenses, the commit­tee prepared an Ordinance in relation to the sale of intoxicating liquors, and one in relation to the appointment, duties, and pay of city officers, which were recommended for passage by the committee.

On motion the committee arose from a committee of the whole, and the Council proceeded to pass on an Ordinance in relation to the sale of intoxicating liquors. On motion said Ordinance was read and duly passed by sections. The vote on the final passage resulted as follows: Yeas—J. M. Dever, M. G. Troup, N. M. Powers, C. C. Black. Nays—none.

Winfield Courier, May 6, 1875.

                                                   City Council Proceedings.

The Council met at council room, May 1st, in pursuance of adjournment. Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; N. M. Powers, M. G. Troup, C. C. Black, Councilmen; J. W. Curns, City Clerk.

The special committee to whom was referred the petitions of Joseph Likowski and Reinhardt Ehret for draft shop license, report­ed that after examining said petitions that they were of the opinion that the petitions contained a majority of the bonafide residents of lawful age. On motion report of the committee was received.

Moved and seconded that a license be granted to both peti­tions. Motion carried.

Council met May 3rd. Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; N. M. Powers, M. G. Troup, C. C. Black, and J. M. Dever, Council­men. Minutes of last meeting read and approved.


An ordinance to provide for the appointment of a clerk, treasurer, marshal, and city attorney, and defining the duties and pay of the same, was read and duly passed. The vote on the final passage was as follows: Yeas, Dever, Black, Powers, Troup. Nays, none.

An ordinance in relation to riding or driving upon side­walks, was read and duly passed. Vote on final passage as follows: Yeas—Dever, Troup, Black, Powers. Nays—none.

Winfield Courier, May 27, 1875.

One day last week the boys at the Courthouse attempted to illustrate the cold water ritual of the Methodists by sprinkling each other. Judge Gans, an old hand at the business, “frowed de last water fust” on Dick Walker, and Dick, not being partial to water in any form, handed a pitcher full to Troup, which, owing to his carelessness, landed on top of his head. This set the ball to rolling. Troup returned the compliment by emptying his coal scuttle of dirty water in Walker’s left ear. Then Bedilion and Walton joined in only to get treated to more cold water than they had been used to lately, and they retired satisfied. Then Walker and Gans formed an alliance, which they were just sealing with a “shake,” when the irrepressible Troup put in his ladle and sent them off shaking themselves and swearing vengeance against him. They soon proved too much for Troup, for while he was guarding the pump and watching Dick, Gans stole upstairs, and emptied four gallons of muddy water down his shirt collar, and in attempting to retreat, he was overhauled by long Dick and treated to another bath, which closed the circus for that day. They are now suffering from bad colds, the penalty for using too much cold water when their constitutions were not used to it.

Winfield Courier, June 17, 1875.

   [Comment from Troup relative to report covering 14 Townships in Cowley County.]

“From the above it will readily be seen that notwithstanding the G. Hoppers, chinch bugs, and hard times, Cowley County has increased her wealth very materially during the last year.

“While it is true we have decreased in ‘personal property,’ we have largely increased our ‘real wealth’ and breadth of several crops. Upon the whole, the comparison affords no cause for alarm as to the future prospects of our county.”

Winfield Courier, June 24, 1875.

                                                                  Notice.

Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commission­ers of Cowley County, Kansas, will meet at the office of the County Clerk of said county on Monday the 5th day of July, A. D., 1875, at 10 o’clock a.m., of said day, for the purpose of equal­izing the assessment of the Real Property of said county. All persons feeling themselves aggrieved with the assessment will please meet the Board at the time and place mentioned, and have such corrections made, as equity and justice may demand.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, July 15, 1875.

County Clerk M. G. Troup showed the following in lengthy report of County Commissioners’ Proceedings held July 12, 1875:

Total amount claimed: $4,241.21

Total amount allowed: $3,625.78

Winfield Courier, July 22, 1875.

                                       City Council Proceedings, July 19, 1875.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; N. M. Powers, M. G. Troup, and C. C. Black, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.


Only child of Troop, Ira, dies of dysentery...

Winfield Courier, August 12, 1875.

DIED. In this city on the 7th inst., of dysentery, Ira, only son of Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Troup.

Winfield Courier, August 19, 1875.

                                                 Adelphi Lodge Resolutions.

                                  HALL OF ADELPHI LODGE, A. F. & A. M.,

                                                    August 13th, A. L. 5,875.

At a special Communication held on the 13th inst., the following was adopted.

WHEREAS, In the dispensation of an All-wise and Overruling Providence, the families of our worthy brothers, M. G. Troup and Perry Hill, have been afflicted by the death of each of their eldest children since our last Communication; and while we submit with becoming Christian resignation to the decree of an All-wise God; yet had it been agreeable to His Divine Will, we would that they could have been spared this great trial.

Resolved, That we tender to the bereaved brethren and their families our sincere, Christian and brotherly sympathy, and our humble and fervent prayers to God that they may be sustained in this, their hour of trial.

                  Committee: W. G. GRAHAM, ENOCH MARIS, J. W. JOHNSTON.

ATTEST: L. J. WEBB, W. M.

Winfield Courier, September 16, 1875.

                                 Proceedings of the City Council Sept. 9th, 1875.

City Council met pursuant to adjournment Thursday, September 9th, 1875.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, J. M. Dever, C. C. Black, and W. M. Powers, councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, September 30, 1875.

Miss Sadie Webb, late of Topeka, is writing in County Clerk Troup’s office, and Mrs. Clara Flint in Register McCulloch’s office at the Courthouse.

Winfield Courier, September 30, 1875.

Moved by M. G. Troup, and carried by vote of the Council, that the Marshal be instructed to give notice that complaint would be entered against all persons residing in, or liable to pay road tax in the City of Winfield, whose tax was not paid by October 10th, 1875.

Winfield Courier, October 7, 1875.

                                                            THE TICKET.

The ticket nominated last Saturday by the Republican County Convention is, all things, considered, one of the strongest and best ever nominated in the county.

Of Sheriff Walker and M. G. Troup we need say nothing; they have each served one term and their work speaks for them. The people of Cowley County believing in genuine reform, will see to it that these men who have served them so faithfully and well will still continue to serve them.

REPUBLICAN TICKET.

FOR REPRESENTATIVE: EDWIN C. MANNING OF WINFIELD.

FOR SHERIFF: R. L. WALKER OF VERNON.

FOR COUNTY CLERK: M. G. TROUP OF TISDALE.


FOR TREASURER: THOMAS R. BRYAN OF DEXTER.

FOR REGISTER OF DEEDS: EZRA P. KINNE OF CRESWELL.

FOR COUNTY SURVEYOR: WIRT W. WALTON OF WINFIELD.

FOR CORONER: DR. JOHN HEADRICK OF WINFIELD.

FOR COMMISSIONERS:

1ST DIST. - WILLIAM WHITE OF ROCK.

2ND DIST. - WILLIAM SLEETH OF CRESWELL.

3RD DIST. - R. F. BURDEN OF WINDSOR.

Winfield Courier, November 25, 1875.

                                                 County Warrants to be Paid.

                   COUNTY TREASURER’S OFFICE, WINFIELD, Nov. 1, 1875.

By virtue of authority given by an Act of the Legislature of the State of Kansas, approved February 10th, 1875, entitled “An Act to amend Section Sixty-nine of Chapter Twenty-five, General Statutes of Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-eight,” I hereby give notice that the principal and accrued interest of County Warrants herein below described will be paid at the County Treasurer’s Office, in Winfield, on and after the 1st day of November, 1875, and that the interest on said warrants will cease on that day. E. B. KAGER, County Treasurer.

By F. GALLOTTI, Deputy.

Names of parties to whom warrants are payable:

M. G. TROUP: 29 WARRANTS [$5/$10/$20] TOTAL DUE: $330.00.

Winfield Courier, December 23, 1875.

City Council met December 20th, 1875, at 7 o’clock P. M.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, N. M. Powers, C. C. Black, Councilmen, and B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, December 23, 1875.

                                       Bills Allowed by County Commissioners.

                                             OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK,

                                           WINFIELD, KAN., Dec. 16, 1875.

Board met in special session. Present: R. F. Burden, M. S. Roseberry, Commissioners; A. J. Pyburn, County Attorney, and M. G. Troup, County Clerk. Among other proceedings had, claims against the county were passed upon.

                                               THE WINFIELD COURIER.

                                                     CENTENNIAL ISSUE.

                         WINFIELD COURIER, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1876.

                          PRODUCED EVERY THURSDAY BY E. C. MANNING.

COUNTY CLERKS.

A. A. JACKSON              Nov. 8, 1870.        Jan. 8, 1872.

A. A. JACKSON              Nov. 7, 1871.        Jan. 11, 1874.

M. G. TROUP             Nov. 4, 1872.        Jan. 10, 1876.

M. G. TROUP             Nov. 2, 1875.

Winfield Courier, January 13, 1876.

City Council met January 3rd, 1876, at 7 o’clock P. M.


Present: M. G. Troup, chairman of Council; N. M. Powers, C. C. Black, Councilmen, and B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, January 13, 1876.

                                                Commissioners’ Proceedings.

                                             OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK.

                                          Winfield, Kansas, January 10, 1876.

New Board of County Commissioners met in regular session. Present: R. F. Burden, W. M. Sleeth, and Wm. White.

On motion of W. M. Sleeth, R. F. Burden was elected chairman of the board for the ensuing year.

The County Clerk is hereby ordered to go to Topeka, Kansas, for the purpose of straightening up our school land sales account with the States; and the board hereby agree to pay the necessary traveling expenses of said County Clerk to and from the State capitol.

STATE OF KANSAS,

COWLEY COUNTY,    ss.

I, M. G. Troup, County Clerk in and for the county and State aforesaid, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of the Commissioners’ Journal for a session of the board held on the 10th and 11th days of January, 1876.

Witness my hand and seal at Winfield, Kansas, this 12th day of January, A. D. 1876.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, January 20, 1876.

City Council met January 17th, 1876, at 7 o’clock P. M.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, N. M. Powers, C. C. Black, Councilmen; J. E. Allen, City Attorney, and B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

On motion of M. G. Troup the resignation of E. R. Evans as City Marshal, and the acceptance of the same by the Mayor, was approved by the Council.

Winfield Courier, February 3, 1876.

TROUP has gone to Topeka to straighten up the records of his predecessors in the school land business.

Winfield Courier, February 10, 1876.

County Clerk Troup returned from Topeka the first of the week. A comparison of the books in his office showing the school land sales in Cowley County with those of the State Auditor revealed the fact that during Jackson’s term of office $824.63 worth of sales had been made that had never been reported to the Auditor, and the money had been laying idle in the county treasury. It also showed that the county had been overcharged $43.20 on the sales of other tracts.

Winfield Courier, February 24, 1876.

City Council met in regular session, February 21st, 1876, at 7½ o’clock p.m.

Present—M. G. Troup, President of Council; N. M. Powers and C. C. Black, Councilmen; J. E. Allen, City Attorney; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, March 2, 1876.

City Council met in regular session, February 28th, 1876.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; C. C. Black, N. M. Powers, and M. G. Troup, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.


Winfield Courier, March 9, 1876.

City Council met in regular session, March 6th, 1876.

Present: M. G. Troup, President of Council; C. C. Black, N. M. Powers, J. M. Dever, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1876.

Troup has called the township trustees together March 27th.

[COUNTY OFFICIALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1876.

Judge 13th Judicial District: W. P. Campbell.

Board of County Commissioners: R. F. Burden, Robert White, Wm. Sleeth.

County Clerk: M. G. Troup.

County Treasurer: E. B. Kager.

Deputy Treasurer: Jas. L. Huey.

Probate Judge: H. D. Gans.

Registrar of Deeds: E. P. Kinne.

Supt. Pub. Inst.: T. A. Wilkinson.

Sheriff: R. L. Walker.

Coroner: Sim. Moore.

County Attorney: A. J. Pyburn.

Clerk District Court: E. S. Bedilion.

County Surveyor: W. W. Walton.

Examining Surgeon U. S. Pensioners: W. Q. Mansfield.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1876.

                                                      Election Proclamation.

I, D. A. Millington, Mayor of the City of Winfield, in Cowley County and State of Kansas, do hereby proclaim that an election will be held at the office of W. H. H. Maris on lot 2 in block 108 in said City on

                                                 Monday, the 3rd day of April,

1876, for the purpose of electing

A Mayor,

A Police Judge, and

Five Councilmen

to serve said city for the ensuing year.

The polls of said election will be open at 8 o’clock a.m., and will close at 6 o’clock p.m., of that day.

M. G. Troup, N. M. Powers, and C. C. Black are appointed judges, and B. F. Baldwin and J. M. Reed, clerks of said elec­tion.

Witness my hand and the seal of the said City this 21st day of March, 1876.

                                         D. A. MILLINGTON, Mayor.  [SEAL.]

Attest, B. F. BALDWIN, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1876.

Note: Council met March 20th; adjourned until March 21st.

City Council met in adjourned session, March 21st, A. D. 1876.


Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; N. M. Powers, C. C. Black, and M. G. Troup, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Ordinance No. 58 was read and passed by sections. Vote on final passage was as follows: Yeas—C. C. Black, M. G. Troup, N. M. Powers. Nays—none.

The Mayor, with the consent of the Council, appointed M. G. Troup, N. M. Powers, and C. C. Black as Judges of the City Election, to be held April third (3d), A. D. 1876.

On motion of M. G. Troup, the Council recommended the County Commissioners to pay the two bills of W. L. Mullen, against Cowley County for rent of house occupied by Mrs. Bishop, a pauper of Winfield City, from November 1st, 1875, to March 1st, 1876, inclusive, at five dollars a month, total twenty dollars. Also recommended the payment of bill of Rilla McClung, for rent of house occupied by Mrs. Walters, a pauper of Winfield City. Also recommended the payment of bill of J. W. Johnston, for one coffin for pauper.

[LEGAL NOTICE RE ESTATE OF SAMUEL DARRAH, DECEASED.]

Cowley County Democrat, Thursday, April 6, 1876.

RECAP ONLY:

To Philena Darrah, and Sylvia M. Mary, and Frank Darrah, Application will be made by M. G. Troup, Administrator of said Estate to the Probate Court of said county on the 24th day of March, A. D., 1876, at one o’clock p.m. of said day...to sell real estate: The undivided one-half of the Southwest Fourth of the Northeast Fourth, and the Northwest Fourth of the Northeast Fourth, and the Northeast Fourth of the Northeast Fourth of Section Twenty, Township Thirty-three, Range Four East.

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1876.

The following is the result of the vote cast at the city election held in Winfield last Monday.

                                                    REPUBLICAN TICKET.

For Mayor, D. A. Millington: 81 votes.

For Police Judge, Linus S. Webb: 75 votes.

For Councilman, A. B. Lemmon: 86 votes.

For Councilman, C. A. Bliss: 81 votes.

For Councilman, T. B. Myers: 84 votes.

For Councilman, H. Brotherton: 88 votes.

For Councilman, M. G. Troup: 91 votes.

                                                     DEMOCRAT TICKET.

For Mayor, H. S. Silver: 86 votes.

For Police Judge, J. W. Curns: 81 votes.

For Councilman, N. Roberson: 71 votes.

For Councilman, A. G. Wilson: 76 votes.

For Councilman, N. M. Powers: 70 votes.

For Councilman, W. L. Mullen: 57 votes.

For Councilman, Frank Williams: 76 votes.

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1876.


Last Saturday was “Arbor Day.” But as the weather clerk paid no respect to the Mayor’s proclamation, it was decided by our citizens, rather than have a “damper” put upon their proceed­ings, to pay no attention to it themselves. We might say it rained last Saturday, but we have no desire to draw upon your credulity. It didn’t rain; it just “poured down!” The day wasn’t largely observed. The clouds and rain were too opaque for an extended observation. Several of our citizens set out trees. Mr. Lemmon planted twenty—in one hole, Mr. Troup likewise buried about the same number, and Mr. Platter “healed in” a nice lot of maples and poplars. The county officers held a meeting and decided not to adorn the Courthouse grounds until they had some assurance from the county fathers that the public square would be fenced and the trees protected.

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1876.

City Council met in adjourned session, March 21st, A. D. 1876.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; N. M. Powers, C. C. Black, and M. G. Troup, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Minutes of previous meeting were read and approved.

The following bills were presented, read, and allowed, and on motion of M. G. Troup, the Clerk was ordered to draw a warrant on the Treasurer for the same.

The Finance Committee made the following report on the cancellation of city warrants:

To the Honorable Mayor and Council of the city of Winfield, county of Cowley, and State of Kansas, we your Finance Committee beg leave to report that we have examined the enclosed package and find it to contain two hundred and forty-three vouchers of the value of $2,467.17, and that said vouchers have been duly canceled on the Winfield city warrant record, and recommend that they be destroyed.

M. G. Troup,          ) Finance Committee.

Chas. C. Black.      ) 

On motion of N. M. Powers the report was received and the vouchers destroyed.

The City Council proceeded to canvass the vote of Winfield city election, held on April 3rd, A. D., 1876, which resulted as follows:

Whole number of votes cast: 182.

For Mayor: D. A. Millington, 81; H. S. Silver, 80, E. S. Bedilion, 1.

For Police Judge: Linus S. Webb, 75; J. W. Curns, 81; J. D. Pryor, 5.

For Councilmen: A. B. Lemmon, 86; M. G. Troup, 91; C. A. Bliss, 81; T. B. Myers, 84; H. Brotherton, 88; N. Roberson, 71; Frank Williams, 76; N. M. Powers, 70; A. G. Wilson, 76; W. L. Mullen, 57; J. P. McMillen, 20; C. C. Black, 3; J. P. Short, 1.

D. A. Millington, having received the highest number of votes for Mayor, was declared elected. J. W. Curns, receiving the highest number of votes for Police Judge, was declared elected. A. B. Lemmon, M. G. Troup, T. B. Myers, C. A. Bliss, and H. Brotherton, receiving the highest number of votes for Councilmen, were declared elected.

[BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 19, 1876. Front Page.

Full Report of All the Business Transacted by the Board of County Commissioners Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, April 10, 11, and 12.

                                               COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE,

                                         WINFIELD, KANSAS, April 10, 1876.


Board met in regular session. Present, R. F. Burden, W. M. Sleeth, Commissioners; A. J. Pyburn, County Attorney, and M. G. Troup, County Clerk. Journal of last regular session read and adopted.

Bills were presented and disposed of as follows.

M. G. Troup, Express postage and traveling expenses: $50.50.

M. G. Troup, Co. Clerk Salary: $286.35.

The County Clerk is hereby ordered to have the county printing of his office done as he in his judgment may deem the most advantageous and just for the county, until next session of the Board.

Winfield Courier, April 20, 1876.

The new City Council has organized with M. G. Troup as president.

Winfield Courier, April 20, 1876.

City Council met at the City Clerk’s office April 17th, A. D. 1876.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, C. A. Bliss, H. Brotherton, and A. B. Lemmon, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

The Mayor read his annual inaugural address to the Council stating the financial condition of the city for the past year, its present condition, and making many suggestions as to its future.

On motion of A. B. Lemmon, M. G. Troup was elected President of the Council for the coming year.

On motion the Mayor appointed three standing committees of three members each, as follows:

Finance committee: M. G. Troup, H. Brotherton, T. B. Myers.

Bill of W. M. Boyer, six dollars and ten cents, Police Judge’s fees in case of city of Winfield vs. Wm. Hudson, was read, and on motion of M. G. Troup was approved for five dollars and sixty cents, being the amount of the bill except the witness fee of M. G. Troup, fifty cents.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1876.

City Council met in regular session at the Clerk’s office, May 1st, 1876.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, C. A. Bliss, H. Brotherton, A. B. Lemmon, and T. B. Myers, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk; J. E. Allen, City Attorney.

Joseph Likowski and Rheinhart Ehret made application, by petition, through their attorney, A. H. Green, for dram shop license. The petitions being read and the Council believing them to contain a majority of all persons residing within the corpo­rate limits of the city of Winfield, over the age of twenty-one years, on motion of M. G. Troup voted that dram shop license be granted to the said petitioners.

Ordinance No. 59 was read and passed by sections. Vote on final passage was as follows: Yes: A. B. Lemmon, H. Brotherton, M. G. Troup, T. B. Myers, and C. A. Bliss. Nays: None. Ordi­nance No. 59, as passed, was duly approved by the Mayor.

The Mayor, with the consent and unanimous vote of the Council, made the following appointments for the year ensuing: For City Clerk, B. F. Baldwin, for City Treasurer, J. C. Fuller, for City Attorney, J. E. Allen.


On motion of M. G. Troup the Council adjourned to meet May 2nd, 1875, at 5 o’clock p.m. B. F. BALDWIN, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, May 11, 1876.

                                                         Republican Work.

The following townships have reported the proceedings of last Thursday’s conventions.

Winfield Township caucus met at the Courthouse at 2 o’clock p.m.; M. G. Troup was selected as chairman and E. C. Manning, secretary. Thirteen delegates to the 88th District Convention were elected as follows: D. A. Millington, J. C. Monforte, M. G. Troup, A. H. Green, T. J. Jones, T. B. Myers, Geo. Robert­son, Sam. Burger, C. A. Bliss, E. P. Kinne, J. L. King, J. P. McMillen, and E. C. Manning.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 17, 1876.

                                                     Notice of Equalization.

Notice is hereby given that the board of Commissioners of Cowley County, Kansas, will meet at the office of the County Clerk in the city of Winfield on Monday the 5th day of June, 1876, as a County Board of Equalization, at which time and place all persons feeling themselves aggrieved can appear and have all errors in the assessors’ returns corrected.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1876. Editorial Page.

                                                                BUSTED.

The President and Directors of the A. T. & S. F. railroad led the people of the Walnut Valley to believe that they would, last Friday, at Wichita, state definitely the time and terms within and upon which they would build a railroad down the valley. They did not do it, however. M. G. Troup, D. A. Millington, W. P. Hackney, C. A. Bliss, and E. C. Manning went to Wichita to learn definitely what the purpose of the railroad company was. A delegation of citizens from each of the following places was there ahead of the directors to interview them: Emporia, Cottonwood Falls, Florence, Butler County, Sumner County, and Cowley County. The special train bearing the rail­road authorities arrived about 6 p.m. About 8 p.m. the delega­tions from Butler and Cowley counties were granted an interview. The President, Mr. Nickerson, then informed the Walnut Valley party that their company was not prepared to say what they would do about building a road down the Valley, but that in thirty or sixty days they would be able to say whether they would or would not build the road, and upon what terms. Upon receiving this highly satisfactory (?) information, the W. V. delegation humbly took their hats and withdrew.

Each of our readers may guess what had possessed these fellows to say at Topeka the week before that they would state a definite proposition at Wichita, which might be accepted or rejected by the Walnut Valley people, and then when the appointed time came, to say they were not ready. We have a guess of our own, but as it is only a guess, we will not give it.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1876.

COUNTY CLERK TROUP has been busily “footing up” the returns of the several township trustees this week. The “population” column is what interests him. 9,999 persons entitles him to a salary of $1,200, while 10,000 would give him $1,500. You see it is a $300 “foot up” with him.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1876.

City Council met in regular session at the Clerk’s office, May 15th, 1876.


Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, A. B. Lemmon, and T. B. Myers, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

[FOURTH OF JULY PREPARATIONS.]

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1876.

Last Saturday, pursuant to call, the citizens of Winfield met at the Courthouse and organized a meeting by calling D. A. Millington to the chair and electing C. M. McIntire secretary.

After deliberation as to what steps should be taken to appropriately celebrate the 4th of July of the Centennial year, the following committee was appointed to draft a plan of procedure and report to a meeting of citizens last night: James Kelly, J. P. Short, C. M. McIntire, W. B. Gibbs, and W. C. Robinson.

At the appointed hour, Wednesday evening, the meeting assembled at the Courthouse and organized by selecting C. A. Bliss, chairman, and J. E. Allen as secretary. The committee made a report which, after some amendments made by the meeting, was finally adopted.

General Superintendent: Prof. A. B. Lemmon.

County Historian: W. W. Walton.

Committee of Arrangements: C. M. Wood, M. L. Bangs, B. B. Vandeventer, John Lowry, J. D. Cochran.

Committee on Programme: H. D. Gans, E. P. Kinne, James Kelly, B. F. Baldwin, W. M. Allison.

Committee on Speakers: E. C. Manning, L. J. Webb, Chas. McIntire.

Committee on Finance: W. C. Robinson, W. P. Hackney, O. F. Boyle, M. G. Troup, J. C. Fuller.

Committee on Music: J. D. Pryor, Mrs. W. D. Roberts, Miss Mollie Bryant.

Committee on Toasts: A. J. Pyburn, J. E. Allen, J. P. Short, Dr. J. Hedrick.

Committee on Stand: W. E. Tansey, T. B. Myers, W. B. Gibbs.

Committee on Decoration: Frank Gallotti, John Swain, I. Randall, Mary Stewart, Jennie Greenlee, Ada Millington, Mrs. Rigby, Mrs. Mansfield.

Committee on Invitation: D. A. Millington, L. C. Harter, J. B. Lynn, C. A. Bliss, J. P. McMillen, H. S. Silver, A. H. Green, S. S. Majors, C. M. Scott, T. B. McIntire, R. C. Haywood, J. L. Abbott, John Blevins, T. R. Bryan, H. C. McDorman, Mc. D. Stapleton, S. M. Fall, J. Stalter, Wm. White, S. S. Moore, Jno. McGuire, H. P. Heath, J. O. Van Orsdol, G. B. Green, W. B. Skinner, J. W. Millspaugh.

Committee on Fireworks: G. S. Manser, T. K. Johnson, C. C. Haskins.

Meeting adjourned to meet at the call of the General Superintendent.

Winfield Courier, June 8, 1876.

City Council met in regular session at the Clerk’s office, May 15th, 1876.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, H. Brotherton, and T. B. Myers, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk, J. E. Allen, City Attorney.

On motion of M. G. Troup, the marshal was instructed to repair the pound, provided said repairs would be received in lieu of four months’ rent.


On motion of M. G. Troup, the Council instructed the marshal to notify the citizens of the city who own dogs, that unless the requirements of ordinance No. 55 are complied with on or before July 1st, 1876, the dogs will be dealt with as said ordinance provides.

Winfield Courier, June 29, 1876.

City Council met in regular session at the Clerk’s office, June 19th, 1876.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, H. Brotherton, T. B. Myers, and C. A. Bliss, Councilmen; J. E. Allen, City Attorney, B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

On motion of councilman Troup, the city attorney was in­structed to prepare an ordinance for the protection of trees growing on the commons and in the streets and alleys of the city, and present the same to the council Monday evening, June 26, 1876.

[COWLEY COUNTY: M. G. TROUP, CLERK.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 5, 1876.

MARE. Taken up by Mark K. Hull, Dexter Township, on the 22nd of May, 1876, one bay mare colt about two years old, branded J. C. on right side of neck under the mane. Valued at $20.

Also, one sorrel mare colt, with a white face and three white feet, about one year old, no brands. Valued at $10.

SOW. Taken up by Brainard Goff, Creswell Township, one black and white spotted sow and seven pigs. Valued at $31.00.

Winfield Courier, July 6, 1876.

City Council met in regular session at the Clerk’s office, July 3rd, 1876.

Present: M. G. Troup, President of Council; T. B. Myers, C. A. Bliss, A. B. Lemmon, Councilmen; J. E. Allen, City Attor­ney; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Minutes of previous meeting read and approved.

City Attorney presented Ordinance No. 60, for the protection of public trees and shrubs growing in the city; the same being read and passed by sections. Vote on final passage was—ayes, C. A. Bliss, T. B. Myers, M. G. Troup, and A. B. Lemmon. Nays, none.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1876.

                                                               Delegates.

The following is a list of the delegates to the republican county convention, from the nine townships heard from.

Winfield: R. L. Walker, James Kelly, E. P. Kinne, M. G. Troup, T. B. Myres, C. C. Pierce, Nels Newell, Jno. Mentch, E. S. Torrance, and A. B. Lemmon.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1876.

                                                    The Republican Caucus.

Last Saturday the Republicans of Winfield Township met in caucus at the courthouse, at 4 o’clock p.m., and elected the following delegates to the county convention, to be held next Saturday in Winfield.

R. L. Walker, A. B. Lemmon, Nels. Newell, T. B. Myers, C. C. Pierce, M. G. Troup, E. P. Kinne, James Kelly, E. S. Torrance, and John Mentch were elected delegates, and W. M. Boyer, T. L. King, John Weakly, S. M. Klingman, S. Johnson, H. L. Barker, G. W. Robertson, J. E. Saint, John C. Roberts, and A. Howland, alternates.

The vote stood 91 for the ticket elected and 9 for the ticket that was defeated. It is an able delegation and was very enthusiastically supported.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1876.


City Council met in regular session at the Clerk’s office, Aug. 7th, 1876.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; H. Brotherton, T. B. Myers, and M. G. Troup, Councilmen; J. E. Allen, City Attorney; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, August 17, 1876. Editorial Page.

                                                 COUNTY CONVENTION.

The Republican county convention convened at the Courthouse, in Winfield, on Saturday, August 12th, at 1 o’clock p.m., and was called to order by A. B. Lemmon, chairman of the Republican county central committee. R. C. Story was elected temporary chairman and James Kelly secretary. A committee on credentials was appointed, consisting of Messrs. E. S. Torrance, J. W. Tull, A. B. Odell, T. R. Bryan, and S. M. Jarvis. The committee reported the following persons as having been duly elected as delegates and alternates to the convention.

Winfield: Delegates, R. L. Walker, A. B. Lemmon, Nels. Newell, T. B. Myers, C. C. Pierce, M. G. Troup, E. P. Kinne, Jno. Mentch, James Kelly, and E. S. Torrance. Alternates, W. M. Boyer, T. L. King, Jno. Weakly, S. D. Klingman, S. Johnson, H. L. Barker, G. W. Robertson, J. E. Saint, John C. Roberts, and A. Howland. E. S. TORRANCE, Chairman.

A. B. ODELL, Secretary.

On motion the following named persons were selected, by acclamation, as delegates to the 3rd District Congressional convention: L. J. Webb, R. L. Walker, J. B. Evans, M. G. Troup, and E. C. Manning; and the following named as alternates: L. Lippman, J. W. Millspaugh, S. S. Moore, T. W. Moore, and A. B. Lemmon.

Winfield Courier, August 17, 1876.

                                            Eighty-Eighth District Convention.

Pursuant to call the delegates of the 88th Representative District met in Republican convention at the courthouse, in Winfield, at 10 o’clock a.m., Saturday, August 12, 1876.

The committee on credentials then submitted the following report.

“Your committee on credentials beg leave to report the following named persons entitled to seats as delegates in the convention.”

Vernon Township: J. S. Wooley, F. W. Schwantes, and J. W. Millspaugh.

Winfield: R. S. Walker, A. B. Lemmon, Nels. Newell, T. B. Myers, C. C. Pierce, M. G. Troup, Jas. Kelly, E. P. Kinne, John Mentch, and E. S. Torrance.

Brother of Troup arrives for a visit...

Winfield Courier, August 31, 1876.

A brother of M. G. Troup is here, viewing the country over. He is a printer, and consequently a good fellow.

Winfield Courier, September 7, 1876.

City Council met in regular session at the Clerk’s office, Sept. 4th, 1876.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; H. Brotherton, C. A. Bliss, and M. G. Troup, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

The councils committee on fire department submitted the following report:

To the Mayor and City Council, Winfield, Kansas.

Gentlemen:

Your committee on fire department beg leave to submit the following recommendations:


1st. That the City Council take immediate steps to procure, for the use of the city, one “Little Giant” chemical engine, two dozen rubber buckets, one two-wheel truck for ladders, and the necessary equipage for a hook and ladder company.

2nd. That a convenient and safe place be secured, in which to keep the engine and other apparatus belonging to the fire department.

3rd. That a fire company be organized which shall become familiar with the management of the engine, and in case of a fire shall have entire control of all the machinery of the department and shall use the same as the officers of said company shall direct.

4th. It shall be the duty of the city marshal to see that the equipments for fighting fire be kept safe in their proper place and ready for use at any time. Respectfully submitted,

                                      A. B. LEMMON, C. A. BLISS, Committee.

The report being read, on motion, was received by the council.

On motion of M. G. Troup, the fire committee were instructed to purchase one “Little Giant” chemical engine, No. 3, also one dozen rubber buckets for the use of the city.

On motion, the committee were also instructed to ascertain the cost of a truck, with hooks, axes, ladders, and all necessary equipage, to be gotten up and purchased here at home; were also instructed to find a suitable room, and probable cost of a room, where an engine and equipage can be kept safe, and to report on each at the next meeting of the council.

On motion, the council instructed the city attorney to prepare an ordinance providing for the organizing of a fire company in the city, and present the same to the council at its next regular meeting.

[COURT DOCKET: OCTOBER TERM.]

Arkansas City Traveler, September 27, 1876.

The following is a list of cases that will stand for trial at the October term, A. D., 1876, of the District Court, and have been placed on the trial docket in the following order.

                                                          CIVIL DOCKET.

                              William R. Warner vs. M. G. Troup Administrator et al.

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1876.

City Council met in regular session at the Clerk’s office, Oct. 3rd, 1876.

Present: M. G. Troup, chairman of the council; A. B. Lemmon, H. Brotherton, C. A. Bliss, and T. B. Myers, councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

A motion was made by Councilman Bliss that $30 be paid out of the city treasury to the Chicago Journal of Commerce for one cut of courthouse and for the advertising of the city of Winfield in said paper; vote being taken, stood as follows: Ayes, C. A. Bliss, M. G. Troup, and H. Brotherton. Nays, A. B. Lemmon and T. B. Myers. The motion being carried, the city clerk was instructed to credit the treasury with the same.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 11, 1876.

                                              OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK,

                                          WINFIELD, KANSAS, Oct. 2, 1876.

Board met in regular session; all present, with A. J. Pyburn, County Attorney, and M. G. Troup, County Clerk. Journal of two last special sessions read and approved.


Petition of Isaac C. Loomis and others, of Creswell Township, asking for view and survey presented, granted, and D. Logan, John Nichols, and Wm. Wilson appointed viewers, and the County Clerk ordered to give legal notice.

Petition of John P. Woodyard and others, of Creswell Township, asking for view and survey of County road, presented, granted, and Henry Endicott, John Harmon, and William Randall appointed viewers, and the County Clerk ordered to give legal notice. Adjourned.

Troup has a child...

Winfield Courier, October 19, 1876.

BIRTHS. Four Family “fysicians” couldn’t keep run of the “advents” of late in this town. A new bankeress, a new city marshaless, and we don’t-know-what-else. This we do know. Messrs. Fuller, Denning, and Huey are the proudest men in the city—except Troup. Troup said it was a whole Troup in itself, weighed a ton, and would vote for Hayes and Wheeler.

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1876.

City Council met at Clerk’s office, Nov. 6, 1876.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; A. B. Lemmon, C. A. Bliss, M. G. Troup, H. Brotherton, and T. B. Myers, Councilmen; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, November 16, 1876.

M. G. Troup is going off on a visit.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 22, 1876.

                                                                  Notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that the Board of County Commission­ers of Cowley County, Kansas, will, at their regular session, commencing on the first Monday of January, 1877, receive sealed proposals for the board and care of the paupers of said county. Said bids to set forth the price per week at which said paupers will be kept, exclusive of clothing and medical treatment. The successful bidder to have exclusive control of the keeping of said county paupers, and to be a resident of said county of Cowley. Bids to be filed with the County Clerk on or before January 1, 1877. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

Done by order of the Board of Commissioners of Cowley County, Kansas.

                                            M. G. TROUP, Clerk of said Board.

Troup and wife visit her father, Judge Stivers, in Fredonia...

Winfield Courier, December 7, 1876.

The Fredonia Citizen says: “M. G. Troup, and wife, of Winfield, arrived in Fredonia last week and are visiting Mrs. Troup’s father, Judge Stivers. Mr. Troup is serving a second term as county Clerk of Cowley County, and is an able official and a fine man.”

Winfield Courier, December 28, 1876.

ADELPHI Lodge, No. 110, of A. F. and A. M.’s of this city, elected the following officers for the ensuing year: Dr. Graham, W. M.; Ex Saint, S. W.; M. G. Troup, J. W.; Frank Baldwin, Treas.; and James Kelly, Secretary. The following appointments were then made: C. C. Black, S. D.; J. C. Roberts, J. D.; Jas. Simpson, S. S.; N. C. McCulloch, J. S.; Wirt W. Walton, Tyler.

[CORRESPONDENCE FROM “C”—WINFIELD.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 3, 1877.

                                                            From Winfield.

                                            WINFIELD, KAN., Dec. 23, 1876.


Our Christmas tree on Saturday evening, the 23rd, was a success; the most remarkable feature was the very large number of books distributed from it.

At the last regular communication of Adelphi Lodge No. 110, A. F. and A. M., the following officers were chosen for the ensuing year: W. M., Wm. G. Graham; Sen. W., J. E. Saint; Jun. W., M. G. Troup; Sec., James Kelly; Treas., B. F. Baldwin; Sen. D., C. C. Black; Jun. D., J. C. Roberts; Sen. S., Jas. A. Simpson; Jun. S., N. C. McCulloch; Tyler, W. W. Walton.

Winfield Courier, January 11, 1877.

Skipped Cowley Commissioners Proceedings on Editorial Page, Winfield Courier, January 11, 1877. M. G. Troup, County Clerk, showed total amount claimed: $3,687.70.

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1877.

City Council met at City Clerk’s office, Jan. 1st, 1877.

PRESENT: M. O. Troup, Chairman of the Council; H. Brotherton, T. B. Myers, councilmen; J. E. Allen, City Attorney; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1877.

The Grouse Valley is pretty well represented at the Court­house: Burden, Troup, McDermott, Bryan, Story, and Gans.

Winfield Courier, March 15, 1877.

City Council met at City Clerk’s office, March 5th, 1877.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, H. Brotherton, T. B. Myers, and C. A. Bliss, councilmen; J. E. Allen, City Attorney; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

On motion of Councilman Troup the city attorney was in­structed to prepare and submit to the council, at its next meeting, an ordinance in relation to transient auctioneers, also an ordinance authorizing the calling of a city election to be held in April next.

Winfield Courier, March 22, 1877.

The following were the officers elected at the Philomatic society on last Friday evening, for the ensuing term: C. M. Wood, President; M. G. Troup, Vice President; Miss Emma Saint, Secretary; J. M. Bair, Treasurer; W. M. Allison, J. E. Platter, and T. A. Wilkinson, Committee on Programme.

Winfield Courier, March 22, 1877.

City Council met at City Clerk’s office, March 19th, 1877.

Present: M. G. Troup, President of the Council; H. Brotherton, T. B. Myers, and C. A. Bliss, councilmen; J. E. Allen, City Attorney; B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Ordinance No. 62, in relation to the place of holding the annual city election to be holden on April 2nd, was read and passed by sections. Vote on final passage was ayes: Bliss, Brotherton, Myers, and Troup. Nays, none.

The chairman, with the consent and approval of the Council, appointed Councilmen C. A. Bliss, H. Brotherton, and T. B. Myers as judges of said election, and J. M. Reed and O. S. Record as clerks of said election.

An ordinance in relation to transient auctioneers was submitted to the council by the City Attorney as requested by the Council at its last regular meeting and was received, read, and on motion laid over until next meeting.

Winfield Courier, March 22, 1877.

                                                          Ordinance No. 61.


An ordinance designating the place of holding the annual city election.

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Councilmen of the City of Winfield:

SECTION 1. That the annual city election of the City of Winfield, to be holden on Monday, the 2nd day of April, A. D. 1877, for the election of a Mayor, a Police Judge, and 5 Council­men for said city be held in the building situated on lot number 10, in block number 107, in the City of Winfield, Cowley county and State of Kansas.

SECTION 2. This ordinance to take effect and be in force from and after its publication once in the Winfield COURIER.

Approved by the President of the Council, March 19th, 1877.

                                                            M. G. TROUP.

March 19th, 1877.

Attest, B. F. BALDWIN, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, March 29, 1877.

The Assessment Roll of Sheridan Township has been returned in good shape to the County Clerk’s office. Hank Clay is the first Trustee to make his assessment returns. M. G. Troup says they are gotten up in the best order.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 3, 1877.

                                                WINFIELD CITY OFFICERS.

Mayor, D. A. Millington.

Police Judge, J. W. Curns.

Members of the Council: M. G. Troup, C. A. Bliss, H. Brotherton, T. B. Myers.

Clerk, B. F. Baldwin.

City Attorney, J. E. Allen.

Marshal, Walter Denning.

Examining Surgeon U. S. Pensioners: W. Q. Mansfield.

Winfield Courier, April 12, 1877.

                                    SHERIFF’S ELECTION PROCLAMATION.

WHEREAS, on the 9th day of April, A. D., 1877, the Board of Commissioners of Cowley County in the State of Kansas, made and entered on record the following order, to-wit:

In the matter of the petition of A. H. Green, et al, for an order calling a special election to be held for the purpose of voting aid to a certain railway company.

Now comes the said A. H. Green and presents to the Board a petition in writing, signed by Nineteen hundred of the resident tax-payers of the county, praying that a special election be called for the purpose of submitting to the electors of the county the question of making a subscription of the sum of Four Thousand Dollars per mile for each mile of railway constructed by said company in said county, to the capital stock of the Memphis & Ellsworth Narrow Gauge Railway Company, Western Branch, and issuing a like amount of the bonds of the county in payment therefor,

Provided, That the total amount of said subscription and bonds shall not exceed One Hundred and Twenty Thousand Dollars.


And upon full consideration of said petition and the evi­dence and arguments adduced and offered in support thereof, it is found by the Board that said petition has been duly signed by two fifths of the resident tax-payers of the county, and is in all respects regular and sufficient.

It is therefore, on this 9th day of April, A. D., 1877, conformable to the statute in such cases, made and provided, and pursuant to the conditions and prayers on that behalf in said petition set forth and contained, ordered by the board that a special election be held in the county of Cowley, at the several precincts therein, on the

                                                 22nd day of May, A. D. 1877,

for the purpose of then, there, and thereby submitting to the qualified electors of said county the following proposition to-wit: Shall said county of Cowley subscribe to the capital stock of the Memphis and Ellsworth Narrow Gauge Railway Company, Western Branch, the sum of four thousand dollars per mile for each mile of railroad to be constructed by said company in said county, said stock to be paid for by an equal amount of the bonds of said county of Cowley to be issued and delivered to said company as follows, to-wit; Twenty-five thousand dollars of such bonds to be issued and delivered and same amount of such stock to be received therefor when said railway company shall have com­pleted and put in operation a railway from the city of Parsons, in Labette County, State of Kansas, to its depot, permanently established at a point in said county of Cowley, within one half mile of the crossing of Cherry street and Broadway, in the townsite of Lazette, twenty-five thousand dollars when twenty miles of said railway shall be completed in said county, and seventy thousand dollars when such railway is completed and put in operation to its depot, permanently located within half a mile of the crossing of Main and Ninth streets, in the city of Winfield, in said county. The aggregate amount of such bonds not to exceed one hundred and twenty thousand dollars.

Provided, That no bonds shall be issued to said company unless the said railway shall be completed and in operation from said City of Parsons to the Leavenworth, Lawrence and Galveston Railway within seven months, nor unless completed and in opera­tion to Elk Falls, in Elk County, Kansas, within twelve months, nor unless completed and in operation to its depot in the City of Winfield within eighteen months from the 22nd day of May, A. D. 1877.

The said railway shall be a three feet gauge road, with rails not inferior to iron of thirty pounds per yard, and to be well constructed and equipped in every respect, with suitable passenger and freight depots at Lazette, Winfield, and an inter­mediate point between the two, on the line of road.

Said bonds to draw interest at the rate of ten percent per annum, payable semi-annually, on the 15th days of April and October of each year. No part of the principal to be paid for ten years from the date of the bonds, after which it shall be paid in ten equal annual installments. Coupons shall be at­tached for the installments of both interest and principal payable at the Fiscal Agency of the State of Kansas in the City of New York.

The forms of the ballots to be used at said election to be: “For the Railway Stock and Bonds,” or “Against the railway Stock and Bonds.”

And it is further ordered by the Board that the Sheriff give notice of the time and purpose of said election by his proclama­tion on that behalf to be published in the Winfield COURIER for the period of thirty days preceding the date of such election.

STATE OF KANSAS, Cowley County,   ss.


I, M. G. Troup, County Clerk in and for the County and State aforesaid, do hereby certify the above and foregoing to be a true and correct copy of the original order.

Witness my hand and seal this 10th day of April, A. D. 1877.

   [SEAL.]  M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Now, therefore, I, R. L. Walker, Sheriff of Cowley County, Kansas, do hereby proclaim and make known that on Tuesday, the 22nd day of May, A. D. 1877, there will be held a special elec­tion at the several voting precincts in said county of Cowley for the proposition contained in the above order, in the manner and form therein provided and set forth.

                                R. L. WALKER, Sheriff of Cowley County, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, April 12, 1877.

City Council met at City Clerk’s office, April 2nd, 1877.

Present: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, Councilman, and B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, April 12, 1877.

City council met at the city clerk’s office, April 4th, 1877.

PRESENT: D. A. Millington, Mayor; M. G. Troup, H. Brotherton, T. B. Myers, and C. A. Bliss, councilmen; J. E. Allen, City Attorney, B. F. Baldwin, City Clerk.

Committee on streets and alleys reported on the report of the road overseer and stated that so far as they could ascertain the report was correct, and that they had seen all the delinquents who promised to work or pay the money when called on.

On motion of councilman Troup, the report was received and the marshal instructed to notify all who were delinquent on road work, and that any who did not work, when notified, or pay the same to the marshal within twenty-four hours thereafter, that he make complaint before the police judge against such persons.

The committee reported unfavorable on the petitions of Mr. R. B. Waite, asking the vacating of certain streets and alleys in the city. Councilman Troup moved that the report of the commit­tee be received and that no action further be taken in the matter by the present acting council. After considerable discussion on both sides of the question, the motion was carried.

The yearly report of the city treasurer, filed with the city clerk, was read and on motion received, and the city clerk instructed to have the same published in the Winfield COURIER, and to file the original in his office, to be delivered, together with the vouchers accompanying the same to the next city council.

The council then proceeded to canvass the vote held on April 2, 1877, for the election of city officers, resulting as follows.

R. L. Walker, having received the highest number of votes for Mayor, was declared duly elected.

John W. Curns, having received the highest number of votes for Police Judge, was declared duly elected.

A. G. Wilson, A. E. Baird, H. Jochems, C. M. Wood, and S. C. Smith, having received the highest number of votes for councilmen, were declared duly elected, and the city clerk instructed to furnish each of the above named persons with a certificate of election.

On motion the Council adjourned sine die.

Winfield Courier, April 19, 1877.


                                            County Commissioners’ Proceedings.

                                              OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK,

                                             Winfield, Kansas, April 11th, 1877.

Board of County Commissioners met in regular session. All the Board present with James McDermott, County Attorney, and M. G. Troup, County Clerk. Among other proceedings had, sundry claims were presented and passed upon as follows:

                                          M. G. Troup, Co. clerk salary: $343.05.

                                      M. G. Troup, postage, express, etc.: $33.70.

Jurors—[Each paid $1.50.]

T. R. Bryan, M. G. Troup, J. H. Finch, B. M. Terrill, S. C. Smith, F. S. Jennings.

NOTE: TOTAL CLAIMED $3,038.45

       TOTAL PAID $2,890.90

STATE OF KANSAS, COUNTY OF COWLEY.   ss.

I hereby certify the foregoing to be a true statement of all claims presented to the Board at their session held on the 9th, 10th, and 11th days of April, 1877.

Witness my hand and seal this 12th day of April, 1877.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, April 26, 1877. Editorial Page.

                                                  THE RAILROAD BONDS.

On the 22nd of May our county is to vote for or against aiding the railroad from Parsons to this place. It is an important step for Cowley County. The favorable or unfavorable decision rendered at that time will tell largely upon the future welfare or illfare of our people. The eyes of all south and southwest Kansas are upon us.

At least a dozen railroad projects are looking towards this county. Of course, the manipulators of eleven of these enterprises hope that the bond proposition in favor of the twelfth will fail.

Of course, all the towns from which the eleven start and through which they propose to run also hope the present bond proposition will fail.

Of course, Independence, Emporia, Eldorado, and Wichita all hope the bond proposition will fail.

Of course, every locality that lives off from the industry of Cowley hopes the bonds will fail.

In view of these facts, no man living in Cowley can afford to oppose the bond proposition simply because the proposed line of road does not touch his farm or his town. If a man is opposed to voting bonds from principle, or is opposed to voting any bonds, as a matter of business, then is the position tenable; but it is an evil day for him as a citizen or for they as a community, who take the responsibility of opposing aid to a railroad into Cowley County merely because it does not run everywhere to suit townsite speculators.

The farmers of Cowley County want a railroad and those men and that locality will not increase their chances for favors or railroads in the future who now oppose this one before us.


The people of Arkansas City are trying to create the impression throughout the county that Winfield has rejected the north and south road and hence they (citizens of Arkansas City) are justifiable in opposing an east and west road. This effort of theirs is a shystering trick. Winfield offered to stand by a proposition to give $100,000 bonds to a north and south road without any reference whatever to an east and west road. Winfield further offered to stand by a county proposition for $100,000 to each, a north and south and an east and west. But no; the managers of the north and south proposition would have $4,000 per mile and the privilege of building as many miles in the county as they were pleased to, and the bonds must first be delivered before work was commenced. This Winfield would not agree to.

After an east and west road had submitted a proposition to build into the county and nineteen hundred petitioners had asked that an election be ordered on the question of voting $120,000 in bonds thereto, then, and not till then, did the friends and projectors of the north and south road conclude that they could build their road for $120,000 in county bonds; but even then, they wanted the bonds issued as soon as voted. Of course, the friends of an east and west road could not support the proposition at that late date, because:

FIRST: The county cannot vote but 200,000 dollars.

SECOND: The east and west road does not ask to have the bonds issued until the road is built.

THIRD: If the bonds for the north and south road were voted and put in escrow, of course they would take precedence even if the road was not built first.

FOURTH: No east and west road would be built and take the chance of getting $120,000 in bonds after a like amount had already been issued for the benefit of a north and south road.

Note: The first “Sheriff’s Election Proclamation,” dated April 9, 1877, was for the east/west railroad. The following is the second “Sheriff’s Election Proclamation,” dated April 17, 1877, for the north/south railroad. Election on both propositions to take place on the same day: May 29, 1877.

Note: Troup witnessed and signed north/south instrument April 17, 1877.

            Troup witnessed and signed the east/west instrument April 10, 1877.

There was a third “Sheriff’s Election Proclamation, designating that Marshal shall receive a salary of $40.00 per month, which shall be in lieu of all fees, costs, and other claims, chargeable to the city for services, and he shall be entitled to the following fees to be charged as costs:

For arresting each person, bringing him before the police judge and making complaint: $1.00

For each commitment, 25 cents.

For serving subpoena, first person, 50 cents.

For each additional person, 25 cents.

For impounding first animal, 75 cents.

For the impounding each additional animal in the same lot, owned by same person, 25 cents.

And Section eight of ordinance Number 53 is hereby repealed.

SEC. 2. This ordinance to take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the Winfield COURIER and Cowley County Telegram.

Approved April 17, 1877. R. L. WALKER, Mayor.

Attest: HENRY E. ASP, City Clerk.


Winfield Courier, April 26, 1877. Editorial Page.

                                    SHERIFF’S ELECTION PROCLAMATION.

WHEREAS, on the 17th day of April, 1877, the board of County Commissioners of Cowley county, in the State of Kansas, made and entered on record the following order, to-wit:

In the matter of the petition of E. G. Willet, et al, for an order calling a special election to be held for the purpose of voting aid to a certain railroad company therein named.

Now comes the said E. G. Willet, et al, and presents to the Board of County Commissioners a petition in writing, signed by one hundred and ten resident taxpayers of the municipal township of Rock Creek, in the county of Cowley and State of Kansas, praying that a special election be called for the purpose of submitting to the electors of said township the question of making a subscription to the capital stock of the Kansas City, Emporia and Southern Railroad Company to the amount of twenty thousand and five hundred dollars ($20,500) and issuing a like amount of the bonds of said township in payment therefore.

And upon full consideration of said petition and the evidence and arguments adduced and offered in support thereof, it is found by the Board that said petition has been duly signed by two fifths of the resident taxpayers of said municipal township of Rock Creek and is in all respects regular and sufficient.

It is therefore, on this 17th day of April, A. D., 1877, conformable to the Statute in such cases made and provided, and pursuant to the conditions and prayers on that behalf in said petition set forth and contained, ordered by the Board that a special election be held in the municipal township of Rock Creek, at the usual place of voting therein, on the 29th day of May, A. D., 1877, for the purpose of then, there and thereby submitting to the qualified electors of said municipal township the following proposition, to-wit:

Shall the municipal township of Rock Creek, in the county of Cowley, by the County Commissioners of said county, subscribe for and in behalf of said township take the capital stock of the Kansas City, Emporia & Southern Railroad Company in the amount of 20,500 dollars, and in payment therefor issue and deliver to said railroad company the bonds of said township to the amount of 20,500 dollars, payable, principal and interest, at the fiscal agency of the State of Kansas, in the city of New York, in thirty years after the date thereof, with the privilege reserved to said township of paying the whole or any part of said bonds at any time after five years from the date thereof by giving notice thereof for twelve months; and the further privilege reserved to said township of paying cash for and redeeming the whole or any part of said bonds at the time of the delivery thereof as herein provided, at the rate of 85 cents for each dollar of the face value of said bonds so paid and redeemed. Said bonds to be issued in denominations of from one to five hundred dollars each, as said company may desire, and to draw interest at the rate of 10 percent per annum from the date of their delivery to said railroad company, payable semi-annually, on the 15th days of January and July in each and every year, and all interest coupons matured or about to mature at the date of the delivery of said bonds to be canceled and returned to the county.


Said bonds to be issued in consideration of the construction, operation, and maintenance of the said railroad into or through said township from the direction of Douglass, in Butler county, over the most practicable route to Arkansas City, with two stations in the said township; and upon the further condition that said road shall be completed and trains running thereon into said township within twenty one months from the time designated for the commencement of the work at Emporia.

Immediately after the proposition is voted by the people of said township, and the result of the election duly ascertained and declared, said subscription to the capital stock of said railroad shall be made.

The said Kansas City, Emporia & Southern Railroad Company or their assigns shall construct and equip as aforesaid and have in operation a railroad of a gauge of three feet, so constructed as to form one continuous and unbroken line from Kansas City, in the State of Missouri, by way of Emporia, in Lyon county, Kansas, and Eureka, in Greenwood county, Kansas, Augusta and Douglass, in Butler county, Kansas, to Arkansas City, in said Cowley county, within twenty-one months from the beginning of the work thereon as hereinafter set forth from Emporia; and from Kansas City within three years from such beginning. Said road to be constructed in a substantial manner and the equipment thereof to be first class and sufficient for the ordinary traffic of the road, and the work of constructing said road to be commenced within ninety days after the voting of bonds in aid of said railroad by the counties of Lyon, Greenwood, and the municipal townships in Butler county through which said road is to pass, and the said work to continue uninterruptedly from the commencement to the completion thereof and no part of said bonds shall be delivered to said railroad company, nor be of any binding force or validity upon said township, until said railroad is completed and trains running thereon into said township.

When said road is completed and trains rushing thereon into said township, the bonds of said township to the amount of $20,500 shall be delivered to said railroad company or their assignees and the stock of said company in equal amount, dollar for dollar, shall be delivered at the same time to the County Commissioners for said township.

The forms of the ballots to be used at said election to be, “For the railroad Stock and Bonds,” or “Against the Railroad Stock and Bonds.”

And it is further ordered by the Board that the Sheriff give notice of the time and purpose of said election by his proclamation on that behalf, to be published in the Arkansas City Traveler and Winfield COURIER for the period of thirty days preceding the date of election.

                                      STATE OF KANSAS, Cowley County,  ss.

I. M. G. TROUP, County Clerk in and for the county and State aforesaid do hereby certify the above and foregoing to be a true and correct copy of the original order.

Witness my hand and seal this 17th day of April, A. D., 1877.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

[COWLEY COUNTY TRIAL DOCKET.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 9, 1877. Front Page.

The following is a list of cases that will stand for trial at the May term of the District Court, of Cowley County, to be begun and held on the first Monday, 7th day of May, A. D. 1877, and have been placed on the Trial docket in the following order.

                                            CIVIL DOCKET. SECOND DAY.

                                    Wm. R. Warner vs. M. G. Troup Administrator.

Winfield Courier, May 10, 1877.


                    OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK, Winfield, Kansas, May 9th, 1877.

Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commissioners will meet at my office, in the Courthouse in Winfield, on Monday, June 4th, at 10 o’clock, a.m., of said day and proceed to equalize the assessment of property, as required by law. At which time and place all persons feeling aggrieved can appear and have all errors in the returns corrected.

                                                    M. G. TROUP, Co. Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 30, 1877.

                                         Statistics of Cowley County for 1877.

The following are the statistics of Cowley County as re­turned by the Trustees of said county for the year 1877.

No. of acres of land under cultivation: 95,220.

No. of acres of land under fence but not under cultivation: 27,034.

No. of acres of winter wheat sown in fall of 1876: 50,621.

No. of acres of rye shown in fall of 1876: 4,477-7/12.

No. of acres of corn planted in the year 1877: 47,795.

No. of acres of barley sown: 236.

No. of acres of oats sown: 5,703.

No. of acres of buckwheat sown: 15.

No. of acres of Irish potatoes sown: 641.

No. of acres of sweet potatoes sown: 14.

No. of acres of sorghum sown: 436.

No. of acres of castor beans sown: 17.

No. of acres of cotton sown: 34-5/16.

No. of acres of flax sown: 395½.

No. of acres of hemp sown: _.

No. of acres of tobacco sown: 10_.

No. of acres of broomcorn sown: 41-2/5.

No. of acres of millet and Hungarian: 3,027½.

No. of bushels old corn on hand March 1st: 213,642.

Produce of garden markets: 1,683.

Value of poultry and eggs sold during the year: $5,679.

Pounds of cheese made in factory: 4,230.

Pounds of cheese made in family: 260.

Pounds of butter: 210,712.

No. of horses: 4,501.

No. of mules and asses: 881.

No. of milch cows: 3,891.

No. of other cattle: 8,236.

No. of sheep: 4,883.

No. of swine: 14,982.

Value of animals slaughtered: $67,157.

No. of hogs died of cholera during the year: 63.

No. of sheep died during the year: 232.


No. of pounds of wool crop of 1876: 15,435.

No. of acres of nurseries: 46_.

No. of apple trees in bearing: 5,363.

No. of pear trees in bearing: 340.

No. of peach trees in bearing: 144,371.

No. of plumb trees in bearing: 1,845.

No. of cherry trees in bearing: 2,047.

No. of apple trees not in bearing: 66,606.

No. of pear trees not in bearing: 2,805.

No. of peach trees not in bearing: 116,539.

No. of plumb trees not in bearing: 3,726.

No. of cherry trees not in bearing: 8,866.

No. of acres small fruit: 94¼.

No. of cultivated forest trees: 272.

No. of miscellaneous trees not otherwise mentioned: 27,702.

No. acres of vineyard: 43¼.

Population of county: 11,722.

                                        STATE OF KANSAS, Cowley County.

I, M. G. Troup, County Clerk in and for the county and State aforesaid do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true and correct statement as showed by the records in my office.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, May 31, 1877.

                                            County Commissioners’ Proceedings.

                                              OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK,

                                             Winfield, Kansas, May 25th, 1877.

Board of County Commissioners met in special session. All the board present, with James McDermott, County Attorney, and M. G. Troup, County Clerk.

                                  JURY AND ELECTION FEES TOTAL: $736.50

STATE OF KANSAS, COUNTY OF COWLEY   ss.

I certify the foregoing to be a true statement of all claims allowed by the Board at a session held on the 25th day of May, 1877. Witness my hand and seal the day above written.

    [SEAL.]           M. G. TROUP, Co. Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1877.

                                    CLERK OF COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS,

                                                   WINFIELD, June 5, 1877.

NOTICE is hereby given that the Board of Commissioners of Cowley County, Kansas, will, at their regular July session, award the contract for the keeping of the paupers of said county to the lowest responsible bidder: Said contract to be made for a period of six months. All bids to be filed with the County Clerk on or before the 2nd day of July, 1877. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids. M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

I. S. Troup, brother of M. G. Troup, newspaper man, visits...

Winfield Courier, July 12, 1877.


Mr. I. S. Troup, ex-foreman of the Cedarvale Blade, is visiting his brother, M. G. Troup, in this city this week.

Winfield Courier, July 12, 1877.

                                            County Commissioners’ Proceedings.

                                              OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK,

                                               Winfield, Kansas, July 5th, 1877.

Board of County Commissioners met in regular session. Present: R. F. Burden, Chairman, W. M. Sleeth and William White, members of the board, with James McDermott, County Attorney, R. L. Walker, Sheriff, and M. G. Troup, County Clerk.

                                        M. G. Troup, Co. clerk’s salary, $302.70.

                     TOTAL CLAIMED: $4,318.67; TOTAL ALLOWED: $4,137.57.

STATE OF KANSAS, COUNTY OF COWLEY. ss.

I certify the foregoing to be a true and correct statement of all claims presented and passed upon by the Board at their regular session held on the 2nd and 3rd day of July, 1877. Witness my hand and seal, at Winfield, this 5th day of July, 1877. M. G. TROUP, Co. Clerk.

[SHERIFF’S ELECTION PROCLAMATION: EMPORIA RAILROAD.]

Winfield Courier, August 30, 1877.

                                    SHERIFF’S ELECTION PROCLAMATION.

WHEREAS, on the 18th day of August, A. D. 1877 the board of county commissioners of Cowley county, in the State of Kansas, made and entered on record this following order, to-wit:

NOW on this 8th day of August, A. D. 1877, comes W. M. Boyer, a resident taxpayer of the county of Cowley and State of Kansas, and with him comes 1,299 other resident tax-payers of said county of Cowley and State of Kansas and present their petition in writing to the board of county commissioners of said county of Cowley praying that a special election be called for the purpose of submitting to the qualified voters of said county a proposition for said county to subscribe to the capital stock of the Kansas City, Emporia & Southern Railroad Company to the amount of one hundred and twenty thousand ($120,000) dollars in payment for said stock, upon the terms and upon the conditions, in said petition mentioned and described. And said board of county commissioners having duly heard, examined, and considered said petition doth find: That said petition is in writing; and that said petition is signed by more than two-fifths of the resident tax-payers of said county of Cowley in the State of Kansas, and is in all respects according to law. It is therefore ordered and declared by said board that the prayer of said petitioners be granted;

And that a special election be held in said county of Cowley, at the usual place of holding elections therein, on Tuesday the 18th day of September A. D. 1877. And that thirty (30) days notice of said election be given by the Sheriff of said county by publication in the Winfield COURIER, a weekly newspaper published and printed in said county of Cowley, and of general circulation therein; and it is further ordered by said board of county commissioners that said subscription to the capital stock of said Kansas City, Emporia & Southern Railroad Company be made, and bonds of said county of Cowley in payment for said stock be issued, upon the following conditions, to-wit:


That the county Cowley, State of Kansas, by the county commissioners, subscribe for, and in behalf of said county, take the capital stock of the Kansas City, Emporia and Southern Railroad Company in the amount of $120,000.00; and in payment therefor, execute and deliver to said railroad company the bonds of said county to the amount of $120,000.00, payable both principal and interest at the Fiscal Agency of the State of Kansas, in the City of New York, in thirty years after the date thereof, with the privilege reserved said county of paying the whole or any part of said bonds at any time after five years from the date thereof, by giving notice thereof for twelve months, and the further privilege reserved to said county, of paying for and redeeming the whole, or any part of said bonds at the time of the delivery thereof, as herein provided: at the rate of eighty-five cents for each dollar of the face value of said bonds so paid and redeemed.

Said bonds to be issued in denominations of $500.00 each, and to draw interest at the rate of eight percent per annum from the date of their delivery to said railroad company; payable semi-annually on the 15th day of January and July in each and every year, and all interest coupons matured or to mature within three months of said delivery of said bonds to be canceled and returned to the county commissioners. Said bonds to be issued in consideration of the construction, operation, and maintenance of the said railroad into and through said county, from the north line thereof in the direction of Douglass, in Butler county, to the south line of the State of Kansas, at or near Arkansas City, over the most practicable route between said points, and the erection and maintenance of suitable freight and passenger depot, and the necessary side tracks at the following points in said county, to-wit:

At a point not exceeding one and ½ miles north of the point where said railroad shall cross Rock creek, at a point not exceeding one mile from the point where said railroad shall cross Little Dutch creek; at a point not exceeding one-half a mile from a point in the city of Winfield where Ninth street intersects Main street; at a point in Pleasant Valley township nearly equidistant from Winfield and Arkansas City; at a point not exceeding one eighth of a mile from the corporate limits of the city of Arkansas City; and at a point at or near the south line of the State in the township of Bolton.

And upon the further condition that the said road shall be completed and trains running thereon from the City of Emporia to the south line of Lyon county, on or before February first, 1878, and to the City of Eureka on or before August first, 1878; and to the south line of Butler county on or before the first day of February, 1879; and to its depot at Winfield on or before the first day of April, 1879, and to its depot at Arkansas City on or before the first day of May, 1879, and to the south line of the State, in Bolton township, on or before the first day of August, 1879.

And should said Railroad Company fail to construct said road to any of the points above mentioned, on or before the dates herein mentioned, said Railroad Company shall forfeit the bonds of said Cowley county.

Immediately after the proposition is voted by the people of said county, and the result of the election duly ascertained to be in favor of said proposition, said subscription to the capital stock of said Railroad Company shall be made.


The said Kansas City, Emporia & Southern Railroad Company or their assigns shall construct and equip as aforesaid, and have in operation a railroad of a gauge of three feet, so constructed as to form one continuous line from the east line of the State of Kansas, at or near Kansas City, Mo., by way of Emporia, in Lyon county, Kansas, and Eureka, Greenwood county, Kansas, to the points herein mentioned in said Cowley county, within two years from the first day of August, 1877.

Said road to be constructed in a substantial manner, and the equipment thereof to be first class, and sufficient for the ordinary traffic of the road. And no part of said bonds shall be delivered to said Railroad Company, nor be of any binding force or validity upon said county until said railroad is completed to the points in said county, and at the times hereinafter specified.

If, however, the said Railroad Company shall be restrained from prosecuting the work, of constructing said road by legal proceedings instituted by citizens of Cowley county, the length of time such restraint shall exist shall be added to the time herein specified for the construction of said road to the various points in said Cowley county,

Provided, That when said road is completed and trains running thereon a distance of ten miles in said county, the bonds of said county to the amount of thirty thousand dollars shall be delivered to said Railroad or their assigns and the stock of said company in equal amount, dollar for dollar, shall be delivered at the same time to the commissioners of said county; and when said road shall be completed and trains running thereon a distance of twenty miles in said county, there shall be an additional amount of thirty thousand dollars of the bonds of said county delivered to said railroad company, and an equal amount of the stock of said company shall be delivered at the same time to the commissioners of said county, and when said road shall be completed and trains running thereon a distance of thirty (30) miles in said county, there shall be an additional instalment of the bonds of said county delivered to said railroad to the amount of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) and an equal amount of the stock of said company shall be delivered at the same time to the commissioners of said county; and when said road shall be completed and trains running thereon to the south line of the State, in the township of Bolton, there shall be delivered to said railroad company the bonds of said county to the amount of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), and an equal amount of the stock of said company shall be delivered at the same time to the commissioners of said county.

And provided further, that if this proposition is adopted by a majority of the legal voters of Cowley county, and the subscription to the capital stock of the said railroad company shall be made, and the bonds of the county executed and delivered as herein provided, then the said railroad company hereby releases all claim to the subscription of stock, and delivery of bonds to said railroad company heretofore voted by the townships of Creswell and Bolton in said Cowley County.

And that the form of ballots to be used at said election in voting upon said proposition be “For subscribing to the capital stock of the Kansas City, Emporia and Southern Rail Road Company and issuing bonds in payment therefore,” and “Against subscribing to the capital stock of the Kansas City, Emporia and Southern Railroad Road Company and issuing bonds in payment therefor,” as prescribed in said petition.

STATE OF KANSAS,

COWLEY COUNTY.  ss.

I, M. G. Troup, Co. Clerk and clerk of the board of county commissioners, in and for the county and State aforesaid certify the foregoing to be a true and correct copy of the order of said board, concerning the matter therein set forth and contained.


Witness my hand and seal this 9th day of August, A. D. 1877.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

                                                                      ---

NOW, therefore, I, R. L. Walker, Sheriff of Cowley county, Kansas, do hereby proclaim and make known that on Tuesday, the 18th day of September, A. D. 1877, there will be held a special election at the usual places of voting in said county of Cowley for the proposition contained in the above order in the manner and form therein provided and set forth.

                                R. L. WALKER, Sheriff of Cowley County, Kansas.

[COMMUNICATION FROM “LITTLE DUTCH”—WINFIELD.]

Arkansas City Traveler, September 5, 1877.

Our town is still going ahead. Several new buildings going up: candidates as thick as ever. Shenneman is the best looking man on the track, but Troup wears the best clothes; old Tom Bryan has the most belly and stomach, and is the surest to win; Kinne don’t say much, but he has lots of friends, and I should not be astonished if he makes the riffle much easier than last time. A good many are running just for the fun of the thing—don’t expect to be nominated, but want to get acquainted in the hope that the lightning might strike them in the future. Our Bill is still slashing around, supporting the hand that furnishes the supplies.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 12, 1877.

The announcement of M. G. Troup as a candidate for County Clerk appears this week. Mr. Troup has filled the office for the last four years and no one doubts his ability to fill the posi­tion. In fact, it has been done heretofore with such satisfac­tion that his friends have urged him to become a candidate again.

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1877.

                                                      Republican Convention.

The Republicans of Richland Township, Cowley County, met pursuant to call at the Floral schoolhouse Sept. 8, 1877.

Motion to instruct the delegates for Walker for Sheriff and Troup for clerk was lost.

Winfield Courier, September 27, 1877.

                                                      THE CONVENTION.

                                         WINFIELD, KANSAS, Sept. 22, 1877.

Pursuant to the call of the Republican County Central Committee, of Cowley County, the delegates assembled in convention at the courthouse, in the city of Winfield, on Saturday, Sept. 22, 1877, at 11 o’clock a.m.

Nominations for County Clerk being next in order L. J. Webb announced that M. G. Troup had withdrawn in favor of J. S. Hunt and moved the nomination of Hunt by acclamation. The motion prevailed and Hunt was so nominated.

Winfield Courier, October 11, 1877.

                            HALL OF ADELPHI LODGE, No. 110, A. F. & A. M.,

                                                WINFIELD, October 7, 1877.

WHEREAS, The grim tyrant death has invaded our fraternal circle and taken from our midst our worthy brother, James D. Cochran, thereby depriving our brotherhood of one of our brightest and most exemplary members, the family of our beloved brother of a loving husband and father, and the community of a useful and energetic citizen; Therefore be it


Resolved, That while we bow in humble submission to the will of our Supreme Grand Master, we do most sincerely deplore the great calamity thus visited upon the fraternity, the family of our departed brother, and the community at large.

Resolved, That we extend to the bereaved family our sincere and heart-felt sympathy, and more especially do we mingle our tears with her, who is thus left a widow—to her and to the children thus bereaved, we pledge our brotherly guardianship in this their life’s greatest affliction.

Resolved, That these resolutions be spread upon the records of the Lodge, that a copy be furnished to the family of our deceased brother, and also to the city papers for publication, and that the members of the Lodge wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days.

                           M. L. READ, M. G. TROUP, A. J. PYBURN, Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 17, 1877.   

                                                   Proposals for Cord Wood.

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Commissioners of Cowley County, Kansas, will, at the Office of the County Clerk of said county, let the contract to furnish forty cords of good merchantable wood for the use of said county. Said contract to be let on the 19th day of November, 1877. Bids to be filed with the County Clerk on or before 1 o’clock p.m. of said day. The Board reserve the right to reject any or all bids.

                                                 M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

[WINFIELD ITEM.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 17, 1877.

It is generally understood that M. G. Troup, the present County Clerk, will be an independent candidate for reelection. Mr. Troup has had the office four years, and the nominating convention declared in favor of Capt. Hunt for the next two years.

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1877.

                                                         COUNTY CLERK.

M. G. Troup is an independent candidate for County Clerk.

We think he is making a great mistake. It is true that he has for four years past filled that office ably, efficiently, and satisfactorily, true that many Republicans desire his re-election, and that many Democrats will vote for him; but it is equally true that there is a large number of the voters of this county who believe and justly, too, that there are a hundred other men in the county who would like a term at the office and are fully competent in every respect to fill it with credit, and these voters hold that such an office ought not to be monopolized by one person but be passed around and give others a chance, that Mr. Troup has held it long enough for one. It was this belief that nominated Capt. James S. Hunt for the office, that will impel not only Republicans but Democrats to vote for him, and will we doubt not, elect him by a handsome majority.

Capt. Hunt is popular where he is known, is eminently fitted for such a position, is honest, capable, and agreeable, was fairly nominated by his party, and should receive the entire vote of that party, while there is no good reason that Democrats should vote for Mr. Troup, another Republican, in his stead.

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1877.

                                                    THE COUNTY TICKET.


In another column will be found the names of the men who are to be chosen officers of Cowley County at the approaching election. Since the convention we have said little about the ticket nominated because, first, it was not required, and secondly, we have been crowded with other topics.

The COURIER expressed its unqualified approval of nearly all the candidates some time ago. We are more than satisfied with the ticket nominated. There is not a mean man on the list. Nearly all of our candidates are well known throughout the county. Most of them have lived among us since the organization of the county. Everyone of them are heartily endorsed and will be warmly supported by those who know them best. . . .

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1877.

                                                            Communicated.

EDITOR COURIER: I see by the Traveler of this date, in a card by M. G. Troup, that he is “still a candidate for re-election” to the office of County Clerk. He says that he believes the action of the late Republican convention did not represent “the wishes of a majority of my party” in selecting a candidate for County Clerk. Well, Mr. Editor, that is good. Will Mr. Troup please tell the voters of Cowley County to what party he belongs? It is a well known fact that the convention recently held by the Republicans of this county represented the whole party. That its nominations were fairly and honestly made, that they are good nominations is not denied. The Republicans did not expect to make nominations for any party but their own. Troup says his party is dissatisfied, and therefore Troup is “still a candidate.” Troup was before the Republican convention distributing tickets from eleven o’clock a.m., until half past eleven p.m., and just before the vote was taken on County Clerk one of Troup’s delegates said he was elected in Troup’s interest, but Mr. Troup was no longer a candidate before that convention. Had he continued on the track and been nominated, his party would undoubtedly have thought the nomination satisfactory. Any way, it is fair to presume that if such had been the case, the head and front of Mr. Troup’s party, Troup himself, would not have been dissatisfied.

Trusting that Republicans will give the matter due consideration, and believing that if they do so they will find Mr. Troup’s party consists of himself, and knowing that it is the duty of Republicans to disregard the appeals of defeated candidates who run independent, we await information concerning “my party.” REPUBLICAN.

Winfield, Oct. 17th, 1877.

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1877.

                                                       The Philomatic Society

Met last Friday evening with a very respectable attendance. The society elected M. G. Troup, President; J. E. Allen, Vice President; Kate Millington, Secretary; Fred Hunt, Treasurer. The music was excellent, and the debate was ably conducted by Messrs. Seward, Rushbridge, and Jennings.

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1877.

                                                                A CARD.

To the Voters of Cowley County:


Believing that the action of the late Republican Convention of this county, in the choice of a candidate for County Clerk, does not represent the wishes of a majority of my party, and at the earnest solicitation of many friends, without regard to party, I am still a candidate for re-election to that office. Believing there is no political significance in the office of County Clerk, and regarding him simply as the servant of the people. I herewith pledge you that, if elected, in the future, as in the past, I shall endeavor to discharge the duties of the office to the entire satisfaction of the whole people, and not in the interests of any party, clique, or ring. Trusting that you will not be deceived and blinded by the “howl” and “smoke” that this Card will call forth from the “professional politicians” of the county.

I am most respectfully, Your obedient servant. M. G. TROUP.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 24, 1877.

The meeting in Bolton Township, at Bland’s schoolhouse, was attended by Hon. C. R. Mitchell, Capt. Hunt, M. G. Troup, and A. W. Berkey—all speakers. The audience failed to come.

Article below really explains Troup...

Winfield Courier, October 25, 1877. Editorial Page.

                                                            M. G. TROUP.

The announcement of this gentleman as an independent candidate for County Clerk deserves more comment. Four years ago he was nominated by the Republican party of this county for that office, and the Republicans stood by him and elected him; not because they knew anything about him but because their convention had endorsed him.

In Tisdale, his own township, where he was best known, a township largely Republican, his opponent received a majority of the votes cast. No other candidate who was before the convention that nominated Mr. Troup had the bad faith to run against him after being defeated in the convention. On the contrary, like honorable men, they accepted the decision of the convention and supported Mr. Troup. Again two years ago he was nominated by the Republicans and no one bolted the nomination to run independent.

Now the Republican convention has in its wisdom nominated Capt. J. S. Hunt for that office, and Mr. Troup says their action “does not represent the wishes of my party.” He assumes by his action that any convention which nominates Mr. Troup is wise, and that any that nominates anyone else for the office does not represent the wishes of his party. His party is only satisfied when it nominates him.

In the COURIER for Sept. 18th is found side by side the announcements of M. G. Troup and J. S. Hunt as candidates for the office of County Clerk before the Republican convention. Both were well known to be candidates all over the county, both canvassed to a considerable extent, and the primaries were held more with reference to the claims of those two candidates than of any others save those for Sheriff, and were more fully attended than ever before; no set of delegates ever before so nearly expressed the will of their constituents, and when the convention assembled, Mr. Troup was there busy canvassing the delegates.

It was there ascertained that a great majority of them were for Capt. Hunt, a fact that Mr. Troup fully realized by his withdrawal, and Capt. Hunt was nominated without dissent. Never was a fairer nomination nor one which gave more general satisfaction to the party.


The people do not know that there is anything wrong about the Clerk’s office. They hope that the incumbent has done his duty well, but they well know that there is opportunity for many frauds in that office, and many neglects of duty which would not be detected until a change of officers. They know that nearly all the astounding frauds that have been unearthed, have been perpetrated by persons who were considered above suspicion; who not having been scrutinized on account of the confidence reposed in them, have been tempted into small peculations which have grown with years into enormous embezzlements and other frauds. They know that in the office of County Clerk there are fees to collect and credit to the county; that there are large amounts of stationery and expensive books to be bought for the county, on which a high price is sometimes paid the seller, who in turn pays back the officer a high commission; that there are large amounts of county scrip to control and handle, that considerable sums of scrip are made and signed, ready for delivery, which are never called for, and should be canceled and destroyed after three years; that there are the accounts of other officers to be kept straight; that the errors and frauds of county officers are usually only detected when there is a change of County Clerks; that County Attorney McDermott discovered last winter a $2,500 error in the late Treasurer’s account which the County Clerk had for three years failed to detect; and that four consecutive years is as long as any person should ever hold that responsible position.

The late convention did well to decide upon a change. It expressed the wishes of nearly all the voters of the county if we may judge from the expression we hear. It did well in nominating Capt. J. S. Hunt, a man who is in every respect the peer of the present incumbent; a man whose whole record shows that he will thoroughly overhaul the past operations, and discover if anything is wrong; and Republicans will, we doubt not, vote for him almost unanimously, while the Democrats who prefer the good of the county rather than the damaging of the Republican party will also support him.

Winfield Courier, October 25, 1877. Editorial Page.

                                                        “CROOKEDNESS.”

Mr. Troup asserts that during his term he has saved this county ten thousand dollars. How, Mr. Troup? When were we in danger of sustaining such a heavy loss? Have you done any more than your sworn duty as an officer? On the contrary, we have just come into possession of evidence that satisfies us that this county did sustain a loss of at least $2,561.20, that is directly charged to either your inefficiency or neglect.


October 23rd, 1876, the retiring county treasurer filed in your office a statement of his business during his term. The board of county commissioners intrusted you to examine that statement in detail, and ordered the county treasurer to refund to Mr. Kager any sum of money you should find due him. You have, or should have, in your office such checks and balances as would enable you to detect at once any error in the county treasurer’s accounts. On the 7th of last December, after examining the statement with Mr. Kager’s attorney, you reported to Mr. Bryan that Mr. Kinne had overpaid the county $522.17, and that that sum should be repaid to him as ordered by the county board. Sometime after this county attorney McDermott called your attention to the fact that District No. 5 had sustained a loss of about $300, and said that it must be an error in your settlement with the county treasurer. You denied this emphatically, and said you knew the statement was correct. Mr. McDermott showed you after your efficient (?) service of three years as county clerk, how to detect such errors, looked up with you the affairs of District No. 5, convinced you that a mistake of over $300 had been made in that instance, and left you to examine the accounts of other districts and see if other blunders had been made.

You then proceeded to make the examination and discovered that in your statement to Mr. Bryan you had made a mistake of $2,561.30, and you reported that blunder to the county board April 11th, 1877. Would the mistake ever have been discovered had it not been for the efficiency of the county attorney? Does not the county attorney deserve the credit for the detection of your blunder and the recovery to this county of the lost $2,561.30? We think so.

Did you save the balance of the ten thousand dollars in the same way?

You are invited to make your defense through the columns of the COURIER.

Winfield Courier, October 25, 1877.

                                                       COMMUNICATED.

                                         WINFIELD, KANSAS, Oct. 23, 1877.

EDITOR COURIER: I understand that Mr. Troup and his friends are circulating the report that he (Troup) was “sold out” in the Republican convention, and did not have a fair show. When it became apparent that George Walker could not be nominated for Sheriff, I told Walker that there was nothing to be gained by prolonging the contest, and he authorized me to act for him as I saw fit, and therefore I withdrew his name. When I did so, Mr. Troup came to me and wanted to know what it meant, and I told him what I had told Walker. He replied, “Why didn’t you wait a little longer and give me a chance to make some votes out of it?” I told him he was all right, and in no danger. He went away and shortly came back and said he was not going to have his name go before the convention. I tried to dissuade him from withdrawing. I told him he was already before the convention, and I believed he could be nominated. He said he could not, and authorized me to withdraw his name. He now charges Capt. Hunt’s nomination to be a “trade,” when there is no foundation for it. He was dissatisfied because he was not notified of Walker’s intention of withdrawing, in order that he (Troup) might “trade” on it. These are the facts, and I only state them in justice to myself,  and others of Mr. Troup’s friends, who were anxious to have him nominated, but are now charged with these things, to secure Mr. Troup’s election, against the regular nominee.

                                                              L. J. WEBB.

Winfield Courier, October 25, 1877.

At the Rock Creek meeting, Mr. Troup attempted to explain the “crookedness” in the $2,561.30 deficiency, but utterly failed to exonerate himself.

[PROS AND CONS ON M. G. TROUP RUNNING INDEPENDENTLY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1877.

Troup was in office for four years as County Clerk. The Republicans did not choose him as their nominee—the Democrats repudiated him also as a nominee. COURIER came out with an article attacking Troup. This was denounced by county commissioners:


This is to certify that we, the undersigned, Commissioners of Cowley County, Kansas, have read an article in the editorial columns of the Winfield Courier, entitled “Crookedness,” and find the same to be a gross misrepresentation of Mr. Troup’s official acts concerning the final statement and settlement of Mr. Kager’s account as County Treasurer of said county. Believing in the motto, “honor to whom honor is due,” we would further say that no official act of Mr. Troup, in connection with Mr. Kager’s final settlement, would in the least degree indicate in the mind of any fair-minded person that he (Troup) was dishonest, inefficient, or unfaithful in the trust confided to his care; but, on the con­trary, his every act in that matter but serves to confirm us in the belief that he has been, and is, a faithful, efficient and honorable public servant.”   R. F. BURDEN, WM. WHITE, W. M. SLEETH.

October 27, 1877.

Winfield Courier, November 1, 1877.

                                                           TROUP AGAIN.

The following editorial appeared in the COURIER of last week.

                           [REPRINTS ARTICLE ENTITLED “CROOKEDNESS.”]

To this Mr. Troup replies as follows:

                                                       TROUP’S DEFENSE.

This is to certify that we, the undersigned Commissioners of Cowley County, Kansas, have read an article in the editorial columns of the Winfield COURIER, entitled “Crookedness,” and find the same to be a gross misrepresentation of Mr. Troup’s official acts concerning the final statement and settlement of Mr. Kager’s account vs. county treasurer of said county. Believing in the motto of “honor to whom honor is due,” we would further say that no official act of Mr. Troup’s in connection with Mr. Kager’s final settlement would, in the least degree, indicate to the mind of any fair-minded person that he (Troup) was dishonest, inefficient, or unfaithful in the trust confided to his care, but on the contrary, his every act in that matter but serves to confirm us in the belief that he has been, and is, a faithful, efficient, and honorable public servant.

                           (Signed) R. F. BURDEN, WM. WHITE, W. M. SLEETH.

October 27th, 1877.

Now, Mr. Editor, I deem the foregoing to be a sufficient answer to the villainous article you published last week, and do not care to trespass further on your space with that matter. However, I desire to say that you must be supporting a most odious ticket indeed, if it requires such dirty work to carry it, as you had made use of, in your last issue. Does it not strike you as being a little ridiculous, Mr. Editors, for you to resort to such infamous measures to carry a ticket, that is as worthy of support as you say yours is, in a county where you have a straight majority of 700 votes? Do you not think you could lend more dignity to the exalted position which you hold, at the head of the public education of this great commonwealth, if you were to devote more time to the educational interests of the state, and less to the publication of such articles, as emanated from your fertile brain last week? Is it not, in fine, just a little degrading to the Office of State Superintendent of Public Instruction, for you to come down here, 200 miles, to do the dirty work for a few political shysters, in a local canvass for county officers? I leave you to answer these interrogations at your leisure.

Now, Mr. Editor, having performed my duties honestly and faithfully, I feel confident that all future discoveries of “crookedness” will have the same foundation of fact, as the one mentioned last week. Having nothing to fear from a strict and impartial inquiry into my official career, I invite you to try again, in your search for “crookedness.”

                                              Yours respectfully, M. G. TROUP.


There is no principle of newspaper courtesy that would require us to publish the above strictures on Mr. Lemmon. On the contrary, under the rules of the press we would be justified in refusing to publish the communication, because Mr. Troup has so forgotten that he should be a gentleman, as to call us hard names. However, we waive the discourtesy and publish the article entire.

We do not think the people care to be diverted from the issues in this canvass by a discussion of Mr. Troup’s strictures on Mr. Lemmon. Mr. Lemmon is a citizen of this county; votes only here, has invested all his means here, returns to this county as his home when his official duties will permit, will permanently remain here when those duties are ended, feels as deep an interest in, and works as hard for the welfare of this county as any other citizen, and has an equal right to be heard in its politics and policies. But whether he is behaving badly or well is not an issue at this time, for he is not “running for office.” Mr. Troup is a candidate for a third term as county clerk, and his official acts are legitimate subjects for discussion. Hence our editorial in last week’s COURIER as above. Please examine it carefully and see where the “villainy,” the “dirty work,” and the “infamous measures,” come in. We think we treated the subject with great fairness—even with tenderness. We stated certain facts which are not controverted in his reply, neither can they be successfully, for the records of his office and that of the county treasurer, together with the testimony of other county officers and other men of unquestioned veracity, amply prove them to be true.

The issue is made only on our conclusion, that the loss of about $2,500 to the county was due either to Mr. Troup’s neglect or his inefficiency. It is a cheap way to controvert such conclusions, to write or dictate a denial in general terms like the above, and induce three of his particular friends to subscribe it as a favor. It is a fact often commented upon that most men at the instance of a friend will sign any paper except a promise to pay money. Our commissioners being human are not exempt from such weakness. But if they really meant to stand by what that paper contains, they are in the same boat with him. There was assuredly some neglect, or inefficiency, or something worse somewhere, or school districts in this county would not thus have lost more than $2,500 of the funds—a loss that would evidently never have been detected had it not been for the efficiency of county attorney McDermott. The use of this large sum for fifteen months was lost beyond recovery.

Mr. Troup makes the commissioners deny that his official action in this case indicates any dishonesty on his part. Please examine our editorial again and see where we intimate that he has been dishonest. We fail to find it. The idea of dishonesty has been suggested by Mr. Troup alone, and while we will not say that “a guilty conscience needs no accuser,” we think it well, now that he has called our attention to this phase of the subject, not to brush the thought too hastily away, but to proceed to state a few more facts.


The law of 1875—a law that has been on our statute books for two and a half years, requires the county clerk to make under oath quarterly, and file with the register of deeds a detailed statement of the amount of fees received by him during the quarter. No such report has ever been filed with the register of deeds of this county. We leave it for others to say whether this is neglect, or inefficiency, or the other thing. The same law declares that county clerks shall be allowed “as full compensation for their services” in counties of 5,000 and less than 10,000 inhabitants, $1,200, and in counties of 10,000, and not more than 15,000 inhabitants, $1,500 per annum, which salaries shall be in full for all the services by law required to be performed in their respective offices.” At the commissioners’ meeting on the first Monday of October last, Mr. Troup presented his statement of account against the county, in which he claimed, after deducting certain fees, a balance due him for his services during the preceding quarter of $663.15, and that sum was allowed and paid him. In that statement was included $300 for a duplicate tax roll. We have consulted the leading attorneys of this city and have failed to find one who will say that the account was a just one, or that it should have been allowed and paid. There is no law authorizing it, and even if there were, the work could have been done for one-fourth of the sum Mr. Troup has received for it, and besides the work had not been done, notwithstanding the account was verified by his oath, stating “that the amount claimed thereon is actually due.” The tax roll had not been completed the first of this week, and yesterday it had not been received by the county treasurer.

What is the conclusion to be drawn from these facts? Are either of the three that are above considered sufficient? A year ago he also collected from the county in addition to his legal salary the sum of $300, for a duplicate tax roll, making with the late $300, and the $2,500, the sum of $3,100 saved to the county in his peculiar way.

The township assessors in the spring of 1875, after the law above referred to came into force, returned a total population of less than 10,000 in the county. Mr. Troup procured an addition to be made to the population returns of one township and raised the total to 10,020, thereby making his salary $1,500, instead of $1,200, thus saving $300 to the county for himself, and $300 for another officer, raising his sum of savings up to $3,700.

So why should we doubt that the whole $10,000 has been thus saved. Mr. Troup claimed to have found many evidences of the three faults we have been discussing in the records made by his predecessor in office. What will Mr. Troup’s successor find? Here we gladly leave the subject of Mr. Troup’s official record. We have stated facts only—facts which we have not searched for, but which our attention has lately been called to, and which we would not state until we had the proofs.

We feel no unkindness toward Mr. Troup, but so long as he and his friends have been perambulating the county making exaggerated statements about his honesty, efficiency, and faithfulness, and circulating slanderous statements about Capt. Hunt, it is due both to Mr. Troup and to the republican nominee for county clerk that the people should know these things that they may vote understandingly.

It is due, however, that Mr. Troup’s political record should receive some attention.

After the republican convention of Sept. 22nd, last, had nominated Capt. Hunt, and up to the time of the democratic convention, Oct. 13th, Mr. Troup repeatedly stated to republicans that he would not be an independent candidate, but would support Mr. Hunt. Was this for the purpose of avoiding an examination of his official record until it should be too late to get before the people in time to influence the election, any facts that might be discovered?


Last fall he requested to be placed on the Manning ticket as a delegate in the convention, and was so placed and selected a delegate. He entered that convention and supported and voted for Manning, as senator, but after Manning was nominated, he was among Manning’s opposers, and anxious to be made a nominee for the same office against Manning. He has talked heavily against bonding the county for any purpose, when that view was popular, and has afterward made speeches in favor of voting bonds. He is strongly temperance, with temperance men; signed three petitions for saloon licenses in one season; and signed a petition and a remonstrance the same week. He has supported both Johnston and Kelly for postmaster at the same time. In fact, his political duplicity has become so notorious that it is often remarked that Troup is on both sides of every question.

He is a politician, and apparently only anxious to be found on the winning side. Two years ago the republicans nominated him as a republican and the democrats as a democrat, and being on both sides, with no opposing candidate, he was sure to win. Now he is at it again, and it remains to be seen whether he will win this time with similar tactics, now that he is opposed to a regular republican nominee.

Winfield Courier, November 1, 1877.

JOHN D. PRYOR, Esq.: Dear Sir: Referring to our editorial entitled “Crookedness,” in last week’s COURIER, will you state what you know about the transaction therein referred to in relation to Mr. Troup’s connection with that settlement with Mr. Kager? Yours truly,     ED. COURIER. MR. EDITOR: In reply to your inquiry above, I would say that I was Mr. Kager’s attorney referred to in that editorial, and acted in place of Mr. Kager in that settlement. Your statement is correct so far as it relates to Mr. Troup’s connection with it.

                                                Yours truly, JOHN D. PRYOR.

Winfield Courier, November 1, 1877.

                                                                A CARD.

                                        WINFIELD, KANSAS, Oct. 31st, 1877.

EDITOR COURIER: In compliance with your request, I herewith submit a statement of the facts in relation to the discovery of the deficiency in the accounts of Mr. Kager, referred to in your editorial article entitled “Crookedness,” in last week’s COURIER, so far as they are within my knowledge.

To begin with, County Treasurer Bryan and myself are both tax-payers in school district No. 5 (Dexter), in this county and both interested in its welfare. Sometime in the summer of 1876, probably in July, I had occasion to, and did, examine the condition of the bond tax fund of that district, and informed myself as to its condition at that time and as to the amount of tax necessary to be levied on the assessment of 1876 to meet the bonds and coupons maturing up to and including June 1st, 1877. That amount (10 mills) was levied. On or about the 4th Monday in January 1877, County Treasurer Bryan prepared and published his first quarterly statement as required by law. That statement showed that district No. 5 had been largely overpaid on account of its bond tax fund, I think something over $300. Shortly after the making of this statement, I happened into Mr. Bryan’s office and he called my attention to the fact that “our district” (meaning No. 5) was in a bad fix. Upon my inquiring what was the matter, he showed me the statement and added that, in addition to the large overpayment there shown, the district had one bond, then past due since the 1st of the preceding June, and still unpaid.


I, referring to the information which I had obtained in the summer before, immediately stated that there was something wrong. That the district could not be in that condition. That there was an error somewhere. Reference was made to the ledger account of the district and an item, of date January 15th, 1877, of sundries $339.01½ was found charged against the district. Mr. Bryan informed me that said item of sundries represented a balance claimed for Kager against the district in final settlement and which claim had been allowed by Troup and the item entered upon the ledger by J. D. Pryor.

I immediately walked into Mr. Troup’s office and called his attention the matter, claiming that there was some mistake. He produced a statement which had been filed by J. D. Pryor for Mr. Kager and proceeded to show me that there could be no mistake. I called his attention to the fact that I had been in his office the summer before, looking into the condition of that district and he admitted having some recollection of that fact.

I then asked him to furnish me with the amount of the levy for bond purposes in that district for the years 1872 to 1875, both inclusive, which he did. (I do not remember the figures.)  I then requested him to take his bond register and tell me the amount of bonds and coupons, issued by that district, which had become due June 1st, 1876, which was still unpaid. This he did and thereby demonstrated the fact that, if Kager had paid all the bonds and coupons which had become due, in fact everything which he could lawfully have paid on account of that district, there would still be a small balance due to the district instead of $339.01½ against it. Having thus convinced Mr. Troup that there was an error somewhere, I left him to find it out. When I next saw Mr. Troup, he informed me that he had discovered the error and that Kager owed district No. 5 $351.69, thereby showing that, at the final settlement, Kager owed that district the sum of $12.67½ instead of the district owing him $339.01½, as claimed by him and as allowed by Troup.

Mr. Troup further stated that there were 12 other districts in the same condition and that the whole amount was $2,561.30.

The above, Mr. Editor, is the full story of the great discovery, so far as I am concerned, and which, I am informed, Mr. Troup denies; I also learn that the commissioners of this county, in a card, have denounced the above facts, with others, as “gross misrepresentations.” In this connection, I desire to state that neither of the commissioners know anything about the facts herein stated, except what may have been told them, and either of the gentlemen ought to have more regard for their reputation as honest and sensible men, than to pronounce as false facts of which they have no knowledge, and I regret exceedingly, for the sake of Cowley County and the Republican party, that the said commissioners are not, to say the least, thoughtful men.

In regard to Mr. Troup’s denial of these facts, I desire to say that if my information is correct, Mr. Troup has, in dealing with this matter, forgotten that he is a gentleman, and has appeared in the role of a blackguard, and, as I do not desire to compete with him for such doubtful honors, I will, so far as that is concerned, “leave him alone in his glory.”


In deciding as to the truth or falsity of Mr. Troup’s denial, it might be well to inquire: If my statement of facts, as above set forth, is not true, what led Mr. Troup, at that particular time, to make an examination of Mr. Kager’s accounts? Mr. Troup admits that in December he examined Kager’s settlement in company with J. D. Pryor and found the sum of $522.17 due to Kager, and he (Troup) ordered Bryan to pay Kager that amount, which Bryan did. Now, if Mr. Troup was not satisfied with the result of that examination, he ought not, as a faithful officer, to have suffered, much less ordered, Bryan to pay Kager that money. If he was satisfied that the statement was correct and that amount of money due Kager, then why examine it again? Surely his attention must have been called to it in the way I have spoken of, if not then, how? Surely at some time matters of this kind must be finally disposed of, and if not so disposed of at the time they are examined and balances paid, then when? And if they are so disposed of at that time, then why examine them again? Mr. Troup, so far, has neglected to state.

Again, Mr. Troup, by his own admission, virtually says, that that statement of Kager’s having been duly examined by the clerk (himself) under the order of the board of county commissioners, pronounced correct and balance shown to be due to Kager, being $522.17, paid, was filed away among the completed records of his office, and, in the regular course of business, would never be looked into again, and the snug little sum of $2,561.30 would have been wholly lost the 13 school districts to which it belonged.

Mr. Troup, I understand, complains that I collected the money and charged 5 percent for so doing. Mr. Troup is right. I collected the money with 15½ month’s interest and charged the 5 percent, which the statute says I shall have for such services, and I am convinced of two facts in regard thereto.

First, that the school districts had better pay me 5 percent than to lose the whole amount, especially as my commission amounted to only about one half of the interest collected.

Second, that I would never have had the opportunity of charging 5 percent, or any other percent, on $522.17 of that amount, if Mr. Troup had not, on the 7th of December last ordered Bryan to pay it to Kager.

Now, Mr. Editor, I have carefully refrained from calling hard names in making this statement. I have not undertaken to say that Mr. Troup is either “dishonest, inefficient, or unfaithful.” I have simply stated the facts and will let the public draw their own conclusions.

If it had not been for serious sickness in my family, I would have met Mr. Troup, face to face, before the people and would not have asked the privilege of communicating with the public through the medium of your paper. JAMES McDERMOTT, Co. Attorney.

I have read the above statement and so far as it refers to me or the records of my office, it is true. T. R. BRYAN, Co. Treasurer.

Winfield Courier, November 1, 1877.

                                    RICHLAND TOWNSHIP NOMINATIONS.

The republicans of Richland Township met in convention Oct. 27th, with D. C. Stevens, chairman, and S. W. Phoenix, secretary, when the following nominations were made.

Mr. Allen, of the democratic county central committee, said that his party had refused to support Mr. Troup for county clerk, and that if his name appeared upon their ticket, it would be as an Independent candidate for the office. They did not want any regular republican in theirs.

Voted that the proceedings of this meeting be published in the Winfield COURIER.

Adjourned. D. C. STEVENS, Chairman.

S. W. PHOENIX, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 7, 1877.

THERE IS an Independent candidate for County Clerk, M. G. Troup, on the Democratic ticket, in this county.


Arkansas City Traveler, November 7, 1877.

L. J. Webb, M. G. Troup, Capt. Hunt, W. M. Allison, and J. P. Short, all attended the Republican meeting last Monday evening, at this place. Speeches were made by all the gentlemen except Mr. Short, and a general talk engaged in.

Troup wins election as county clerk thanks to Democrats...

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1877.

                                                            THE RESULT.

The result of the late election so far as the offices of sheriff and county clerk are concerned is a republican defeat. The causes of this are quite apparent. In the first place the successful candidates, M. G. Troup and Charley Harter, are well known all over the county and their well known affability and obliging dispositions have made them extremely popular everywhere. In the next place Capt. Hunt and Mr. Lippman were not so widely known, but that electioneering lies told against them had considerable effect.

The result does not show that they were not the choice of a majority of the republicans in the county, but it does show that they were not the choice of a minority of about one-fourth of the Republican voters, and that this minority voted with the democrats for Troup and Harter. Now that the election is over and the smoke of the contest is clearing away, we can look back on our course and the words we have published and say truly that we have done what we could honorably for the success of the whole republican ticket and have said nothing that we need to take back or apologize for. We can stand by what we have said.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1877.

We have been unable to obtain before going to press the full returns of the election in this county last Tuesday, but we can give the result with sufficient certainty. Troup, Independent, is elected county clerk by about 150 majority; Harter, democrat, is elected sheriff by over 100 majority; the republican candidates, Kinne for register of deeds, Haight for surveyor, Graham for coroner, and Gale, Sleeth, and Burden for commissioners are elected by large majorities, and Bryan, republican, is elected treasurer without opposition.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1877.

Total Cast for Troup and Hunt: 1,122 for Troup; 970 for Hunt.

Majority [Troup over Hunt]: 143.

Creswell: 118 Hunt, 82 Troup.

Bolton East: 8 Hunt, 31 Troup.

Bolton West: 19 Hunt, 7 Troup.

Winfield: 206 Hunt, 286 Troup.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 14, 1877. Editorial.

                                                          The Battle Over.

CAPT. HUNT feels his defeat. He is no politician, and regards human beings as objects not to be wholly relied on. His friends also feel for him.

TROUP is chuckling in his sleeve thinking, “I told you so,” and has squared himself for another two years’ work.

[CORRESPONDENCE FROM WILLIAM WHITE.]

Winfield Courier, November 15, 1877. Editorial Page.

                                               LITTLE DUTCH, Nov. 3, 1877.


EDITOR COURIER: I desire through your column to make a statement personal to myself. Some hard things have been said of me during the campaign to which I would reply that my friends may not be led astray. It has been said in speeches that a certain person (meaning me) was electioneering on the day of the republican convention for a nomination as commissioner because he could be used as Winfield dictated.

A report has been circulated by Mr. Gale’s friends that E. C. Manning had stated that I could be thus used. What the effect of these statements was I neither know nor care, but I wish to say that I have never in any official capacity done anything favoring Winfield against the interests of other portions of the county, and those who have circulated such statements have simply given currency to falsehoods.

Mr. McDermott says the commissioners are not thoughtful men to say the least. He may admit that one of them at least is not so thoughtless, when he learns that he was not the first man to discover an error in the statement submitted by J. D. Pryor. I myself first discovered something wrong in regard to district number 26, in which district I was a taxpayer. I happen to know what I was doing when I signed that card.

Now, Mr. Editor, you would like to make the people of Cowley County believe there was something wrong about the commissioners. You say that but for the efficiency of the County Attorney, the county would have lost so much money, and in another column you attempt to show dishonesty on the part of Mr. Troup and the board of commissioners in the matter of the duplicate tax roll.

It is a little strange that, lawyer as you are, you are not aware that you are getting your efficient County Attorney in a fix, as he is the legal adviser of the board who indorsed the claim “County liable.” I believe that better men than Messrs. Sleeth and Burden for commissioners never were or will be elected to that office in this county, and such stuff as the COURIER contained in relation to them is mere trash fabricated for electioneering purposes.

As for myself, Messrs. Webb and McDermott with the COURIER man have fixed me out. Now, MR. COURIER, I have always been a republican, am now, and expect to remain so. Mr. McDermott deserves no credit in the Kager matter because I discovered an error first, and I think I should have called Mr. Troup’s attention to it just about as repeatedly as I did Mr. McDermott’s for six months after the mistake was discovered.

You are right about my signing Mr. Troup’s card. I did it because I was his friend and believed I was stating the truth in his behalf—not because I was fighting Capt. Hunt, whom I have always considered a gentleman and my friend.

The future will probably develop the motives for using my name in this campaign, while I was not a candidate. Before this reaches you the election will be over, so it cannot be said this is for electioneering purposes. My object is to let my friends have the truth and not be led into error by false statements about the county board. Yours Respectfully,

                                                         WILLIAM WHITE.


[We publish the above because Mr. White feels hurt by some matter which has appeared in the COURIER, and desires to be heard in reply thereto. The strictures we made were in reply to a card which termed our remarks referred to therein “gross misrepresentations,” which was signed by Mr. White, knowing that it was to be published for electioneering purposes. If in proving that we did not misrepresent, we had to hit him, he has no reason to complain. We shall stand by our statement of fact. However, he did not accuse the commissioners of any official wrong, and we think with Mr. White that they are as good men for the office as we ever had or may expect to have. We do not think Mr. White’s statement of facts warrants his conclusion that Mr. McDermott is not entitled to the credit of discovering the error in the account of district No. 5, and of causing the matter to be pursued until the total sum named was discovered.]—ED.

Winfield Courier, November 22, 1877.

                                       Claims Presented for Election Services.

                                              OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK,

                                          WINFIELD, KANSAS, Nov. 9, 1877.

The Board of Commissioners met in special session. Present: R. F. Burden, W. M. Sleeth, and William White, Commissioners; James McDermott, County Attorney, and M. G. Troup, County Clerk.

A. Troup, father of M. G. Troup, becomes sheriff of Phillips County...

Winfield Courier, November 29, 1877.

                                                ANOTHER TROUP AHEAD.

“The main fight was made on A. Troup, candidate for sheriff, Jas. H. Clark, a democrat being his opponent, and a gallant fight he made, but Troup received ninety-seven votes too many for him.” Kirwin Chief.

We understand that the above named gentleman is the father of our county clerk.

Winfield Courier, December 6, 1877.

                                                                  Notice.

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Commissioners of Cowley County, Kansas, will at their regular session in January, 1878, receive sealed proposals for the care of paupers of said county. Said proposals must specify the price per week at which the bidder will care for said paupers, exclusive of clothing and medical treatment. Bids must be filed with the County Clerk on or before January 7th, 1878. The contract to be for the year 1878. The successful bidder must enter into an undertaking for the faithful performance of duty. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids. M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, December 27, 1877.

At a stated communication of Adelphi Lodge, No. 110, A. F. & A. M., held last week (Tuesday evening), the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: M. G. Troup, W. M.; C. C. Black, S. W.; James McDermott, J. W.; B. F. Baldwin, Treas.; L. J. Webb, Sec.; J. S. Hunt, S. D.; J. Wade McDonald, J. D.; W. G. Graham, Chaplain; Perry Hill, S. S.; J. H. Land, J. S.; S. E. Burger, Tyler.

Winfield Courier, January 10, 1878.         

                                                       Installation I. O. O. F.

On last Saturday evening, the 5th inst., the installation of officers of the Winfield Lodge No. 101, I. O. O. F. for the year 1878 took place at the Presbyterian church. A considerable delegation of members of the order from Wichita and other places were present, including W. E. Ritchie, grand master; _____ Russell, grand treasurer; and W. P. Campbell, grand marshal.


The ceremonies were conducted in a pleasing and impressive manner. The officers installed were: R. Birnbaum, N. G.; M. G. Troup, V. G.; J. W. Curns, R. W.; E. S. Bedilion, P. S.; Max Shoeb, T.

But the performance of the evening was the oration delivered by His Honor Judge W. P. Campbell, grand marshal, who gave the most complete exposition of the history, aims, and operations of the order we ever heard or saw within the limits of an evening’s lecture. It was a gem of rhetoric, combining finished oratory with terseness and vigor, alike creditable to the head and heart of the speaker.

After the ceremonies were over, a supper was served at the Williams House. Though we did ample justice to that supper at the time, our pencil is incapable of doing so now. It must suffice to say that it was got up in Frank Williams’ best style, and this is the highest praise we know how to bestow on any supper.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1878.

                                                  Commissioners’ Proceedings.

At the regular meeting of January 7th, the board ordered the opening of the Laubner, Loy, and Owings roads; rejected the report of the commissioners to locate the Arkansas City and Independence state road, and refused to pay the expenses; allowed various claims, amounting to $3,878; approved the bond of Chas. Harter, sheriff; approved the bonds of a large number of township officers; received and approved the reports of trustees of all the townships except Otter, Sheridan, and Silverdale; canceled county orders paid by the treasurer to the amount of $4,403.17; canceled $27.50 in orders that had been left in the county clerk’s hands three years uncalled for; and granted ferry license across the Arkansas River, near Salt City, to Henry Pruden.

Monday, the 14th. New board: R. F. Burden, chairman; W. M. Sleeth and G. L. Gale. Appointed John B. Lynn and Frank Williams to assist Judge Gans in counting the county funds; appointed Jas. L. Huey trustee of Creswell Township, vice Leonard, resigned; let the pauper contract to Butterfield, of Silverdale Township; let the medical attendance to Dr. Shepard, of Arkansas City.

We are indebted to the courtesy of M. G. Troup, county clerk, for the above items, and also for the following.

Total assessment of the county, $1,967,563; total tax levy for all purposes, $70,784.92, of which $18,793.20 is school tax and $17,633.07 is school bond tax.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1878.

C. L. Harter, the new Sheriff, has gracefully and quietly assumed the office and its duties; Mr. Haight, the new surveyor, is also installed in his office without display; E. P. Kinne and M. G. Troup succeeded their predecessors without much trouble and the county offices are ready for the business of the term.

[COMMISSIONERS’ PROCEEDINGS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 23, 1878.

                                                  [From the Winfield Courier.]


At the regular meeting of Jan. 7th the board ordered the opening of the Laubner, Loy and Owings roads; rejected the report of the commissioners to locate the Arkansas City and Independence state road, and refused to pay the expenses; allowed various claims, amounting to $3,878; approved the bond of Chas. Harter, sheriff; approved the bonds of a large number of township offi­cers; received and approved the reports of trustees of all the townships except Otter, Sheridan, and Silverdale; canceled county orders paid by the treasurer to the amount of $4,403.17; canceled $27.50 in orders that had been in the county clerk’s hands three years uncalled for; and granted ferry license across the Arkansas river, near Salt City, to Henry Pruden.

Monday, the 14th. New Board: R. F. Burden, chairman, W. M. Sleeth, and G. L. Gale. Appointed John Lynn and Frank Williams to assist Judge Gans in counting the county funds; appointed Jas. L. Huey trustee of Creswell township, vice Leon­ard, resigned; let the pauper contract to Butterfield, of Silverdale township; let the medical attendance to Dr. Shepard, of Arkansas City.

We are indebted to the courtesy of M. G. Troup, county clerk, for the above items, and also for the following.

Total assessment of the county, $1,967,563.

Total tax levy for all purposes, $70,784.92, of which $18,793.30 is school tax and $17,633.07 is school bond tax.

Treasurer Bryan has collected about $29,000 of the taxes for 1877, which is about 41 percent. Winfield township has paid over one-half of its taxes. Mr. Bryan has gone to Topeka to settle with the State treasurer. He will pay there about $7,000, including payment of all the school bonds that are matured.

Winfield Courier, January 24, 1878.

                            COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. Claims allowed Jan. 10.

                                          County clerk: M. G. Troup, $50, $1.50.

A. Troup, father of M. G. Troup, elected sheriff of Phillips County...

Winfield Courier, January 24, 1878.

Mr. A. Troup, the father of our M. G. Troup, was elected sheriff of Phillips County last fall. The Kirwin Chief gives him the following complimentary notice: “Our new sheriff, Mr. A. Troup, has taken charge of his office and sails around as if he meant business. He was one of our old board of commissioners, and the people did well to entrust such an important office in his hands.”

Winfield Courier, March 7, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, furnishes the following report.

Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Troup...

Arkansas City Traveler, March 20, 1878.

The Masonic supper and reunion was largely attended last Wednesday evening, and we believe enjoyed by everyone. Supper was served in the hall, after which music and dancing was engaged in at the Central Avenue Hotel until early in the morning. Mr. Bonsall delivered a few appropriate remarks at the opening, and assisted in conducting the exercises that followed. Among the fraternity we noticed M. G. Troup and lady from Winfield, and a good number from Bolton and Silverdale Townships.

[PROBATE COURT MATTERS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 10, 1878.


M. G. Troup was appointed Administrator of Hiram Chase.

Troup has assistant: W. R. Stivers...

Winfield Courier, April 18, 1878.

                                                  Commissioners’ Proceedings.

We are indebted to W. R. Stivers, the efficient assistant of the county clerk, for the following report.

The board of commissioners of Cowley County met in regular session at the county clerk’s office on the 8th day of April, 1878. Present: R. F. Burden, W. M. Sleeth, and George L. Gale, commissioners; James McDermott, county attorney, and M. G. Troup, county clerk.

Winfield Courier, May 2, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

                   M. G. Troup, county clerk, to W. D. Lytle, lot 13, block 104, Tisdale.

M. G. Troup becomes an attorney...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 8, 1878.

M. G. TROUP has been admitted to the bar to practice in the District Court as an attorney. Troup has the ability to make a good one.

Winfield Courier, May 9, 1878.

                                                  District Court Proceedings.

Monday, May 6th, 10 o’clock a.m. His Honor, W. P. Campbell, on the bench. Present: C. L. Harter, sheriff; E. S. Bedilion, clerk; Jas. McDermott, prosecuting attorney; attorneys C. Coldwell, W. P. Hackney, Henry E. Asp, J. E. Allen, D. C. Beach, E. S. Torrance, J. M. Alexander, A. J. Pyburn, N. C. Coldwell, Jas. Christian, G. H. Buckman, S. D. Pryor, J. Wade McDonald, C. R. Mitchell, J. D. Pryor, C. C. Black, R. C. Story, L. J. Webb, W. M. Boyer, F. S. Jennings, and D. A. Millington.

Motion was made by             to admit M. G. Troup as member of the bar. Court appointed G. H. Buckman, J. D. Pryor, and L. J. Webb a committee to examine the applicant and adjourned to half past one for the examination and to 8 o’clock on Tuesday morning for the further business of the court. In the afternoon the candidate was examined and admitted.

Winfield Courier, May 9, 1878.

                                                             M. G. Troup.

This gentleman passed a first-class examination and is admitted to practice in the district and inferior courts of this state. He is a young man of great enthusiasm and energy of character, is pleasing and gentlemanly in deportment, and will make a reliable, popular, and successful attorney. He has our congratulations and best wishes.

Winfield Courier, May 23, 1878.

One of the lawyers, in examining M. G. Troup for admittance to the bar, was noticed to speak very low and get as close as possible to the applicant; and when a brother lawyer asked him why he didn’t speak up so somebody could hear him, he whispered:

“Hang it all; hush! I don’t want to expose my ignorance in this business.”

We would tell who it was but—L. J.—beer promised, you know—can’t do it!

                                                Commissioners’ Proceedings.

Winfield Courier, June 6, 1878.

                                                   MONDAY, JUNE 3, 1878.


Board of county commissioners met at the office of the county clerk.

Present: R. F. Burden, G. L. Gale, commissioners, and M. G. Troup, Clerk.

Winfield Courier, June 13, 1878.

                                 WHEAT STATISTICS OF COWLEY COUNTY.

Last winter M. G. Troup, county clerk, made from all the information in his reach a careful estimate of the acreage of winter wheat growing in this county, showing over 75,000 acres. We carefully revised his estimates in the light of such information as we had been able to collect and were satisfied that they were not too high. Since then the township assessors have made their statistical returns and to our astonishment they only show an aggregate in the county of 61,987 acres of fall sown wheat. Not satisfied with this result, Mr. Troup and ourself have scrutinized the statistical returns and compared them with the assessment returns, the returns of last year, and with facts in our possession, and find that there are evident errors in the wheat statistics returned from at least ten of the townships. To illustrate the nature of these errors, we will note the two which stand at the head of the list.

The returns from Beaver Township for 1877 show 6,397 acres of wheat; those for 1878 show 4,736 acres, a falling off of 1,967 acres. The farmers from that township with whom we have consulted estimate the increase of acreage thirty percent or higher, or at least 2,000 acres. We assume an increase of 1,843, which added to the reported decrease, makes the error 3,800 acres.

The Bolton assessment returns show 14,021 cultivated acres while the statistical returns show only 11,506, or 2,515 less, when they should show at least ten percent more because of the fact that there is a considerable cultivated land which is not entered and therefore does not appear on the assessment role. Assuming ten percent as a basis, it would show an error in the statistics of 3,717 acres, of which we assume that 2,000 are in wheat.

Thus from these two townships we show the acres of wheat returned to be probably at least 5,800 too low. A similar canvass of the returns of eight other townships gives us errors to the amount of 7,500, making the aggregate error in ten townships amount to 18,300, which added to the footings, shows a wheat acreage of 75,287.

Some persons whose opinions are entitled to weight have estimated the wheat acreage at from 80,000 to 90,000. We feel sure that there are not less than 75,000 acres.

Winfield Courier, June 13, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

         M. G. Troup, administrator, to James T. Brooks, se. 38-32-5; 160 acres, $925.00.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to Samuel Theaker, 14 lots in Arkansas City and 19 lots in Tisdale. Taxes.

[COWLEY COUNTY STATISTICS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 19, 1878.

M. G. Troup, County Clerk, furnishes the returns as follows.

The population of the county is 15,390—an increase of 3,663 since 1876. Winfield has a population of 2,542.


The county has 132,653 acres of improved land, of which area 61,987 are in winter wheat, 48,824 in corn, 8,108 in oats, and 928 in Irish potatoes. There were 266,140 bushels of old corn on hand, March 1st. The county has 5,160 head of horses, 1,027 mules, 4,060 milch cows, 7,905 other cattle, 7,035 sheep, and 27,290 head of swine.

Winfield Courier, July 4, 1878.

                                                                I. O. O. F.

The following is a list of the officers of Winfield Lodge, No. 101, I. O. O. F., for the term commencing July, 1878: M. G. Troup, N. G.; M. Shields, V. G.; David C. Beach, Rec. Sec.; E. S. Bedilion, P. Sec.; Max Shoeb, Treas.; John E. Allen, Rep. to G. L.; C. C. Stevens, W.; W. D. Southard, C.; John M. Read, O. G.; Chas. McIntire, R. S. to N. G.; E. A. Clisbee, L. B. to N. G.; John Hoenscheidt, R. S. S.; B. M. Terrill, T. S. S.; W. M. Parker, R. S. to V. G.; Herman Schmode, L. S. to V. G.; John W. Curns, Chaplain; John Smiley, Host.

                                                      A Threatened Famine.

Winfield Courier, July 4, 1878.

C. A. Bliss, G. S. Manser, A. B. Lemmon, E. P. Kinne, J. C. Fuller, M. L. Read, T. R. Bryan, W. M. Allison, J. W. Curns, C. C. Black, D. A. Millington, E. S. Bliss, E. S. Torrance, A. E. Baird, J. B. Lynn, M. G. Troup, M. L. Robinson, J. C. McMullen, E. C. Manning, and probably many others, all with their wives, will make a raid upon Arkansas City, the steam boats, and Newman’s dam on the Fourth. They will seize all the provisions they can find in the city, capture both the “Aunt Sally” and the—the—well, Amos’ steamship, will rip out Newman’s dam, and steam up the Walnut to Winfield, driving a large herd of catfish. Bliss and Harter & Harris will load the steamers with flour at their mills. The party will start at about 9 o’clock a.m.

                                                 That Trip on the Aunt Sally.

Winfield Courier, July 11, 1878.

We “let off” our surplus patriotism on the Fourth by going to Arkansas City and taking a ride on the “Aunt Sally” beneath the classic shades of the “raging Walnut.” The said “Aunt Sally” is not exactly like the Sound steamers that ply between Fall River and New York. We did not see the elegant staterooms, dining-hall, furniture, and such; but she paddled along just as well as though arrayed in gay plumage. The passengers stood up on deck and sweltered in the heat; taking two or three small showers for variety; then the whistle made most unearthly screams and the band played patriotic airs. The boat was manned by Channell, Sleeth, Swarts, Farrar, Mowry, and many others of the old sailors of Arkansas City. Many Winfield ladies and gentlemen were on board with us, exhibiting more enthusiasm, we thought, than did our “seaport” friends. When we returned to the landing, Bonsall was on hand with his camera to take a picture of the boat and its passengers, but we shall never believe he got a good picture until he furnishes us with a copy. When that infernal whistle shrieked, it was with difficulty that we prevented our unsophisticated Winfielders from following the example of the Indians down the river by jumping off and wading ashore. Troup jumped about 18 feet, Harris 14, Baird 12, Bliss 10, McMullen & Lemmon 3, Hudson 2. The rest of them were on the other side of the boat and we were not able to record their feats of ground and lofty tumbling.

Mrs. M. G. Troup...

[TISDALE CORRESPONDENT: “NIP.”]

Winfield Courier, July 18, 1878.

Mrs. James Napier, of Bushnell, and Mrs. M. G. Troup are visiting friends in Tisdale.


Winfield Courier, August 1, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

H. C. Loomis to M. G. Troup, lots 1, 2, and 3, block 158, Winfield; $200.

M. G. Troup and wife to John E. Allen, lot 7, block 115, Winfield; $1.

Winfield Courier, August 22, 1878.

                                                                Trial List.

The following is a list of cases that will stand for trial at the August A. D. 1878 term of the District Court of Cowley County, and have been placed on the Trial Docket in the following order.

                                             CIVIL DOCKET. THIRD DAY.

Mercy M. Funk, Administratrix, vs. M. G. Troup, Administrator. [Jennings & Buckman; J. E. Allen.]

                                           CIVIL DOCKET. FOURTH DAY.

Phillip Hedges vs. Emily C. Hedges. [M. G. Troup.]

Winfield Courier, August 29, 1878.

                                                            District Court.

Met Monday morning, August 26th, 1878.

Present: Judge W. P. Campbell, Sheriff C. L. Harter, Clerk E. S. Bedilion, Attorneys McDermott, Torrance, C. Coldwell, N. C. Coldwell, Hackney, McDonald, Pryor, Pyburn, Allen, Jennings, Buckman, Black, Webb, Alexander, Beach, Troup, Jarvis, Asp, of Winfield; and Dennison, of Osage Mission.

Martin vs. Lewis, M. G. Troup appointed guardian of minor defendants ad litem; judgment against others.

Winfield Courier, September 12, 1878.

                                                            District Court.

                                               MONDAY, September 2, 1878.

Mercy M. Funk, administratrix, vs. M. G. Troup, administrator. Continued.

Winfield Courier, September 12, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to G. M. Martin, lot 3, block 90, Winfield; tax.

Winfield Courier, September 26, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to F. L. Lewis, lots 2 and 3, 5, 35, 7, and e. ½ off se. ¼ 22, 34, 3, and e. ½ nw, 31, 33, 5; and part of lots 1, 2, and 3, and ne. 18, 33, 3, and w. ½ of nw. 28, 32, 6, and w. ½ of ne. 29, 34, 3.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to J. Wade McDonald, sw. 6, 34, 3.

Winfield Courier, October 3, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to James A. Loomis, s. ½ of sw. 6, 36, 4.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to H. C. Day, nw. ½, 29, 30, 4.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to H. C. Shock, ne. ¼, 20, 31, 4.

Winfield Courier, October 10, 1878.

                                                          The Yellow Fever.


The concert given by the Odd Fellows for the benefit of the yellow fever sufferers was well attended notwithstanding the muddy condition of our streets on account of the recent rains. The concert was opened by the I. O. O. F., in regalia, and consisted of a short address by M. G. Troup, singing by Lodge, and prayer by J. W. Curns. Then came music by orchestra, followed by a quartette by Mr. and Mrs. Holloway, Miss Thomas, and Prof. Farringer. . . . OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Misses Dover and Hane, Mr. Wilkinson, Willie Farringer, Roberts Brothers, Misses Lillie Wilson, May Beach, and Mary Schofield. Net receipts were about $60, with $10 of expense, leaving about fifty dollars to be forwarded to the suffering South. The Odd Fellows deserve great credit in taking hold of this project with so much zeal. Mr. Hoenscheidt is especially deserving of credit for his labor in arranging and working up the matter, as is also Prof. Farringer for arranging the musical performances.

Winfield Courier, October 17, 1878. Editorial Columns.

                                                            M. G. TROUP.

This gentleman is in a predicament. He has stated positively that he would not be a candidate for representative on any ticket whatever. He tells us that he has told a hundred different men that he would not be a candidate, that he was nominated last Saturday without his consent, that if he refuses to run some will be angry and if he accepts others will justly accuse him. We should think there was one way to get out of this predicament honorably, and that is to absolutely refuse to accept the nomination or to serve if elected. In that way he can maintain his own truthfulness and the respect of the people of this country. We have no dirt to throw at Mr. Troup. Personally we like him. As county clerk he is justly popular with the people, but we do not believe it is right in him or just to the county to go away from his work in the county clerk’s office to spend two months at Topeka. The people of Cowley County by their votes last November said that they wanted his services in that office. They are paying him the magnificent salary of two thousand dollars a year for his services, while they are earning this money for him by hard labor on their farms and in their shops, labor at least as exhausting as his with not one fourth of the remuneration and they have a right to his undivided attention to the duties of that office. He is not the only man in this district who is capable of representing the people at Topeka. There are many others who if given a chance would prove equally valuable public servants, and we do not believe in heaping all the paying offices upon any one man. We do not believe in giving any one man all the opportunities of gaining distinction and amassing wealth. We are satisfied that Mr. Troup should earn if possible and enjoy his two thousand a year, but we do not wish to ruin him by making him a bloated bondholder in too much haste. True he is an ambitious man and when he has served out his present term of office, should he decline a reelection, we can surely find something else for him to do even if we have to run him for congress.


Besides at present we do not know exactly where or what he is. He was always a republican, was a first time and a second time nominated and elected to the office he now holds by the Republican party and a year ago, though not a Republican nominee, he was elected by Republican votes, or at least could not have been elected without them. They say he is a greenbacker now, but so are the Republicans, and he claims to hold the same opinions on the finance questions as are held by the Republicans. Yet when he is put in nomination at the dictation of the Democrats of Winfield and by a corrupt ring foisted upon the National party through a trick, should he accept the nomination there is every reason to believe that he is in the ring now and will soon be in the Democratic party. We do not see how he could honorably accept even were he not bound to give his time and talents to the earning of his $2,000 salary.

Winfield Courier, October 17, 1878.

                        THE NATIONAL GREENBACK LABOR CONVENTION.

                                      Sold Out by a Ring—The Way It Was Done.

During Thursday and Friday of last week, Allison, A. A. Jackson, J. E. Allen, and two or three other greenbackers of this city were apparently very industrious and busy with the Democrats fixing up something. It seems that they arranged who should be chairman of the greenback convention, what he should do, who should be the committees, what they should do, who should be nominated by the convention, and how it should be done. They had their tickets printed and everything well cut and dried. At least the developments of Saturday show such a state of facts.

The National Greenback Labor Convention met on Saturday at 11 o’clock a.m. J. B. Callison was chosen chairman and A. J. Pickering secretary. A committee on credentials and permanent organization was appointed and then Allison moved that a committee be appointed by the chair to confer with a similar committee to be appointed by the Democratic convention, then in session, to agree upon terms, and candidates for a fusion of the two parties. This motion was opposed by several delegates. When one of them commenced to speak against the motion, Allison would boisterously call him to order and the chairman would help choke the speaker down. Then Allison would make a speech for the motion abusing the opposers. In this way they choked down several delegates and finally crowded the motion to a vote taken standing. Fourteen delegates voted for and sixteen against the motion. The chairman looked beat and at a loss what to do, but Allison was equal to the occasion. He said, “It is carried, Mr. Chairman,” and then the chairman said, “it is carried,” and took up a paper from his table and read from it the names of the pre-arranged committee, of which Allison was made chairman. The convention then adjourned to 2 o’clock p.m.

At the hour named the convention again met and the committee on credentials and permanent organization reported the names of delegates entitled to vote, and in favor of J. B. Callison for chairman, A. J. Pickering for secretary, and T. J. Floyd for assistant secretary. The report was accepted but was not adopted or otherwise disposed of.


Allison then sprang to the floor and in a loud, hurried, and excited manner read without leave the report of his fusion committee nominating M. G. Troup for representative 88th district, M. R. Leonard for 89th district, H. D. Gans for Probate Judge, John E. Allen for County Attorney, J. S. Allen for District Clerk, J. S. Baker for Superintendent, and A. G. Wilson for commissioner first district. He said that the Democrats would nominate this ticket and moved that his report be accepted. This immediately raised a storm. The anti-fusionists were in a majority and a number of speakers arose to oppose, among whom were Douglas and Tansey and Crum, who would not be choked down, as their speakers had been in the morning. A standing vote was taken on the motion to accept, which resulted 17 for and 20 against. This did not trouble Allison much. He pronounced his motion carried and so did the chairman, but Tansey demanded in a motion a call for the ayes and noes. Allison made several speeches and Alexander and Jackson spoke. Seeing they were in a minority they changed their tactics to entreaty, said a vote to accept was not a vote to adopt, that it was necessary to vote to accept in order that the convention might get to work, that after they had voted to accept, they could kill the report by laying it on the table or in any other way they chose and that it would be a terrible insult to the committee to refuse to accept. After an hour of choking down speakers who opposed, of entreaty, bulldozing and confusion that would have put Babel or the gold room into the shade, some of the anti-fusionists yielded and the vote to accept was carried. A part of the anti-fusionists announced their withdrawal from the convention. Allison then decided that the report was adopted so far that the convention must vote for or against the nominees of the report. The anti-fusionists not having the matter cut and dried as had the fusionists, were taken at a disadvantage and were caught and beaten by the trick. In order to make the trick sure to win a motion was made that the candidates having the highest number of votes should be the nominees and was carried before the anti-fusionists had time to see the drift of it. The balloting then commenced and of course the fusion nominees got a plurality and were declared the nominees of the convention. By some blunder some of the fusionists voted for Millard instead of Baker which was the only flaw in the execution of the program.

A cold deck had been prepared, the cards were stocked carefully, the deal and cut were in the hands of the fusionists and the moment a few anti-fusionists consented to play with them they were beaten. It was perfectly clear to any unprejudiced observer that the anti-fusionists were in a majority but were beaten by the cut and dried tactics of Allison and his ring. This ring had completely sold out the convention to the Democrats. They did not even adopt a platform but adjourned hastily. This omission of the platform was evidently not accidental, but was probably a part of the pre-arranged program. The Democrats furnish the platform as they dictate the candidates for the new fusion party. The Democratic snake has swallowed the tail end of the National party but we imagine that the head end will separate and go for principles rather than for fusion with the democrats. After the adjournment of the Nationals the Democrats accepted their blunder and nominated Millard, Allison, Jackson, Allen, and perhaps a few others composing the ring that has done the business.

Winfield Courier, October 17, 1878.

M. G. Troup, C. C. Black, and A. B. Lemmon go from this place as delegates to the Masonic Grand Lodge, held at Atchison this week.

Winfield Courier, October 17, 1878.

                                                      Democratic Convention.

This body met in the office of C. C. Black, in Winfield, on Saturday last, at 11 o’clock a.m. E. P. Young was chosen temporary chairman and C. C. Black secretary.

A committee on credentials was appointed consisting of Williams, Lester, and Yount; and as committee on permanent organization, McIntire, Howard, and Pratt; also a committee to confer with a similar committee from the National Convention to report a fusion ticket, consisting of Judge McDonald, Sol. Smith, and Amos Walton.

Adjourned to 2 o’clock p.m.

Met according to adjournment, and committee on credentials reported, which report was adopted.


Committee on permanent organization reported for chairman E. P. Young, of Tisdale, and for secretary W. H. H. Maris, of Winfield. Report was adopted.

Committee on conference with Nationals reported.

For Representative 88th Dist., M. G. Troup; 89th District, M. E. Leonard; Probate Judge, H. D. Gans; County Attorney, J. E. Allen; District Clerk, J. S. Allen; Superintendent, J. S. Baker; Commissioner 1st District, A. G. Wilson. The report was received.

The report was amended by the substitution of E. A. Millard in place of Baker for superintendent and adopted as amended.

A platform was adopted, committees appointed, and convention adjourned.

Winfield Courier, October 17, 1878.

                                                   Democratic Ticket for 1879.

FOR SHERIFF: M. G. TROUP.

FOR REGISTER OF DEEDS: M. G. TROUP.

FOR COUNTY CLERK: M. G. TROUP.

FOR TREASURER: M. G. TROUP & J. E. ALLEN.

FOR CORONER: M. G. TROUP & J. E. ALLEN.

FOR COMMISSIONER 2ND DIST.: M. G. TROUP & J. E. ALLEN.

FOR WET NURSES: W. M. ALLISON & A. A. JACKSON.

[DEXTER CORRESPONDENT: “A GREENBACKER.”]

Winfield Courier, October 17, 1878.

                                                 DEXTER, October 14, 1878.

I am a greenback man, but Saturday that old devil Democracy gobbled us body and breeches, poked down our throats their ticket, not ours. They put Troup on to get him on their side in the future. He holds one office now and I for one will not give him my vote this fall because I think he is asking for too much. If he wants to join the Democrats, why, join them; but one county office is enough for one man to hold at once. We organized so as to have a pure party and we sent honest delegates to Winfield to represent us, but somehow or other the Democrats got hold of the convention and ran it to suit themselves. Now, Mr. Editor, I have but little education but can see a thing or two. Give my old hat to them Democrats and tell them I thank them for this trick, but it won’t win in November. A GREENBACKER.

Excerpts from a lengthy article...

                                              STEALING THE TOWN SITE.

                                                   A SCRAP OF HISTORY.

Winfield Courier, October 24, 1878.

Allison and other speakers in the interest of Troup, in their violent efforts to charge some evil against E. C. Manning, are making the statement that Manning stole the townsite of Winfield, and that it is from the money that he got for lots belonging to others, which has erected his magnificent building.

Now, some of the men who most strenuously insisted on Manning’s candidacy at this time, and who are among his most earnest supporters, are men who fought him all through this townsite contest and know, if anyone does, of any wrong that he did in relation to that matter. If they do not know of any, no one does.


But when such a charge is made, it is not against Manning alone, but becomes a personal charge against the senior editor of this paper and others associated with Manning in the town site enterprise, and we now propose to answer it by stating the facts which all who are familiar with the past history of this city know to be true, for the information of such voters as were not here, and know these matters only by hearsay.

Pyburn, one of Jackson’s attorneys, is a member of the State Senate and it is thought he can be depended upon to get the new law through the Senate, and, if they can get Troup elected to the House, they feel confident they can pass a law that will beat Hill & Christie, town company, et al., in their pending suits and everybody else that holds title under either of the town companies.

Winfield Courier, October 31, 1878.

                                                   Farmers and Laboring Men.

Do not fail to vote for farmers and laboring men when you have such candidates who are honest, faithful, and efficient. Such are G. L. Gale, J. W. Millspaugh, A. A. Wiley, and E. C. Manning and such Troup, Gans, and Leonard are not. Surely enough professional men get into office at best.

Winfield Courier, October 31, 1878.

Troup gets $2,000 a year as salary and perhaps $300 extra for making the tax lists, but is not satisfied and wants another office so as to get twice paid for the time he spends at Topeka.

Winfield Courier, December 5, 1878.

                                                            District Court.

Judge Campbell came down from Wichita on Monday and the session of court commenced.

Present: His Honor Judge W. P. Campbell; C. L. Harter, sheriff; E. S. Bedilion, district clerk; J. McDermott, county attorney; and Messrs. J. E. Allen, C. C. Black, S. D. Pryor, A. J. Pyburn, J. M. Alexander, F. S. Jennings, C. R. Mitchell, L. J. Webb, E. S. Torrance, N. C. Coldwell, W. M. Boyer, W. P. Hackney, O. M. Seward, C. H. Payson, H. E. Asp, G. H. Buckman, J. D. Pryor, D. C. Beach, W. M. Boyer, C. Coldwell, M. G. Troup, S. M. Jarvis, A. H. Green, attorneys.

Winfield Courier, December 12, 1878. Editorial Page.

                                             ROCK, KANSAS, Nov. 27, 1878.

EDITOR COURIER: Please answer the following questions in your next issue. In your last you claim that somebody has saved the county the excess of the difference between $180,000 and $144,000 on the A., T. & S. F. railroad proposition now before the people. I desire to ask you whether as a lawyer you believe that the remitter and stipulations published in the Telegram will be binding on the said railway company, and is that instrument properly signed so as to bind the company? In fine, is it not signed in such a manner as to bind nobody but Ross Burns? And lastly does it not mean that the citizens of Cowley County will have to pay $180,000 in bonds if they vote that amount?

Very respectfully, C. H. EAGIN.


Well, suppose the bonds to be carried on the proposition as published, then suppose the company comes and demands that the county commissioners subscribe $180,000 to the capital stock of the company. They will of course refuse to subscribe more than $144,000, and how can they be compelled to subscribe the balance? Will you try mandamus? “As a lawyer” we venture the opinion that no court, with the existing facts before it, would make the mandamus absolute. Well, suppose the road be built 45 miles in the county and the company demand the issue of $180,000 in bonds. The commissioners will refuse to issue more than $141,000, and how can they be compelled to issue more? We venture the opinion that it cannot be done and that it never would be undertaken.

It is usual that the action of an attorney is binding on his principal. Ross Burns is the accredited attorney for the company.

But we are not left to the equities in a court nor to the signature of Ross Burns as attorney for the company.

A copy of the stipulation has just been filed with the county clerk, stating that it is for publication for the information of voters, signed by the proper officers of the company in as binding a manner as any corporation can execute a contract. And this contract has a consideration—It tells the voters that in consideration of their votes for the proposition the county shall only subscribe $144,000 and the company shall receive only $144,000 of bonds. That stipulation is published below. Is it satisfactory to our correspondent?

WHEREAS, Ross Burns, the attorney of the Cowley, Sumner & Fort Smith railroad company, did on the 19th day of November, 1878, make and execute for and on behalf of said company the following agreement:

STATE OF KANSAS,      )

  County of Cowley,          )   ss:

WHEREAS, It has been ascertained that the total length of the line of the Cowley, Sumner & Fort Smith railroad from where it enters the said county of Cowley to a point on the south line of said county and the state line will not exceed thirty-six miles, in place of forty-five miles, as the same is petitioned for and acted upon by the board of county commissioners of said county, and

WHEREAS, It is desirable to secure the shortest practicable line with the view of forming a connection with the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad and thus completing a through line between the Southern States and the Pacific Ocean.

It is therefore stipulated and agreed by the said Cowley, Sumner & Fort Smith railroad company, that said proposition be so modified and changed that the total number of miles of railroad for which aid is voted shall not exceed thirty-six miles in said county of Cowley and that the total amount of stock subscribed by said county of Cowley under said proposition and the total amount of bonds to be issued by the said county of Cowley shall not exceed the sum of stock and issue of bonds of said county of Cowley to the amount of one hundred and forty-four thousand (141,000) dollars.


And it is further agreed and stipulated on the part of the Cowley, Sumner & Ft. Smith railroad company, that in consideration that the proposition to take stock by the said county of Cowley in said railroad company and to issue the bonds of said county in pursuance of the terms contained in the petition this day presented to the board of county commissioners of said Cowley County, with the modifications or abatement made by said railroad company in the amount of one hundred and forty-four thousand (144,000) dollars, is voted by the qualified voters of the said county at the election this day ordered for that purpose the said railroad company agree to modify or change the said proposition, as follows, to-wit: It will locate a freight and passenger depot on the East side of the Walnut River, and the South side of Timber Creek, within one-half mile of the crossing of Main street and Ninth avenue in said city of Winfield; provided that three acres of land in a suitable location and shape so as to be acceptable to the engineer of said company for depot purposes and the right of way through said city of Winfield by way of said depot grounds, be furnished said company free of costs, but in no event shall said depot be more than three-quarters of a mile from said crossing of Main street and Ninth avenue in said city of Winfield. And it is further stipulated and agreed in consideration aforesaid, that said railroad company will locate a freight and passenger depot within three-fourths of a one mile of the crossing of Summit street and Central avenue in said city of Arkansas City.

                                                            ROSS BURNS,

                                                    Attorney for said R. R. Co.

Now, the said railroad company by Wm. B. Strong, vice President and General Manager and acting President does hereby consent to ratify, approve, and agree to carry out each and every of the above agreements entered into by said Ross Burns, and a duly attested copy of this approval is directed to be filed in the office of the county clerk of said Cowley County, and the same be published in the Cowley County Telegram, along with the proposition as submitted for the benefit and information of the electors of said Cowley County.

Dated this 28th day of Nov. 1878.

                                                         WM. B. STRONG,

                            Vice President and General Manager and acting President.

                                                      E. WILDER, Secretary.

Attest:

  [L. S.]

STATE OF KANSAS,       )

Cowley County,            )    ss.

I, M. G. Troup, county clerk in and for the county and State aforesaid, do hereby certify the above and foregoing to be a true copy of a document now on file in this office.

Witness my hand and seal this 5th day of December, 1878.

[L. S.]                                       M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

                                                   By Will. R. Stivers, Deputy.

[COUNTY OFFICERS.]

Winfield Courier, January 2, 1879.

Judge 13th Judicial District.—Hon. W. Campbell.

Board of County Commissioners.—R. F. Burden, G. L. Gale, W. M. Sleeth.

County Clerk.—M. G. Troup.

County Treasurer.—T. R. Bryan.

Probate Judge.—H. D. Gans.

Register of Deeds.—E. P. Kinne.

Supt. Pub. Inst.—R. C. Story.

Sheriff.—C. L. Harter.

Coroner.—W. G. Graham.


County Attorney.—James McDermott.

Clerk District Court.—B. S. Bedilion.

County Surveyor.—N. A. Haight.

Deputy County Surveyor.—J. Hoenscheidt.

[SOCIETY CARDS.]

Winfield Courier, January 2, 1879.

ADELPHI LODGE, NO. 110, A. F. & A. M. M. G. TROUP, W. M. R. C. STORY, SEC’Y PRO TEM.

WINFIELD LODGE, NO. 101, I. O. O. F. M. G. TROUP, N. G. DAVID C. BEACH, REC. SEC’Y.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

Board of County Commissioners met in regular session [Janu­ary 6, 1879]. Present: R. F. Burden, W. M. Sleeth, and G. L. Gale, commissioners, James McDermott, county attorney, and M. G. Troup, county clerk.

                                    M. G. Troup, county treasury, salary. [$471.00]

Mrs. Troup...

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Presbyterian Ladies’ Aid Society meets on Thursday of this week with Mrs. Troup.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

                                     News from “Cedarite” in Cedar Township.

Was the report that Troup went to Topeka to try to keep the legislature from meddling with the salaries of county officers correct? CEDARITE.

Portraits: Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Troup...

Winfield Courier, February 20, 1879.

We were shown this week portraits of Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Troup, taken from life, which are very fine. The artist, Mr. H. A. Allen, has located in our town, and persons desiring to inspect his work can find him in his rooms in the Bahntge building.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

                                           CITY COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS.

                                          WINFIELD, KANS., March 17, 1879.

Council met at the usual place and hour, C. M. Wood, Presi­dent of Council, in chair; Councilmen Gully, Jochems, Manning, and Robinson; J. P. Short, clerk, and N. C. Coldwell, city attorney, present.

The Governor’s proclamation making Winfield a city of the second class was then read, after which a petition of some ninety citizens in opposition to changing the class of the city was read; and Mr. Manning moved that the prayer of the petitioners be granted. The matter was discussed by Councilman Manning and H. E. Asp and J. E. Allen, citizens, for, and N. C. Coldwell, Col. Alexander, and M. G. Troup, against. The roll being called the vote stood as follows: Yes—Jochems and Manning. Nay—Gully, Robinson, and Wood.

On motion of Robinson, the clerk was instructed to spread the Governor’s proclamation on the Record.

Ordinance No. 84, dividing the city into two wards, was then passed.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.


                          NOTICE: SPECIAL RAILROAD BOND ELECTION.

Whereas, the county commissioners of the county of Cowley, State of Kansas, at a special meeting, held March 10th, 1879, made an order of which the following is a copy.

“At a special meeting of the county commissioners of Cowley County, holden at the office of the county clerk in the court­house in the City of Winfield in said county on the 10th day of March A. D. 1879, there were present: R. F. Burden, Chairman; W. M. Sleeth and Geo. L. Gale, Commissioners; with E. S. Torrance, County Attorney, and M. G. Troup, County Clerk; a petition was presented to the Board, signed by two-fifths of the resident taxpayers of said county which, with the signatures omitted is as follows: to wit:

“To the Honorable the Board of County Commissioners of the county of Cowley and State of Kansas:

“Inasmuch as the Southern Kansas and Western Railroad Company proposes to construct a line of railroad into and through the county of Cowley, in the State of Kansas, the undersigned, being more than two-fifths of the resident tax payers of said county, respectfully petition your Honorable Board to call a special election in said county at as early a day as is practica­ble, and legal, and at such special election to submit to the qualified electors of said county, a proposition to subscribe 68 thousand (68,000) dollars to the capital stock of said Southern Kansas and Western Railroad Company, a corporation duly organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Kansas, and to issue the bonds of said county in the like amount of sixty-eight thousand (68,000) dollars, in payment of said subscriptions, said bonds to be delivered to said railroad company for like amounts of the capital stock thereof as follows: Fifty-one thousand (51,000) dollars when said railroad is in operation to the point herein after named, near the city of Winfield in said county, and the remaining seventeen thousand (17,000) dollars when the said railroad is in operation to the western line of said county. . . .

M. G. Troup, member of Board of Education...

[CITY ELECTION.]

Winfield Courier, April 3, 1879.

The election last Tuesday was very warm and excited, but everything went off pleasantly. The result was:

1st w.         2nd w.

BOARD OF EDUCATION.

Long Term, M. G. Troup ...                     146               ...

Long Term, B. F. Baldwin .                           102               ...

Short Term, N. L. Rigby ....                           240               ...

Long Term, F. S. Jennings                              ...             336

Short Term, H. Brotherton                             ...             107

Short Term, I. W. Randall                               ...             122

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1879

Municipal election in the City of Winfield resulted in the election of the Citizen’s Ticket:

Mayor elected: J. B. Lynn.

Police Judge: W. M. Boyer.

City Attorney: O. M. Seward.


City Treasurer: J. C. McMullen.

Treas. Board Education: J. D. Pryor.

Council: H. Jochems, C. C. Black, M. L. Read, and S. H. Myton.

Board of Education: Rev. Rigby, F. S. Jennings, Mr. Randall, and M. G. Troup.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

M. G. Troup, Co. Clerk, to Channell & McLaughlin, lt. 9, block 24, lts. 14, 13, and 2, blk. 146, lt. 28, blk. 145, lt. 1, blk. 146, lt. 27, blk. 143, lt. 15, blk. 128, lt. 15, blk. 129, lt. 24, blk. 67, lts. 15 and 16, blk. 103, lts. 26 and 27, blk. 59, lt. 16, blk. 27, lt. 24, blk. 48, lot 29, blk. 59, lt. 25, blk. 48, lt. 8, blk. 24, lt. 15, blk. 27, lt. 14, blk. 52, lts 1, 5, 6, 7, 13, and 12, blk. 24, lts. 15 and 16, blk. 48, lt. 14, blk. 24, lts. 1, 3, 8, 27 and 28, blk. 50, Ark. City.

M. G. Troup to W. M. Sleeth and H. P. Farrar, lot 11, blk. 80, lots 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14, blk. 19, and lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, blk. 16 and lot 9, blk. 55, Ark. City.

M. G. Troup to W. M. Sleeth and H. P. Farrar, lot 11, blk. 80, lots 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14, blk. 10, and lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, blk. 16 and lot 9, blk. 55, Ark. City.

M. G. Troup to Channell & McLaughlin, lot 26, blk. 27, lot 4, blk. 28, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk. 56 and lots 12, 13, and 14, blk. 139, and lot 16, blk. 52, lot 7, blk. 67, Ark. City.

[ORGANIZATION OF BOARD OF EDUCATION.]

Winfield Courier, May 8, 1879.

The Board of Education, elect, met Monday evening in pursu­ance of the provisions of the law for the purpose of effecting an organization.

The meeting was called to order by Mr. M. G. Troup, after which officers for the ensuing year were elected as follows.

President: F. S. Jennings.

Vice President: N. L. Rigby.

Clerk: Fred C. Hunt.

The clerk’s salary was fixed at $50.00 per annum.

The Treasurer’s bond was fixed at $10,000.

Resolution passed that no application for position as teacher be considered until after the middle of June, and that in the meantime all applications be filed with the Clerk of the Board.

[COURT HOUSE NOTES.]

Winfield Courier, May 8, 1879.

                                                REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to C. R. Mitchell, lot 8, blk 82, Ark City  Taxes.

M. G. Troup, county clerk to Mary C. Hartsock, lots 34 and 5, blk 39, Ark City.

[COURT HOUSE NOTES.]

Winfield Courier, May 15, 1879.

                                    REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS [CITY ONLY].

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to W. S. Houghton, lot 13, blk. 69, Arkansas City. Taxes.

[NOTICE OF EQUALIZATION.]

Winfield Courier, May 15, 1879.


Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commission­ers of Cowley County, Kansas, will meet at the office of the County Clerk of said county on Monday, June 2d, A. D. 1879, for the purpose of fairly and impartially equalizing the valuation of all property returned by the assessors for the year 1879; at which time and place all persons feeling themselves aggrieved by their assessment can appear and have all errors in the returns corrected. M. G. TROUP, County Clerk.

Winfield Courier, June 5, 1879.

The meeting to devise ways and means for celebrating the “Glorious Fourth,” met at the office of Chas. Payson and orga­nized by electing J. Conklin, chairman, and E. P. Greer, secre­tary. The following committees were appointed.

Programme: Messrs. Kinne, Troup, and Jennings.

Winfield Courier, June 26, 1879.

At a meeting of the School Directors on Monday, June 16th, F. S. Jennings in the chair, the following appointments were made for the coming year: Principal, Prof. E. T. Trimble, of Illi­nois, who takes the place of Mr. G. W. Robinson, resigned; Helen E. Meach, of Chicago, who takes the place of Miss Aldrich in the grammar department; Miss Sarah Hodges, who takes the place of Mrs. Moffit, resigned—second intermediate; Miss Minnie Johnson, a new appointment, 1st intermediate; Miss Allie Klingman, returned, 2nd primary; Miss Mollie Bryant, 1st primary. The Chair appoint­ed the committees for the ensuing year, to-wit: M. G. Troup, Finance; N. L. Rigby, Ways and Means; I. W. Randall, Care of School property. The first Monday in July was set for the next meeting of the Directors. The fall term of school opens Septem­ber 1st.

Troup announces candidacy for County Treasurer...

[COUNTY TREASURER: M. G. TROUP.]

Winfield Courier, July 3, 1879.

M. G. Troup is announced as a candidate for treasurer of this county at the next election. He will submit his candidacy to the Republican county convention, and if he be there, and should be favored with a nomination, he will accept it with thanks and make the race; but if in its discretion, it shall select someone else for the place, he will step aside, for he does not propose to go into the canvass otherwise. He thinks that with a rebel brigadier congress who insist that we have no nation, that the states are sovereign, that Uncle Sam cannot enforce his laws in the states, that each state may depart from the confederation at will and that the Union cause is the “lost cause.” It is time that all Republicans should pull together to save the government from falling entirely into the hands of those who fought four years to destroy it, and that Greenbackism is a minor consider­ation. He is acknowledged to have been one of the most effi­cient, pleasant, and popular officers we ever had, thoroughly well qualified in every respect for the position which he desires. His efficiency as county clerk is beyond question and he would without doubt manage the treasury equally well for he is perfectly familiar with all its details. We have a warm side toward Mr. Troup because he takes great pains to furnish us with matters of interest to our readers and always pays the printer.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 23, 1879.


M. G. Troup was in town Monday, and made our office a pleasant call. Mr. Troup has served the people of this county for the past six years in the capacity of County Clerk. He will come before the people this fall for the office of Treasurer, placing himself squarely upon the actions of the Republican convention, and if elected we have no doubt he will give as universal satisfaction in the office of Treasurer as in the office of clerk. Even his opponents admit his competency in whatever capacity he serves.

[DISTRICT COURT CALENDAR - AUGUST TERM.]

Winfield Courier, August 21, 1879.

                                            CIVIL DOCKET. EIGHTH DAY. 

Thomas D. Lewis   [J. E. Allen, attorney] vs. T. H. Geuthuer [M. G. Troup, attorney].

B. Dunwood, administrator [Troup and Hudson, attorneys] vs. M. J. Parr, et. al.

[REPUBLICAN CONVENTION.]

Winfield Courier, September 11, 1879.

The Cowley County Republican convention met on Saturday, Sept. 6th, at 11 o’clock a.m., at Manning’s Hall, in Winfield.

Vote for treasurer.

M. G. Troup, 15; James Harden, 59; George Youle, 13.

Winfield Courier, September 11, 1879.

A large number of Odd Fellows went from this place, last Friday, to institute a lodge at Arkansas City. The ceremonies were conducted by M. G. Troup and the lodge was started off in good shape with a membership of fifteen. The Fellows speak highly of the hospitable manner in which they were treated at the City.

[NOTICE OF WALNUT VALLEY FAIR]

Winfield Courier, September 25, 1879.

                                                By order of the Executive Com.,

                             M. G. TROUP, Chairman. E. C. MANNING, Secretary.

Mr. and Mrs. Troup...

Winfield Courier, October 16, 1879.

M. G. Troup and lady started for Topeka Monday. Mr. Troup is a delegate to the Grand Lodge of I. O. O. F., which meets there this week.

Winfield Courier, October 23, 1879.

                                                        A BATCH OF LIES.

The Telegram, of yesterday morning, finally came out with its batch of full-blown lies, such as it had intimated by its insinuations being manufactured against Shenneman. After stating the lies without the least evidence in proof, the Telegram has the cheek to say: “If they are not true, let Shenneman and his friends go to Troup, Walker, Webb, or Hackney, and get their affidavits to the contrary.” That is their game. If they charge that Shenneman sometime stole a sheep or robbed a hen-roost, they expect it to be believed unless he comes forward and performs an impossibility for any man by proving he never did such a thing. Never mind. You will see affidavits enough, and your timid, namby-pamby, money-getting candidate will be somewhat shown up too, because of going into this contemptible mode of

electioneering.

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

The following is a list of the elective and appointed officers of Winfield lodge No. 101, I. O. O. F., to serve for the ensuing year.

N. G.: A. W. Davis.

V. G.: James H. Vance.


Rec. Sec.: David C. Beach.

Treas.: Max Shoeb.

W.: John W. Smiley.

C.: D. W. Southard.

I. G.: M. B. Shields.

O. G.: F. Ebenback.

R. S. to N. G.: Jacob Lipps.

L. S. to N. G.: Charles Youngheim.

R. S. to V. G.: John Fleming.

L. S. to V. G.: Daniel Steel.

R. S. S.: B. M. Terrill.

L. S. S.: Jno. Hohenscheidt.

Chaplain: W. H. H. Maris.

D. D. G. M.: M. G. Troup.

[ADELPHI LODGE, NO. 110: OFFICERS FOR 1880.]

Winfield Courier, December 18, 1879.

The officers of Adelphi Lodge, No. 110, A. F. & A. M., for 1880, are

W. M.: James McDermott.

S. W.: M. G. Troup.

J. W.: E. P. Kinne.

Treas.: C. C. Black.

Sec.: W. W. Perkins.

S. D.: R. C. Story.

J. D.: James Simpson.

S. S.: S. H. Myton.

J. S.: J. C. Roberts.

C.: E. T. Trimble.

T.: S. E. Berger.

Troup setting up law office in new bank building...

Winfield Courier, January 1, 1880.

M. G. Troup has secured one of the offices in the new bank building, and is completing his arrangements to step down and out and into a first-class law practice after the 12th day of Janu­ary. His intimate knowledge of titles, together with his clear and concise ideas of law will soon place him in the foremost rank of attorneys at our bar.

Winfield Courier, January 15, 1880.

M. G. Troup steps down and out of the County Clerk’s office this week to give place to his successor. He has held the office for six years and leaves it with an honorable record. He has been one of the most accomplished and obliging officers we ever had. He will carry his energy and efficiency into this law and collection business and make it a success.

Winfield Courier, January 22, 1880.


Suss, Seward, Troup, and several others went up the river last Sunday on the little steamboat. When about two miles up, they spied a lame duck with a broken wing, and immediately started in pursuit. The duck proved to be a good swimmer, and for over an hour the contest for possession on one hand and life and liberty on the other, was waged with unequaled fierceness. But the duck was captured, and that evening seven tired but brave souls were tucked away in seven little beds, with a duck feather ornamenting each headboard as a trophy of this glorious victory. They now think of joining the militia.

Winfield Courier, February 19, 1880.

M. G. Troup is home again.

Winfield Courier, March 25, 1880.

M. G. Troup received a brand new safe Tuesday morning.

Troup and Allen B. Lemmon become law partners: Winfield Bank Building...

Arkansas City Traveler, April 14, 1880.

Troup and Lemmon, of Winfield, have formed a partnership in the practice of law.

Winfield Courier, April 15, 1880.

M. G. Troup and A. B. Lemmon have formed a co-partnership in the practice of law. Their card appears in this paper. CARD: TROUP & LEMMON [M. G. TROUP/ALLEN B. LEMMON], ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Special attention given to Collections. Office in Winfield Bank Building, Winfield, Kansas.

[LEMMON AND TROOP: LAW PARTNERSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, May 6, 1880.

State Superintendent Lemmon has formed a law partnership with M. G. Troup, of Winfield, and will engage in the legal profession at the expiration of his present official tenure and settle at Winfield, his former home. Mr. Lemmon is a man of indomitable energy, will power, and tenacity, and he will engage in his new calling with earnestness, and success.            Mr. Troup is a gentleman of capability and experience as well as one of Cowley County’s most popular and trusted citizens. Fredonia Citizen.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 11, 1880.

M. G. Troup and Frank Jennings came down from Winfield last night to address the Republicans of this place, but on account of the temperance meeting, it was thought best to adjourn politics. Notice will be given next week of our next meeting.

[“X. Y. CAESAR” - BALTIMORE.]

Winfield Courier, August 12, 1880.

Mr. M. G. Troup made a call on the Republicans congregated in their primary.

M. G. Troup on advisory board of company...

[ENTERPRISE GOLD AND SILVER MINING AND SMELTING COMPANY.]

Winfield Courier, August 12, 1880.

At the meeting of the Directors of The Enterprise Gold and Silver Mining and Smelting Company, of Sherman, Colorado, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year.

Hon. W. P. Hackney, President.

John Service, Vice-President.

T. K. Johnston, Treasurer.

E. P. Kinne, Secretary.

F. Gallotti, General Manager.

Advisory Board: S. C. Smith, M. G. Troup, John D. Pryor.

Special Executive Committee: T. K. Johnston, E. P. Kinne, F. Gallotti.


Arkansas City Traveler, August 18, 1880.

At the meeting of the citizens of Winfield in the interest of the Enterprise Gold and Silver Mining and Smelting Company, an organization was perfected and the following officers elected: President, Hon. W. P. Hackney; vice president, John Service; treasurer, T. K. Johnston; secretary, E. P. Kinne; general manager, Frank Gallotti; advisory board—S. C. Smith, M. G. Troup, John D. Pryor. A special executive committee, consisting of T. K. Johnston, Frank Gallotti, and E. P. Kinne, was selected.

[CONVENTION NOTES.]

Winfield Courier, September 9, 1880.

After E. B. Brainerd was put in nomination by Hon. A. L. Redden, for Treasurer, M. G. Troup, of Winfield, arose and  in a short address seconded the nomination. We were back of the Cowley delegation sitting on a table at the end of the hall beside the Hon. Eugene Ware, the famed poet of Fort Scott. Mr. Ware remarked to us that Mr. Troup’s speech was “just the neatest and best thing of the kind he ever heard.” Not long after this Mr. Troup was strolling past us and we had the pleasure of introduc­ing to the poet the orator he had so gracefully complimented.

M. G. Troup was a member of the committee on credentials and was complimented on the efficient work he did in that capacity.

Winfield Courier, November 18, 1880.

Troup & Lemmon have increased their law library so much of late that they have been compelled to put in a fine, new, large book-case extra. They have a large and fine looking library.

Winfield Courier, December 2, 1880.

Judge Stivers and wife, of Fredonia, Kansas, came over to eat turkey with their children, M. G. Troup and wife, and George R. Stivers. The judge is hale and looks in the prime of life.

Mrs. Troup...

[TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE TO THOSE IN WANT IN WINFIELD.]

Winfield Courier, December 16, 1880.

A meeting was held in the council rooms last Thursday evening to consider means for temporary assistance to those in want in our city.

John B. Lynn was made chairman, and James Kelly, secretary.

Committees to solicit contributions were appointed as follows.

Northeast:  Mesdames Holloway, Linticum, and Troup.

Mr. and Mrs. Troup...

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

With the earliest settlers of Winfield, came Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Millington, since which time their hospitable home has been a favorite with our society people.

At their reception last evening an unusually happy and enjoyable time was had. Mr. and Mrs. Millington, assisted by their daughters, Misses Kate and Jessie, were truly at home in the manner and method of receiving their friends, with a smile and a pleasant word for all. No wonder the hours passed so quickly by. All restraint and formality was laid aside for an evening of genuine good feeling and pleasure.


Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bliss, Mr. and Mrs. N. L. Rigby, Mr. and Mrs. McDonald, Mr. and Mrs. Hackney, Mr. and Mrs. Spotswood, Mr. and Mrs. Gene Baird, Mr. and Mrs. Bedilion, Mr. and Mrs. Moffitt, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. McMullen, Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. H. Brown, Dr. and Mrs. Black, Mr. and Mrs. Hickok, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Pryor, Mr. and Mrs. Troup, Mr. and Mrs. Scovill, Mr. and Mrs. Lundy, Mr. and Mrs. Lemmon, Dr. and Mrs. Emerson, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Short, Mr. and Mrs. Kretsinger, Mr. and Mrs. Shrieves, Mr. and Mrs. Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Millington, Mrs. Huston, Miss McCommon, Wirt W. Walton, and J. R. Conklin.

Refreshments were served to the satisfaction and praise of all, and not until a late hour came the “good nights” and the departure of friends for their homes, each of whom will not soon forget the pleasant evening with Mr. and Mrs. Millington. Daily Telegram.

[ELECTION OF OFFICERS, ADELPHI LODGE.]

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

Adelphi Lodge No. 110, A. F. & A. M., elected and installed officers on Monday evening as follows.

J. S. Hunt, W. M.

James Kelly, S. W.

R. C Story, J. W.

J. C. McMullen, Treas.

E. T. Trimble, Secretary.

C. C. Black, S. D.

M. G. Troup, J. D.

J. Cairns, Chaplain.

W. A. Freeman, S. S.

W. W. Smith, J. S.

S. E. Berger, Tyler.

Troup now has a new law partner: Lafe Pence...

[THE MONITOR’S LOCALS.]

Winfield Courier, January 13, 1881.

The lawyers are doing what the bachelors ought to do, that is double up. The latest combination is that of M. G. Troup and Lafe Pence. It makes a strong team and is well balanced politi­cally. Success and long life to the combination.

[REPUBLICAN WARD MEETINGS.]

Winfield Courier, March 24, 1881.

The Republicans of the First Ward of the city met at the courthouse on Saturday evening, the 19th. Called to order by W. J. Wilson of the Ward committee: D. A. Millington was chosen chairman and S. M. Jarvis secretary. J. E. Platter was nominated for member of the school board by acclamation. A ballot was taken for councilman, resulting in E. P. Hickok 34, C. A. Bliss 12. Mr. Hickok was declared the nominee. The chairman being authorized by a vote of the meeting to appoint a ward committee of three, appointed M. G. Troup, W. J. Wilson, and R. R. Conklin such committee.

[FOR SALE: PAT KIRBY FARM.]


Winfield Courier, March 24, 1881.

I have for sale 160 acres of first-class land, 4 miles north of Winfield, the same being known as the Pat Kirby farm. For sale cheap. Payments part cash and part credit. For further information inquire of the undersigned at his residence, or M. G. Troup, at his office in Winfield, Kansas. FRANK WEAKLY, Administrator of Pat Kirby.

Troup nominated Mayor on fourth ballot...

[REPUBLICAN CITY CONVENTION.]

Winfield Courier, March 31, 1881.

RECAP: Judge Soward and Ed Greer were appointed tellers. On motion of Hackney, delegates were requested to deposit the ballot on the call of the secretary. Nominations being in order, the following gentlemen were placed in nomination for mayor: T. R. Bryan, S. C. Smith, J. C. McMullen, and M. G. Troup. On the fourth ballot Mr. Troup was nominated.

Excerpt from a lengthy article...

[EDITORIAL PAGE: H. P. STANDLEY, PUBLISHER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 6, 1881.

I have not been a supporter of Mr. Troup of late years; I, in common with many others, fell into the foolish notion that, because a man made a good officer, and held the office a long time, was no reason for his further retention; hence, I voted for Captain Hunt and against Troup, but I am forced to admit that Mr. Troup’s official record is without a blemish, and I, with others who thought as I did, regret the day that saw him step down and out. Certain it is, that the blunders now charged to the county commissioners, and which, if really chargeable at all, are chargeable to the inefficiency of the county clerk; and never would have happened had Mr. Troup retained his old position.

[CITY POLITICS.]

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

A great many Republicans were not satisfied with the Repub­lican nominations for city officers, and joined with the Demo­crats to nominate a citizens’ ticket. They met at the opera house on last Saturday evening and put in nomination J. B. Lynn for mayor, O. M. Seward for city attorney, T. R. Bryan for city treasurer, J. D. Pryor for treasurer of the board of education, W. E. Tansey for justice of the peace and police judge, John Moffitt and A. H. Doane for councilmen, N. L. Rigby and E. P. Kinne for members of the school board, and J. T. Quarles and B. McFadden for constables. Mr. Bryan was not present at the meeting, but it was understood that he would support the straight Republican ticket, having already accepted the nomination for city treasurer tendered him by the Republicans.

On Monday evening the supporters of both tickets held meetings, and speakers harangued the people. The Citizens held their meeting in the street, and used the stone steps of the Winfield Bank for a rostrum.

We did not get a report of the speakers, for we were in the other meeting: that of the republi­cans in the opera house. Of this meeting Col. C. M. Wood was chairman, and made a stirring address, which was followed by strong and pungent speeches from H. E. Asp, M. G. Troup, W. P. Hackney, and T. H. Soward.


The scathing that Mayor Lynn and Marshal Stevens got at their hands was terrible and cruel to the victims. Their admin­istration was shown up in no enviable light, and the speakers demanded a change.

Mr. and Mrs. Troup...

[THE SOCIAL ENTERTAINMENT OF THE SEASON.]

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

On last Thursday evening was gathered in the magnificent salons of M. L. Robinson one of the largest parties which have assembled in Winfield this past season. The honors of the occasion were conducted by Mr. and Mrs. Robinson and Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Spotswood in the most graceful and pleasing manner, making each of the guests feel delighted and happy. A new departure was made in the hour for reception which we cannot too highly commend, that of substituting 7 o’clock for the late hours which usually prevail, but the habits of some were so confirmed that they could not get around until nine o’clock. The banquet was excellent beyond our power of description. Nothing was wanting to render it perfect in all its appointments. At a reasonable hour the guests retired, expressing the warmest thanks to their kind hostesses and hosts for the pleasures of the evening. The following are the names of the guests as we now remember them.

Miss Nettie McCoy, Mrs. Huston, Mrs. S. H. Myton, Mrs. Mansfield, Mrs. Eastman, Mrs. Ticer, Mr. M. G. Hodges, Mr. C. A. Bliss, Mr. W. C. Robinson, Mr. W. A. Smith, Mr. W. J. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Loose, Mrs. Herrington, Mr. and Mrs. Van Doren, Mr. and Mrs. S. S. Linn, Mr. and Mrs. Wallis, Mr. and Mrs. Lemmon, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. Platter, Mr. and Mrs. J. Harden, Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Hackney, Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Pryor, Mr. and Mrs. Black, Mr. and Mrs. H. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. Hickok, Mr. and Mrs. Conklin, Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Bryan, Mr. and Mrs. Dever, Mr. and Mrs. Bedilion, Mr. and Mrs. Holmes, Mr. and Mrs. Barclay, Mrs. W. F. Baird, Mr. and Mrs. Mann, Mr. and Mrs. Allen, Mr. and Mrs. Doane, Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Millington, Mr. and Mrs. Horning, Mr. and Mrs. Troup, Mr. and Mrs. F. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Baird, Mr. and Mrs. Emerson, Mr. and Mrs. McDonald, and Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Read.

[ELECTION RETURNS.]

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

The result of the city election of last Tuesday is given in the table below. Names of candidates on the Republican ticket are in Roman, Citizens ticket in small caps, and on both in caps.

FOR MAYOR: M. G. TROUP AND J. B. LYNN.

            TROUP WON: MAJORITY 28.

FOR COUNCILMEN: JOHN MOFFITT, M. L. READ, A. H. DOANE.

       JOHN MOFFITT WON: MAJORITY 57; AND

            M. L. READ WON: MAJORITY 22.

Troup becomes Mayor of Winfield...

Arkansas City Traveler, April 13, 1881.

The city election, in Winfield, last week resulted as follows. Mayor: M. G. Troup. Councilmen: J. Moffitt, M. L. Read. Treasurer: T. R. Bryan. Attorney: O. M. Seward. Police Judge and J. P.: N. E. Tansey.

[MAYOR TROUP’S INAUGURAL.]

Winfield Courier, April 14, 1881.


               To the Honorable Council of the City of Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas.

Gentlemen: To the end that we may mutually understand the condition of our City affairs at the time when they are turned over to our care and management by our predecessors in office and be mutually and understandingly advised as to the obstacles and difficulties that we shall necessarily encounter in our endeavor to faithfully administer said affairs so as not to make them an unnecessary burden upon the people, and at the same time to be able to turn them over to our successors in office unencumbered by debt, I deem it my duty to submit this paper to your consideration.

Now that we are elected and installed, we are no longer the partisan candidates of any “ring,” “clique,” or “act,” but as men, worthy of the honor conferred upon us, we are the servants of every man, woman, and child, resident in our little City, and as honest men, are bound to regard the rights of all, however humble or exalted their station among us. I hope that “equal and exact justice to all,” and “a due regard to the right of protec­tion to person and property to every individual citizen,” may be the thought uppermost in the minds of us all, in the discharge of our several duties, at all times, during our rela­tions as offi­cers of this city.

The first and most serious obstacle that we shall encounter will be the question of a revenue with which to meet the neces­sary expenses incident to a faithful and prudent administration of the city government.

As you are all aware, the principal source of revenue of cities like ours, has been entirely and unalterably cut off by the adoption of the amendment, and the enactment of a law to enforce the same, so that we are now called upon to administer our affairs without that revenue, and are, as I look at it, bound to do so in the way and manner that will be least oppres­sive to the public.

Your clerk has kindly furnished me the following statement of the receipts, and expenditures for the year ending March 15th, 1881, with the amount on hand at the beginning of the year, namely on March 15th, 1880.

RECEIPTS.

Fines Police Court:                   $    254.25

License drays and busses:         $    302.50

License concerts and shows:           $      64.50

License pedlars and street:        $      80.75

License shooting galleries:         $      21.00

License billiard tables:               $      57.50

License auctioneers:                        $      38.35

License public scales:                      $      29.60

License express and telegraph:  $      24.20

License saloons:                              $ 2,000.00

License druggists:                      $    190.00

Rent from county:                     $      26.65

Dog tax:                                         $      68.00

Old tax county treasurer:                 $    157.01

Total receipts:                     $ 3,320.31

On hand March 15, 1880:        $    649.87


Total resources:                  $ 3,969.98

Total expenditures:        $ 3,423.73

Balance:                             $    545.25

EXPENDITURES

Officers salaries:                             $ 1,460.05

Street crossings and gutters:            $    771.90

Work on streets:                             $    237.50

Extra police service:                        $      28.50

City printing:                                   $    143.68

Books and stationery:                     $      34.44

Office rents:                                    $    120.60

Boarding prisoners:                   $      64.30

Judges and clerks election:        $      20.00

Rooms for election:                   $        8.00

Express and postage charges:          $      17.30

Public wells:                                    $    122.95

Water works committee:                 $    200.00

Merchandise and lumber:                $      62.08

Fuel:                                               $      27.20

Tool repairs:                                   $      12.95

Repairs on jail:                          $      34.82

Rent engine house grounds:       $      30.00

Remitted license:                             $      10.00

Removing nuisances:                       $      18.00

Total expenditures:              $ 3,423.73

The above balance was the cash resources of the city on hand March 15th, 1881. The clerk also informs me that warrants against said amount have been issued by our predecessors since the 15th of March last, to such an amount as to now leave on hand in cash the sum of $104.18. The city also holds unpaid orders on the county treasurer for rent to the amount of $90.00; so that it may be said that we receive our trust unencumbered by debt, and with $194.16 in the treasury. A casual glance at the sources of revenue will disclose to you that from three items, namely, the saloons, druggists, and county treasurer, the city received $2,347.01, the balance of the revenue amounting to $973.30 coming from sources still open to us under the ordinances as they now exist.


It is perhaps hardly fair to assume that the receipts from the sources left will be as great this year as last, because I find on examination that the fines for the first quarter of last year amount to five times as much as they do for the fourth quarter, and is accounted for by the fact that during the first part of last year the last of our railroad building was being done, and every person will doubtless remember that the railroad builders were very liberal contributors to this fund. I suppose that with the saloons will also go out some of the billiard table licenses. The clerk, who is perhaps best able to estimate the income from the present sources, places it at about $635.00. Now “the nut we are expected to crack” is now to run this city on $600 or $700, when it cost $3,423.73 to maintain the city during the year last past, and do this without imposing enormous taxes on an already tax-burdened people.

Certainly radical and practical economy and retrenchment will be required to enable us to accomplish this result. It will be observed from the foregoing statement that there was expended on the streets in cash the sum of $1,009.46. It does seem to me that with a faithful, efficient, and honest street commissioner, that the two days’ work (or in lieu thereof three dollars) which every able-bodied male citizen between the ages of twenty-one and forty-five is required to perform or pay, will be abundantly sufficient to keep up and maintain in proper condition all the streets and alleys in the city. This source of revenue to the city seems to have been sadly overlooked and neglected, as I find that no report or accounting has been made or had at the hands of the street commissioner during the past year. I trust that with your assistance we may be able to make this department suffi­ciently efficient to keep up the streets without any expenditure out of the city treasury, and if possible create a revenue besides. This will save an item of $1,009.46.

I have a proposition from a gentleman who is in every respect qualified for the position, that if he be appointed city clerk, he will furnish to the city free of rent a suitable room for the sittings of the council, during the year. I hope that you will agree with me in this appointment, to the end that we may thus save to the city an item of $120 rent, and $27.20 fuel.

The item of $200, to a water works committee, I take it can very well be dispensed with entirely during the coming year. It seems to me that the officers’ salaries ought to be brought within the sum of $1,000, especially while we are in our present condition, and graded and fixed at $500 for the marshal, $200 for the clerk, including registration services, $150 for the street commissioner, $100 for the city attorney, and $50 for the city engineer. If that could be done, it would save us on the item of official salaries the sum of $460.05 over last year. Thus on the five items of streets, rent, fuel, water works, and official salaries, we can, if we do our duty as we ought under all the circumstances, save the sum of $1,818.41, which would bring our expenses down to the sum of $1,613.63. I think that by exercis­ing rigid and practical economy, we might reduce all the other items of expenses sufficiently to save $212.63 more, which would bring it down to $1,400.

We have seen above that we may expect from the ordinary sources under the ordinances as they now exist, about $700; rent from the county $120.00; and now we have on hand $194.18, making in all $1,014.16 as our present and future resources, leaving us only the sum of $385.84 to be raised in some way to be provided for by you.

If after mature deliberation and investigation, we find that we can raise that amount either by increasing the licenses already imposed by ordinance or by imposing other licenses on some transient or special business that will not militate against the reasonably accepted best business interests, growth and prosperity of our city, then I shall be in favor of so raising said sum in that way; otherwise, I am of the opinion that it ought to be raised by direct taxation.


In conclusion, gentlemen, I trust I shall have your cordial cooperation in reducing our city expenses to the lowest possible limit consistent with the efficient management of its affairs, and its material growth and development. I also trust that you will unanimously aid me in the organization of the executive force of the city in such manner as will insure the enforcement of all laws which are calculated to secure morality, sobriety, virtue, and protection to person and property in our midst during our term of office.

Let us not make use of our power in the reflection of the executive force “to reward our friends and punish our enemies, but let us have in view solely the enforcement of law, and good order and government.”

I recognize the fact that upon the mayor largely depends the enforcement of the laws providing punishment for crimes peculiar to all cities, such as gambling, bawdyism, and the sale of intoxicating liquors; and I say to you here and now, that if you will provide me with subordinates who will faithfully and fully aid and assist me in enforcing the laws, that I will undertake to see that all the laws prohibiting these things shall be duly enforced.

I say this not in a braggadocio spirit, nor for the purpose of cruelly or harshly persecuting any person, or class of per­sons; but on the contrary, I say it in all kindness but firmness, believing that it is now my sworn duty, during my term of office, to see that those peculiar vices are made to feel the full penalty of the law.

Believing that you, each and all, have in view only the government of our city in such manner as will secure to us an orderly, moral, temperate, and law abiding community, wherein we may have our homes without “fear and trembling” lest our sons and daughters may be led away by these pitfalls of ruin, I confident­ly and implicitly rely upon you to do all things within your power to aid me “in enforcing all laws and ordinances for the government of the city” in such a way as to secure to us that priceless blessing.

                                                      M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Winfield, Kansas, April 11, 1881.

[PUBLICATION NOTICE: WASHINGTON COUNTY ORGANIZATION.]

Winfield Courier, April 14, 1881.

                  Before the Board of County Commissioners of Cowley County, Kansas.

In the matter of the organization of Washington township.

Notice is hereby given to all persons interested that a petition signed by Daniel Zerger and forty-nine other qualified electors residing on the territory hereinafter described, will on the 4th day of October, A. D., 1881, be presented to the board of county commissioners of Cowley County, Kansas, asking said board to set off and organize a new township, bounded as follows, to wit:

Commencing at the northeast corner of section one (1), in township thirty-one (31), south of range seven (7) east; running thence south along the section line to the southwest corner of section thirteen (13), in township thirty-two (32), south of range seven (7) east; thence east on the section line to the east line of Cowley County; thence north along the east line of said county to the township line between townships thirty (30) and thirty-one (31), and thence west along said township line to the place of beginning; said new township to be called Washington, and to be formed wholly out of territory now being a part of Windsor township.

                                        TROUP & PENCE, Atty’s for Petitioners.

Winfield, Kas., April 1, 1881

[THE NEW CITY OFFICERS.]

Winfield Courier, April 21, 1881.


On Monday night Mayor Troup gave his nominations for city officers in the council. The names offered by him were: For marshal, James Bethel; for city clerk, D. C. Beach; for street commissioner, C. M. Wood, for city engineer, S. C. Smith. The council confirmed the appointments of Beach for clerk and Smith for engineer, but refused to confirm Bethel as marshal. A resolution was passed requiring the marshal to perform the duties of street commissioner in addition to his own, and reducing his salary to forty dollars a month. The council then went into executive session on the marshal question, which resulted in the appointment of Mr. John Burris. Mr. Burris is a good man, and will fill the position to the satisfaction of all, if he decides to accept the appointment.

[DISTRICT COURT.]

Winfield Courier, May 12, 1881.

Smiley vs. Wright, referred to M. G. Troup.

Troup has another person with him in law office: J. P. Short...

Winfield Courier, May 19, 1881.

J. P. Short can be found with M. G. Troup, upstairs, in the Winfield Bank building.

Winfield Courier, May 19, 1881.

The contract on the McDougall building was let to John Swain, on Monday and work was begun immediately. It is to be completed by September 1st. The work is in charge of a superin­tendent, and referees have been appointed to settle disputed questions between the contractor and superintendent. The refer­ees appoint­ed are A. B. Lemmon, M. G. Troup, and M. L. Robinson.

Mrs. Troup and children go visiting...

Winfield Courier, June 16, 1881.

Mrs. M. G. Troup and children have gone on a visit to Fredonia.

[RELIEF FOR THE SUFFERERS BY THE FLORAL CYCLONE.]

Winfield Courier, June 16, 1881.

A considerable number of the citizens of Winfield met on Monday evening on the steps of the Winfield Bank to provide for raising funds for the immediate relief of the sufferers caused by the cyclone Sunday evening. Mr. Crippen called the people together by music from the band.

Rev. J. E. Platter was chosen chairman and made one of his neat and impressive speeches followed by Messrs. Hackney, Troup, Beach, and others.

A committee of ten gentlemen was appointed by the chair to canvass for subscriptions, consisting of Messrs. C. C. Black, J. S. Hunt, J. B. Lynn, M. G. Troup, D. A. Millington, D. L. Kretsinger, J. P. Short, R. E. Wallis, W. H. Smith, and H. D. Gans.

During the day the canvass of the city resulted in the following cash subscriptions.

                                                        M. G. Troup $10.00.

Winfield Courier, June 23, 1881.

M. G. Troup has gone to Fredonia after his family.

Excerpts...

[THE MANNY TRIAL.]

Winfield Courier, July 7, 1881.

                                                 THE EVIDENCE IN BRIEF.


Mr. Miller was then asked what he had drank at Manny’s. He stated that he had called for “ginger” and that he probably got what he called for. That it was about the color of barnyard drainage, that he had bought a quart, and had paid twenty cents for it, that he had never become intoxicated on it, and had never drank more than two glasses at a time. He was then asked when he had heard that “ginger” was being sold there.

The defense objected, but the objection was overruled. The witness then said that it was about the middle of May. He stated that he had never seen anyone become intoxicated on this drink. That he lived several hundred feet from the brewery; that it had about the same effect as lemonade.

Mr. Jochems was then called. He had been at Manny’s brewery twice since the first of May. The defense then objected on the ground that the prosecution should confine itself to the sale already proven and the point was ably argued by Mr. Asp. Mr. Troup assisting the state, spoke for ten minutes, and Mr. Asp closed the argument. The objection was sustained and the court held the prosecution to the sale proven to Miller and allowed to introduce testimony to prove the drink known as “ginger” was intoxicating, providing no date or other sale than the one made to Miller was fixed by date. Mr. Jochems then testified that he had drank “ginger” and that it produced no effect on him.

The argument of the state was opened by Mr. Beach in a general review of the evidence. He was followed by Judge Soward who made an able argument extending over an hour and a half, containing many excellent points. M. G. Troup followed with an hour, Judge Camp-bell with an hour and a half, and Attorney Jennings closed.

The jury remained out all night and till late the next day when, having failed to agree, they were discharged by the court. The ballot stood seven for conviction and five for acquittal.

[COUNTY FUNDS REFUNDED BY COUNTY OFFICERS.]

Winfield Courier, August 11, 1881.

The amount refunded by the county officers having received excessive salaries, principal, and interest, is as follows.

Story: $178.61

McDermott: $178.61

Bryan: $1,500.00

Troup: $595.37

Total: $2,452.59

Amount due and soon to be paid in:

Bryan: $728.00

Torrance: $222.00

T        : $250.00

GRAND TOTAL: $3,402.59

[THE OLD SOLDIERS.]

Winfield Courier, August 25, 1881.

The meeting at Manning’s hall on Saturday, August 20th, was well attended by the old soldiers. Capt. Haight with a section of his battery, put in a number of shots that sounded like old times to the boys. Messrs. Pixley, Requa, Woodruff, Roseberry, and others furnished old time martial music. At 11 a.m., the meeting was called to order with C. M. Wood in the chair, and Jake Nixon, secretary.


Invitation and speakers: Hon. W. P. Hackney, Gen. A. H. Green, D. L. Kretsinger, M. G. Troup, Capt. Chenoweth, Capt. Nipp, Major D. P. Marshall, N. W. Dressie, and C. H. Bing.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 31, 1881. Editorial Page.

                                                    THE OLD SOLDIERS.

Delegates meeting—a permanent organization elected, committees appointed, and the time fixed for the reunion of the old soldiers of Cowley.

The meeting at Manning’s hall on Saturday, Aug. 20th, was well attended by the old soldiers. Capt. Haight with a section of his battery, put in a number of shots that sounded like old times to the boys. Messrs. Pixley, Requa, Woodruff, Roseberry, and others furnished old time martial music. At 11 a.m. the meeting was called to order with C. M. Wood in the chair, and Jake Nixon, secretary.

Invitation and speakers—Hon. W. P. Hackney, Gen. Green, D. L. Kretsinger, M. G. Troup, Capt. Chenoweth, Capt. Nipp, Major Marshall, N. W. Dressie, and C. H. Bing.

Winfield Courier, October 20, 1881.

T. A. Wilkinson is no longer among us, but several of our citizens who befriended him and helped him to breast the storms of life by extending credit will have cause to remember him as long as memory holds. The COURIER is one of the unfortunate who placed too much confidence in an oily tongue and an adamantine cheek, and mourns this fact to the tune of $175.00. Other small amounts are scattered here and there, and in fact his autographs are so conspicuously abundant in this community that they have fallen way below par. But the worst victims misplaced confi­dence are Messrs. J. E. Platter, M. G. Troup, and J. W. Curns. Wilkinson at one time conceived the idea of starting a lumber yard. This, of itself, wasn’t much of a conception, as men start lumber yards every day.

The brilliant feature in this case was that Wilkinson hadn’t a dollar in the world, or credit enough to buy a ring of bologna sausage on time. But he intended to work “with his usual ability” to compass that end. The world will never know the sleek arguments and sycophantic appeals for aid that induced the following gentleman to execute this paper.

                                            Winfield, Kansas, March 11, 1881.

“We hereby authorize the Chicago Lumber Company of Wichita, Kansas, to furnish to T. A. Wilkinson such building material as he may wish, not exceeding the value of $2,000 at once, and if the said T. A. Wilkinson shall fail to pay the same, either in money or material received from the Chicago Lumber Company, then, upon ninety days notice, we agree to pay the Chicago Lumber Company the amount remaining due from T. A. Wilkinson to the Chicago Lumber Company.

T. A. WILKINSON.                       JAS. E. PLATTER,

M. G. TROUP,

J. W. CURNS.


The reader will observe Mr. Wilkinson’s name in the left hand corner. This was put on to give the paper a current value as it were. Things went on swimmingly for a time. The lumber yard “boomed,” Wilkinson “bummed” and everything wore a roseate hue. But finally there came a crash, the lumber yard suspended, and Wilkinson rushed wildly around tearing his hair and assuring his creditors that “all would be right,” he “intended to pay every cent he owed,” and indulging in various other mythical and fanciful expressions. This was his last business venture here, and after swindling out a scanty existence for a short time, packed his valise, and amid tears and lamentations, bid Cowley an affectionate adieu and hid himself in New Mexico, leaving Messrs. Platter, Troup, and Curns to pay the full amount of their guaran­tee for lumber that he had bought, sold, and squandered the proceeds of. He is now in Pueblo, we understand, running a hotel. He should be running a shovel up at Leavenworth, with black and white stripes running around his trouser legs. He is a large able-bodied citizen, fully able to take an ax and earn his living as Abraham Lincoln did, and it is a sad commentary on the laws of our country that he is still permitted to run at large and grow fat on the substance of others.

Winfield Courier, October 20, 1881.

Monday evening Mr. Burroughs offered his resignation as marshal to the council and it was accepted. Mayor Troup nominated James Bethel for the place, but the vote stood two for and two against confirmation. The Mayor did not throw the casting vote and offered the name of R. H. True, which was unanimously endorsed. Mr. True is one of our best citizens and will make an excellent marshal.

Troup appears alone: no partners listed...

Cowley County Courant, November 17, 1881.

M. G. TROUP, ATTORNEY AT LAW. Office, Winfield bank building, upstairs.

Cowley County Courant, November 24, 1881.

And now comes another suit against old Winfield Township, this time in the U. S. Court. It is brought by the King Bridge Company, who sue for about $2,000. Mayor Troup and the different township officers have been served with the proper papers.

[BRIDGE SUITS.]

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

The King Iron Bridge Co. has sued the townships of Vernon, Pleasant Valley, and Walnut, and the City of Winfield in the United States Circuit Court for the sum of $1,879.67 and inter­est, on five township orders of the old Winfield Township, all issued for building the approaches to the South bridge April 10, 1879, except $330.00, Dec. 31, 1878, for iron bridges. Rossington, Johnston & Smith of Topeka are attorneys for the plaintiff. The petition asks for the appointment of a master in chancery who shall take proof of the territorial extent and taxable property of the parts of the old Winfield Township now in each of the defendant limits and apportion the indebtedness to each, and that an order issue that each of the defendant munici­palities pay their proportion immediately. This is in addition to the suit of Carpenter brought by M. G. Troup in the district court of this county for the payment of $2,036.10 of bridge scrip of Winfield Township and interest from October 15, 1881. This is one of the results of bad management in the past in the disrup­tion of Winfield Township. Now there is no other way to pay the indebtedness legally except at the end of a suit in chancery.

Winfield Courier, December 15, 1881.

Mayor Troup and S. D. Pryor went over to Independence Tuesday morning to look after some cases in the Montgomery court.

Cowley County Courant, December 22, 1881.


Messrs. Hackney, Troup, Pryor, and Boyle returned from Independence Saturday night. The Hitchcock-Tarrant case was given to the jury Friday, who wrestled with it until Saturday evening, bringing in a verdict in favor of Tarrant. We under­stand that they stood at first, ten for Tarrant and two for Hitchcock. The case will probably be appealed to the Supreme Court. The other Winfield cases were put over until next week.

Troup has another law partner: Jennings. He is now over Read’s Bank...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Messrs. Jennings and Troup have entered into a law part­nership in Winfield.

Cowley County Courant, January 19, 1882.

Judge Buckman has moved into the back rooms over Read’s bank, and Jennings & Troup occupy the front rooms. Excellent loafing quarters up there now.

Cowley County Courant, January 19, 1882.

The old established and well known law firm of Jennings & Buckman has been dissolved. This firm came here a few years ago, and had steadily increased its law practice, and won the highest respect of all who had business transactions with it. Messrs. Jennings and Troup have formed a law partnership, and have fitted up the rooms over Read’s Bank, that were formerly occupied by the old firm. Mr. Buckman occupies the rooms in the rear, over the same building, where he still continues to dispense justice to unfortunate litigants. While we thought Messrs. Jennings and Buckman were wedded in the law practice, we believe the new firm will meet with the success that two such capable men as our worthy Mayor and County Attorney must bring. We wish the new firm and Mr. Buckman success.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

Jennings & Troup have fitted up their office in first-class style. It is a mighty comfortable place to spend an hour, although they wouldn’t have us say it for a dollar.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

County Attorney Jennings went down to Atlantic City, Wednesday, to try a case on a grand larceny charge. A farmer in Bolton Township is charged with stealing a harrow and plow.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

Messrs. Frank S. Jennings and M. G. Troup have formed a co-partnership in the law business. No two men in the State of Kansas are better fitted to work together than these gentlemen. They are both lawyers of acknowledged merit, thoroughly acquainted with all branches of the practice, and chuck full of legal lore. They will take rank with the leading firms of the Southwest at once.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Frank Jennings and M. G. Troup have formed a law partner­ship. They will make one of the best legal teams in this county, as both are well known as accurate, careful lawyers.

CARD: F. S. JENNINGS                                      M. G. TROUP

                                                     JENNINGS & TROUP,

                                                    ATTORNEYS AT LAW,

                                                           Winfield, Kansas.

                                             Office up stairs over the Post Office.

Cowley County Courant, February 2, 1882.


M. G. Troup, James McDermott, and J. R. Bryan have been chosen arbitrators to adjust the Tunnel Mills difficulty between Harter and Harris. No better men could have been chosen for this work.

Winfield Courier, February 2, 1882.

DIED. It is with pain that we record the death of Mr. Thos. G. Ticer, which occurred at his home on Saturday evening, January 28th. Mr. Ticer came here with his family some three years ago, and established himself in the Loan and Insurance business. He had not been here long when ill health compelled him to leave here, and he went on the road hoping that the change would prove beneficial; but after trying Colorado and New Mexico, his disease took the form of consumption and he at last rejoined his family, and came back to die. He was surrounded during his last illness by wife and children, brothers and sisters, and sympathizing friends, each trying to brighten his few remaining hours on earth. The funeral occurred on Monday morning at ten o’clock and was conducted by the Masonic lodge, the members appearing in regalia, with appropriate emblems. The Episcopal choir sang some beautiful hymns in their sweetest manner, and Mr. Platter’s comforting remarks did much to ease the pains of parting with the dead. The pall bearers were Messrs. E. S. Torrance, A. D. Hendricks, Dr. Cooper, M. G. Troup, McCune, and J. S. Mann.

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

                                                           Bonds Wanted.

The undersigned desires to invest $1,200 in school bonds. Will pay the market price. Bonds and interest payable at Winfield, Kansas. Inquire or write to G. L. RINKER, Executor of the estate of Judge Baily deceased, or JENNINGS & TROUP, Attorneys.

                                                   OLD WINFIELD SCRIP.

Cowley County Courant, March 2, 1882.

We have heard considerable comment among our citizens in relation to the payment of the city’s share of the scrip issued by old Winfield Township, for which the city of Winfield has been sued by the King Bridge Company and by Carpenter and Reed.

The city’s proportion to pay, should the courts decide the debt legal, would be considerable, and the people of this city would certainly wish to know that the debt was lawful before they are called upon to tax themselves for two or three thousand dollars. The city council at a meeting resolved to contest, if all the other townships would join, in testing the legality of this large amount of scrip.

Since then we have learned that Pleasant Valley Township has refused to contest, but we suppose of course, the city council will take steps to protect the interests of the people and see that they pay only such debts as are legal. This scrip has not a very good name, and is thought by many to have been illegally issued.

Though Mayor Troup is attorney for the parties bringing the suit, we suppose he will guard the interests of the people as well as those of his clients, and the citizens of this city will look to him and to the city council for full protection of their rights. If these claims are legal, the city will not hesitate a moment or protest an instant over their payment, but a decision of the courts should certainly be obtained.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

                                                       BONDS WANTED.


The undersigned desires to invest $1,200 in School Bonds. Will pay the highest market price. Bonds and interest will be payable at Winfield, Kansas. Write, or inquire personally, of G. L. Rinker, Executor of estate of Judge Bailey, deceased, or Jennings & Troup, Attorneys, Winfield, Kansas.

Cowley County Courant, March 16, 1882.

During the trial of Thomas Sheddan before Judge Gans this morning, Mayor Troup appeared as council for the county and while asking diverse questions, the defendant was walking the floor and in illustrating how he had attacked his wife recently, played that the Mayor was his wife for the time being and sprang upon him like an infuriated tiger, causing him to fall backward out of his chair and turn white as a sheet. It is probable that Mr. Troup will not wish to act as deputy County attorney again soon. Still he was not injured!

It appears that the Courier did not cover city council meetings for some time...

Cowley County Courant, April 6, 1882.

                                                COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS.

Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup presiding. Roll call, present: councilmen Read, Gary, and Mater; City Attorney Seward; Clerk Beach. Minutes of last meeting read and approved.

Petition of A. T. Spotswood and 12 others for sidewalk of usual width and construction, along the east side of block 153 and along the west side of blocks 172, 171, and 170 was present­ed. On motion of Mr. Gary the prayer of the petition was granted and the attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance in accordance therewith. Ninety days from the passage of the ordinance to be allowed property owners to complete the same.

It was moved by Mr. Read that a committee be appointed to confer with County Commissioners relative to cost of constructing a frame with wind mill attached on Court House Square. Carried.

The Mayor appointed Messrs. Gary and Read such committee.

On motion council adjourned to meet on Friday evening April 7th.

                                                      M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: D. C. BEACH, City Clerk.

C. H. Robinson now has office with Jennings & Troup...

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

MONEY TO LOAN. I am prepared to loan money on very favorable terms on improved farm property in Cowley County, in sums to suit on three to five years time. C. H. Robinson, office with Jennings & Troup.

Important council meeting: McMullen and Wilson become members...

Cowley County Courant, April 20, 1882.

                                                 COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup presiding. Present, Councilmen Read, Gary, Mater, and Hodges, City Attorney Seward, and Clerk Beach.

The minutes of the regular meeting of April 3rd, and of the meeting of April 7th, to canvass the votes cast at the general election held April 8th, were read and approved.

Col. J. C. McMullen and Mr. R. S. Wilson, Councilmen elect, being present, were then inducted into office; Messrs. Hodges and Mater, vacating their offices.


Petition of J. W. Curns and ten others, for sidewalk and street crossings, to begin at the southeast corner of lot No. 6, in block No. 87, and running thence south on the west side of Manning street to the southeast corner of lot No. 18, in block No. 89, in the city of Winfield, was read and on motion the prayer of the petitioners was granted, and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance in accordance therewith.

Petition of E. P. Hickok and ninety-seven others, asking that the Council cause to be removed the powder house in the south part of Winfield, between Main and Millington streets, was read, and on motion of Mr. McMullen was granted, and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance providing for its removal to as great a distance from the city as the general safety demands, and the laws of the state will permit.

Ordinance No. 156 being an ordinance providing for the construction of certain sidewalks therein named, was read and on motion of Mr. Read, was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 were adopted. On the motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye, were Messrs. Read, Gary, McMullen, and Wilson; nays, none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

The finance committee reported on the reports of Treasurer, for the months ending January 15th, February 15th, and March 15th, 1882, that they had examined the same and found them correct. Report adopted.

The special committee, appointed to confer with the County Commissioners relative to the construction of a tank and windmill on the courthouse grounds, reported adversely to the city having any connection with the matter. On motion, the report was adopted and the committee was discharged.

Bill of clerks and judges of election, 1st and 2nd ward, $20.000, was allowed and ordered paid.

Bill of W. L. Hands, for use of team, for burial of pauper, $3.00, was approved and recommended to the County Commissioners for payment.

Report of Police Judge for March was read and referred to committee on finance.

On motion of Mr. Gary, the City Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance prohibiting the lariating of stock, so that they may obstruct any street or alley, by crossing the same; prohibiting the stacking of hay within the city limits, and prohibiting the use of barbed wire for fencing, within the city limits, unless the same shall be protected by a board above it.

The City Attorney was, on motion of Mr. Read, instructed to amend the ordinance relating to fire limits, so as to bring it within the provisions of the statute concerning the same.

On motion of Mr. McMullen, Mr. Read was elected President of the Council for the ensuing year.

The Mayor then made the following appointments of standing committees for the ensuing year.

Finance: Gary, McMullen, and Wilson.

Streets and Alleys: Read, Gary, and Wilson.

Public Health: McMullen, Read, and Gary.

Fire Department: Wilson, Gary, and McMullen.

The Mayor appointed David C. Beach, City Clerk, for the coming year.


On motion of Mr. Gary, the appointment was confirmed by the Council.

The appointment of City Engineer was laid over for one meeting.

The Mayor then appointed James Bethel to the office of City Marshal.

Mr. Read moved that the appointment be confirmed; no second. On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

This is Court week and our lion-like attorneys are in clover. The following gentlemen are present: A. J. Pyburn of La Mars, Missouri; C. R. Mitchell, of Geuda Springs; Senator Hackney, Judge McDonald, Judge Tipton, Jas. O’Hare, Henry E. Asp, S. D. Pryor, J. F. McMullen, D. C. Beach, O. M. Seward, J. E. Allen, A. P. Johnson, James McDermott, P. H. Albright, T. H. Soward, Geo. H. Buckman, M. G. Troup, and County Attorney Jennings.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

                      COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, MAY 1, 1882.

Councilmen met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup presiding. Present, Councilmen Read, Gary, McMullen, and Wilson, City Attorney, and Clerk.

Minutes of last meeting read and approved.

Petition of A. E. Baird and six others for the construction of a gutter on Main Street was read; and the following resolutions concerning the same were adopted.

Resolved, That the City Council deem it necessary to provide by ordinance for the laying of a stone gutter five feet wide along the west side of Main Street, commencing at Seventh Avenue and running thence south to Tenth Avenue; also on the east side of Main Street, running from Seventh Avenue to Tenth Avenue, and that said gutter-stone be set on edge and be not less than six inches in thickness and laid adjacent to the sidewalk.

Resolved, That unless a majority of the resident owners of the property along said proposed line of improvement, subject to taxation for the same, do not within twenty days from the publication of these resolutions file their protest with the City Clerk, then each improvement shall be ordered.

Bid of COURIER COMPANY to do the City printing at legal rates was presented. Bid of Winfield “Courant” on same terms was also presented.

It was moved that the contract for the City printing for the ensuing year be awarded to the COURIER COMPANY. Carried.

Mr. R. H. True tendered his resignation as City Marshal. On motion the resignation was accepted.

Report of City Treasurer for month ending April 15th was presented and referred to Committee on Finance.

The Mayor appointed James Bethel marshal for the ensuing year. On the motion of Mr. Read to confirm the appointment, the vote resulted in a tie.

The Mayor appointed Mr. D. A. Millington City Engineer for the ensuing year. On motion the appointment was confirmed.

Council then adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.


At a meeting of the city council Monday evening, the question of Marshal was again debated. Mr. True tendered his resignation, and the Mayor again appointed James Bethel. The motion to confirm was a tie. Mayor Troup maintained that he had a right to name the officer who was to assist him in executing the laws, and finally refused to appoint any other than Bethel until satisfactory evidence could be shown of his incompetency for the position. Thus the matter stands and at present the city is without a regular marshal.

Mrs. Troup leaves for visit back east...

Cowley County Courant, May 4, 1882.

Mrs. M. G. Troup took the early train for the east this morning, where she will visit old friends for some time. M. G. will live on hotel fare and get fat until she returns.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

Messrs. C. H. Connell and Sam Davis were admitted to the bar Monday. M. G. Troup, one of the examining committee, made a speech in which he spoke very highly of the candidates’ qualifications and pointed out the course that young lawyers should pursue in order to succeed in the profession.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, May 15th, 1882.

Council met in regular session and was called to order by Mayor Troup. The following officers answered to the call of the roll: Councilmen Read, Gary, and Wilson, and City Clerk.

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

An ordinance relating to the storing of powder within the City limits was read, and on motion was referred to the Committee on Fire Department and City Attorney for modification and revision.

Petition of J. A. Case and others for the construction of a four foot stone sidewalk on the West side of Block No. 71 was read, and on motion of Mr. Read, the prayer of the petition was granted and the attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance in accordance therewith.

The Committee on Finance reported that they had examined the reports of Treasurer for month ending April 15th, and of Police Judge for March, and found them correct. Report adopted.

Report of retiring Marshal, True, of Dog tax collected was read and placed on file.

The following bills were allowed and ordered paid.

R. H. True, Marshal salary, one day: $1.50

Thomas Wright, rent room election: $2.00

H. L. Thomas, crossings and culverts: $84.30

Bill of C. W. Nichols and J. W. Hipps for street work, $17.50, was referred to the Committee on Streets and Alleys.

Councilman McMullen then came in and the Council went into executive session.

Mayor Troup appointed Benj. F. Herrod Marshal for the ensuing year. On motion of Mr. Gary, the Council confirmed the appointment.

Council adjourned to meet on Tuesday night, May 22nd, 1882.

                                                      M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Cowley County Courant, May 18, 1882.


The Republican county convention to elect delegates to the congressional convention to be held at Emporia on the 24th inst., met at Manning’s Hall at 11 o’clock Saturday. The conven­tion was called to order by D. A. Millington, chairman of the county central committee, who read the call. On motion of T. H. Soward, H. D. Gans was elected temporary chairman and J. V. Hines temporary secretary. On motion, committees were appointed as follows.

Congressional State Convention to be held at Topeka June 28, 1882: C. R. Mitchell, M. G. Troup, C. M. Scott, M. L. Robinson, John Wallace, R. L. Walker, J. E. Conklin, H. D. Gans. Alter­nates: Henry E. Asp, J. B. Tucker, J. M. Harcourt, J. B. Evans, R. F. Burden, N. W. Dressie, W. P. Heath, T. H. Soward, H. C. McDorman.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

                                                      THE CONVENTION.

Delegates to State Convention at Topeka June 28th: C. R. Mitchell, M. G. Troup, C. M. Scott, M. L. Robinson, John Wallace, R. L. Walker, J. E. Conklin, H. D. Gans. Alternates: Henry E. Asp, J. B. Tucker, John M. Harcourt, J. B. Evans, R. F. Burden, N. W. Dressie, W. P. Heath, T. H. Soward, H. C. McDorman.

Cowley County Courant, May 25, 1882.

Mayor M. G. Troup has returned with his family from Fredonia where they have been visiting.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1882.

                     COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, MAY 23, 1882.

Council met pursuant to adjournment. Mayor Troup in chair.

Roll called. Present, Councilmen Read, Gary, McMullen, and Wilson.

Bond of Benjamin F. Herrod as marshal, with Geo. T. Wilson, J. L. Hodges, and J. A. McGuire as securities, was presented and on motion of Mr. McMullen was approved.

Remonstrance of Jno. W. Curns and 17 others against the construction of the stone guttering on East side of Main street between 7th and 10th avenues was read and placed on file.

Ordinance No. 157 providing for the construction of certain sidewalks therein specified was read and on motion of Mr. Read was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson; nays none, and the Ordinance was declared adopted.

Ordinance No. 158 regulating the storing and keeping of powder was read, and on motion was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, Gary, McMullen, and Wilson; nays none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.


Ordinance No. 159, Protecting life and property by regulating the maintenance and construction of wire fences and the lariating of stock was read and on motion of Mr. Read, was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, and 3 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson, nays none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

Winfield Courier, June 8, 1882.

                    COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, JUNE 5TH, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup in chair. Present: Councilmen Read, Gary, Wilson, and McMullen; City Attorney and Clerk.

Petition of Geo. A. Schroeter for appointment to the position of the City Time Keeper was read and on motion granted upon the same conditions and terms as last year.

Proposition of Hudson Bros., to furnish a time clock for the regulation of night police without expense to the city, was presented and accepted.

Ordinance No. 161, prohibiting the stacking of hay and other combustible material and the covering of stables and other buildings with such materials, within the corporate limits of the City of Winfield, was read and on motion was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson; nays none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

Ordinance No. 163 amending Sections No. 3 of Ordinance No. 111 and Ordinance No. 141 was read and on motion was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections No. 1, 2, and 3 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, McMullen, Gary and Wilson; nays none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

Cowley County Courant, June 8, 1882.

A few evenings ago a number of old soldiers met at Judge Soward’s office for the purpose of organizing a post of the Grand Army of the Republic. After they were about all in the room, someone proposed that they all arise and repeat the Lord’s Prayer in concert. Each looked at the other to begin the prayer. Finally Judge Soward, seeing that nobody else would commence, started in as follows: “The Star Spangled banner in triumph ...” when Mayor Troup hunched him and told him he was wrong. The Judge was a little mad, and told him to go ahead himself, if he thought he knew it all, and the Mayor started in “Now I lay me down to sleep.” Senator Hackney, who was present, stopped Troup, and told him that was not it, when Troup told Hackney to speak. The Senator cleared his throat and commenced, “Rock of Ages cleft for me,” when Dr. Wells pulled his coat and made him stop. Hackney quit, and told the doctor to work it up, and Wells began, “There’s a land that is fairer than this,” but they all told him to cheese it, and he quit, blushing like a school girl. Just at this point Charley Steuven became disgusted, said he was ashamed of the whole gang, and they told him to try to start it. Charles rolled his eyes up and started, “The Lord into the garden came.” At this juncture General Green came in and asked what they were drilling on. He was informed of the condition of things, and relieved the suspense by starting, “Our Father who art in Heav­en.” They all joined in then, and after the prayer had been repeated, someone said that Green’s associations with the minis­try gave him a big advantage over the rest of them.

Winfield Courier, June 15, 1882.

                                                     FOURTH OF J. U. L. Y.

On Tuesday evening the citizens met at the Opera House to hear the report of the executive committee on 4th of July celebration. The committee reported as follows.


On Finance: M. L. Robinson, J. B. Lynn, J. P. Baden, S. H. Myton, J. C. McMullen.

On Speakers and Invitation: J. C. Fuller, D. A. Millington, A. B. Steinberger, M. G. Troup, and J. Wade McDonald.

On Grounds and seats: A. T. Spotswood, Jas. H. Bullen, A. Wilson, S. C. Smith, W. O. Johnson, and H. Brotherton.

On Police Regulations and personal comfort: D. L. Kretsinger, R. E. Wallis, H. S. Silver, J. H. Kinney, and A. T. Shenneman.

On Music: J. P. Short, E. H. Blair, G. H. Buckman, H. E. Silliman, and R. C. Bowles.

On Old Soldiers: Col. McMullen, Adjt. Wells, Judge Bard, Capt. Steuven, and Capt. Haight.

On Representation of 13 Original States: Mrs. H. P. Mansfield, Mrs. Caton, Mrs. Carruthers.

On Floral Decoration: Mrs. Kretsinger, Misses Jessie Millington, Amy Scothorn, Jennie Hane, Mrs. J. L. Horning, and Mrs. G. S. Manser.

Speeches were made by Judge J. Wade McDonald, Judge Soward, Mayor Troup, D. A. Millington, Capt. Hunt, and D. L. Kretsinger. The City is enthusiastic on the subject and are bound to make this a big Fourth. The committee on speakers will secure the attendance of some of our State’s best talent. Let everyone prepare to come, bring their lunch baskets, and enjoy themselves in the finest park in the State.

Winfield Courier, July 13, 1882.

                      COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, JULY 7, 1882.

Council met pursuant to adjournment, Mayor Troup in the chair.

Present: Councilmen Read, McMullen, and Wilson, City Clerk and Attorney.

Minutes of last meeting were read and approved.

Reports of Treasurer for months ending May 15 and June 15 and of City Clerk for quarter ending June 15th were read and referred to Finance Committee.

It was moved that the Finance Committee be instructed to obtain from Police Judge reports of the business of his office for months of April, May, and June. Carried.

It was moved that the street commissioner be requested to make a report of road tax collected by him, by next meeting of the Council.

Bills of Winfield COURIER for printing, $28.50, and J. E. Conklin for dirt on Main Street, $25.00, were referred to Finance Committee.

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, July 17, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup in chair.

Roll called: Present, Councilmen Read, Gary, and Wilson, City Attorney and Clerk.

Petition of W. E. Tansey and 51 others asking that steps be taken to have the weeds and grass growing along the sidewalks and crossings cut down and removed, was read. On motion the Marshal was instructed to have the weeds removed where most needed, with road work.

The Street Commissioner made a report showing the names of 112 jurors whose road tax had been paid by work upon the streets. Filed.


On motion of Mr. Gary the resolution relating to guttering Main street between 7th and 10th avenue, and the remonstrance against the same were referred to the Committee on Streets and Alleys and the City Attorney with instructions to investigate the matter and report at the next meeting of the City Council by ordinance if necessary.

The Committee on Streets and Alleys were instructed to buy a scraper.

Winfield Courier, July 27, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, JULY 24, 1882.

Council met in adjourned session, Mayor Troup presiding. Present: Councilmen Read, Gary, and Wilson, City Attorney and Clerk.

Ordinance No. 162, providing for the construction of a stone gutter on Main Street between 7th and 10th Avenues, was read, and on motion of Mr. Read was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, and 3 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole, in its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, Gary, and Wilson; nays none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

The Committee on Finance reported on clerk’s quarterly statements, and on reports of City Treasurer for months ending May 12th and June 15th, that they had examined the same and found them correct; also on bill of J. E. Conklin, for dirt $25.00, and of Winfield COURIER for printing, $28.50, that they found them correct and recommended payment. On bill of Winfield Courant for printing $11.00, they recommended that it be allowed at $10.50. Reports adopted and warrants ordered drawn for the respective amounts.

[REPUBLICAN COUNTY CONVENTION.]

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

Delegates entitled to seats.

Winfield 1st Ward: H. H. Siverd, Frank Bowen, M. G. Troup, H. E. Asp, W. P. Hackney.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, AUGUST 7, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup in the Chair. Roll called. Present: Councilmen Read, McMullen, and Gary, City Attorney and Clerk.

It was moved that the Marshal be instructed to notify the Police Judge that he must make his reports to date and signify his disposition to try the cases ready to be brought before him as such Police Judge, or resign his office at once, or steps would be taken to oust him therefrom. The motion was carried.

Estimate of City Engineer of cost of constructing sidewalk on south side of 11th avenue, abutting on lot 10, block 51, was read and approved, and the Mayor was authorized to contract for the construction of the same.

Winfield Courier, August 17, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, AUG. 9, 1882.

Council met pursuant to adjournment. Mayor Troup in chair.

Roll called. Present: Councilmen Read, McMullen, and Gary, City Attorney and Clerk.

Resignation of W. E. Tansey as Police Judge was read.

“Having yesterday determined to permanently remove from the city, I hereby tender my resignation as Police Judge of the City of Winfield, so that you may take such action as in your judgment may seem best. . . . (Aug. 9, 1882) W. E. TANSY.

On motion of Mr. Read the resignation was accepted.


Reports of Police Judge for months of April, May, June, and July and to August 9th were presented and referred to Finance Committee.

It was moved that Mr. T. H. Soward be elected as Police Judge for the unexpired term. The motion prevailed.

It was moved that the City Attorney be instructed to prepare an Ordinance providing a penalty for violating section 16 of Chapter 89. Carried. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, August 24, 1882.

                  COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, AUGUST 21, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup presiding.

Roll called. Present: Councilmen Read, Gary, and Wilson and City Attorney and Clerk.

Ordinance No. 163, being an ordinance in relation to working the road tax in the streets and alleys of Winfield City, was read and on motion of Mr. Read was taken up for consideration by sections.

Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, Gary, and Wilson; nays none, and the Ordinance was declared adopted.

Bond of T. H. Soward, Police Judge, with S. L. Gilbert, Jos. O’Hare, I. D. Gans, T. R. Bryan, and J. S. Mann, as sureties, was read and approved.

Report of City Clerk of receipts and expenditures for the year ending June 15, 1882, was read as follows. . . .

Receipts from—Licenses: $820.65; Fines, Police Court: $222.26; General Tax: $1,035.00; Dog Tax: $7.00. TOTAL RECEIPTS: $2,084.91.

Warrants issued for the following purposes.

For official salaries: $891.60; For street crossings and street work: $1,476.18; For printing: $81.50; For removing nuisances: $10.50; For election expenses: $40.00; For Miscellaneous Items: $336.65. TOTAL AMOUNT OF WARRANTS: $2,835.83.

The report was placed on file.

The City Attorney was instructed to prepare an Ordinance providing for a tax levy of five (5) mills to meet outstanding indebtedness and current expenses for the coming year.

On motion Council adjourned to meet on Tuesday, August 22, at 8 p.m.

                                                      M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, August 24, 1882.

                  COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, AUGUST 22, 1882.

Council met in adjourned session, Mayor Troup in chair. Roll called: Present, Councilmen Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson, and City Clerk.

Ordinance 164 levying a tax for general revenue was read and on motion of Mr. McMullen was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, and 3 were adopted on motion to adopt as a whole in its final passage. The vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson. Nays one and the ordinance was declared adopted.

Winfield Courier, August 31, 1882.


                            Minutes of the Meeting of Citizens on the Glucose Works.

WINFIELD, KANSAS, AUGUST 28, 1832.

A number of the businessmen of the city convened at Doane & Kretsinger’s office Monday evening to consider the proposition of Messrs. Morse, Scott & Harris for building a glucose factory at Winfield.

On motion, Mayor M. G. Troup was called to the chair and J. W. Curns elected secretary.

Mr. M. L. Robinson being called upon stated that the object of the meeting was to consider the matter of building said factory and discussing the propriety of giving aid by subscription to the institution and taking stock in return.

On motion G. S. Manser, M. G. Troup, and D. L. Kretsinger were appointed a committee to draw up articles of incorporation and file with Secretary of State and procure a charter and M. G. Troup, J. P. Short, J. W. McDonald, and J. W. Curns were appointed a committee to make contract for the carrying into effect the proposition.

On motion adjourned. M. G. TROUP, President.

J. W. CURNS, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, August 31, 1882.

A number of the businessmen of the city convened at Doane & Kretsinger’s office Monday evening to consider the proposition of Messrs. Morse, Scott & Harris for building a glucose factory at Winfield.

On motion, Mayor M. G. Troup was called to the chair and J. W. Curns elected secretary.

On motion G. S. Manser, M. G. Troup, and D. L. Kretsinger were appointed a committee to draw up articles of incorporation and file with Secretary of State and procure a charter and M. G. Troup, J. P. Short, J. W. McDonald, and J. W. Curns were appointed a committee to make contract for the carrying into effect the proposition.

On motion adjourned. M. G. TROUP, President.

J. W. CURNS, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, August 31, 1882.

                                                       GLUCOSE WORKS.

                 The Largest Glucose Manufactory in the West to be Located at Winfield.

                  Seventy-Five Thousand Dollars to be Expended at Once in its Erection.

                                                   Winfield “Takes the Cake.”

A meeting was held on Monday evening at A. H. Doane & Co.’s office for the purpose of considering a proposition for erecting a glucose factory in this city. About thirty of our leading businessmen were present. M. G. Troup was made chairman and J. W. Curns Secretary. M. L. Robinson stated the object of the meeting, setting forth clearly and concisely the advantages to be derived from the establishment.

Mr. Harris, representing eastern capitalists, was present, and made a proposition. Another proposition was made by citizens, to organize a joint stock corporation and erect a building and works to cost $75,000, of which $25,000 should be furnished by citizens and $50,000 by the eastern capitalists; the building to be 175 by 225 feet, four stories high, with a capacity for using 2,000 bushels of corn per day; and to be called the Winfield Syrup and Sugar Refinery. The proposition was accepted.

Committees were appointed as follows.


On soliciting subscription to the capital stock: M. L. Robinson, J. C. McMullen, A. T. Spotswood, J. B. Lynn, J. P. Short.

On incorporation: G. S. Manser, M. G. Troup, D. L. Kretsinger.

On contract: M. G. Troup, J. P. Short, J. Wade McDonald, J. W. Curns.

Winfield Courier, September 7, 1882.

                COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, SEPTEMBER 4, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup presiding.

Present: Councilmen Read, Gary, and Wilson; City attorney and Clerk.

Minutes of last regular and of adjourned, and called sessions read and approved.

Application of A. G. Wilson for appointment as City weigh-master for the six months next ensuing was read and on motion of Mr. Read, Mr. Wilson was appointed.

The Finance Committee reported on reports of Police Judge for months of April, May, July, and August that they found the same correct. Adopted. On report for June the Committee asked further time, which was granted.

On bill of J. Heller, the Committee reported that they had examined the same and found it correct. Report adopted.

Petition of Jno. A. McGuire & others presented at last regular meeting was taken up. On motion of Mr. Read, the City Attorney was instructed to report by ordinance or otherwise to the next meeting of the City Council with a view to the appointment of a Deputy Marshal.

Winfield Courier, September 21, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, SEPTEMBER 18, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup, presiding. Present: Councilmen Gary, McMullen, and Wilson, City Attorney and Clerk.

The reading of the minutes of previous meeting was postponed until next meeting.

Petition of W. C. Robinson and 73 others, asking that the sum of $25 per month be appropriated for the support of a free Reading Room, was read and on motion was laid over until the next meeting.

The City Attorney stated that ordinances already in force provided for the appointment of an assistant Marshal at a salary of $1.25 per day. By consent the matter of the appointment of an assistant Marshal was referred to the Mayor with authority to make such appointment whenever in his judgment such an officer shall be needed.

Reports of Police Judge for August, and of City Treasurer for months ending July 15th, August 15th, and September 15th, and of City Clerk for quarter ending September 15th, 1882, were read and referred to Finance Committee.

Bill of Wm. Warren for street crossing and culverts, $14.60, was allowed and ordered paid.

Blanche Troup, Willie Troup, children of M. G. Troup...

Winfield Courier, September 28, 1882.


A happy crowd of very little folks met as per invitation at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Buckman Wednesday afternoon, to celebrate the third birthday of little Miss Stella Buckman. It was one of the few real jolly parties that have been held this season. The ceremony of introduction was dispensed with and each one present seemed imbued with unusual conversational power. In the matter of real, solid enjoyment, it was the model party of the age. Little Miss Stella was the recipient of many beautiful presents from her youthful friends. Those present were Misses Flora Moorehouse, Maud Miller, Mamie Pryor, Margie Pryor, Gracie Gary, Edna Glass, Inez Crippen, Blanche Troup, Nellie Harden, June and Bessie Schofield, and Mattie Marshall. Our future statesmen were represented by Masters Willie Nixon, Edgar Powers, Johnnie Crippen, Willie Troup, Ralph Brown, Eddie Greer, Harvey Harden, Baron Bahntge, Roy Robinson, Robbie Platter, and Royal Carver. As this was the first event in the social life of the little ones, it will be remembered with much pleasure.

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, OCT. 2, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup presiding. Present: Councilmen Gary, Wilson, McMullen, and City Attorney Seward. In the absence of City Clerk, D. C. Beach, on motion of Gary, O. M. Seward was appointed City Clerk pro tem. Minutes of meetings of Sept. 4th and 18th, 1882, read and approved.

Petition of W. C. Robinson, E. P. Hickok, and others asking for an appropriation of $25 a month for a public reading room, was postponed until the next regular meeting of the Council.

Reports of the City Treasurer for the months ending July, August, and September 15th, 1882. Approved.

The bill of Wm. Warren for $28.50 for street crossings was referred to the Finance Committee.

Jennings & Troup...

Winfield Courier, October 19, 1882.

                                                    It Does Prohibit a Little.

Ed. Weitzel was tried last week before Justice Buckman for selling beer and whiskey contrary to law. The trial lasted three days. Jennings & Troup and Henry E. Asp prosecuted and J. Wade McDonald and S. D. Pryor defended. Saturday evening the jury of twelve, after consulting two or three hours, brought in a verdict of guilty. The Justice assessed a fine of $200, and costs. The costs, attorney’s fees, and some little outside matters which he would not like to mention, must have cost him about $250, and there are yet five complaints against him to be tried. He took an appeal with a thousand dollar bond. If tried in the District Court, the witness who happened (?) to be absent will be present, there will be no doubt about the result, and it will probably cost him $1,000 in all. Frank Manny says that Ed. was an officer of the Good Templars and a warm advocate of the prohibition amendment and that he is now taking his own medicine so he must not squeal.


It seems that Ed. commenced selling at his hotel stand, which he was using as a billiard hall, during fair week. He hired W. D. Smith to tend bar for him at $25 per month. He kept his business so close that it did not get out on him until last week. He had then sold intoxicating liquors to the amount of about $60. Frank Jennings got hold of it, investigated the matter, and made six complaints against him and one against the boy, Smith, his bar tender. Ed. got bail for himself, but let Smith go to jail. Ed. was tried on one case, convicted and fined $200, and cost. Smith plead guilty and was fined $100. Ed. then plead guilty on another complaint and was fined $100. The fines and costs in all amounted to over $600, besides attorney fees and other expenses, with four complaints standing against. Verily the way of the transgressor is hard.

Winfield Courier, October 26, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, OCTOBER 16, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup in chair. Roll called. Present: Councilmen McMullen, Gary, and Wilson, City Attorney and Clerk.

Petition of G. B. Stiles for authority to number the buildings in the city was read and referred to the Committee on streets and alleys.

Petition of H. D. Gans and 11 others for sidewalk on the east side of Block 145 was read and on motion of Mr. Gary, the prayer of the petition was granted and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance in accordance therewith.

Petition of C. L. Harter and 13 others for sidewalk on north side of Blocks 87 and 107 was read and on motion of Mr. McMullen, the prayer of the petition was granted and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance accordingly.

Petition of W. C. Robinson, J. W. Curns, and 125 others asking an appropriation for City Library was again presented. On motion of Mr. McMullen, action on same was postponed until next regular meeting.

Report of Finance Committee on Police Judge’s report for August, that they found the same correct, was adopted. The Committee were given further time in all other matters in their hands.

Bill of C. H. Wooden, removing nuisances, $3.75, and of Wm. Warren, street crossings, etc., $28.50, were allowed and ordered paid.

Bill of A. T. Shenneman for board of city prisoners from January 1st to Sept. 16, $42.25, and bill of Winfield COURIER, printing and job work, $51.00, were referred to the Finance Committee.

It was moved that the time allowed under the deed from the city to the County Commissioners for constructing a fence around the Courthouse grounds be extended to the 1st day of January 1883. Carried.

On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Blanche Troup...

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1882.

                                                        Little Folks’ Party.


A large number of little folks gathered together at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Pryor Monday afternoon to celebrate with little Mamie her third birthday. The crowd was the jolliest and liveliest we have seen and each of the little folks seemed to take in the full measure of enjoyment. A splendid repast was set for them which they attacked with a relish. Little Mamie received a large number of elegant presents from her young friends. The following is a list of the presents and of those present: 1 silver set knife, fork, and spoon; 2 Majolica plates; 2 gold sash pins; 1 gold ring; 1 child’s decorated china wash stand set; 1 child’s dinner castor; 1 hand painted mug; 1 porte-monnaie; 5 China cups and saucers; 2 China mugs; 1 glass mug; 1 doll’s parlor suite; 1 autograph album; 1 photograph album; 1 wood tea set combination table and cupboard; 1 Brittania tea set; 2 child’s glass sets; sugar bowl; butter dish, etc.; 3 dolls; 2 doll’s canopy top phaetons; 1 doll and carriage; 2 picture books; 1 flat iron and stand; 1 bell cart and span of goats; 1 bouquet; 1 basket of flowers; 1 satin puff box; 1 panorama egg; 6 elegant birthday cards; 1 little brown jug; 1 necklace of pearl beads; 1 shell box; 1 photograph with frame; 2 China match safes; 2 bottles perfumery; 1 card receiver (Kalo Meda); 2 handkerchiefs (embroidered); 1 collar; 1 tooth-pick holder.

Present: Misses Birdie Wright, Edna Glass, Blanche Bliss, Blanche Troup, Stella Buckman, Mamie Black, Frankie Black, Mary Spotswood, Maggie Pryor, Edna Pryor, Muriel Covert, Annie McDonald, Clara Austin, Pearl E. Snyder, Maggie Johnson, Emma Johnson, Bernice Bullen, Beryl Johnston, Nina Nelson, Nona Nelson, Lube Myton, Josie Myton, Ethel Carruthers, Mary Brotherton, Bell Brotherton, Nina Harter, May Harter, Maud Miller, Gertie Lynn, Effie Lynn, Edna Short, Alma Miller, Mollie Trezise, Lillie Trezise, Fannie Bryan, Flossie Bullen, Ollie Newcomb, Edna Fitch, Maud Cooper, Daisy Clark.

Masters Eddie Greer, Eddie Thorp, Ralph Brown, Roy Robinson, Bertie Silliman, Vere Hollenbeck, Charles F. Green, Charlie Sydal, Henrion McDonald, Dolphi Green, Clare Bullen, Bruce Carruthers, Edgar Powers, Charlie Lynn, Paul Bedilion, Codie Waite, Zack Miller, Willie Trezise, Carl Farringer, Walter Baird, and Willis Young.

Winfield Courier, November 16, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, NOVEMBER 6, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup in chair. Roll called. Present, Councilmen Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson; City Attorney and Clerk.

Petition of A. B. Graham and 10 others for sidewalk on west side of block 187 and on south side of block 186, was read. On motion of Mr. Gary, that part of the petition relating to sidewalk on west side of block 187 was granted and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an Ordinance in accordance therewith.

Ordinance No. 165 providing for the construction of sidewalks on the west side of block 187; on the north side of blocks 87 and 107; and on the east side of block No. 145, was read and on motion of Mr. Read was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye, were Councilmen Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson; nays none, and the Ordinance was declared adopted.

Communication from S. L. Gilbert declining to remain on the bond of T. H. Soward as Police Judge, and asking to be released therefrom, was read. On motion of Mr. Gary, the communication was placed on file and the clerk was instructed to notify the Police Judge that he must file a new bond by the next meeting of the Council.

David C. Beach again tendered his resignation as City Clerk, which was accepted. The Mayor appointed Lovell H. Webb to the position of City Clerk for the remainder of the term, he to file his bond for approval at the next regular meeting. On motion, the appointment of the Mayor was confirmed by the council.

The Finance Committee reported on Clerk’s quarterly statement for Sept. 15th that they had examined the same and found it correct. Reports adopted. On Police Judges report for June the Committee reported that they found it correct. Report adopted.


E. H. Lintrell and W. B. McConnels made a statement concerning the fines assessed against them in Police Court for violation of the Ordinance relating to licenses. The Mayor for the reason that the violations were technical and unintentional, remitted their fines. The action of the Mayor was on motion approved by the Council, and the City Clerk was instructed to inform the Police Judge of the same.

On motion the City Clerk was instructed to notify the Police Judge to make his reports for months of Sept. and Oct.

Winfield Courier, December 14, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, DEC. 4, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup presiding.

Roll called: Present, Councilmen Read, McMullen and Gary; City Attorney and Clerk.

The Police Judge’s reports for the months of September and October were read and referred to Committee on Finance.

The council were addressed by a committee of ladies in the question of an appropriation to the City Library.

It was moved by Col. McMullen that the City Council appropriate the sum of $25.00 per month for a City Library in accordance with the petition filed in this case. Motion lost.

Bond of L. H. Webb as City Clerk, with W. C. Robinson, J. Wade McDonald, W. S. Mendenhall, and J. S. Mann, as sureties, was read and approved by the Council.

The following resolution was adopted: Resolved, That the Mayor and Council hereby tender their thanks to David C. Beach for the faithful and efficient manner in which he has performed the duties of the office of City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, December 14, 1882.

The air is thick with rumors of a gambling den somewhere in this city in which a game is constantly run for high stakes; that the town is infested with gamblers; and that a man enjoying a position of trust in this city has lost six hundred dollars of his employer’s money and is on the verge of ruin and disgrace. If such is the case, the officers should do their duty and clean it out. When Mayor Troup was elected, he pledged the people of this city that he would do all in his power to suppress these dens. Now is the time for him to fulfill his pledges and instruct his Marshal to at once blot out these places.

Dec. 18, 1882: 1st meeting—Petition of citizens for water works presented...

Winfield Courier, December 21, 1882.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, DECEMBER 18, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup presiding. Roll called. Present: Councilmen Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson, City Attorney and Clerk. Minutes of last meeting read and approved. Finance committee given until the next regular meeting to report on all matters referred to them.

Petition of certain draymen to change the ordinance relating to dray licenses was presented. A motion was carried that the prayer of the petition be granted and the City Attorney was instructed to draw an ordinance in accordance therewith.

Petition of citizens in reference to water works was presented. On motion consideration of the matter was postponed until the next meeting.

The report of the Police Judge for the month of November, 1882, was presented and on motion referred to the Finance committee.


The reports of the Treasurer for the months ending Oct. 15, Nov. 15, Dec. 15, 1882, were presented, and on motion referred to the Finance committee.

The bond filed by the Police Judge was read and on motion was approved and accepted by the council.

The report of the City Clerk for the quarter ending Dec. 15, 1882, was presented and referred to the Finance committee and ordered published.

The Street Commission was ordered to report at the next regular meeting the number of those liable who have paid their road taxes and the number in default.

On motion the Council adjourned to meet on Friday evening, Dec. 22, 1882.

                                                      M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: L. H. WEBB, City Clerk.

Dec. 22, 1882: 2nd meeting—Water works not mentioned in minutes...

Winfield Courier, December 28, 1882.

                                                 COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS.

                                   CITY OF WINFIELD, DECEMBER 22, 1882.

Council met pursuant to adjournment, Mayor Troup in the chair. Present: Councilmen Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson, and the City Attorney.

In the absence of the City Clerk, D. C. Beach, Esq., was elected Clerk pro tem.

Petition of W. F. Bowen and others in reference to dray licenses was presented and read.

The City Attorney presented proposed Ordinance No. 166 entitled “An Ordinance amending Sec. No. 1 of Ordinance No. 135, providing for the levy and collection of certain license taxes,” as instructed at the last meeting, which proposed Ordinance was read and considered by sections, with the following result: The proposed Ordinance as a whole was then submitted to a vote on its final passage, with the following result. Those voting aye were Councilmen Read, McMullen, Wilson, and Gary; noes, none; and the Ordinance was declared passed, and was approved by the Mayor.

On motion the Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: L. H. WEBB, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, December 28, 1882.

                                             A GAMBLING HOUSE RAIDED.


Last Friday Harry Bahntge, who has been for a long time running a gambling den in a room back of his billiard hall in the Brettun House, was arrested and brought before Justice Buckman. He plead guilty to running a gambling table, was fined one hundred dollars and costs, which he paid, and went on his way rejoicing. In about an hour he was again arrested on another charge, which he likewise settled up. But the majesty of the law was not satisfied, and he was immediately arrested a third time, on another charge, and after it was settled, he was again pounced upon for the fourth time by the sheriff. This was more than even Mr. Bahntge’s proud spirit could brook, and he prayed the Court for mercy. When it was intimated that the end was not yet, and that the next case was five hundred or the pen, he wilted like a cabbage plant at high noon, and swore by all that was good and great that if they would but spare him the last dose, he would pay all the rest up, throw his room open, turn the gambling devices over to the officers, take the bars from the doors and the blinds from the windows, and let the bright sun of heaven pour into its iniquitous recesses forever more, amen; and further, that he would never do so any more. Upon these conditions he was let off, after paying two hundred and fifty dollars in fines and costs, and turning over to the constable his gambling table and checks, which were, by order of the Court, destroyed in the public street. The execution of the table was witnessed by a large concourse of people.

Mayor Troup and his associate and assistant in breaking up this business, Frank W. Finch, are entitled to the thanks of the community in addition to the knowledge of having done their whole duty in the premises.

Winfield Courier, December 28, 1882.

The Water Works question is engaging the attention of our citizens at the present moment.

Date sequence out of order at this point!

Dec. 23, 1882: 3rd meeting—Water Works...

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

                                                        Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, DECEMBER 23, 1882.

Council met in special session on call of the Mayor.

On motion, it was resolved to consider the proposed ordinance in relation to water works.

The proposed ordinance offered with the petition in relation to water works was then taken up for consideration by sections, with the following result: Sections 1 and 2 were adopted as read. Section three was amended and adopted. Sections 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 were adopted as read. Section 9 was amended and adopted. Section 10 was adopted as read. Sections 11, 12, and 13 were amended and adopted. Sections 14 and 15 were adopted as read.

Adjourned to Tuesday night.

Dec. 26, 1882: 4th meeting—Water Works...

DECEMBER 26, 1882.

Council met pursuant to adjournment, Mayor Troup in the chair. Present, Councilmen Read, Wilson, Gary, and McMullen, City Attorney and Clerk.

The proposed water works ordinance was again taken up for consideration. Sections 16 and 17 were amended and adopted, Sections 18 and 19 were adopted as read.

It was then moved that Section 1 be reconsidered. The vote upon the motion was a tie. The Mayor voted in favor of such reconsideration. It was then moved to amend Section 1 by adding the following:

“Provided, That nothing in this ordinance shall be deemed or held to give to said Barclay or assigns the exclusive privilege to construct, operate, or maintain a system of water works in said city.”

The vote upon such motion was a tie, and the Mayor voted against such motion to amend. It was then moved to adopt Section 1 as originally adopted. The vote upon said motion was a tie, and the Mayor voted in favor of such adoption.

A motion was carried to reconsider Section 19. The following was adopted as Section 19.

“Section 19. That the said Frank Barclay, his associates, successors, or assigns shall be required under the provisions of this ordinance to do the business pertaining to their said water works company within the corporate limits of the said city of Winfield.”


Former Section 19 was then adopted as Section 20.

The Council then adjourned without taking final action in the matter.

                                                      M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: L. H. WEBB, City Clerk.

Jan. 1, 1883: 5th meeting—Water works...

1st ward citizens want action on water works postponed.

Greer proposition for water works mentioned.

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, JANUARY 1, 1883.

Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup in the chair. Present: Councilmen McMullen, Gary, and Wilson; absent, Read. Minutes of last regular meeting and of the adjourned and special sessions were read. A motion was carried to amend the minutes of the meeting of Dec. 26 so as to show the votes of the several Councilmen on the tie vote there recorded. Upon the motion to reconsider Sec. 1 of the proposed ordinance, the vote was as follows: Those voting aye were Councilmen McMullen and Gary; those voting no were Councilmen Wilson and Read. Upon the motion to amend Sec. 1 by the addition of the proviso, Councilmen McMullen and Gary voted aye and Councilmen Read and Wilson voted no. Upon the motion to adopt Sec. 1 as originally adopted, Councilmen Read and Wilson voted aye and Councilmen Gary and McMullen voted no. The minutes as amended were then adopted.

A petition from citizens of 1st ward to postpone definite action on the proposed waterworks ordinance was read and ordered filed.

A communication from Councilman Read was read and ordered filed.

A proposition from C. H. Wooden to do all the work of removing nuisances in the city for the year 1883 for fifteen dollars, payable quarterly at the end of each quarter, was read, accepted by the Council, and ordered fixed.

The Finance Committee was given until the next regular meeting to report on matters referred to them.

The report of the street commissioner as to those who have paid road tax and those in default was referred to the committee on streets and alleys.

A proposition from E. P. Greer in reference to water works, in the shape of a proposed ordinance, was presented and read, and Mr. Greer addressed the Council thereon. Several citizens then addressed the Council on the question of water works.

On motion the Council adjourned M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: L. H. WEBB, City Clerk.

Jan. 15, 1883: 6th meeting, Water Works...

Greer water-works ordinance considered by sections.

Crucial vote:  For Greer ordinance (McMullen and Wilson).

Against Greer ordinance (Read, Gary, Mayor Troup).

Ordinance amended to incorporate Greer changes to Barclay’s proposition...

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, JANUARY 15, 1883.


Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup in chair. Roll called. Present: Councilmen Read, Wilson, McMullen, and Gary; City Attorney and Clerk.

Minutes of last meeting read and approved.

The finance committee reported on and found correct the statement of the Clerk for the quarter ending Dec. 15th, 1882; the report of the Police Judge for the months of August, September, October, and December, 1882, and the reports of the Treasurer for the months ending Oct. 15, Nov. 15, and Dec. 15, 1882, and the bill of Horning and Whitney for $1.15 for goods furnished the city, and recommended that the bill be paid. The report of the committee was adopted and the bill of Horning & Whitney was ordered paid.

The bill of W. A. Lee for $2.00 for room rent for election was presented, allowed, and ordered paid.

The Police Judge’s report for December was presented and referred to finance committee.

Mr. McMullen moved to consider by sections the so-called Greer water-works ordinance. Those voting aye were Councilmen McMullen and Wilson; those voting no were Councilmen Read and Gary. The Mayor voted no.

Mr. Gary moved that the Council go into committee of the whole on all questions relative to water-works, and the motion was carried and the Council then went into committee of the whole. Upon rising the committee reported back the two water-works propositions with certain proposed amendments submitted to them in relation to the proposition made by Frank Barclay, but without making any recommendation in regard thereto.

On motion the Council adjourned until January 16, 1883, at 7 o’clock p.m.

January 16, 1883: 7th meeting—Water Works...

January 17, 1883: 8th meeting—Water Works...

Barclay proposition (Winfield Water Company) accepted...

Voting for Barclay ordinance (Read, Gary, Mayor Troup); against (McMullen and Wilson).

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

                 COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, JANUARY 16, 1883.

Council met pursuant to adjournment. Mayor Troup in the chair. Present: Councilmen Read, Wilson, Gary, and McMullen, and Clerk.

A petition to change the ordinance relating to auction merchants was presented, read, and ordered filed.

A petition to indefinitely postpone the propositions before the Council in reference to water-works was presented, read, and ordered filed.

The Council then listened to propositions in relation to water-works by Frank Barclay and certain others, and by Ed. P. Greer and others.

It was then moved that the Council accept the proposition made by Mr. Barclay and certain others. Those voting aye were Councilmen Read and Gary; those voting no were Councilmen McMullen and Wilson. The Mayor voted aye.

On motion the Council adjourned until January 17th, 1883, at 7 o’clock p.m.

                 COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, JANUARY 17, 1883.

Council met pursuant to adjournment. Mayor Troup in the chair. Roll called. Present: Councilmen Read, Gary, and Wilson; absent, McMullen.

A communication from Councilman McMullen was read and ordered filed.


A motion was carried to reconsider the vote by which the proposed ordinance No. 167 was adopted, for the purpose of considering said proposed ordinance with certain amendments thereto. Said proposed ordinance as amended was taken up for consideration by sections, with the following result:

Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 were adopted as read.

Section 8 was amended and adopted.

Sections 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20 were adopted as read.

The ordinance as a whole was then submitted to a vote upon its final passage with the following result. Those voting aye were Councilmen Read, Wilson, and Gary; noes none, and the ordinance was declared adopted and was approved by the Mayor.

A motion was carried to adopt the following as the title and number of such ordinance: “Ordinance No. 167. An ordinance contracting for and providing for a system of water works for the City of Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas, for domestic, sanitary, and other purposes,  and regulating the rates thereof.”

On motion the Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: L. H. WEBB, City Clerk.

[LEGAL NOTICES.]

Winfield Courier, January 18, 1883.

Final settlement. John H. Mounts, Administrator of the estate of Henry Shaver; Jennings & Troup, Attorneys.

Millington sounds off about water works in editorial...

[WATER WORKS.]

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883. Editorial.

                                  THE WATER WORKS QUESTION SETTLED.

                                                    Job Reduced But Still Big.

Last week we went over east with Joe. E. Conklin on business in the interest of Winfield and her citizens, and in our absence the water works question came up before the city council on Monday evening, and as we expected, was not concluded by the passage of an ordinance. We further expected that the matter would go over to the next regular meeting, by which time it could probably be determined whether a better proposition could be obtained than either of the two propositions before the council. Contrary to our expectations the council adjourned to Tuesday and then to Wednesday evening and rushed the matter along, finally passing an ordinance substantially that offered by Ed. Greer with his amendments, but giving the contract to the originators of the Barclay ordinance, contrary to all rules of justice and fair dealing. Instead of giving the contract to the lowest responsible bidder, it was given to the highest bidder on the condition that he should accept the terms proposed by the lowest bidder.


This was an outrage which admits of no excuse, and we believe that no one pretends there was any excuse for it. Ed. had the backing of at least as much Winfield capital and character as had the parties to whom the job was awarded, and in addition he had the indorsement of one of the strongest water works builders in the country who promised to build the works if Greer’s proposition passed; while the parties to whom the award was made, had no outside backing at all, and now boast that their pretended backing, John Worthington, has been dead two years.

Such an outrage could not have been perpetrated by councilmen Read and Mayor Troup alone. One other councilman was necessary to complete the job. Councilmen Wilson and McMullen could never have been inveigled into such a measure. Councilman Gary was their only chance. He had been the most stubborn opponent to the Barclay job and held that the city could not afford to go into any plan of water works which had been presented or was likely to be presented. Wilson and McMullen were in favor of water works on the best terms the city could get. Read and Troup were as certainly in favor of giving as big a job as possible to Barclay’s assigns, viz., Read’s Bank. How they managed to win Gary to their side is a matter on which our citizens will all have an opinion, but we need not state ours. Some circumstances, however, will not be overlooked. In the first place, it seems that only Read’s Bank was in the scheme. It becoming necessary to have a good talker and a lawyer, Hackney was enlisted, either on a fee or with a share in the job. We have too much regard for his shrewdness to suppose he went in without either. The job did not rush through as suddenly as was expected and Hackney had to go to Topeka. Several outsiders tumbled to their racket, probably without pay or shares, but simply because their souls belonged to Read’s Bank. But they did not count for much. Greer had put in an ordinance that would favor the city at least  $55,000 over the other ordinance and something had to be done or the original job would be beaten. They must have a lawyer and a shrewd talker. They selected J. Wade McDonald, probably on similar terms to those on which Hackney was engaged, and because it was claimed that Wade had Gary in his vest pocket. But somehow Gary did not tumble at once. He promised Ed. that he would vote for his ordinance unless the other fellows should present something a great deal better, that he would never vote to allow any other to take the job on Ed’s bid. There was still a hitch in the matter and other arguments had to be used on Gary. Other parties were taken into the ring to help out. We did not hear the new argument which was presented to Gary, but whatever it was it brought him down. On the first test vote, Gary went over to the enemy. He even refused to support Wilson’s motion to reduce the rents on additional hydrants from $75 to $65, according to Greer’s offer. This showed that Ed’s ordinance would certainly be passed and given to the other fellows, and Ed. wilted and gave up the fight. Believing that it was necessary to have water works and that the matter was reduced to the best terms the city could get, Ed. urged Wilson to vote for the measure with Read and Gary and thus settle the question. Had we been present we would have continued the fight for two weeks longer if possible, with the expectation of getting, within that time, a much better proposition for the city than that which is now saddled upon us.

We consider that Ed. has succeeded in his main point, that of saving the city a large sum of money by compelling Robinson & Co., to accept a franchise not worth one-half as much as that which they would have got but for his efforts.

Under the original ordinance, which would certainly have passed but for him, the City would have had to pay rents on at least eighty hydrants after two years at most at $75 per hydrant per year to the end of the 99 years, amounting to $6,000 a year, and if the City should require 20 more, or 100 hydrants in all, it would cost the city $7,500 a year.


Under the ordinance as passed, it will cost the city $3,000 a year for the first 40 hydrants, $65 each per year for perhaps 20 more, and the other 40 hydrants to make up 100 may be free of rent to the city, thus possibly costing the city only $4,300 a year rent for 100 hydrants, a possible saving to the city of $3,200 a year. As this sum is simply interest on the franchise, it reduces the value of the franchise by a sum which would produce $3,200 a year at 6 percent interest.

But we hold that this ordinance ought not to have passed, simply because the city cannot afford it, and because the city could have established and maintained the same kind of works with less than half of the expense, and possibly with no expense at all after two or three years; by issuing $50,000 six percent bonds and letting the individual water-rents pay the running expenses, repairs, and interest on the bonds and creating sinking fund to extinguish the bonds. Because too, as we are now informed, a proposition would soon have been made, on the same basis as the one passed, in all respects except that no hydrant should cost the city more than $60 per year, which would be a further saving to the city of about $700 a year.

But we have not got altogether a sure thing on the savings of $3,200 a year on the ordinance as passed, over the first ordinance as presented. It depends upon the structure of our future city governments. If the persons who own this franchise should be allowed to control the city legislation as in the past, they will make their stock pay, “you bet.”

The only way to preserve what we have gained is to always elect mayors and councilmen who are not interested in this stock. Even with the closest care we are liable to elect persons who are secretly stockholders or who may be bought.

The grand objection which was urged against the City building its own water works, was, that it would make a big hubbub and quarrel at every city election in the struggle between parties and individuals to get control of the water works offices. We have got the same troubles or worse ones fastened on us with this ordinance. At every city election there will be a struggle and bad blood to determine whether water works men or other citizens shall fill the city offices.

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

                                                            SOME JOKES.

Ed. Greer is the butt of some rather keen jokes since his ordinance was passed and given to M. L. Robinson & Co. Ed. is pictured as Diogenes with a lantern looking for an honest man, and thinking he had found one, rested in security. The result was that he got left. Another is that John Worthington, the backing of the Barclay ordinance, died two years ago, and M. L. beat Ed. with a “stiff.” Ed. retorts on M. L. inquiring if he means to say that he fooled our worthy mayor so completely with a mere “stiff.” Another is that the Council passed Ed.’s ordinance and then beat him out of it by striking out his name and inserting those of Robinson et. al. Ed. consoles himself that his ordinance saves the city two thousand dollars a year for ninety-nine years over the original Barclay ordinance, and that is some glory, though others reap the harvest of profits and fortune which his ordinance still retained for the poor fellows who now get the benefits of it.

[LEGAL NOTICES.]

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

Recap: Administrator’s Notice, Probate Court, Estate of N. M. Scofield, deceased. Administrator: J. B. Scofield. Jennings & Troup, Attorneys for Administrator.

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.


                                                      A Monumental Fraud,

                              With an Attempt to Make Anti-Prohibition Capital,

                                          And Establish Glickeries in Winfield.

                                                 A PETITION AND REPLY.

The following petition was circulated last week by Frank Manny, taken to Topeka, and presented by him to Senator Hackney.

WINFIELD, KANSAS, January 23, 1883.

HON. W. P. HACKNEY, State Senator, Topeka, Kansas.

Inasmuch as the Prohibition Amendment, as enforced, has always resulted in injury to the material development of our town—it having signally failed to accomplish the object sought, the suppression of the sale and use of intoxicating drinks—we would respectfully urge upon you the necessity of so providing for the enforcement of the law that its application shall be uniform throughout the State. If this is impossible, don’t sacrifice our town on the altar of inordinate devotion to an impracticable principle.

D. L. Kretsinger, John Bobbitt, S. G. Gary, H. S. Silver, J. P. Short, John M. Keck, J. B. Schofield, J. H. Vance, D. R. Gates, N. [?] Myers, W. H. Smith, M. L. Robinson, Vic S. Mays, Geo. Emerson, M. L. Read, L. F. Hess, J. Birdzell, A. A. Jackson, J. B. Richards, G. W. Miller, W. K. Davis, V. B. Bartlett, Chas. Schmidt, Allen Johnson, W. S. Mendenhall, J. N. Harter, Quincy A. Glass, F. J. Sydal, R. E. Wallis, Jr., Geo. C. Rembaugh, J. B. Lynn, M. B. Shields, J. P. Baden, J. F. Burroughs, G. L. Rinker, W. J. Cochran, C. L. Harter, D. V. Cole, J. E. Snider, J. S. Mann, Henry Goldsmith, R. M. Boles, John H. Hyde, W. B. Simpson, Hudson Bros., Edwin Bailey, Horning & Whitney, James M. Stafford, Alonzo Wharton, W. H. Shearer, R. Allison, J. Headrick, John Fogarty, H. F. Miller & Co., R. Carter, August Kadau, Beuler Buck, L. L. Beck, A. F. Kroan, D. H. Long, D. M. Harter, Joseph O’Hare, L. D. Zenor, J. W. C. Springston, J. N. Hall, R. J. Brown, M. C. Adair, E. C. Sengby, H. S. Bixby, O. [?C.?] A. Garlick, Geo. Daily [?], F. C. Nommsen, G. D. Headrick, D. A. Carr, M. W. Tanner, F. L. Weaverling, J. B. Goodrich, J. G. Kraft, O. H. Herrington, C. H. Mayler [?], C. C. Harris, H. L. Shivers, E. F. Blair, John J. Zant, M. H. Mount, B. F. Harrod, A. G. Wilson, E. C. Goodrich, Dick Silver, S. C. Smith, L. C. Harter, S. S. Major, W. Kenell, S. Burkhalter, A. Herpich, J. Flickinger, H. J. Weaver, W. H. Hudson, G. H. Wheeler, Charles Wm. Keef [?], Geo. H. Ratzer, C. W. Nichols, N. S. Ollie, Wm. W. Fleming.


NEXT COLUMN: J. L. Horning, W. C. Robinson, Chas. F. Bahntge, Wm. J. Hodges, A. T. Spotswood, Sam’l Bard, A. H. Doane, Wm. Whiting, A. E. Baird, L. C. Scott, A. D. Hendricks, R. C. Wilson, N. C. Clark, T. K. Johnston, G. W. Yount, Geo. M. Miller, John Dix, J. W. McRorey, G. H. Allen, G. E. Brach, C. Callins, F. M. Burge, Geo. Leiman, M. Hahn, A. J. Burgauer, Joseph Finkelling, J. A. Waggoner, C. M. Wood, John Fraser, W. D. Shotwell, J. Fleming, Wallis & Wallis, E. C. Seward, A. C. Taylor, J. L. Hodges, O. M. Seward, W. H. Dawson, L. B. Lattiff, S. H. Crawford, E. A. Cook, George Olive, C. W. Lathrop, Elijah Perigo, A. Bixbee, Devore Parmer, J. Batchelder, John A. Edwards, Isaac Behner, J. E. Miller, C. B. Dalgarn, Wm. Whitford, Ed Lamont, Wm. H. Fox, H. L. Wells, F. R. Hinner, Robert M. Woodson, W. F. Dorley, Brettun Crapster, A. C. Bangs, Berry Scroggins, G. J. Lockwood, E. H. Nixon, W. J. Wilson, G. J. Swind, Geo. F. Cotterall, H. C. Chappell, Edwin G. Fitch, Jas. McClain, J. W. Beard, S. L. Gilbert, W. A. Tilston, R. A. Lett, Jerry Cland, J. G. Myer, S. B. Stills, W. L. Hands, B. F. Cox, John D. Pryor, J. L. Littington, Harry Foults, Philip Sipe, T. E. Cochran, J. Heller, J. S. Mater, C. Seifert, John Fashing, J. S. McIntire, A. N. Emery, W. H. Allen, J. A. Patterson, Morris, T. W. Hambric, B. J. Mays, John Likowski, Ed F. Nelson, F. B. Clark, W. L. Webb, John E. Silany, W. H. Strahn, C. H. Limbocker, Samuel Layman, F. E. Sears, Wm. Kelly, M. G. Troup.

                                                            AN ANSWER.

GENTLEMEN: I am in receipt of the above and foregoing petition, and replying to those of the signers who are the sworn officers of the law, whose duty it is to enforce the same, I have to say: that were I to pay any attention to your petition, I would be as unworthy of the confidence and support of the good people of Cowley County, as you have shown yourselves to be, by signing such a paper as the above.

You do not seem to know what your duty is, and I will try and enlighten you with the information, that it is my duty under my oath to make laws, and it is yours to enforce them. What right have you to criticize laws, and parcel out those to be enforced, and those to be ignored?

Such petitions as you sent me, will do more to give aid and comfort to the band of outlaws now seeking to subvert constitutional obligations and duties in this state, than any one thing you can do. How is it your business, whether this or that law works well or not? You have taken an oath to see that all laws are enforced, and this coupled with your duty as men, should make you swift to throttle all infringements, and to punish all infractions. And I can assure you one and all, that I need none of your counsel or advice, and did I need any, I should look to men who have some regard for their constitutional obligation and oaths.

If you will devote your time to the performance of your duty as assiduously and vigorously as I do to mine, the discontent of the people at your pusillanimous duplicity and negligence of constitutional obligations would soon be among the things of the past.

To that portion of the signers who make their living by the sweat of other men’s brows, and who have no particular principles save and except schemes to amass wealth, I will say, that while the question of constitutional prohibition was before the people, you were unanimous for prohibition; but, when you came to adopt facts instead of theories, and for the first time you realized that under the old system the drunken debauchee paid your municipal taxes, and that under prohibition you pay your own, of course you at once there and then lost all faith in your prohibition laws because such of you would rather the county would go to the diminution bow-wows if your taxes were thereby paid than to live in a heaven on earth and pay your own taxes.

Under the old saloon system, the people who drank liquor paid your taxes for you, be they residents of the city or county. Now you must pay your own, and hence “these tears.” Under the former system families went hungry for bread that you might fatten. Under the new system you enjoy no such franchises. What do you care for betrayed trusts or broken promises, whether made by me or the officers of the law, so long as you escape what you have so often by fraud and perjury, escaped—namely taxation. Hence your discontent, hence this petition.


Winfield is not suffering from the saloon system or of the want of it. What Winfield needs is more men of capital and less Shylock’s; men of large minds and fewer small ones; less money changers and more money makers. She wants manufactories, and business that will employ honest men at honest wages who have families to feed and support. That man who has money and will spend it in these enterprises is a public benefactor. You have none now, and the prospect for getting such is not flattering.

What Winfield wants is less such Christians as you fellows are, and more of the character patterned after Him who died on the cross; less cant, hypocrisy and double dealing; more honesty and earnestness of purpose. With all this change brought about, Winfield will prosper. Without it, all the saloons outside of Hell will not add one iota to the prosperity of your town. Either wake up and rub the mildew from the prosperity of your town, or continue to swap dollars and sit upon your own prosperity.

Others of you signed this because you are devoid of the moral courage to say no. Others for fear thereby you would lose a nickel, while a very few of you favor a change hoping that you might better your condition thereby. There are a large number of you who, I cannot believe, would have signed the petition knowing that it meant saloons in Winfield. I believe that many believed it only meant strict enforcement in the large cities of the state. Its language would admit of such construction to one who was off his guard.

Now in conclusion, permit me to say that until this Legislature adjourns, I shall continue to do all I can to make prohibition a success, though by so doing I “sacrifice Winfield on the altar of inordinate devotion to an impracticable principle.” And all petitions asking for a change, will only be that much waste paper. The people who voted for prohibition two years ago and whom I promised to help, will find me steadfast until my stewardship with them ceases—which will close with this session of the Legislature, after which they may select someone else to serve them. Until then you may look for no change in my conduct on this question. I, after reading your senseless twaddle in this petition, know that I am better prepared to take care of the interests of Cowley County than are any of you.

Trusting that time will soften the poignancy of your grief, the result of contemplating the possibility of having to pay your taxes yourselves, I remain your Senator,

                                                         W. P. HACKNEY.

Owners of Read’s Bank, Mayor Troup, Councilman Gary cited as principal signers of petition to Senator Hackney...

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

                  THE TRUE “INWARDNESS” OF THE PETITION TO HACKNEY.

The original petition is drawn in the hand writing of M. L. Robinson, the originator and principal member of the water-works scheme. That measure entails a heavy tax on the citizens, of which its projectors will have their portion to pay, besides this tax is likely to create a prejudice against the originators. It is said that there are three men who are willing to pay three thousand dollars a year each for the privilege of opening and running saloons in this city. This three thousand dollars a year, with a probable increase after the first year, would be about enough to pay the water rents saddled on to the city. Besides, Read’s Bank is supposed to hold Frank Manny’s paper to a large amount, which would be largely enhanced in value if Frank could get to making money in selling intoxicating drinks.


So to help out the securities of the bank and to provide a fund for paying the water rents without taxation, these hitherto ultra prohibitionists have become the most ultra advocates of saloons and breweries we have. For the sake of paltry dollars, they are anxious to open up the flood-gates of drunkenness and debauchery upon our city and county. Hackney has an interest in the water-works stock, and judging him by themselves, they concluded that by fortifying him with a tremendous petition, he might be won over to help them in their schemes. It was an insult to him, and he has duly resented it in his answer in this paper.

Instead of 300 names on the petition as stated in the Journal, and other papers, there are just 209 only. These names are the owners and employees of Read’s Bank, Mayor Troup, and Councilman Gary, about a dozen fellows whose souls are not their own, all those who wish to run or patronize saloons, all the anti-prohibition element, and besides this, a very considerable number of respectable businessmen or citizens, who evidently signed without thought or consideration, merely to please the person who presented it. Many of these have stated that they signed under the explanation that the petition was to ask that laws be passed that would enforce the prohibitory law in the large cities of the state as effectively as it is enforced here—a construction which the ambiguity of the petition may well bear. Others say they never signed it nor authorized their names to be attached. We do not believe that one half of the signers are in favor of saloon here, or would have signed if they had understood that such was the meaning of it. We consider it a fraud upon its face, starting out as it does with statements which are well known to be false and concealing its object under ambiguous language.

It is well known here that the prohibition law has been better and more effectively enforced than the dram-shop act, which preceded it, ever was; that the sale and use of intoxicating drinks have been very largely decreased, though not entirely suppressed; that drunkenness has become ten times more rare than under license, and that the moral and business interests of the community have been greatly enhanced.

Some of the businessmen whose names are on this petition have told us that their business has been greater and better the past year than ever before, and much better than it could have been but for the prohibition law.

[PROHIBITION.]

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

                                        WINFIELD DON’T WANT SALOONS.

On looking over carefully the list of signatures on the petition to Hackney, we find a considerable number of names of persons who live in the country, and many more whom nobody knows. We find only 101 names, less than half of those on the petition, who are known as citizens of Winfield. Less than half of these probably understood what they were signing, and are in favor of saloons. It is presumable that the originators got all the names of prominent Winfield men they could by any kind of representations; and, considering all these things, the petition is not so very formidable after all. But it is enough to give our city a bad name, and give a severe stab to the cause of prohibition. The Kansas City Journal’s Topeka correspondence says that the names of all the prominent men and business firms of Winfield are found on that petition, except one bank and one hardware store. We notice that the following Winfield firms and names are conspicuously absent from the petition.

Absent from petition to Hackney...


COURIER Office, Winfield Bank, S. H. Myton, W. E. McDonald & Co., W. C. Root & Co., Hughes & Cooper, J. W. Johnston, J. S. Hunt, A. B. Arment, D. F. Best, F. M. Friend, C. E. Steuven, N. M. Powers, H. D. Gans, T. R. Bryan, C. Farringer, McGuire Bros., A. H. Green, T. J. Harris, Wm. Newton, Jacob Nixon, Curns & Manser, T. B. Myers, L. B. Stone, Frank Jennings, Henry E. Asp, G. H. Buckman, H. H. Siverd, Frank Finch, J. Wade McDonald, T. H. Soward, Ed Bedilion, J. M. Dever, Bliss & Wood, W. P. Hackney, P. H. Albright & Co., R. C. Story, Youngheim Bros., E. S. Torrance, Mr. Tomlin, Brown & Son, H. Brotherton, E. T. Trimble, W. A. Lee, A. B. Robinson, A T & S F R R STATION, Holmes’ Packing House, K C L & S R R Station, C. Trump, Dr. W. G. Graham.

Besides all the clergymen of the city and more than four hundred other businessmen and voters of the city, it does not show up big when we remember that but a very small proportion of the 650 voters in the city signed the petition.

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

                                                            Public Meeting.

The citizens of Winfield, irrespective of party or sentiment on the prohibition question, are requested to meet at the Opera House on Monday evening, February 5th, for the purpose of discussing the petition forwarded to Senator Hackney, advising him as to his action with regard to the legislation on the subject of the prohibitory law. F. S. JENNINGS, H. D. GANS, M. L. ROBINSON, J. S. HUNT, A. T. SPOTSWOOD, P. F. JONES, JAS. E. PLATTER, D. A. MILLINGTON, M. G. TROUP, T. R. BRYAN. HENRY E. ASP.

[COURIER THREATENED BY ROBINSON AND TROUP.]

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883. Editorial.

                                                          FREEZING OUT.

We understand that Robinson and Troup are going to freeze out the COURIER. We will keep from freezing if we can. In this number we have thrown in an extra hod of native coal which we can get, not only in this county but in Missouri and other places. We think we can keep it warm for awhile, at least.

[PROHIBITION AND HACKNEY.]

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

                                             AN ARDENT PROHIBITIONIST.

It is stated that the man who originated the petition to Hackney in the “glorious cause of prohibition,” before that petition was circulated, approached County Attorney Jennings and asked him the following question in substance: “Now if the city council should pass an ordinance licensing the sale of lemonade and other drinks, something like the Topeka ordinance, and could thereby raise a revenue of $3,000 a year on the sale of liquor, would you not be willing to leave the prohibition and liquor business to the city authorities and refuse to prosecute?

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

                                               A TREMENDOUS MEETING.

                                 Robinson in the Role of Prohibition Leader of Antis.

                    MAYOR TROUP BITTERLY OPPOSED TO PROHIBITION.

                                             TIPTON AS A WISHY-WASHY.

                                                            Another Crank.


When the COURIER of last week came out with the petition to Senator Hackney, his answer and our remarks, some few of our anti-prohibition friends were red hot, particularly those few who were specially hit. Our friend, Robinson, was the hottest of them, and after the call of the meeting for the following Monday evening of all citizens, irrespective of their opinions on the prohibition question, to consider the petition to Hackney, he spent about four days on the street, trying to infuse his anger into other citizens, particularly to show those who signed the petition and were not hit that they were hit; and in organizing a crowd to attend the meeting and defeat prohibition resolutions. A plan was adopted and was carried out in the meeting of Monday as far as the noise and howling was concerned.

On last Monday evening, at an early hour, the Opera House was packed full of people. Every seat and every foot of standing room was filled. There were not less than eight hundred, and possibly one thousand, present.

Judge Tipton, not one of the callers of the meeting, pushed himself into the position of temporary chairman, and nominated Rev. J. E. Platter as Chairman, who was elected. Mr. Platter refused to be silenced in that way, and nominated Hon. T. R. Bryan for Chairman, who was elected and took the chair.

Millington offered a resolution to the effect that this meeting is utterly opposed to the establishment of saloons in this city, and moved its adoption, which was seconded by numberless voices all through the hall.

Robinson jumped up and made a long, loud, and excited speech to show that the resolution was unfair and unjust.

Tipton moved to lay the resolution on the table. A vote was called on Tipton’s motion, and the saloon element set up a tremendous howl of ayes, repeated by comparatively few voices. The nays were general throughout the house. The Chairman could not decided, and a rising vote was taken. About 150 rose to lay on the table, and nearly the whole congregation rose on the vote against the motion. The prolonged howling prevented the Chairman from deciding the motion, and Millington withdrew his resolution temporarily.

Robinson then got the floor and read in a loud tone, very slowly and excitedly, a long speech abusive of Senator Hackney, and stating, substantially, that he drew the petition to Senator Hackney, and knew what it meant; that it simply meant that the prohibition law was not as well enforced in other cities as in Winfield, and that somehow this operated against Winfield; that he was enthusiastically in favor of the “glorious prohibition amendment and law,” and the petition was to urge Senator Hackney to procure the passage of a law that would strictly enforce prohibition everywhere in the State; and that the closing clause, “If this is impossible, don’t sacrifice our town on the altar of inordinate devotion to an impracticable principle, did not mean anything at all, but was only some big words which he had on hand, left over, which he threw in merely to round off the paragraph.

During this tirade of three-quarters of an hour the audience sat quietly and heard him out, except that Mr. B. F. Wood raised the point of order that abuse of Hackney was foreign to the object of the meeting as stated in the call. The Chair ruled the point well taken, but the orator was permitted to proceed.


When he yielded the floor, Millington remarked that, as the originator of the petition meant only prohibition in its strictest sense, there seemed to be no controversy, and he there-fore offered the following resolutions as the sense of the meeting, and moved their adoption after debate, which motion was seconded by hundreds of voices.

We, citizens of Winfield and vicinity, in mass meeting assembled, to express ourselves in relation to the matter of the late petition to Senator Hackney, do hereby declare;

First—That we are utterly opposed to the establishment of saloons in Winfield, or in this county.

Second—That we are opposed to the re-submission of the prohibitory amendment.

Third—That we are earnestly in favor of such legislation as will make the prohibitory law more effective.

Fourth—That we heartily endorse and will stand by Senator W. P. Hackney in his efforts to make the prohibitory law more effective, and honor him for his fearless and manly course on this question.

Fifth—That we request our Senator and Representatives to continue their efforts to strengthen this law and to guard against unfavorable legislation.

Sixth—That the prohibition law has been much better enforced in this city and county than any former law in relation to the sale of intoxicating drinks.

Seventh—That, through the operation of the prohibitory law, drunkenness and the sale and use of intoxicating drinks have very largely decreased in our midst; that our city has become largely more orderly and moral than before it went into operation, and that all legitimate business is more prosperous and flourishing than it could have been in the presence of saloons.

Eighth—That it is our honest conviction that the temperance movement in Kansas has been a blessing to thousands of our citizens.

Rev. J. E. Platter then made a short, concise, and practical speech showing the obvious meaning of the petition as interpreted by almost everybody and expressing his strong and earnest dissent from its evident objects.

Mayor Troup then got the floor and spoke loudly and slowly for about an hour and a quarter with the evident intention of worrying out the temperance people in the congregation and making them leave the hall, but they quietly heard him out. He took an entirely different view of the meaning of the petition from that of the originator. He signed that petition because it meant to him that the prohibitory law is an utter and absolute failure; that the amendment ought to be repealed; that it urged Hackney to vote for the re-submission of the amendment, and for revenue purposes, saloons ought to be re-established in Winfield. He knew that prohibition in Winfield was an utter failure; for there were two of the dirtiest saloons here, where the stench of liquor offended the nostrils of the noble mayor (who is also assistant county attorney and don’t prosecute) and that three awful saloons are known as Express offices, and are bringing in intoxicating drinks by railroad every day.

Mr. T. H. Soward was called out and took the floor. Troup tried to choke him off by interruption and the audience tried to yell Troup down. Soward in a gentlemanly manner got through with his remarks in a few minutes.

Judge Tipton took the floor for the purpose, evidently, of worrying out the temperance people, for he had absolutely nothing to say but rambled on for fifteen minutes with the most wishy-washy and senseless jargon we had ever heard from the lips of a sane man.


Another old crank got up with a nose about three by six and as red as a beet, and howled about Hackney.

It was evident from the first that three-fourths of the audience at least, were in favor of passing the resolutions offered by Millington, and the scheme of Robinson was to prevent a vote being taken on them by howling. This was kept up until the chairman got so disgusted that he pronounced the meeting adjourned, and the crowd began to move toward the door and go out.

Robinson sprang upon a chair and called the meeting to order. Millington sprang upon another chair and called out swinging a paper in his hand. The audience halted a few moments in quiet, and Millington said in a loud voice:

“The question in order before the house is on the passage of the series of resolutions presented by me. All in favor of the passage of these resolutions will say, Aye—meeting with a general response of “Aye” by nearly the whole crowd. He then said; those opposed will say, “No.” A few feeble responses were heard and he proclaimed that the resolutions were carried by an overwhelming majority. The crowd then continued to pass out amidst such a noise that nothing could be heard.

Robinson sprang upon the stage and swung his arm yelling something at the top of his voice about coming to order, but he could not be heard and the audience continued to pour out.

The writer remained until nearly all the audience had passed out and the lights were turned down. Nothing more was done and he left.

This meeting demonstrates that the people of this city are overwhelmingly in favor of all the above resolutions, and particularly enthusiastic in their endorsement of Senator Hackney.

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

                                                THAT SALOON BUSINESS.

Speaking of the petition to Senator Hackney in behalf of saloons in Winfield and the remarks in the Kansas City Journal from its Topeka correspondent, the Wellingtonian remarks:

“While it is true that Cowley County was the banner prohibition county of the state, it is equally not true that Winfield was ever anything of a banner prohibition city. None know this any better than the Journal’s clever Topeka correspondent. None better than he know that the businessmen of Winfield, as a class, never were prohibitionists. He also knows what he dare not tell, for the effect it would have, that the ‘prominent manufacturer and ice dealer’ is, or rather was, a manufacturer of beer, only. There are in the town, exclusive of the hotels and drug stores and including the two banks, eighteen that could by any decent reasoning, be called ‘largest’ business houses. Of this number—fifteen of these same ‘largest business houses’ never were prohibitionists. So that leaves but three to be accounted for, and the correspondent does that for two of them, namely: the bank and hardware, and leaves but the grocery house to be accounted for, and we can do that. Winfield, like other towns of its like, and for purpose of this sort, too often counts every peanut vender, billiard saloon keeper and lunch counter president, as ‘prominent’ businessmen.


“Again: had the astute correspondent said, something over 200, instead of almost 300 names, he would have impressed us as being nearer the truth. It would also have been better had he told his readers, that many of these same businessmen allowed themselves to be classed as prohibitionists, when in reality, they were not; but on the contrary, their sympathies were all the other way. Senator Hackney himself was not; and is perhaps not yet, a prohibitionist, as he himself says in this interview, and yet it would be hard for Journal readers to understand that. While it is true that Winfield has always been rated a prohibition city, yet these same businessmen have no settled convictions upon this or any other subject, any farther than it may effect their pockets and their standing in society. There are more people in Winfield whose lives go to disprove the Bible doctrine, ‘a man cannot serve God and Mammon,’ than any other town in the state. Hence it will be seen that any apparent reaction in this town is not much of a ‘pointer’ and bears with it but very little significance.”

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

                                                      A SLIGHT MISTAKE.

Mayor Troup in his speech Monday evening complained that Hackney in his letter of reply called him a money changer.

Why, my dear fellow, Hackney did not call you a money changer. You neglect the coat the senator prepared you, don the coat made for the other fellow, and complain that it don’t fit. Please read carefully the first part of the letter about sworn officers of the law disregarding their oaths and their duties and doing all they possibly can do to subvert law and render aid and comfort to outlaws. That is the coat made for you. The onslaught on money changers was prepared for the other fellow. Are you not the mayor of the city whose sworn duty it is to see the laws are enforced? Are you not assistant and acting county attorney whose duty it is to prosecute violations of the law? Did you not state in that speech that you knew of two of the meanest, dirtiest kind of saloons which have been selling intoxicating drinks for a long time in this city, known as express offices? Have you prosecuted these men for violation of the law? Have you closed up these places as nuisances? Are you not owned body and soul by the money changer who will use you just as long as you will do his dirty work and squeeze a nickel out of you and then sell you to someone else or kick you one side among the rubbish?

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

                                                             JUST RIGHT.

Some conservative prohibitionists have admitted that Hackney in his answer to the petitioners, handled the originators of the petition too roughly. Now if they knew all the badgering and attempted intimidation these same men had heaped upon the Senator to induce him to violate his promises to his constituents before his election, to violate his oath to support the constitution, and to second and help them in their schemes to have saloons opened in Winfield and the law set at defiance, they would say as we do, that his answer was just right. Nothing that the popular senator has ever said or done has made him so many enthusiastic friends as that letter. Hundreds of men have called into our office to express their warmest approval of the letter and of course on this question, and many of them who have always opposed him politically, say now that they would vote for him for anything he should want. We believe that a majority of those petitioners would now vote the warmest approval of his letter.

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.


Frank Finch tells a good joke on M. L. Robinson, and which portrays certain traits in the gentleman’s character so clearly that we reproduce it.

Frank and Troup were coming into town, Monday evening, before the meeting. When passing near M. L.’s house they were hailed, and that worthy came rushing up to the buggy, stuck his head under Troup’s nose in that confidential manner so peculiarly his own, and said: “We’ve got ’em on the hip! Now don’t be too strong anti-prohibition. We want to go slow. Just keep cool; we’ve got the resolutions!” He had his resolutions, and he has them yet—in his pocket. By the way, how do the anti-prohibition boys, who turned out so nobly at his solicitation, like the way he kicked them overboard and flopped back to the “glorious cause of prohibition, so near to his heart?” His eagle eye must have detected a nickel on the side of prohibition that he hadn’t seen when he was negotiating with them.

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

                       COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, Feb. 5, 1883.

Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup in the chair. Roll called. Present: Councilmen Wilson, McMullen, and Gary; absent, Councilman Read.

Minutes of last regular meeting, and of the adjourned meetings of Jan. 16 and 17 were read and approved.

The bill of F. M. Freeland for 75 cents for board furnished city poor, was approved and recommended to the county commissioners for payment.

The City Attorney was instructed to inquire into and report upon, by ordinance or otherwise, the question whether those taking out licenses as movers of buildings cannot be protected as such licensees.

On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: L. H. WEBB, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, February 15, 1883.

We wonder that the Telegram critic who discovered Hackney’s “lamentable ignorance,” and who is so familiar with Dickens, did not notice the striking similarity of Mayor Troup’s “simplicity,” in his open letter, and Uriah Heep’s “humbleness.”

Winfield Courier, February 15, 1883.

Mayor Troup’s letter on Senator Hackney is a wonderful document. Withering in sarcasm and running over with scintillating invective, it metaphorically dangles the mangled scalp of our Senator before a horrified public. We understand he wrote it with a stick. What would it have been if he had written it with a steel pen? The thought is too saddening for contemplation.

[ELECTION REQUEST: SCHOOL PURPOSES.]

Winfield Courier, February 15, 1883.

RECAP: MAYOR TROUP ISSUED PER REQUEST OF BOARD OF EDUCATION A REQUEST FOR AN ELECTION. WED., FEB. 28, FOR PROPOSITION OF ISSUING $5,000 OF THE BONDS OF SAID CITY FOR SCHOOL PURPOSES. GEO. EMERSON, PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD, L. D. ZENOR, CLERK OF BOARD.

“For the purpose of paying teachers’ wages and improving and repairing school buildings, the laying of sidewalks and improvement of school furniture. . . .”


      Election 1st ward: to be held in a building situated on Lot No. 19, in Block No. 129, in said ward. J. C. Fuller, George Emerson, and G. H. Buckman to be judges; John M. Reed and H. E. Silliman to act as clerks.

Election 2nd ward: to be held in a building situated on the rear end of Lot No. 1, in Block No. 109, in said ward. B. F. Wood, A. H. Doane, and T. H. Seward to be judges; L. D. Zenor and J. H. Vance to act as clerks.

[HACKNEY’S BILL PASSED SENATE.]

Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.