N. T. SNYDER.

                            [Joined by brother, Phil. L. Snyder, at a later period.]

                                                            Arkansas City.

ARKANSAS CITY 1893:

Snyder, N. T.; spouse, Lenora, 42.

                                               FROM THE NEWSPAPERS.

Winfield Courier, July 25, 1878.

N. T. Snyder, of Michigan, will put into A. H. Green’s building a full stock of books, stationery, and musical instruments. Though a young man, he has a large experience in the business.

Winfield Courier, October 3, 1878.

N. T. Snyder, from Muskegon, Michigan, arrived with his lady to become residents of this city. He will soon open a stock of books, stationery, notions, and fancy goods in this place. They will be a pleasant addition to the society of this city.

Winfield Courier, October 3, 1878.

Henry Goldsmith, from Clinton, Missouri, will, about the 10th inst., occupy the corner of Manning’s new block with a full stock of books, stationery, tobacco, cigars, and gent’s furnishing goods; also news depot. The post office will occupy the rear end of the room.

Winfield Courier, January 2, 1879.

Listed as a Courier Advertiser:

GOLDSMITH runs the bookstore, newsstand, confectionery, fruit, and toy store at the post office. The amount of Christmas goods he has disposed of in the past two weeks would hardly be believed if told accurately. He is assisted by Mr. Snyder, an accomplished salesman in his line.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

If you want to learn anything of blooded fowls, ask N. T. Snyder about them.

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

Mr. N. T. Snyder is making arrangements to publish an illustrated catalogue in connection with his poultry establish­ment. It will contain much valuable information to poultry raisers, and will be distributed free of charge.

[REVIEWING NEW YEAR’S DAY.]

Winfield Courier, January 8, 1880.

The liveliest crowd we encountered during the rounds was the “Pickwick Club.” Their immense pasteboard cards, embellished with “original photographs” of the members, with the inimitable Nat. Snyder as “Mr. Pickwick,” was the talk of all we met. Taken altogether, this was the biggest day, socially, Winfield has ever seen. It may be said, greatly to the credit of the ladies receiving, that no wines were served, and that no disturbances occurred to mar the pleasures of the day.

Winfield Courier, March 11, 1880.

Last week Mr. Nat. Snyder shipped a trio of thorough-bred Buff Cochins from his poultry yards to a gentleman in Joplin, Mo. Nat is gaining a wide reputation as a poultry breeder.

Winfield Courier, April 1, 1880.

Nat Snyder has been appointed agent for Wanamaker & Brown.


 

N. T. and L. Snyder [First mention of L. Snyder]...

[WALNUT VALLEY POULTRY YARDS.]

Winfield Courier, April 1, 1880.

Notice to farmers and lovers of fine poultry: Our turkeys are now laying and we are prepared to furnish eggs for setting, 13 eggs for $5. First come, first served. Our breeding yard (boss and five hen turkeys) is the finest in the west. Average weight at two years old, hens, 25 to 35 pounds; gobblers, 35 to 45 pounds. Call and see them.

                                          WALNUT VAL. POULTRY YARDS.

                    OFFICE IN POST OFFICE BOOKSTORE. N. T. & L. SNYDER.

[NOTICE: POULTRY WANTED.]

Winfield Courier, May 13, 1880.

I will pay the highest cash price for 100 dozen live chick­ens, delivered at the Walnut Valley Poultry Yards, or Wallis & Wallis’ grocery, Winfield, Kansas. N. T. SNYDER.

Cowley County Courant, March 16, 1882.

George Rhodes, our enterprising furniture dealer, has a show window of more than ordinary attraction. The window shows a large room, formed of muslin, which contains thirty-six live red birds, fluttering and flying around in the branches of a cedar tree. The birds were secured by Mr. Rhodes and Nate Snyder, and the sight is certainly worth going some distance to see.

Winfield Courier, March 30, 1882.

A. H. Green has made arrangements to start a branch real estate office at Arkansas City with Nat Snyder in charge.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 5, 1882.

Gen. A. H. Green, the well known real estate man of Winfield, was in our city last Monday upon business connected with the starting of a Real Estate office. He has secured a temporary office in G. W. Cunningham’s store, the business of which will be mainly managed by Mr. Nat. Snyder.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 26, 1882.

Green & Snyder will insure you against damage to crops, farm buildings, horses, etc., from lightning and tornadoes.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 10, 1882.

Messrs. Green & Snyder sold the J. A. West farm, east of town, last week for $4,000.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 17, 1882.

Green & Snyder made another sale of 160 acres, in West Bolton, last week for $900.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 17, 1882.

Snyder & Green say they want more improved and unimproved farms to sell. Farmers, if you want to sell your farms, and get good prices, leave your farms with them to sell. Office opposite the Post Office.

Winfield Courier, July 13, 1882.

DIED. INGHAM. On the 6th inst., Samuel Ingham, at the residence of his son-in-law, N. T. Snyder, aged 68 years, 2 months, and 7 days.


He was born in Whitesborough, near Utica, New York, in 1814. When a young man he  entered into business in Oswego. In the year 1850 he moved to Jersey City, New Jersey; from thence he moved to Michigan about 1865; and from thence to Kansas in 1878. He has been a member of the Baptist Church something over forty years. In his middle life he was an active and successful merchant and businessman. He always sustained a high character and was much beloved wherever he was known.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 19, 1882.

Most of the real estate transfers of this vicinity the past few weeks have been made through our real estate men, Green & Snyder.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 19, 1882.

Messrs. Green & Snyder are now issuing the eighth edition of their Real Estate News. It is a twenty-four column paper and brim full of matter of interest to land buyers and home seekers. The matter contained in its columns is reliable and not overdrawn as many such publications are. This is one of the livest and most energetic real estate firms in the West, and does business in a manner that is satisfactory both to buyer and seller.

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

Messrs. Green and Snyder, Land Brokers of Arkansas City, issued this week an edition of their Real Estate News. It is filled with interesting and valuable matter about Cowley County and Arkansas City, and will prove a valuable medium for the promotion of immigration to that part of the county.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1882.

Mr. J. Godfrey sold his house and two lots, through Green & Snyder, last week to a Mr. A. C. Cleveland, who will occupy the same as a residence.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1882.

L. Small has purchased the Rev. Faulkner place, in the south part of the city. Of course, our real estate men, Green & Snyder, had a hand in the transaction.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1882.

John W. French sold his house and six lots on Eighth St. to George Cunningham last week. The sale was negotiated by Green & Snyder, who realized a handsome price for the property.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 23, 1882.

Messrs. W. R. Owen and T. J. Eaton, sheep men from Ohio, on last week purchased the McCan farm of 400 acres on Silver Creek for $4,000. Green & Snyder negotiated the sale.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 6, 1882.

Green & Snyder have just sold the Daniels property just west of the U. P. church, to Mr. Endicott, from Indiana, a cousin of P. F. Endicott.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 13, 1882.

Green & Snyder made the following sales of land on Monday last.

Eighty acres in West Bolton owned by A. G. Kells, of Shelby­ville, Tennessee, to James Headley for $750.

Eighty acres in East Bolton owned by R. A. Houghton to A. C. Crutchfield, of Waverly, Missouri, for $500.

Five acres adjoining the town site owned by W. H. Earnest, of Iowa, to Al. Woolsey for $150.


Winfield Courier, September 14, 1882.

                                                        Horticultural Meeting.

Special meeting of the Society held at the Courthouse in Winfield, on Saturday, Sept. 9th, 1882. Present: J. F. Martin, President; G. W. Robertson, Treasurer; the Secretary being absent, T. A. Blanchard was elected Secretary pro tem.

Mr. Blanchard, the committee appointed at last meeting to solicit subscriptions for the purpose of defraying expense in making collections of horticultural products for display at state and county fair, reported $17.00 collected and $3.00 subscribed and not yet paid, and upon motion of S. E. Berger, was directed to turn the same over to the Treasurer. The committee was then discharged.

Dr. Marsh made a partial report of the committee on fruit collection, and was requested to prepare a full report for publication, which he consented to do.

The committee appointed at last meeting to take charge of our fruit display at the State Fair, was directed to preserve and return the same for display at our county fair. Messrs. Berger, Brown, and Williams were appointed a committee to take charge of all fruit on the table not needed for the State fair, and preserve the same for exhibition at the county fair.

Mr. Hogue exhibited a seedling apple grown by J. W. Curfman, which is said to possess excellent keeping qualities, and is of fine flavor. There were displayed on the table three watermelons by Mr. N. T. Snyder, weighing respectfully 50, 52, and 53½  pounds; also some mammoth onions, all of which were kindly donated for display at the State fair.

Society adjourned to meet at the COURIER office next Saturday.

                                        T. A. BLANCHARD, Secretary Pro Tem.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 20, 1882.

Green & Snyder sell real estate in short order.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 27, 1882.

Mr. Nat Snyder, our enterprising real-estate man, is ship­ping corn in the ear to Kansas City. He paid 35 cents a bushel last week.

Winfield Courier, September 21, 1882.

                                                        Horticultural Matters.

N. T. Snyder brought in two Gipsy watermelons, weighing 53 and 50 pounds respectively, and one Cuban Queen weighing 52½  pounds. These melons were raised by Mr. Dalzell, near Arkansas City.

Mr. Snyder also brought some very large Giant Roeca and Red Tripoli onions and some early Ohio potatoes. The society sent them to the State Fair.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 22, 1882.

If you wish to purchase a house, town lots, or an improved farm, call on Green & Snyder.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 6, 1882.

Messrs. N. T. Snyder, C. H. Searing, and Capt. C. M. Scott left on Monday’s train for the East. Before returning all three of the gentlemen will visit Washington, D. C.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 27, 1882.

N. T. Snyder returned from his eastern trip on Sunday last.

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.


Gen. A. H. Green is now issuing the ninth edition of his paper, known as “Green’s Real Estate News.” These papers reflect credit upon the General as a businessman, besides giving land news of both local and general importance. His enterprise, untiring energy, close attention to business, and honorable and upright manner of dealing, make him well worth of having, as he does, the largest real estate business in the West. He is now issuing an 11,000 edition, 6,000 of which is for his home office in this city, and 5,000 for his branch office at Arkansas City, this county, which is under the management and control of Nat. Snyder, his partner in that office, who is an affable, energetic, and thoroughly reliable businessman. The General has been issuing these papers at intervals of from five, seven, or eight months, for the past seven years, and as an evidence of the high regard entertained for his paper as an advertising medium, the reader is referred not only to the advertisements of nearly all of our intelligent, enterprising, and most successful businessmen, but to the large advertisement, on the 4th page, of our best line of railroad, the K. C. S. and S. K. Gen. Green’s enemies are often heard to admit that he is an honorable businessman, and that what he says can be depended upon.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 17, 1883.

Lower as never was are Green & Snyder’s rates on money to loan.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 17, 1883.

Green & Snyder are the men to call on if you want to buy or sell anything in the way of farms or city property.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 17, 1883.

                                       Arkansas City Council M.—National Union.

This lodge was organized with 22 members, last Monday night, by Dr. W. G. Graham and C. H. Wilson, of Winfield. This lodge is very similar to the Knights of Honor and A. O. U. W., save that they have a different and, it is claimed, much superior plan of insurance. The officers elected for the ensuing year are as follows: N. T. Snyder, P; W. V. McConn, F. S.; Maude E. McConn, S; Sarah E. Kellogg, T.; O. S. Rarick, V. P.; T. V. McConn, S. P.; H. D. Kellogg, E. P.; E. A. Barron, C.; Theo Fairclo, U.; W. E. Moore, S (al) A.; A. H. Fitch, D. K.; H. D. Kellogg, Med. Examiner; R. C. Lent, T. V. McConn, O. S. Rarick, Trustees.

Winfield Courier, January 18, 1883.

                                      [From Green & Snyder’s Real Estate News.]

                                            Arkansas City and Her Surroundings.


Arkansas City is the second city in size in Cowley County, and is the center of trade for the southwest portion of the county. The section of country tributary to her cannot be excelled in the state of Kansas, taking in as it does the valleys of the Arkansas, Walnut, and Grouse, with a portion of the valley between the Walnut and Arkansas, all first-class land. This surrounding country is now thickly settled with enterprising farmers who are making permanent improvements. The three streams afford sufficient timber for all present use, and the country abounds in stone of every variety from water-lime to limestone. Stone as hard as flint and stone that can be cut with a common saw, but hardens sufficiently with exposure to make first-class building rock. This section has fully tested all the cereals with uncommon success. Small fruits and grapes ripen to perfection, and so far have been remarkably free  from disease. Peaches budded and seedlings have known but few failures since the first bearings. The apple orchards have come into bearing to a sufficient extent to demonstrate that all the leading varieties that have been tested in the older settled portions of the state will succeed here. Such is the country surrounding the city, and from such a country it is easy to predict that it will be a good feeder for steady and enduring trade.

                                                                THE CITY

is situated upon the divide which separates the Walnut and Arkansas Rivers, and no finer site can be found in the State of Kansas. The land gently sloping to either river, the first rays of morning come gleaming over the Walnut, and the last rays of the setting sun dance in beauty over the waters and through the leafy trees on the banks of the Arkansas.

In addition to the beauty of the town site, the city is so located (being only four and one-half miles from the Territory line) that the ranche trade and the trade of the agencies center here. The ranche trade alone amounts to over one hundred thousand dollars a year, while the agency trade is continually increasing. Not only in location, but in material for building does the city excel. In every direction within one mile of the city are inexhaustible quarries of building stone. Brick of the finest quality are made on the town site, lime is burned within a short distance of the city, and sand procured within one-half mile. The progress of the city has been steady from the beginning. One log hut in 1871; forty business houses, and two hundred dwellings in 1882.

                                                             CHURCHES.

In churches Arkansas City is well represented, Presbyterians and Methodists having three fine church buildings and a large membership. The Baptist, free Methodist, and Christians have organizations and expect to build. In schools and school buildings she has always taken the lead, having now the finest school building in southern Kansas, and is making preparation to erect two more, when the larger building will be made a first-class graded school, giving facilities for education found in but few cities in Kansas.

                                                              BUSINESS.

All kinds of business is well represented and doing well, with room for more. Two banks. Three first-class dry goods establishments, in rooms twenty-five by one hundred feet, are doing a large business; eleven groceries—part of them carrying large stocks, two clothing, four drugstores, two jewelry establishments, four hardware, three restaurants, four livery stables, one bakery, one harness shop, two agricultural and implement stores, one real estate, and two law offices make up the business of the town. In addition to this are three mills with a capacity for grinding twelve hundred bushels of wheat per day, and a foundry and machine shop for casting and machinery repairs.

                                                             RAILROADS.

The city is at present the terminus of the A. T. & S. F., and has now three trains a day. The A. T. & S. F. will move on down the river to Ft. Smith as soon as the right of way can be secured. It will be found by looking at the map that a straight line from this place strikes the main line of the A. T. & S. F., at Ft. Dodge, which will shorten the main line fifty miles and will put Arkansas City on the main line from the Mississippi to the Pacific. Another line is projected and partially built, which will follow the southern line of the state, and must strike this place as it moves west.

                                                        MANUFACTURES.


In regard to manufactories the city rightfully claims first rank, having the finest improved water power in the state of Kansas.

This improvement made by the “Arkansas Water Power Company” has already involved an outlay of over one hundred thousand dollars, and consists of a race connecting the Arkansas River with the Walnut River, the race being three miles in length and sixteen feet at the bottom and thirty-two feet at the top in width, giving a fall of twenty-one and one third feet, with present capacity for driving machinery to the amount of seven hundred horse-power, and provision made to enlarge to double the amount at any time it may be required. The company have a well constructed dam over the Arkansas four feet in height, which has been sufficiently tried by the floods to give confidence in its permanency. The mason work at the head and tail gates is massive and solid, and constructed in a first-class manner. The company have secured the erection by experienced men of two fine mills—one in operation with a capacity of six hundred bushels of wheat per day and latest improvements for making fine flour—now known to the trade. This mill, built at a cost of over twenty-five thousand dollars, has been in constant operation since its completion. A first-class stone mill has also been erected and is now about ready for operation. The company are also negotiating for the erection of a cotton mill by an eastern party of experience. As an additional attraction to the city a company has been formed, the lots purchased, and the money raised for the construction of a public hall fifty feet by one hundred feet, eighteen foot story and two storerooms and basement beneath, to be furnished in the latest style.

                                                                HEALTH.

Last, but not least, comes a question of great importance to all parties seeking a new location. Situated as Arkansas City is upon a rolling knoll with constant breezes and no stagnant water in any direction, it accounts for the fact that her people can claim an immunity from diseases that is found in very few localities in the state. Further than this, as a point favorable to the health of the city, is the fact that pure, living water can be found at a reasonable depth in all parts of the city. In addition to this the city has inaugurated a system of water-works which can be increased with its growth, by which water is raised by machinery to the highest point on the town site and distributed by pipes throughout the city, making a plentiful supply of water for use and a complete safeguard against fire.

Strangers desiring to settle will find a pleasant, sociable people ready to extend the hand of friendship and make them perfectly at home.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 24, 1883.

                               ARKANSAS CITY AND HER SURROUNDINGS.


Arkansas City is the second city in size in Cowley County, and is the center of trade for the southwest portion of the county. The section of country tributary to her cannot be excelled in the State of Kansas, taking in, as it does, the valleys of the Arkansas, Walnut, and Grouse, with a portion of the valley between the Walnut and Arkansas, all first-class land. The surrounding country is now thickly settled with enterprising farmers, who are making permanent improvements. The three streams afford sufficient timber for all present use, and the country abounds in stone of every variety, from water-lime to limestone. Stone that is hard as flint and stone that can be cut with a common saw, but hardens sufficiently with exposure to make first-class building rock. This section has fully tested all the cereals with uncommon success. Small fruits and grapes ripen to perfection, and so far have been remarkably free from disease. Peaches, budded and seedlings, have known but few failures since the first beginning. The apple orchards have come into bearing to a sufficient extent to demonstrate that all the leading varieties that have been tested in the older settled portions of the State will succeed here. Such is the country surrounding the city, and from such a country, it is easy to predict that it will be a good feeder for steady and enduring trade.

The City is situated upon a divide which separates the Walnut and Arkansas Rivers, and no finer a town can be found in the state of Kansas. The land generally sloping to either river, the first rays of morning come gleaming over the Walnut, and the last rays of the setting sun dance in beauty over the waters and through the leafy trees on the banks of the Arkansas.

In addition to the beauty of the townsite, the city is so located (being only four and one-half miles from the Territory line) that the ranche trade and the trade of the agencies center here. The ranche trade alone amounts to over one hundred thousand dollars a year, while the agency trade is continually increasing. Not only in location, but in material for building, does the city excel. In every direction within one mile of the city are inexhaustible quarries of building stone. Brick of the finest quality are made on the townsite, lime is burned within a short distance of the city, and sand procured within one-half mile. The progress of the city has been steady from the beginning. One log hut in 1871; forty business houses and two hundred dwellings in 1882.

Churches. In churches Arkansas City is well represented: Presbyterians and Methodists having three fine church buildings and a large membership. The Baptist, Free Methodists, and Christians have organizations, and expect to build.

Schools. In schools and school buildings she has always taken the lead, having now the finest school building in Southern Kansas, and is making preparation to erect two more, when the larger building will be a first-class graded school, giving facilities for education found in but few cities in Kansas.

Business. All kinds of business is well represented and doing well, with room for more. Two banks. Three first-class dry goods establishments, in rooms twenty-five by one hundred feet, are doing a large business; eleven groceries, part of them carrying large stocks; two clothing; four drug stores; two jewelry establishments; four hardware; three restaurants; four livery stables; one bakery; two harness shops; two agricultural and implement stores; one real estate and two law offices, make up the business of the town. In addition to this are three mills with a capacity for grinding twelve hundred bushels of wheat per day, and a foundry and machine shop for casting and machinery repairs.

Railroads. The city is at present the terminus of the A. T. & S. F., and has now three trains a day. The A. T. & S. F. will move on down the river to Ft. Smith as soon as the right of way can be secured. It will be found by looking at the map that a straight line from this place strikes the mail line of the A. T. & S. F. at Ft. Dodge, which will shorten the main line fifty miles and will put Arkansas City on the main line from the Mississippi to the Pacific. Another line is projected and partially built which will follow the southern line of the State, and must strike this place as it moves west.


Manufacturers. In regards to manufactories the city rightfully claims first rank, having the finest improved water power in the State of Kansas. The improvement made by the Arkansas City Water Power Company has already involved an outlay of over one hundred thousand dollars, and consists of a race connecting the Arkansas River with the Walnut River, the race being three miles in length and sixteen feet at the bottom and thirty-two feet at the top in width, giving a fall of twenty-one and one-third feet, with present capacity for driving machinery to the amount of seven hundred horsepower, and provision made to enlarge to double the amount at any time it may be required.

The company have a well constructed dam over the Arkansas four feet in height, which has been sufficiently tried by the flood to give confidence in its permanency. The mason work at the head and tail gates is massive and solid, and constructed in a first-class manner. The company have secured the erection by experienced men of two fine mills—one operating with capacity of six hundred bushels of wheat per day and latest improvements for making fine flour—now known to the trade. This mill, built at a cost of over twenty-five thousand dollars, has been in constant operation ever since its completion. A first-class stone mill has also been erected and is now in operation. The company are also negotiating for the erection of a cotton mill by an eastern party of experience. As an additional attraction to the city, a company has been formed, the lots purchased, and the money raised for the construction of a public hall fifty feet by one hundred feet, eighteen foot story and two store rooms and basement beneath, to be finished in the latest style.

Health. Last, but not least, comes a question of great importance to all parties seeking a new location. Situated as Arkansas City is, upon a rolling knoll with constant breezes and no stagnant water in any direction, it accounts for the fact that her population claim an immunity from diseases that is found in very few localities in the State. Further than this, as a point favorable to the health of the city, is the fact that pure living water can be found at a reasonable depth in all parts of the city. In addition to this, the city has inaugurated a system of water-works, which can be increased with its growth, by which water is raised by machinery to the highest point on the townsite; and distributed by pipes throughout the city, making a plentiful supply of water for use and a complete safeguard against fire.

Strangers desiring to settle will find a pleasant, sociable people ready to extend the hand of friendship and make them perfectly at home. Green & Snyder’s Real Estate News.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 31, 1883.

A good cattle ranch for sale by Green & Snyder.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 21, 1883.

Mr. Nat Snyder has purchased three lots between W. D. Bishop’s and Geo. Cunning-ham’s residence on Ninth Street for $300 and will shortly put himself up a neat and commodious home.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 21, 1883.

N. T. Snyder, who has been sick for some time past, was on the streets again Monday, but looked much the worse for wear. We hope Nat will have no more back sets, but soon become his old self once more.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 28, 1883.

Green & Snyder is the place to go for bargains in real estate.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 28, 1883.

Real estate has been changing hands pretty lively for the past few days.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 14, 1883.


N. T. Snyder will shortly put up a residence in our city.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 14, 1883.

Messrs. Green & Snyder, our live real estate men, call the attention of buyers to the fact that their books always show a list of choice farms, city property, etc., for sale.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 4, 1883.

The real estate boom we are now enjoying needs no further proof than the statement that property to the amount of $100,000 has already changed hands through our real estate men, Green & Snyder.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 11, 1883.

Messrs. Green & Snyder sold a lot on Main Street, opposite the post office, for $1,200 last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 18, 1883.

                                                           Railroad Meeting.

There was a call for the businessmen of the city and country to meet at McLaughlin’s Hall at 4 o’clock, April 13th, to take into consideration the building of a railroad from Arkansas City, Kansas, to Coffeyville, Kansas, and west as far as Caldwell, and farther, if desired.

Meeting called to order by Dr. Chapel; T. H. McLaughlin appointed Chairman and Wm. Blakeney, Secretary. Chair called for remarks.

James Hill being asked to state, in full, the object of the meeting, spoke in a clear and forcible manner of the great advantages that a railroad would do us, as a city and country, running along so near the Territory line, making a direct road from this city to St. Louis, thereby saving much time and expense in getting our stock and grain to a good market. Mr. Hill also stated that if we were not up and doing, other cities would take all the things of advantage to themselves, building up their cities and counties, and we would be left out in the cold.

Rev. Fleming spoke on the question with much earnestness, advising that whatever was done be done at once. Many spoke very freely on the question, all taking a deep interest in doing something to help make our city a better city and our county a better county.

After the project being understood, a committee, comprising James Hill and Dr. Chapel, was appointed to solicit bonds, along the line, from the cities and counties. Another committee was also appointed to solicit funds to meet the expense of surveying. Committee: James Huey, E. D. Eddy, N. T. Snyder, and Wm. Sleeth. Motion made to adjourn.

                                                WM. BLAKENEY, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 18, 1883.

Messrs. Gibby & Endicott’s meat market, and Green & Snyder’s real estate office bask in the shade of a brand new awning since last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 2, 1883.

The foundation for N. T. Snyder’s new house is just completed.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 9, 1883.

We call attention to the advertisement of town lots in the Leonard Addition for sale, by Messrs. Green & Snyder, which appears in this issue. These lots are 50 x 131 feet and are situated in one of the most desirable parts of town.


Ad. 100 LOTS 50 X 131 FEET FOR SALE IN LEONARD’S AND CANAL ADDITION. These lots will be sold on time to parties wishing to build. Prices $25 to $10 a lot, giving purchaser the choice of location. This addition will soon be supplied with the water works, saving all expense of digging wells. GREEN & SNYDER.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 9, 1883.

                                                         Railroad Meeting.

In accordance with notice duly given a number of our citizens gathered at McLaughlin’s Hall last Monday evening to talk over railroad matters in general, and to take the necessary steps towards securing an east and west railroad to this point in particular. The meeting was called to order and T. H. McLaughlin was called to take the Chair, and N. T. Snyder to act as Secretary of the meeting. About the first thing brought before the attention of the meeting was a proposition from Winfield stating what they desired in order to enable them to work with us in securing county bonds in aid of an eastern road. The proposition, which was signed by several leading citizens of Winfield, was in substance as follows.

“That Winfield would do all in her power to aid us in working for said road and in securing county bonds in aid of the enterprise, provided that said road should enter the county in the vicinity of Cedarvale, then running on the most practicable route to WINFIELD from there to GEUDA SPRINGS and then to Arkansas City.”

This proposition was received with tremendous cheers, but after quite a lengthy talk, failing to elicit whether it was submitted as a joke or in sober earnest, it was unanimously resolved by the meeting that it be tabled. Mr. A. A. Newman then submitted a resolution in substance as follows.

Resolved. That the citizens of Arkansas City would pledge themselves to do all in their power to secure county aid in bonds to a railroad which would enter the county from the east in the vicinity of Cedarvale, thence proceed towards Dexter, near which, and at a point equidistant from Winfield and Arkansas City, the road should divide into two branches, one of which should go to each town, both towns to be named as temporary terminal points, and the further westward course of the road, whether from Winfield or Arkansas City, to be decided by the interests of the road as developed in the future.

The resolution was unanimously adopted by the meeting, and Messrs. James Hill and Wm. P. Sleeth were appointed as a committee to lay the same before the citizens of Winfield at an early day. It was further taken as the sentiment of the meeting that no time be lost in prosecuting the matter towards securing an east and west railroad, and the two gentlemen last named were delegated to see that all steps necessary to be taken, with this end in view, be promptly attended to. The meeting also authorized a per centum of the money subscribed for a preliminary survey to be appropriated for the payment of the incidental expenses of the committee. The meeting adjourned after being in session about two hours.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 30, 1883.

Messrs. F. J. Hess and Green & Snyder, our real estate men, report business in their line as simply immense, all of which speaks volumes as to the desirability of property in this vicinity.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 6, 1883.


N. T. Snyder’s new house on Fifth Street is enclosed and is being pushed towards completion as rapidly as possible.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 20, 1883.

BIRTH. N. T. Snyder was around in the most benign manner possible yesterday, feeding the boys, not taffy, but cigars. It is a girl, and a boss one, so says paterfamilias. Date June 18th, 1883.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 4, 1883.

The lot now occupied by Green & Snyder’s real estate agency was sold by the latter gentleman to a Mr. Prichard, of Denver, last week, the consideration being $1,000.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 4, 1883.

At a meeting of the members of the Baptist Church in Arkansas City, the following gentlemen were elected trustees of the First Baptist Church of Arkansas City: Wm. Mercer, N. T. Snyder, C. C. Hollister, Samuel Clarke, L. Goff.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 22, 1883.

                                                         Railroad Meeting.

Pursuant to notice given a number of our citizens gathered at McLaughlin’s Hall last Monday evening to discuss railroad matters. Dr. A. J. Chapel was called to the chair, and N. T. Snyder to the secretary’s desk. The chairman introduced Mr. Hill, who enlarged upon the advantages to be gained by our city and county by the construction of the proposed Missouri, Winfield & Southwestern railroad through our county. Mr. Henry Asp was then called upon to read the proposition, the main points of which we will briefly state, as our space precludes us from publishing it in full this week. It asks the county to take capital stock to the amount of $100,000, to be paid for in county bonds. Each mile of road constructed in the county is to cost not more than $2,800 per mile. As soon as ten miles of road have been constructed in the county, bonds to the amount of $12,000 shall be paid to the company, and each succeeding five miles constructed shall entitle the company to receive an additional $12,000. This rate of payment will entitle the company to receive, upon the completion of its line and when cars are running to the south line of the state, the residue of the bonds, or $20,000. To put the above in few words, it is proposed to build a road from the north to the south line of the county for one hundred thousand dollars, of which over 25 percent, or $26,000, are not to be paid until the road is actually running to the south line of the state in Bolton Township. Said road is to issue to the county in return for its bonds $100,000 of fully paid up stock. The road is to be completed in two years from the date of issuance of the bonds. The probable point of junction of the proposed railroad with the St. Louis, Fort Scott & Wichita railroad will be at Eureka, which will cause the road to enter Cowley near the northeast corner of the county, and run via Winfield and Arkansas City to a point south or southwest of this city in Bolton Township, thus giving us advantages that no other road could give us in securing the territory cattle trade. Those present were asked to sign the petition to the county commissioners calling for an election, nearly all responding. It was also moved and carried that those parties who had subscribed for the expenses of a preliminary survey on the east and west road should transfer their subscriptions to the M. W. & S. R. R. instead, after which the meeting adjourned.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 29, 1883.


We this week present a supplement to the TRAVELER in the shape of an extensive list of real estate for sale by the enterprising local man, N. T. Snyder. We have printed some 3,000 copies of this real estate circular, and as an evidence of the substantial movement in this line of business, we will furnish a similar number this week for Mr. F. J. Hess. Verily, Cowley doth boom. [Did not find Supplement.]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 7, 1883.

                                                      The “Farm and Home.”

The above is the title of a most newsy and readable real estate paper issued from this office in the interests of our county and city, by N. T. Snyder, the enterprising land agent. Unlike most gentlemen in business ventures of this kind, Mr. Snyder occupies a very small portion of the paper for himself, giving the main space to matters of county interest and advertising for our merchants. It cannot fail to result in much good for our city, to those who advertise in it and Mr. Snyder himself, who will send out several hundred copies each month to every state and territory. Each issue will contain items of useful information to farmers and stock men, and will prove of far greater value to them than the nominal sum of fifty cents per year, which is simply for the purpose of covering the expense of issuing. Parties in the east contemplating a change in the near future cannot do better than to make themselves regular subscribers of the Farm and Home—and the TRAVELER.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 21, 1883.

WANTED. I want two good houses of five or six rooms, in good location, to rent. Good tenants furnished. Inquire of N. T. Snyder.

Winfield Courier, November 22, 1883.

                                                           Farm and Home.

This is a new paper published by our old friend, N. T. Snyder, at Arkansas City, and the first number is before us. It gives a great many valuable and interesting facts in relation to Cowley County and Arkansas City and a summary of local and general news. It will be a good accessory to his real estate business. It is to be published monthly.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1883.

The ladies of the Baptist Church, and all others interested, are invited to meet at the residence of Mrs. N. T. Snyder on Friday, 2 o’clock p.m., to make arrangements for a fair and festival to be held in the week before Christmas.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1883.

N. T. Snyder’s real estate paper, the Farm and Home, will appear again this week. Since its last issue Mr. Snyder has sold nearly every piece of property advertised therein, proving its value as an advertising medium. The Farm and Home is fast becoming an institution of Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 2, 1884.

N. T. Snyder is now in Iowa, where he will purchase stock; according to the last edition of the Farm and Home.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 16, 1884.

Mr. N. T. Snyder last week sold the Norton farm in North Bolton to Mr. A. Means, of Indiana, for $10,000. It is one of the best improved places in the township.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 16, 1884.


The editor of the Farm and Home, Mr. N. T. Snyder, has some fine blooded horses and cattle these days. The cattle are especially interesting as being full blooded Jerseys. Our farmer friends should call round and see Nate’s pets.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 30, 1884.

Mr. N. T. Snyder’s real estate office has been fixed up and rearranged, and as a result thereof Nate has a neat and commodious office.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 16, 1884.

                                  ARKANSAS CITY AND SURROUNDINGS.

                                                   REAL ESTATE AGENTS.

N. T. Snyder, Frank J. Hess, and Kellogg & Matlack. The last named firm have recently secured a complete set of abstract books and persons purchasing from them may rely upon titles given.

[SNYDER’S LAND AGENCY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 27, 1884.

The old reliable Snyder’s land agency is the place to place your farm and city property if you want it sold quick. This firm has sold more land than any other firm in the county during the year 1883. They do not parade their business in the city papers, but go ahead and do a land office business, and keep the same to themselves; work for the interest of the buyer and seller, make money for both, and last but not least, for our big partner, J. W. Hutchison. It don’t make any difference what you have to sell. Call and see us. We will sell anything from your wife and babies down to a TEXAS bulldog, and give an abstract to the same. It takes experience to sell land and we can furnish four years of this, and if necessary a little check, which is sometimes needed. (Mr. J. W. Hutchison is now our partner.)

Arkansas City Republican, March 1, 1884.

We call attention to the new advertisement of Snyder & Hutchinson. They are among the oldest and best known of real estate dealers in the southwest. They have a large list of valuable property for sale, and will serve you fairly and honorably.

ODD! COULD NOT FIND AD! WONDER IF THEY ISSUED A SUPPLEMENT, WHICH WE DO NOT HAVE!

Arkansas City Traveler, March 5, 1884.

                                                         Railroad Meeting.

A railroad meeting was called on last Monday, March 3, at I. H. Bonsall’s office, for the purpose of considering the narrow gauge proposition now before the people and taking steps to insure its defeat. Mr. T. McIntire was made chairman and I. H. Bonsall secretary. A resolution to the effect that the interests of Cowley County demanded the defeat of this proposition was read and unanimously endorsed, and the following committee was appointed to raise funds to defray the expenses of canvassing the county: A. A. Newman, W. M. Sleeth, James Benedict, T. H. McLaughlin, and J. L. Huey. Messrs. A. A. Wiley, J. B. Nipp, A. J. Chapel, O. S. Rarick, T. H. McLaughlin, and N. T. Snyder were appointed as committee on arrangements with power to select sub-committees, to take whatever steps may be deemed necessary to accomplish the object of the meeting. The meeting then adjourned to next Saturday at 2 p.m. at Highland Hall, when we hope to see a general turn out of businessmen and farmers.

Arkansas City Republican, March 8, 1884.


                                                         Railroad Meeting.

A railroad meeting was called last Monday, March 3, to take measures for defeating the proposition to vote county bonds for the narrow gauge railroad next Tuesday. A motion was made that the voters of Creswell Township vote against said proposition, and was carried unanimously. On motion, the following committees were appointed by the chair:

A. A. Newman, Wm. M. Sleeth, Jas. Benedict, T. H. McLaughlin, and Jas. L. Huey were appointed as a committee to raise funds to pay the expenses of canvassing the county.

A. A. Wiley, J. B. Nipp, A. J. Chapel, O. S. Rarick, T. H. McLaughlin, and N. T. Snyder were appointed a committee on arrangements, with power to select sub-committees to canvass and make any arrangements necessary to accomplish the object of the meeting.

The meeting then adjourned to convene today, at 2 p.m., at Highland Hall, when we hope to see a good crowd assembled.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 19, 1884.

                                                 Real Estate Mens’ Convention.

The real estate men of Kansas are called to meet in convention at Emporia, Kansas, on the 20th day of March, 1884, for the purpose of organizing an association. The real estate men of Emporia will make the necessary arrangements without further notice. The papers throughout the state are requested to copy the call.

[Signed.] D. M. BRONSON, Eldorado; N. T. SNYDER, Arkansas City; STONE, BAIR & CO., Topeka; I. W. PACK, North Topeka; CURNS & MANSER, Winfield; JACK SCOTT, Beattie; and many others.

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

N. T. Snyder and Dr. Kellogg were absent most of this week, at the real estate agents’ convention at Emporia.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 26, 1884.

Snyder & Hutchison have a dandy new sign.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 2, 1884.

                                                             Aid for Ohio.

The good work started by Sedgwick County is being seconded throughout the country about us, and everywhere we hear of the farmers responding to the call for help from the overflowed districts of Ohio. Not to be outdone in this respect, Cowley County is now making an effort to send several cars of corn to the Ohio relief committee. Free transportation is promised from Winfield by the Southern Kansas Railroad company. Several of Bolton’s prominent farmers waited on the TRAVELER last week and requested that a call be issued for the people to meet at Theaker, Bland, and Stony Point schoolhouses on next Friday evening, and ascertaining just what can be done in this direction. This is a good plan, and it should result in every farmer coming out and constituting himself a committee of one to help in this grand work. If there should be any difficulty in obtaining transportation, the corn could easily be sold to grain buyers in this city and the money forwarded to the proper parties in Ohio. Whatever progress is made can be reported to Mr. N. T. Snyder, who will act in conjunction with the Winfield parties who are pushing this matter. Let our Bolton farmers bear in mind the date and place of meeting—Friday, April 4, at the Theaker, Bland, and Stony Point schoolhouses.


               [NOTE: ALL THIS ACTION DUE TO HORRIBLE FLOOD IN OHIO.]

Arkansas City Republican, April 5, 1884.

The Baptists organized a Sunday School last Sunday at the U. P. Church, with Rev. F. L. Walker, Superintendent; V. M. Ayres assistant superintendent; Miss Amy Landes, treasurer; and N. T. Snyder, secretary. The organization was very satisfactory to the society, and they hope soon to have a large attendance and interesting school.

Arkansas City Republican, April 5, 1884.

Our enterprising real estate firm, Snyder & Hutchison, have a fine new sign. Robertson & Ferguson painted it.

Arkansas City Republican, April 5, 1884.

Hon. A. J. Pyburn: Though aware of your repeated refusal to become a candidate for any office; and the determination to devote your time to your profession, and although cognizant of the fact that an election and acceptance would involve to a certain extent the sacrifice of personal interests, yet we request and urge that you permit your name to be used in nomination for the position of mayor of Arkansas City, feeling as we do, that in your election, you will represent the whole people regardless of politics, issues, or business, and have only at heart the best interests of the place, and welfare of the citizens.

                                    One of those who signed petition: N. T. Snyder.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1884.

TESTIMONIAL AD GIVEN HOWARD & COONROD FOR THEIR LIGHTNING RODS.

                             N. T. SNYDER, LAND, LOAN, AND INSURANCE.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1884.

ANOTHER TESTIMONIAL AD:

REFERENCES: Rev. S. B. Fleming, Johnson Leeper, S. B. Pickle, A. B. DeBruce, Margaret Finney, H. P. Standley, J. W. Feagin, A. J. Kimmel, N. T. Snyder, A. M. Coonrod, G. W. Cunningham, A. A. C. Smith, C. M. McIntire, Hutchison & Son, W. D. Kreamer, L. M. Hartley, Q. M. Bixler, D. D. Jones, Thos. Gilliland, Hy Esterhold, J. H. Long, Thos. Parvin, E. H. McConahie, Jno. A. Clifton.

                          HOWARD & COONROD, LIGHTNING ROD AGENTS.

Arkansas City Republican, April 12, 1884.

J. W. Oldham has severed his connection with Snyder & Hutchison, and is now bookkeeper for Landes, Beall & Co.

Arkansas City Republican, April 12, 1884.

W. V. McConn is clerking for the old reliable firm of Snyder & Hutchison.

[COONROD & HOWARD: REFERENCES.]

Arkansas City Republican, April 19, 1884.

Coonrod & Howard give as references for straight-forward dealing, the following list of names, parties for whom we have done work, and who have recommended us to the people of Cowley County and the surrounding country: S. B. Fleming, Johnson Leeper, S. B. Pickle,


A. B. DeBruce, G. W. Dunn, Margaret Finney, H. P. Standley, C. M. McIntire, J. W. Feagin, Henry Esterhold, Thomas Parvin, E. H. McConahie, A. A. C. Smith, A. J. Kimmel, N. T. Snyder, G. W. Cunningham, C. T. Atkinson, W. D. Kreamer, L. M. Hartley, Q. M. Bixler, D. D. Jones, Thomas Gilliland, J. H. Long, J. W. Robinson, J. B. Clifton, A. M. Coonrod, J. W. Hutchison.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1884.

The First Baptist society of Arkansas City will entertain the Baptist society of Winfield at the residence of Mrs. N. T. Snyder, on Friday, April 25. Dinner at 1 o’clock, to which all friends are cordially invited.

[BAPTIST SEWING CIRCLE, ARKANSAS CITY, ENTERTAINS WINFIELD.]

Arkansas City Republican, April 26, 1884.

The Baptist Sewing Circle of Arkansas City, this week, issued invitations to persons at Winfield and at home, to a social gathering to be held yesterday, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. N. T. Snyder. Many, both from Winfield and at home, responded to the invitation.

From the former were Rev. Cairns and wife; Mr. Johnson and wife; E. H. Bliss and wife; Mr. Hickock and wife; Mr. Gilbert and wife; Mr. Hunt and wife; Mr. Silliman and wife; Mrs. Collins, Mrs. Hendricks, Mrs. Mann, Mrs. Branham, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Wait, Mrs. Shearer, Mrs. Albright, Mrs. Herpich, Mrs. Capt. Whiting, Mrs. Will Whiting, Mrs. Nelson, Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Dressy, Mrs. Phenix; Misses C. Bliss and Tyner.

The following were from this city: Mr. Stacy Matlack and wife; Mr. Geo. Cunningham and wife; Mr. Wyckoff and wife; Mr. Allen Ayers and wife; Mr. H. P. Standley and wife; Mr. C. W. Coombs and wife.

Mrs. Matlack, Mrs. Clevenger, Mrs. Klopf, Mrs. Landes, Mrs. C. T. Atkinson, Mrs. Loveland, Mrs. Hilliard, Mrs. T. C. Bird, Mrs. C. C. Hollister, Mrs. B. Goff, Mrs. Cypher, Mrs. H. W. Stewart, Mrs. Taylor, Miss Taylor, Miss Chapin, Miss Blaine, Miss Fitch, Miss Anna Hunt, Miss Jennie Upton, Mrs. Lent, Rev. J. O. Campbell, Rev. Wood and wife.            Twelve came from Winfield, in the bus, and the remainder in carriages. They expressed themselves as very much pleased with the appearance of our city. At one o’clock, a delicious “lap-a-mince,” consisting of dessert, cake, and ice cream was served. The guests are under obligations to Mr. and Mrs. Snyder for a very enjoyable time. The receipts were about $25.00, which will be placed in the general fund for building the new Baptist Church in this city.

The editor of this paper regrets that school duties forbade his attendance, but trusts that dame fortune may yet be kind enough to grant him the acquaintance of so many clever and cultured people.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1884.

                                                             Baptist Dinner.


The dinner given by the ladies of the Baptist Church of Arkansas City at the residence of Mrs. N. T. Snyder last Friday was quite a social event, nearly one hundred persons participating in the luxuries provided. Quite a delegation of Winfield friends were present, among whom we noticed: Mr. and Mrs. Cairns, Mr. and Mrs. Hickock, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert, Mr. and Mrs. Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. Silliman, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Bliss, Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Johnson, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Waite, Mrs. Shearer, Mrs. Albright, Mrs. Herpich, Mrs. Capt. Whiting, Mrs. Will Whiting, Mrs. Nelson, Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Dressy, Mrs. Phenix, Mrs. Branham, Mrs. Mann, Mrs. Hendricks, Mrs. Collins, Miss C. Bliss, Miss Tiner. The affair was enjoyable in the extreme and in its management our ladies certainly achieved unusual success.

Arkansas City Republican, May 3, 1884.

Our informant of last week was mistaken concerning the maker of the ice cream for the lunch served at Mr. Snyder’s last Friday one week. It was furnished by Mrs. Landes. However, it is a high compliment to her that her product was attributed to so excellent a caterer as S. V. Goeden.

[CARD OF THANKS: LADIES’ AID SOCIETY, FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH.]

Arkansas City Republican, May 3, 1884.

                                                          A Card of Thanks.

The members of the Ladies’ Aid Society of the First Baptist Church of Winfield, who accepted the invitation to attend the entertainment given them by the ladies of the Baptist society of Arkansas City, desire to extend their thanks for the bountiful repast furnished them, on Friday, of last week, at the residence of N. T. Snyder, of that place, and hope that the pleasant acquaintances thus established may ever be sustained.

                                             MRS. H. E. SILLIMAN, Secretary.

By order of the Society.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1884.

Geo. L. Phillips, president, and Paul W. Bossart, superintendent of the United Telephone company, will be in our city in a few days, to look up the matter of a telephone line to the agencies in the Indian Territory. Wellington and Caldwell want the line to run south from there by the way of Hunnewell. Our merchants should at once take steps to secure this telephone line from here. If it should start from any of the towns west of us, it would cut off a large portion of our Territory trade, and we cannot afford to lose it. The stock men and all the traders and agencies are anxious for a telephone connection with the state.

                                   N. T. SNYDER, Manager Telephone Exchange.

Arkansas City Republican, June 7, 1884.

Snyder & Hutchison are furnishing abstracts at 9-3/4 cents a transfer.

Arkansas City Republican, June 7, 1884.

Jacob Grabfield bought of Snyder & Hutchison this week four lots on 4th Street on which he will erect four tenement houses.

Arkansas City Republican, June 7, 1884.

The bulletin board of Snyder & Hutchison shows that abstracts can be obtained at that place at 9-3/4 cents a transfer. The “Old Reliable” is not to be outdone.

Arkansas City Republican, June 7, 1884.

Snyder & Hutchison sold this week to Franklin Booton, who came here from Greenup County, Kentucky, about two months ago, Wm. Trimble’s farm of 160 acres, lying about half way between this place and Geuda Springs, for $5,600.

Arkansas City Republican, June 7, 1884.

Snyder & Hutchison sold this week, to Mr. Goodenough, a wealthy merchant of Erie, Pennsylvania, two vacant lots lying near the M. E. Church for $425. Mr. Goodenough had an offer on his property in Erie, and has returned there to sell it. He will return here and build a fine dwelling on the lots purchased.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1884.


Snyder & Hutchison sold two lots on west Central Avenue last Friday to Mr. Goodenough, of Erie, Pennsylvania, who will immediately erect a commodious residence; also four lots to Mr. Grabfield, of Cincinnati, who will build four residences, and Geo. Allen property on Summit street to Mr. Deming, of Olathe, Kansas, who intends putting up a good residence building, and will also put in a stock of groceries. Verily the future great doth boom.

Arkansas City Republican, June 14, 1884.

             AD. “SHE DO MOVE.” “OWN YOUR OWN LITTLE PRIVATE ROOM.”

The “Old Reliable” Real Estate Office has not been asleep this month, as their business shows. They have sold in town—

L. Small’s house and 3 lots.

Sam Reed’s house and 4 lots.

Geo. Miller, 2 lots for $425.

J. S. Pickard, house and 3 lots.

Robert Baird, house and 3 lots.

One-half interest in J. W. Patterson’s livery stable.

Geo. Allen’s house, on 9th Street.

Harry Edward’s house and 1 lot.

Mac Peecher, 1 lot for $100, with some lots scattered along for spice.

In the meantime, to keep the country from thinking the city was enjoying all the boom, they sold the

Moses lot for $1,600.

Mrs. Halyard, 1/4 for $2,000.

Bly’s 2½ acres, joining the city, for $800.

This makes an average of over one sale a day of $1,000.

Who says we do not boom, with a large B.

They also have for sale a few special bargains, which are bound to sell at once.

For instance:

Two acres on west side of Summit Street for $1,000.

House 14 x 14, wing 14 x 14, 6 rooms, and 3 lots on Summit St. These lots are worth $450 each. Price: $750.

House 16 x 20, kitchen 10 x 16, stable 8 x 10, hydrant in the yard, lots fenced, 2 lots. $250 asked for lots in that neighborhood and $200 offered. Price: $500.

                                                  SNYDER & HUTCHISON,

                                              LAND AND LOAN BROKERS.

                                                      Arkansas City, Kansas.

Arkansas City Republican, June 14, 1884.

Miss Belle Roberts, of Chicago, is visiting Mr. and Mrs. N. T. Snyder. She will remain in the city for several weeks, after which she will make a visit of several months to an uncle in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Arkansas City Republican, July 5, 1884.

                                                 READ, REFLECT, SELECT!

From Our “Want” Column Any of the Bargains Offered, Will Make You Money.


Wanted. A purchaser for a good, new, clean, and select stock of groceries. Stock will invoice about $2,300. Location confidential. Call and see us.

Wanted. A purchaser for 160 acres of land; 75 acres cultivated, and only 4 miles from the city. Price $4,500.

Wanted. A purchaser for 80 acres of all raw land. Only 2½ miles from the city. Living water on the farm. Price $1,500.

Wanted. Some person or persons to buy 5 good cows with calves.

Wanted. To sell 1,640 acres of good farm land near Hunnewell, with good buildings and some of the land improved. This tract is all good farm land. Price $20 to $30 per acre.

Wanted. A purchaser for 2 acres in city limits. Price $1,000. SNYDER & HUTCHISON,

                    LAND AND LOAN BROKERS, ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.

Arkansas City Republican, August 9, 1884.

AD. PUBLIC SALE! We will sell at public sale 100 Head of Grade Native Cattle At Thompson & Woodin’s Livery Stable, in Arkansas City, Kansas, on Saturday, Aug. 9, 1884.

Sale to commence at 10 o’clock. A.M., and continue until all are sold.

15 head of yearling steers and heifers.

  5 head of 2 year old heifers.

50 head of three year old heifers.

10 head of cows with calves.

  8 head of cows to calve soon.

  1 large Durham bull 4 years old.

  2 two year old bulls.

The cows are selected milkers. Will sell in lot or by single one. This will be your time to get a good cow.

TERMS: 9 months at 12 percent; 5 percent off for cash.

                                    SNYDER & HUTCHISON, SALE AGENTS.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 20, 1884.

Scott & Topliff last week purchased N. T. Snyder’s large bay horse, “Pedro,” at a cost of about $600.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 6, 1884.

N. T. Snyder has entered into partnership with Sam Gould to open a large stationery house in the new post office building. Mr. Snyder starts for New York Monday to buy the stock. He will bring home his brother, who will superintend Mr. Snyder’s interest in the stationery business. The real estate business will continue as heretofore with N. T. always ready to accommodate the purchasing public.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 6, 1884.

                                                     The New Baptist Church.


Rev. F. L. Walker called on the REPUBLICAN Wednesday and exhibited the plans of the new Baptist Church. The foundation is already complete. The building committee, composed of N. T. Snyder, John Landes, V. M. Ayres, and Rev. F. L. Walker, have sent to Chicago for the materials, which will be here shortly. Several bids have been received on the building, but all have proven unsatisfactory. A foreman will probably be employed and the work on the church will go ahead as soon as the lumber arrives. The drawings shown exhibit a handsome Gothic structure. The building will be divided into two main rooms, the audience room and lecture room. The audience room will be 30 x 50 feet. The lecture room will be located west of the audience room with folding doors separating the two. The size of the lecture room is 16 x 30 feet. On the east of the audience room will be the pulpit and dressing room. The edifice is to be handsomely finished inside and out. A tower will extend upward 65 feet. The basement has been so arranged that the church will be heated with a steam apparatus. The estimated cost of the church is $3,000 without seats. Wm. Gall is the designer of this elegant church, and it will always be a standing monument of his ability as an architect.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 6, 1884.

                                               Prospects for a Mammoth Hotel.

There is talk of converting the second and third stories of the Hasie block into a hotel. This is a move in the right direction and if the idea is carried into execution Arkansas City will have one of the grandest hotels in Kansas. N. T. Snyder has been corresponding with T. L. Williams, formerly of Winfield and lately of the Occidental, of Wichita, on the subject. Maj. Hasie has consented to allow the building to be used for this purpose, and no doubt someone will be found ready to occupy the building as soon as it is completed.

Arkansas City Republican, September 6, 1884.

Snyder & Gould will be the name of the new stationery firm which will hold forth in the new post office building as soon as completed.

Arkansas City Republican, September 6, 1884.

Business is opening up lively this month, and especially so with Snyder & Hutchison. Will McConn, that indefatigable writer, wrote up $33,000 worth of insurance, $18,000 accident, and $15,000 fire in the first four days of the month.

Arkansas City Republican, September 20, 1884.

N. T. Snyder started for New York to buy his stationery stock Tuesday. After he had started his little girl was taken suddenly ill, and a telegram was sent in pursuit of Mr. Snyder, which overtook him at Newton. Wednesday he returned home. The sick child has not recovered sufficiently as to allow Mr. Snyder to take his departure.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 24, 1884.

                                                        Telephone Exchange.

                                                    N. T. Snyder’s Residence.

Messages can be sent at night and on Sundays as follows:

To Winfield from N. T. Snyder’s residence.

To Geuda Springs from Leland Hotel.

Subscribers will please cut this out and paste up in a conspicuous place.

Telephone charges are for five minutes’ conversation as follows:

To Winfield:            25 cents

To Geuda Springs:  25 cents

Messenger Service: 15 cents

City limits:         10 cents

                                                    N. T. SNYDER, Manager.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 1, 1884.


N. T. Snyder leaves today for the East to lay in a stock of stationery for the new post office book and news firm.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 8, 1884.

D. M. Purdy brought in the finest lot of peaches we have seen this season. They are now on exhibition in Snyder & Hutchison’s real estate office.

Arkansas City Republican, October 25, 1884.

Ridenour & Thompson will occupy their new quarters next week. They have just received a large stock of clocks, jewelry, etc., and will show the people what is what in a few days. Snyder & Gould have also received some of their stock of books, and stationery. Their opening will occur at the same time as Ridenour & Thompson’s.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 29, 1884.

Our new sign painter, Wm. O. Gilva, has put himself on record in splendid shape upon the fancy gold leaf lettering upon the windows of Messrs. Snyder & Hutchison’s real estate office. They speak volumes for his skill as an artist, and we predict for him a large number of patrons who want first-class work.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 5, 1884.

The postoffice book store of Messrs. Snyder & Gould is represented in the columns of the TRAVELER this week and we can safely say that they will keep a full stock of everything in their line.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, November 5, 1884.

BIG AD. COME AND SEE US AND OUR STOCK AT THE POSTOFFICE BOOK STORE! NEW STORE! NEW GOODS! Our line of Holiday Goods is the finest in the market. GOULD & SNYDER. POSTOFFICE BLOCK.

                                     [Note: At that time Post Office was one word!]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 5, 1884.

                                                            Our Post Office.

Among the many good buildings that have been completed in our city during the past year, our new post office formally opened to the public last week takes a front rank.

It is a substantial stone building, 110 feet deep by 25 feet in width, pressed brick front, cut stone trimmings, and the whole surrounded by an elegant stone capping, the finest of the kind yet to be found in our town.

The building, which was erected by our postmaster, J. C. Topliff, is specially fitted for the transaction of postal business, being supplied with every convenience that will conduce the rapid delivery of the mail and the general dispatch of business. The rear part is lighted by a skylight, and the interior fixtures, in the way of boxes, wainscoting, etc., of black walnut, makes a decidedly attractive and elegant appearance. The furnace for heating both the office and store rooms is in the basement and is the first of its kind put up in the city. The patrons of the office will no doubt fully appreciate the action of our postmaster in providing them with the best arranged, most perfectly appointed, and withal, the most beautiful postoffice in the county.


The store room is occupied on the north by the large and entirely new stock of stationery, books, etc., purchased by the new firm of Snyder & Gould, while on the south, the magnificent display made by our pioneer jewelers, Ridenour & Thompson, put in the shade anything heretofore seen in the city. Both stores are fitted up alike with handsome tables and large show cases, all of which make up a whole of which the citizens of Arkansas City may justly be proud.

Arkansas City Republican, November 8, 1884.

In this issue of the REPUBLICAN, Gould and Snyder fling their banner to the breeze. Their bookstore no longer goes by the appellation of P. O. Bookstore, but in keeping with the times, they have changed its name to the City Book Store.

P. L. Snyder, of Penn Yan, New York, brother of N. T. Snyder, arrives...

Arkansas City Republican, November 15, 1884.

P. L. Snyder, of Penn Yan, New York, arrived in Arkansas City Thursday. Mr. Snyder is a brother of N. T. Snyder, our real estate man. He comes here to superintend N. T. Snyder’s interest in the book store. Mr. Snyder is a thorough stationer, and will make a valuable assistant.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 19, 1884.

We cannot speak too highly of the artistic appearance of our new post office. The appearance of the interior as arranged by Ridenour & Thompson, and Gould & Snyder, is certainly very fine.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 19, 1884.

Messrs. Gould & Snyder of the post office bookstore last week sent out their monthly bulletin of new books just received. The list is a long and well selected one and speaks well for the enterprise of the firm.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 19, 1884.

BIRTH. J. W. Oldham telephoned up from the mill Monday to Snyder that it was a girl, and to send the TRAVELER boys to J. W. Hutchison & Sons for the cigars. It is needless to say they went.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 19, 1884.

J. L. Bell recently disposed of his farm east of the Walnut to Alexander S. Fowler, of Ohio, brother-in-law of Mr. A. C. Gould. Mr. Fowler will bring his family to this country in the spring. Snyder & Hutchison effected the sale.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 19, 1884.

Daniel F. Learnard, of Tecumseh, Michigan, came to sunny Kansas seeking a warmer climate. Snyder & Hutchison succeeded in locating him east of the Walnut. He purchased Jesse Crue’s farm. Mr. Crue will become a resident of our city about the beginning of the new year.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 19, 1884.

P. L. Snyder, of Penn Yan, New York, brother of our popular real estate man, arrived in our city last Thursday. He comes here to represent his brother, N. T., behind the counter of Gould & Snyder. “Phil” comes highly recommended as a pushing businessman and we welcome him to our midst.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 19, 1884.


H. G. Chipchase, manager of the United Telephone Co., at Wellington and Caldwell, and A. G. Kirkpatrick are here this week repairing the exchange. “Chip” says Arkansas City must have more vim than Wellington, as she has as many instruments as Wellington, and more than Caldwell. “So say we all of us.”

Arkansas City Republican, November 22, 1884.

G. W. S. Warner, a Kentuckian, has purchased David Tompkin’s farm, over in Sumner County. Mr. Warner has moved his family here and they took possession of the farm Tuesday. The trade was made through Snyder & Hutchison’s Agency. $8,000 was the consideration.

Arkansas City Republican, November 22, 1884.

Daniel F. Learnard, of Tecumseh, Michigan, has been visiting here for several days. Snyder & Hutchison showed up the value of our country to such good advantage that Mr. Learnard was induced to purchase a farm. He bought Jesse Crews’ farm, east of the Walnut. Mr. Crews will probably buy property in this city.

Arkansas City Republican, November 22, 1884.

P. L. Snyder is on duty behind the counters of the City Book Store.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 26, 1884.

Our telephone exchange is growing rapidly. N. T. Snyder, the manager, has ordered a switch board double the capacity of the present one, which is now full.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 26, 1884.

Snyder & Hutchison have an elegant bunch of peanuts raised on the townsite. Like everything else in Southern Kansas, however, they are larger than the usual run.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 26, 1884.

Monday we saw our small friend, D. P. Marshall, meandering down street with his arms full of turnips which, upon closer inspection, proved to be two turnips. And a load they were. Staggering into Snyder & Hutchison’s real estate office, he deposited them with a vigorous thump, saying: “That’s my size.” They are curiosities.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 26, 1884.

Ivan Robinson and Mr. Holmes, of Winfield, were in our city last week looking for a location for a coal yard. After looking the field over, they left Snyder & Hutchison to secure a suitable location. These gentlemen then bought out Pitts Ellis’ scales and office with fixtures and bins and leased of Newman & McLaughlin two lots on Central Avenue, opposite Fairclo Bro.’s livery stable. Messrs. Robinson & Holmes will immediately commence the erection of sheds, and will have seven cars of coal, hard and soft, in our city this week. These gentlemen are men who will always have coal of all kinds in hand, and we need have no more fear of a coal famine as we have been having. They will keep not less than ten car loads on hand at all times. Their office will be on the corner of Summit Street and Central Avenue.

                            [NOTE: THE PAPER HAD “IVON” ROBINSON...???]

Arkansas City Traveler, December 3, 1884.

N. T. Snyder and wife visited Winfield last Friday.

Philip Snyder, N. T.’s brother...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 3, 1884.


As we were passing the P. O. the other day, Sam Gould called us in to hear the serenade. We stepped in and our ears were greeted with “Over the Garden Wall,” “Last Rose of Summer,” “Swanee River,” and other new and delightful tunes, the quacking of geese squeaking of pigs, crowing of roosters, and last but not least, the sweet voices of Philip Snyder and Minnie Stewart expatiating on the merits of this book and the cheapness of that work box. Recovering somewhat from our astonishment, we took a more leisurely survey of Gould & Snyder’s immense stock of holiday goods. We were surprised at the endless variety of toys and the richness of the display of velvet goods and books. Everything is arranged to the best advantage and the shelves and show windows evince the presence and touches of an old and tasty hand at the business. They have the best selected and arranged stock of holiday goods ever in the city.

Not sure if next entry refers to N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, December 6, 1884.

N. Snyder brought the news over from Wellington Thursday that a cavalry detachment was to leave Hunnewell yesterday morning to join the other troops in the territory. They intend being prepared for the boomers.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 10, 1884.

                                                        Telephone Exchange.

Number 108 was used for the following:

POST OFFICE; RIDENOUR & T. GOULD & SNYDER.

Residences: N. T. Snyder.

Phil Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 10, 1884.

                                                  Young People’s Social Club.

The above is the title of an organization recently perfected by some of our young people, having for its object mutual improvement and the enjoyment of a social good time. It is proposed to meet Tuesday evening of each week, the place of meeting to be selected each evening for the following meeting. The officers elected for the first six months are as follows.

Phil Snyder, President.

Miss Nellie Nash, Vice President.

Charles Chapel, Secretary.

Miss Mamie Stineman, Treasurer.

Due notice of the place of meeting each week will be published. At present the number of the members is about fifteen, but any of the young people fond of literary and social pleasures are cordially invited to meet with the society at Mr. Kingsbury’s rooms over the Cowley County Bank next Tuesday evening; and should they desire to join, they will be gladly welcomed. There is no monetary expenses incurred either for membership or other privileges. We heartily wish this society a long and prosperous life, and shall be pleased to assist at any time in furthering the objects for which it works.

Arkansas City Republican, December 13, 1884.

A. C. Wells purchased O. C. Randall’s residence Tuesday morning through the agency of Snyder & Hutchison.

Arkansas City Republican, December 13, 1884.

This do beat all! We understand a disciple of Democracy has applied to President elect Cleveland for the telephone exchange here, claiming that all office holding Republicans must go under Democratic rule. Nate Snyder wants to look out.


Phil L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, December 13, 1884.

                                                         The Auction Social.

Last Tuesday evening, at the residence of J. L. Huey, the social event of the season occurred. The Presbyterian ladies are renowned for their successful entertainments, but this, the auction social, excelled all others. The weather was somewhat inclement, but nevertheless the large residence was filled to its utmost capacity with guests to partake of Mr. and Mrs. Huey’s hospitality. The entertainment of the vast assemblage was begun by a panoramic view of a dream by Frank Hess. Mr. Hess indulged his appetite to too great an extent in mince pies, which caused him to pass into dreamland. As he lay in the arms of Morpheus, several unique, as well as very laughable, scenes were presented to the audience as Mr. Hess performed the role of a gentle deceiver. One scene was where Frank’s thoughts reverted to the laughing darkey who made the pie; finally Mr. Hess was awakened from dreamland, and the guests were then entertained by music and singing. The Chinese song, rendered by Messrs. Hutchison and Grosscup, was justly applauded. Their shadow picture imitations of Chinamen eating rats, resembled the real performance so perfectly that some of the guests’ appetites were stayed before supper was announced. The selling of the ladies now occurred. Rev. J. O. Campbell performed in the role of the auctioneer. To say that he was a success hardly expresses it. It sounded somewhat natural to hear his well trained voice crying: “I am offered 95, who will make it $1?” The auctioneering of the ladies was highly rousing, and the bidding lively. The good natured contest for the lady on sale, made the entertainment more enlivening. The ladies were all masked. The prices ranged from 75 cents up to $7.00, Miss Ida Lowe being the fortunate lady who brought that price. It will be seen by a glance at the list that Geo. W. Cunningham was almost equal to Brigham Young. We always knew George was a great admirer of the ladies, but never thought he had turned Mormon. Appended is the list of the “sold” ladies and their purchasers, as near as we could obtain them.

Miss Ella Love to E. D. Eddy.

Miss Maggie Sample to G. W. Cunningham.

Miss Ida Lowe to J. L. H. Huey.

Miss Ora Farrar to F. K. Grosscup.

Miss Viola Bishop to F. B. Hutchison.

Miss Mary Love to Dr. S. B. Parsons.

Miss Albertine Maxwell to A. A. Newman.

Miss Alto Maxwell to J. M. Steel.

Miss Hattie Corey to Fred Farrar.

Miss Nellie Nash to Dr. J. A. Mitchell.

Miss Eva Collins to E. L. Kingsbury.

Miss Myrtle Jones to G. W. Cunningham.

Miss Jennie Peterson to Dr. Love.

Miss Lizzie Gatwood to H. Wyckoff.

Miss Liiase [?] Guthrie to Dr. G. H. J. Hart.

Miss Alice Pyburn to R. U. Hess.


Miss Rose Morse to G. W. Cunningham.

Miss Annie Bowen to J. R. L. Adams.

Mrs. Henderson to G. W. Cunningham.

Mrs. Nicholson to J. M. Steele.

Mrs. Geo. Cunningham to Rev. W. H. H. Harris.

Mrs. E. D. Eddy to Ivan Robinson.

Mrs. E. L. Kingsbury to Phil. L. Snyder.

The purchase of a lady entitled the buyer to his supper. The handsome sum of $43.75 was realized in this manner. Mr. Cunningham’s disposal of one of his ladies to her husband for $1—25 cents commission. Songs were rendered by Mrs. Frank Beall, Rev. Harris’ two little boys, and others. Good instrumental music was interspersed in the programme. All in all, it was the event of the season.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, December 13, 1884.

                                                 Prospects for a Machine Shop.

John G. Danks, of Cincinnati, Ohio, a director of the Ohio Mechanics Institution, came in on the Santa Fe train Monday. Mr. Danks is looking up a location for a machine shop and foundry. He was shown over town by N. T. Snyder, and was favorably impressed with the advantages of Arkansas City. Mr. Danks is a thorough machinist. He has followed the business all of his life. In the Danks family there are six brothers: all machinists. They desire to locate a shop in Kansas. Three of them will come to this state and three remain there. They are men of capital and we are informed they will ask for nothing more than the site on which to erect their buildings. Tuesday Mr. Danks went to Harper, where he will visit some friends. Next week, he will return here and lay before our citizens a proposition for the building of the machine shop he contemplates. Should Mr. Danks conclude to locate here, the manufactory he proposes building will be the cause of adding several more families to our population.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

A full line of standard poems in morocco at Gould & Snyder’s.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

Fringed holiday books, autograph and scrap albums at Gould & Snyder’s.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

Snyder & Hutchison sold O. C. R. Randall’s property to AL Wells last week. [? DO YOU SUPPOSE THEY MEANT A. L. INSTEAD OF AL???]

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

Tennyson’s beautiful poem, Lady Clare, in plush at Gould & Snyder’s city book store.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

The finest display of holiday goods ever seen in Arkansas City at Gould & Snyder’s.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

N. T. Snyder traded his eighty acres south of town to S. R. Anderson for a herd of graded horses.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.


The most complete line of morocco and plush albums in the city at Gould & Snyder’s city book store.

Annie and Willie’s Prayer Ideal poems and the Ninety and Nine in plush at Gould & Snyder’s city book store.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

H. G. Chipchase, of Wellington, telephone lineman, came over last Friday to put in some new phones and do general repairing.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

Specialties for the season will be found to be attractively mentioned in the new advertisement of Gould & Snyder, of the city book store, in this issue. Don’t fail to read it.

BIG AD. CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR’S AT THE CITY BOOK STORE!

Dickens’ Complete Works.

  Scott’s Complete Works.

    George Eliot’s Complete Works.

 Irving’s Complete Works.

               Macaulay’s History of England.

Chas. Lamb’s Complete Works.

Dictionaries and Holders.

Works of all Standard Authors.

A Complete Line of Fancy Inkstands, Stationery.

BOOKS, TOYS, GAMES,

CHINA DOLLS, WAX DOLLS, RUBBER DOLLS, FANCY PLUSH GOODS,

FANCY MOROCCO GOODS, INDIAN BEAD WORK, WRITING DESKS,

JEWEL CASKETS, PEARL CARD CASES, LADIES’ CALLING CARDS,

LADIES’ WORK BASKETS, PLUSH AND MOROCCO ALBUMS,

SCRAP ALBUMS AND PICTURES.

                                                         Autograph Albums,

                                               Shopping Bags, Christmas Cards,

                                                              Family Bibles,

                                                           Teachers’ Bibles.

In fact, any and everything you want for the Holidays.

                                                       GOULD & SNYDER.

Arkansas City Republican, December 20, 1884.

                                                        ARKANSAS CITY.

                                  Her Business Firms and Their Establishments.

                                                       GOULD & SNYDER,


Proprietors of the City Book Store, will greet you this season with the handsomest line of holiday goods in Kansas. S. P. Gould commenced his career as a book dealer in 1883. His business increased so much that a partner became necessary. Several months ago N. T. Snyder associated himself with Mr. Gould. By the partnership the stock was about trebled. Now their shelves and display tables are creaking with the load of beautiful things for the holidays. There are albums that will be an acquisition to the centre table of any parlor. Books of poems of all the principal authors. Histories, works of fiction. Writing desks. Boxes of fancy stationery, Paper knives, Sewing baskets, Cigar cases, Perfumery, Lamps. This is only a partial enumeration, and to these are added vases, harmonicas, toys, pictures, scrap-books, and many minor articles which we cannot mention on account of our limited space. We have often heard of Paradise Lost, but if you will step into Gould & Snyder’s book store, you will have it found.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 24, 1884.

N. T. Snyder made a flying trip to Winfield Friday.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 24, 1884.

N. T. Snyder traded eight horses yesterday for two houses of Ed. Mason.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 24, 1884.

Miss Laura Gould is assisting Gould & Snyder during their rush. These gentlemen are having an immense trade, and you hear no complaint about hard times from them.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 24, 1884.

A full line of standard poems in morocco at Gould & Snyder’s.

Arkansas City Republican, December 27, 1884.

CITY BOOK STORE! GOULD & SNYDER, PROPRIETORS, has just opened, and is now ready to receive your patronage. Works of Fiction, Histories, School Books, Newspapers, Illustrated Papers FOR SALE HERE.

The ONLY COMPLETE STATIONERY FURNISHERS IN ARKANSAS CITY.

Give Us a Call. GOULD & SNYDER.

Arkansas City Republican, December 27, 1884.

                        “The Old Reliable!” SNYDER & HUTCHISON’S COLUMN.

                                           The Best Bargains Offered for Months.

Three room house; lot 50 feet on corner; covered with fruit trees, situated on Summit Street, 4 blocks from P. O. Price $275; very cheap.

1½ story house of 4 rooms and cellar, on northeast corner of block; 2 lots 3 blocks from P. O. A very fine location. Price $950.

8 percent money to loan on good Real Estate security, the old reliable Snyder & Hutchison.

8 acres on Arkansas River, finely adapted for hogs or cattle. Plenty of grass, timber, and water. ½ mile from city. Price $300.

Special: 140 acres; 110 acres cultivation; House 16 x 24; Kansas stable, good well, 120 acres pasture fenced; on territory line. Price $3,500.

Good half section of land close to city for $5,150.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 31, 1884.

                                                             XMAS BALL.

A most enjoyable time was had in Highland Hall, Christmas evening, by the lovers of the Terpsichorean set. Notwithstanding the failure of the musicians engaged, very good music was had by the energetic rustling of Lute Coombs and Ed. Kingsbury after the arrival of the crowd. All present made the most of the occasion and went away eulogizing the committee, which consisted of C. C. Sollitt, L. V. Coombs, F. K. Grosscup, P. L. Snyder, and E. L. Kingsbury.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 7, 1885.


The Ladies’ Mite Society of the Baptist Church will meet at the residence of Mrs. N. T. Snyder Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock. At 6 p.m. refreshments will be served, to which all have a very pressing invitation to attend and enjoy a good social time.

Phil. L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 7, 1885.

The Episcopal ladies were overrun, New Year’s afternoon, with visitors, who came to enjoy their hospitality—which is renowned in Arkansas City. The names of the ladies who received were:

Mrs. W. E. Gooch, Mrs. R. E. Grubbs, Mrs. Nicholson, Mrs. M. S. Hasie, Mrs. Frank Beall, Mrs. John Landes, Mrs. J. H. Hilliard, Mrs. A. J. Chapel, Miss Jennie Peterson, Misses Hasie, Etta Barnett, Mame Stineman, Minnie Stewart.

The names of the principal callers we append below.

Maj. M. S. Hasie, Mr. Nicholson, I. H. Bonsall, Dr. H. D. Kellogg, T. S. Moorhead, Dr. J. A. Mitchell, A. D. Hawk, Rev. J. O. Campbell, J. H. Hilliard, Chas. Chapel, Phil. L. Snyder, Ed. L. Kingsbury, Lute V. Coombs, Leavitt Coburn, Frank M. Grosscup, Richard L. Howard, B. E. Grubbs, S. Matlack, C. Mead, John Kroenert, Sam P. Gould, Dr. A. J. Chapel, Wyard E. Gooch, Dr. G. H. J. Hart, C. H. Searing, G. W. Cunningham, F. P. Schiffbauer, Charles Schiffbauer, O. Ingersoll, Sam Wile, Al. Levy, Frank Beall, C. R. Sipes, R. C. Multer.

Gould & Snyder dissolve...

The ladies received royally, and a royal attendance was the result.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 7, 1885.

The firm heretofore existing under the firm name of Gould & Snyder, is this day dissolved by mutual consent. The business will be transacted by S. P. Gould, and all accounts of the firm will be settled by him. N. T. SNYDER, S. P. GOULD.

Phil L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 14, 1885.

                                                 Young People’s Social Club.

The last two meetings which were held at the residences of Miss Etta Barnett and Phil Snyder, have been very encouraging as well as entertaining. Several select readings, essays, and declamations by the different members, were rendered, and the names of F. K. Grosscup, Miss Emma Grosscup, L. N. Coburn, J. W. Griffith, Miss Ebie Steel, Misses Martin, Miss Maggie Hoffman, Misses Christian, Frank Hutchison, and Fred Hawk were proposed for membership, and voted in. A committee has been appointed to see to the renting of a room, which will be furnished and used as a club room.

The next meeting will be held at the residence of the Misses Christian. A full attendance of members is desired.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 14, 1885.

The Favorite Social Club will give a select ball at Highland Hall tomorrow night. Committee: C. C. Sollitt, P. L. Snyder, F. K. Grosscup, L. V. Coombs, E. L. Kingsbury, G. W. Cunningham.

Phil. L. Snyder...

      Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 17, 1885.

                                                G. A. R. ENTERTAINMENT.


                                                   THE SPY OF ATLANTA.

                                                  CAST OF CHARACTERS.

Edwin Dalton (Union man)                          D. D. Dobbs

Edward Sinclair (Southerner)                      J. H. Johnston

Park Sinclair (Edward’s father)                         P. L. Snyder

Charlie Dalton (Edwin’s brother)                       L. V. Coombs

Farmer Dalton (Northern Union man)                E. L. Kingsbury

Jake Schneider (fat Dutchman, true blue)           S. V. Devendorf

Capt. Mason (U. S. A.)                                    J. J. Clark

Pete (colored gentleman)                                  B. F. Cooper

Gen. Sherman (U. S. A.)                                  S. C. Lindsay

Gen. McPherson (U. S. A.)                              W. D. Mowry

Gen. Logan (U. S. A.)                                   L. D. Davis

Maj. Wilber (U. S. A.)                                  C. C. Sollitt

Col. Harrison (U. S. A.)                                   T. J. Stafford

Sargt. Bates (C. S. A.)                                  Pat Franey

Corporal Ogden (C. S. A.)                               N. T. Lawton

Maud Dalton (wife of Edwin)                         Miss Nellie Nash

Carrie Dalton (sister of Edwin)                       Miss Minnie Stewart

Mrs. Dalton (wife of farmer Dalton)                  Miss Etta Barnett

Little Willie (Edwin’s brother,

    the drummer boy)                       Willie Rike

Little Annie (daughter of Edwin and Maud)                              

Schneider’s volunteers; Citizens; Soldiers; and 14 young ladies for tableau.

Phil. L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1885.

Ask Phil. Snyder how he likes guns.

Arkansas City Republican, February 7, 1885.

                                                         St. Valentine’s Day.

Next Saturday evening the ladies of the Presbyterian society will celebrate this day with one of their unique and inimitable entertainments. To make the entertainment doubly interesting, a marriage ceremony will be performed. The high contracting parties are citizens well known in our social circle, and when their names we divulge, our readers’ eyes will dilate with astonishment. Everybody is invited to attend the wedding, which will occur in Highland Hall. Rev. J. O. Campbell will act as the “go-between.” The groom, Mr. J. C. Topliff, and the bride, Miss Linda Christian, are the subjects which Rev. Campbell will unite. The bridal couple after the ceremony will enjoy the bounteous feast, which will be prepared by the Presbyterian ladies. Phil Snyder and E. L. McDowell will be the groomsmen and Miss Annie Meigs and Mrs. J. H. Heck the bridesmaids. No invitations will be issued, but a general one to the public is extended. The new couple will please accept the congratulations of the REPUBLICAN in advance although we may be somewhat premature.


N. B. Dear reader, for fear you may think “Top” is really going to be married, we wish to inform you that it is only to be a Japanese wedding and not a binding one. Although they may agree to take each other for better or worse, it is only in fun.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1885.

The ladies of the Presbyterian Church will give a unique entertainment at Highland Hall on the evening of St. Valentine’s Day. First will be a Japanese wedding, in which the high contracting parties will be Jas. C. Topliff and Miss Linda Christian, with Miss Anna Meigs, Mrs. J. W. Heck, Phil L. Snyder, and Ernest L. McDowell as attendants, and Rev. J. O. Campbell as njukkorzatti ogrekzwim, or whatever officiating clergyman is in Japanese, Then there will be an elegant supper for all the guests. There will also be a Japanese table where fancy goods of all kinds and descriptions may be obtained. An admission fee of 35 cents at the door will entitle those who come to the entertainment and refreshments.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1885.

The Y. P. S. C. will give a select Mother Hubbard ball at Highland Hall next Tuesday night. They will have the best music to be obtained, and expect to have the same caller from Winfield who gave such satisfaction at their last ball. Our people have come to expect something fine when the Social Club are interested in anything, and have never yet been disappointed.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1885.

A merry party, composed of Phil Snyder and Molly Christian, Ed. Kingsbury, and Etta Barnett, Charles Chapel, and Minnie Stewart, spent a pleasant evening at Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Sollitt’s residence last Saturday night. The home of “Kit” and his amiable wife is very popular with our young folks.

N. T. Snyder of Snyder & Hutchinson...

Arkansas City Traveler, February 18, 1885.

David G. Wettimer disposed of his farm on the Arkansas River last week to Ross Merrick for $1,600. Snyder & Hutchison effected the sale.

Phil. L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, February 18, 1885.

                                                    MAMMA HUBBARD.

The most successful of the season’s social events occurred last night at Highland Hall under the auspices of the Favorite Social Club. A large and select party of maskers were they, who glided about the hall in the many intricacies of the dance. A feast for the eyes was the many colors as they glided in and out in serpentine movements or moved along stately in massed colors. The beautiful costumes of the ladies, the grotesque and glaring ones of the gentlemen, called up scenes of oriental splendor and was soothing and calming while yet exciting to the lookers on. The names of those who were invited to the Ma Hubbard, were, so near as we could learn as follows.


C. H. Searing and wife, S. Matlack and wife, H. P. Farrar and wife, F. W. Farrar and wife, E. L. McDowell, W. D. Mowry and wife, C. C. Sollitt and wife, J. V. Hull, Frank Austin and wife, John Kroenert and wife, Al Heitkam, C. O. Harris, Dr. Westfall and wife, John B. Walker and wife, Matt Aldridge and wife, C. R. Sipes and wife, John Ingliss, Will Griffith, A. A. Newman and wife, Wyard Gooch and wife, L. N. Coburn, A. V. Alexander and wife, Dr. J. Vawter and wife, Geo. Schmidt, J. Landes and wife, Frank Beall and wife, C. G. Thompson and wife, J. H. Hilliard and wife, Joe Finkleburg, J. A. McIntyre and wife, E. L. Kingsbury, F. K. Grosscup, A. D. Ayres and wife, Thos. Kimmel and wife, Will Moore and wife, Ivan Robinson, J. C. Topliff, Will Thompson, R. E. Grubbs and wife, Chas. Schiffbauer and wife, L. H. Northey, O. Ingersoll and wife, Chas. Chapel, Lute Coombs, P. L. Snyder, J. W. Heck and wife, Frank Thompson, Sherman Thompson, W. A. Daniels, F. B. Willitts, Jerry Adams, Sept. Andrews, Will L. Aldridge, A. J. Pyburn, S. B. Reed, Dr. S. B. Parsons, Dr. M. B. Vawter, Dr. J. A. Mitchell, Isaac Ochs and wife, H. Nicholson, Frank Hutchison, R. P. Hutchison and wife, Herman Wyckoff, F. J. Sweeny and wife, J. L. Huey and wife, R. B. Norton, Chas. Hutchins and wife, Cal. Dean and wife, C. M. Scott and wife, Frank J. Hess and wife, R. U. Hess, R. L. Howard and wife, Dr. H. D. Kellogg and wife, H. P. Standley and wife, E. O. Stevenson and wife, H. H. Perry and wife, G. W. Cunningham and wife, J. G. Shelden and wife, Sam Wyle, Maj. M. S. Hasie and wife, Chs. Hilliard, Tillie Crawford, J. W. Duncan, A. H. Fitch, James Ridenour and wife, J. R. Rogers and wife, Tip Davenport and wife, E. W. Weston, of Wellington, Kansas, Ed. Cole and wife, Lafe Tomlin and wife, Ed. McMullen, of Winfield.

Arkansas City Republican, February 21, 1885.

                                                      The Japanese Wedding.

Last Saturday evening the ladies of the Presbyterian Aid Society held their entertainment in Highland Hall. The Japanese Wedding was the main feature. It was purely oriental. The participants were dressed in the Japanese garb. Miss Linda Christian and J. C. Topliff were the high contracting parties. E. L. McDowell and Mrs. J. W. Heck, the parents of the groom; Philip Snyder and Miss Annie Meigs, the parents of the unsophisticated bride. Misses Maggie Hoffman, Laura Gould, Flora Gould, Rosa Morse, Edna Worthley, Viola Bishop, and Mamie Steinman were the bridesmaids.

First of all appeared on the stage the parents of the groom, followed by the parents of the bride, who glided to their place quietly. Next came Rev. J. O. Campbell, the “go-between,” followed by the couple who were desirous of being united. After Salaam to their hearts content, the “go-between” proceeded with his part. He goes to the groom, who whispers in his ear, and then he transfers his information to the bride, who in return whispers to the “go-between” and he carries it back to the groom. The ceremony was realistic, and considerable mirth was provoked, yet it was interesting.

After the wedding a bounteous feast was resorted to by the guests. A neat little sum of money was realized from this entertainment. There were two booths, one a candy and the other a fancy-work, which were presided over by the young ladies. Miss Ora Farrar had possession of the candy booth, which netted a goodly sum of money. Mrs. Steel furnished the candy, and as it was homemade, the customers pronounced it excellent. Misses Ella Love and Lissa Guthrie were in charge of the fancy-work booth. A silk crazy quilt, which was to have been voted to the most beautiful lady, resulted in a tie between Miss Hattie Cory and Mrs. S. B. Fleming. It will be disposed of at some future time.

N. T. Snyder, Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, February 25, 1885.

Snyder & Hutchison inform us that they have loaned $10,000 on real estate security in the last month.

Arkansas City Republican, February 28, 1885.


A. D. Campbell, wife and child, of Michigan City, arrived in the city Thursday. Mr. Campbell is a valued friend of N. T. Snyder, and he and his family are visiting at the home of Mr. Snyder.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 4, 1885.

We issued this week one of the neatest and best Real Estate papers published in the county, the Farm and Home, for Snyder & Hutchison. These gentlemen have a very large list of farm and city property, and they send this paper all over the United States. It is a great advertisement for the city and themselves, and brings many a newcomer into our midst.

[Believe the paper goofed in next item. Name should be “W. M. Henderson.” MAW]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 7, 1885.

D. W. Henderson, while assisting in the moving of a heavy casting at the Canal Roller Mills, last Saturday, severely mashed his right thumb. The physician thinks that amputation will be unnecessary. He had just taken out an accident policy in the Traveler’s Insurance Company of Hartford, through N. T. Snyder, the company’s agent here, and will draw $10.00 per week while he is disabled.

Arkansas City Republican, March 7, 1885.

Capt. Campbell and family, friends of N. T. Snyder, returned home Wednesday.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 11, 1885.

C. T. Pritchard disposed of one of his farms last week to Joseph Bittle for $2,700. Snyder & Hutchison effected the sale.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 11, 1885.

J. W. Mansfield purchased of Snyder & Hutchison, last week, Mr. Leonard’s house in the fourth ward, for $725.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 18, 1885.

Snyder & Hutchison have just placed $35,000 insurance for Hemphill A. Woy, of Darlington, Indian Territory.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 18, 1885.

Snyder & Hutchison have been doing some little work this year. They have placed over $60,000 of insurance, sold nearly $27,000 worth of real estate, and loaned $12,000 for eastern parties. These gentlemen are a great advertisement for our city and lose no chance to expatiate on its charms and advantages.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, March 25, 1885.

BIG AD. SNYDER & HUTCHISON OFFER THE FOLLOWING BARGAINS.

14 SUBURBAN Residence Lots, containing 5 Acres each, in DUNCAN’S ADDITION, North Arkansas City. These are very desirable lots, and will be sold very cheap and on easy terms.

TEN ACRES of good land only one half mile from City; splendid place for a small fruit farm. Will sell for $700; $400 cash, balance in one year at 10 percent.

Five acres south of Arkansas City; good new frame house; good well, and lots all improved and fenced.

TWO LOTS and a fair house and barn on North Summit Street. Good location for business house.

Excerpts...


Mrs. N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, March 25, 1885.

                                                       BEETHOVEN CLUB.

Initial steps were taken a week ago last Wednesday for the formation of a musical society, and culminated last Wednesday in the formation of the Beethoven Club. The officers elected are as follows.

Geo. E. Hasie, President.

Mrs. Frank Beall, Vice President.

Mrs. Geo. W. Cunningham, Treasurer.

Stacy Matlack, Secretary.

R. W. Campbell, Librarian.

The charter members are: Wm. M. Sleeth, F. K. Grosscup, Mrs. Geo. Cunningham, J. O. Campbell, Mrs. C. H. Searing, Mrs. E. A. Barron, Miss Rosa Morse, C. L. Swarts, S. Matlack, R. W. Campbell, Mrs. Morse, Allen Ayres, Miss Peterson, S. B. Fleming, W. D. Mowry, Ella Love, Mrs. Allen Ayres, Mrs. Chas. Howard, Mrs. N. T. Snyder, Mrs. E. D. Eddy, F. B. Hutchison, Mrs. W. E. Gooch, Mrs. A. A. Newman, Mrs. H. P. Farrar, Mrs. N. S. Martin, Geo. E. Hasie.

N. T. Snyder: Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, March 25, 1885.

Ad. We wish to call the attention of Traders and agents in the Indian Territory that we are now writing insurance in the Territory, and any application for Insurance through us will receive prompt attention and your Insurance placed in good companies.

                                      Snyder & Hutchison, Arkansas City, Kansas.

N. T. Snyder...

            THE KANSAS CITY AND SOUTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 1, 1885.

                                  THE KANSAS CITY AND SOUTHWESTERN.

                           An Enthusiastic Meeting Held at Highland Hall Sunday Night

                                       And Proposition of the Company Accepted.

Now, All Pulling Together, “a Long Pull, a Strong Pull, a Pull Altogether;” and Cowley County will Double in Population and Wealth in the Next Two Years.

A meeting of our citizens was called Monday night to hear the proposition of the K. C. & S. W. Ry. Co. J. Q. Ashton was elected chairman and Wm. Jenkins, secretary. The proposition, as read by the secretary, was submitted in the form of a petition to the board of county commissioners, and tenor of it was as follows.

The undersigned resident tax payers respectfully petition for a special election to be called for the purpose of accepting a proposition to subscribe $160,000 to the capital stock of the K. C. & S. W. R. R. Co., and to issue bonds to that amount, to aid in securing said road to be constructed from Kansas City, in the state of Missouri, to the south line of the state of Kansas, through said county, the Co. first promising to construct that portion from the St. L. & S. F. R. R. north or northeast from said Cowley County into and through said county by the way of the City of Winfield and the city of Arkansas City to the south line of the state.


The bonds to be issued to be of the denomination of $1,000 each, to run 30 years (redeemable at the expiration of 10 years at the will of the county), to bear 6 percent interest, the interest payable semi-annually at the fiscal agency of the state of Kansas to the city of New York.

The said railroad shall enter the said Cowley County on the north side thereof, and extend through said county in a southwesterly direction, and through the townships of Omnia, Richland, Fairview, and Walnut, to Winfield, and thence by the most practicable route to Arkansas City, and touching its corporate limits, and thence to the south or west line of said Cowley County, with suitable passenger and freight depots located—one in Omnia Township, two in Richland Township, one within 3/4 of a mile by an air line from the crossing of Main Street and Ninth Avenue in the city of Winfield; one in Pleasant Valley Township; one within 3/4 of a mile of the intersection of Central Avenue and Summit Street, in Arkansas City; and one in Bolton Township.

The railroad to be of standard gauge, to be a first-class road, and to be built and completed and have cars running thereon, for the transaction of business to Arkansas City on or before six months from date of election, and to the south or west line of Bolton Township, on or before nine months.

Provided, That before any election shall be called, the said company shall give security either by depositing with the county treasurer a sum sufficient to defray the expenses of said election or by executing a bond to the State of Kansas for the benefit of said county to pay the costs of such election, in case the said company fails to build said road.

When the company shall have built 10 miles of road and fully equipped the same, bonds to the amount of $30,000 are to be issued to them; when they reach Winfield, bonds to the amount of $30,000 more shall be issued; when they shall reach Arkansas City, $40,000 more, and the balance when completed.

The form of the ballots to be “For the railroad stock and bonds of the K. C. & S. W. R. R. Co.,” and “Against the railroad stock and bonds of the K. C. & S. W. R. R. Co.”

With very little discussion the proposition was adopted. The following committee was appointed to work in the interest of the road to the outlying townships: Maj. W. M. Sleeth, H. P. Farrar, J. L. Huey, C. Mead, Rev. S. B. Fleming, J. Q. Ashton, Wm. Jenkins, S. Matlack, N. T. Snyder, Maj. M. S. Hasie, Judge T. McIntire; and they were empowered to add others to the committee at their discretion.

The first steps have now been taken toward securing this road, a good beginning made. But our people must realize that it is only a beginning, a small one at that. Before us lies a great deal of hard, persistent work. The eastern portion of this county, through the mistaken idea that if the road does not traverse their townships, it will be of no benefit to them, will oppose the bonds to a man. The northwest will go equally as strong the same way. We take the following statistics from the last report of the Board of Agriculture, because we have not the vote of the townships at hand.

The population of concerned townships in 1884.

Omnia Township: 458

Richland Township: 905

Walnut Township: 1,285

Pleasant Valley: 936


Creswell Township: 879

Bolton Township: 1,228

Winfield, City: 3,617

Arkansas City: 2,838

TOTAL: 12,186

Population of county in 1884, 26,149.

Difference: 14,018

Leaving a majority against us in 1884 of 1,977. This, of course, is allowing that everyone is in favor of the road in the townships named and all the rest against us. We presume that this relation between the total population and the number of voters remains the same relatively all over the county.

The additional fact must also be kept in mind that while Winfield and Arkansas City have increased in population at from 25 to 40 percent since the above census was taken, the rest of the county has in a very small percent. Looking at it in this light, the most favorable we can allow, the total population of the townships mentioned above is less than the balance of the county, and the voters in proportion. The difference and a sufficient number more must be obtained by hard work. Not by the holding of an occasional meeting in the outlying townships, but by meeting six nights in the week, and twelve hours a day. If this road will be of any benefit to us, it will be of thousands of dollars in benefit. This will take time, money, and dogged persistence. If our city wants to do this work, or its share of it, well and good. If not, then the county bonds can be counted on as defeated from the beginning.

In order to understand fully the next item on N. T. Snyder, it is necessary to have some background on what happened...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 6, 1885.

The McLaughlin Bros., have sold out their grocery store to Henry Endicott, and the last named took possession on Monday. Mr. Endicott is one of the old settlers of this valley, and has been associated with the store as salesman for the recent owners. He is known to our citizens, and is certain to secure a fair share of their patronage.

On January 1, 1884, J. W. Hutchison, the father took it upon himself to purchase the grocery store of Wm. Blakeney. His sons, one of whom was Frank B. Hutchison, ran the grocery store.

On February 27, 1884, J. W. Hutchison became the partner of N. T. Snyder. They became very successful in selling land, etc.

The following ad reflects that for a time Henry Endicott, N. T. Snyder, and J. W. Hutchison became the partners of a grocery store.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, May 20, 1885.

HENRY ENDICOTT, SNYDER, & HUTCHISON

-DEALERS IN- STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES!

QUEENSWARE, COAL OIL, ETC. ETC.

ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.

OFFER THE FOLLOWING BARGAINS:


14 SUBURBAN Residence Lots, containing 5 Acres each, in DUNCAN’s ADDITION, North Arkansas City. These are very desirable lots, and will be sold very cheap and on easy terms.

TEN ACRES of good land only one-half mile from City; splendid place for a small fruit farm. Will sell for $700; $400 cash, balance in one year at 10 percent.

Five acres south of Arkansas City; good new frame house; good well and lots all improved and fenced.

TWO LOTS and a fair house and barn on North Summit Street. Good location for business house.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 20, 1885.

                                                                 Runaway.

Quite an excitement was raised in the northwest part of town last Sunday afternoon, by the headlong careering of a team of horses adorned by the remnants of a harness, which swept over that portion of the townsite, at to say the least, an immoderate speed, until one of them was thrown, when they were caught before doing further damage. The team was the property of Messrs. Snyder & Hutchison, and it would appear they broke away while being hitched up; but before leaving the premises of Mr. Snyder, made the buggy to which they were attached into patent kindling, but luckily, beyond upsetting Mr. J. Hutchison, did no further damage. Mr. Ed. Hutchison, we are informed, then hitched the team to a heavy wagon and gave them all the exercise they needed to insure them a good night’s rest.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 20, 1885.

                                                           Registered Stock.

                        Imported Jerseys are coming into the market in Cowley County.

L. C. Norton and N. T. Snyder have just purchased of J. C. McMullen, the Pure Bred Jersey Bull, “Endorus,” one of the finest bred bulls in the United States. The Grand sire took the first premium at the Ronal Fair on the Island of Jersey. The Dam was a descendant of one of the most celebrated families of the Island, and imported to Kansas by A. M. Harkness, of Philadelphia, and was purchased by Gov. Smith, of Vermont, on whose farm “Endorus” was bred and sold to Ezra Meech, of Winfield, and purchased by J. C. McMullen, who has made a specialty of breeding Jerseys on his farm, on Timber Creek. He is one of the finest perfect animals of the breed. His weight is 1,200 pounds, his style perfect, and every way desirable. He will be kept at the barn of L. C. Norton, where he can be seen and will accommodate all who wish to avail themselves of this rare opportunity to obtain the benefit of this famous breed of milk and butter cattle.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 27, 1885.

Card. I wish to state to the public that my claim of $110 for eleven weeks disability caused by accident was promptly and satisfactorily settled by the old reliable Travelers’ Insurance Co., of Hartford, Conn., through their popular and gentlemanly agent, N. T. Snyder, of this city. While thanking this company for their prompt and courteous treatment would suggest to my friends that the jingling of the dollars helps the hurt that a crippled hand feels. Respectfully yours, WILL M. HENDERSON.

N. T. Snyder...

                                    COWLEY COUNTY CATTLE COMPANY.


Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 28, 1885.

The Cowley County Cattle Company with a capital stock of $150,000, has been formed. It is composed of W. J. Hodges, of this city, W. C. Wright, of Lyon County, and Geo. Kirkpatrick, R. A. Houghton, and N. T. Snyder, of Arkansas City. W. J. Hodges is president and N. T. Snyder, secretary and general manager. The company holds the lease of 40,000 acres on the Nez Perce reservation, all under wire fence. The Charter of the corporation runs twenty years, and the lease ten years from July 1st, 1884. Geo. Kirkpatrick is treasurer. The cattle now owned by the company run way up into the thousands, and the number will be largely increased.

N. T. Snyder and Wm. M. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 13, 1885.

                                            Arkansas City Live Stock Exchange.

An organization was effected at the real estate office of Snyder & Hutchison to be known as the Arkansas City Live Stock Exchange. The company was formed for the purpose of buying and selling all kinds of live stock on commission, where can be found on file all the leading live stock journals of the east, west, and south. It is intended to make the office of this company the headquarters of stock men when in this city. All parties, having stock in the territory for sale, will place a list on file in this office and any parties at home or from abroad wishing to purchase horses and cattle can always find what they want by consulting this list. This is a want long felt by our stock men and will be greatly appreciated by them. The officers are W. J. Hodges, of Ponca, Indian Territory, president; W. M. Snyder, of Nez Perces, Indian Territory, treasurer; and N. T. Snyder, secretary. All communications should be addressed to the secretary at Arkansas City.

N. T. Snyder: Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 13, 1885.

                                 SNYDER & HUTCHISON’S EXCHANGE LIST.

Have you any property in the city or county to swap for any of the following:

$6,000 stock of Clothing, Boots, and Shoes, a clean new stock, and all bought in the last nine months.

$1,200 stock of groceries, fresh and clean. Will trade for city property.

40 acres joining the city of Augusta, Kansas, well improved, with good farm house and plenty of fruit of all kinds, also timber and water; a good place to feed stock.

Complete printing office outfit for job work and running a newspaper located in a live town in Butler County, Kansas. Stock will invoice from $1,500 to $2,000. Will trade for a good farm or city property.

840 acres near Napoleon, Henry Co., Ohio, all covered with heavy timber. Timber will sell on the land for $1,600.

Also the following farms in Butler County, Kansas.

                                                                   No. 1.

160 acres, a choice good farm with all the latest improvements, one of the best in the county.

                                                                   No. 2.


160 acres well improved with good farm house and young orchard, stable, good well. For sale or trade. Valued at $1,800.

                                                                   No. 3.

160 acres, 20 cultivated, 2 miles from Keighley, good two room house, and about 70 acres bottom land; young orchard of about 300 trees. For sale or trade: value $1,200.

                                                                   No. 4.

A number 1 farm of 160 acres, 15 miles west of Wichita, Kansas, and only 2 miles south of Garden Plain; would prefer to trade this farm for a good farm near Arkansas City; but would take city property as part payment.

Also bear in mind that we are now offering special bargains in lots in

                                                   DUNCAN’S ADDITION.

These lots all contain 5 acres, and sell from $400 to $50 each.

                                                        SPECIAL NOTICE.

We also have a fine hotel property in northern Iowa for sale. Price $4,000.

If you want to buy, sell, or trade, we invite you to call and consult the OLD RELIABLE Land Brokers. SNYDER & HUTCHISON.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 20, 1885.

By July 1, Ward will have his new spring drays here and ready for business. Ward invites the patronage of his many former customers. His office is at Beatty Bros. Meat Market or Snyder & Hutchison’s real estate office.

Phil L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, June 20, 1885.

Steve George, a special reporter of the REPUBLICAN, tells that Phil Snyder is sick. Phil appears robust in form. It cannot be that Phil is lovesick. For fear that he is, we send him a bundle of unprinted paper.

N. T. Snyder...

                                                            SHOT DEAD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

N. T. Snyder telephones us from Arkansas City that Charley Soup, a lad of fourteen, living in Silverdale township, accidentally killed himself Sunday. He was handling a revolver, in some way, when it discharged, the ball going clear through his right breast and killing him immediately. Of course, “he didn’t know it was loaded.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

W. M. Sleeth and son and Nate Snyder were up from the miasma City last Friday.

Excerpts from lengthy article: N. T. Snyder...

                                        DOWN THE “RAGIN ARKINSAW.”

           The Kansas Millers Practically Tested by the Arkansas River Navigation

                         Company and a Cargo of Interested Citizens, Grain, Etc.

                                         Our Elongated Scribe Sandwiched In.

                                        Cowley’s New Steamer A Big Success.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.


Through the courtesy of Mr. Spencer Bliss, representing Bliss & Wood in the Arkansas River Navigation Company, our elongated reporter hauled himself from his couch at 3:30 yesterday morning, and in company with Mr. J. W. Millspaugh and Prof. Davis, sped away behind Mr. Bliss’ bay chargers for the city of many “invalids” and much “medicine.” The object was to join the Navigation Company, composed of James Hill, Bliss & Wood, Searing & Mead, and V. M. Ayres, and leading citizens of the Terminus, in an excursion down the “ragin’ Arkinsaw” on the new steamer, Kansas Millers, as a practical test of its ability to master the sand bars and general “cussedness” of the American Nile.

Returning, a speed of about seven miles an hour was maintained, in a current much swifter than when status quo. About half way up, an anchorage was made in a shady nook, and toasts given to the “Kansas Millers.” Mayor Schiffbauer was master of ceremonies and Nate Snyder did the shorthand act. The Mayor voiced the warm interest of Arkansas City’s businessmen in this promising enterprise. James Hill, general manager of the K. C. & S. W. railroad and father of this steamboat scheme, showed up the great saving to Cowley County in freight rates, in the success of this barge line. The company propose to put $5,000 into a barge fleet. It will be composed of five steel barges, enclosed, and forty feet long and ten wide, each with ordinary capacity of twenty-five tons. They will ply them between Arkansas City and Fort Smith and Little Rock. Flour, meat, hay, etc., will be taken down and coal and lumber brought back. Flour, etc., can be taken down for $5 a ton, half what it now costs by rail, to the best market we can get. As good coal as can be found in Colorado and Pennsylvania can be bought at $2.50 per ton at Ft. Smith and lumber at prices to greatly benefit the consumer, laid down at Arkansas City. The daily expense of running this line will be twenty dollars. The boat cost $7,000 laid down at its destination, and with the barges, will show an investment of twelve thousand. Capt. Moorhead, under whose supervision the boat was constructed and brought up, said he had made a careful examination of the river all the way up and is satisfied, beyond a doubt, that it can be navigated with ease and profit to the company and people. The Captain takes great pride in this enterprise and shows an energy and knowledge of water most commendable. He says he can make the down trip to Ft. Smith, Arkansas, in four days, and return in six—three trips a month. He is convinced that in the near future two boats will be numerously plying the Arkansas to Arkansas City. The fifteen thousand dollars, appropriated and yet unused by Congress last winter for the improvement of the Arkansas river, will be applied for and promises to be forthcoming with other appropriations as soon as successful navigation is assured. Spencer Bliss, Judge Sumner, Judge McIntire, A. V. Alexander, and others made good speeches commendatory of the enterprise. The Navigation Company has divided its capital stock into 110 shares of $100 each. They were opened for subscriptions from those on the boat, and well on to $5,000, the amount necessary to construct the barges, was subscribed by H. D. Kellogg, J. H. Sparks, Ira Barnett, Herman Godehard, T. R. Houghton, Snyder & Hutchison, H. O. Meigs, Peter Pearson, Henry Endicott, Frick Bros., Wagner & Howard, S. F. George, C. H. Burroughs, A. V. Alexander, Mayor Schiffbauer, George Cunningham, Kimmel & Moore, Judge Sumner, and others. All were enthusiastic over the success, so far, of navigating the river.


We shall not soon forget our first trip down the “ragin’ Arkinsaw” on a steamboat. The construction of this steamer is the inauguration of a great enterprise, and exhibits forcibly the characteristic “git up and git” of Cowley County men. Mr. James Hill, the father of the enterprise, and Capt. Moorhead, who planned and superintended so successfully the construction of the boat, are entitled to special credit. Mr. Hill would like to see three locks in the Walnut, letting the steamer come up to Winfield, which she could easily do with these adjuncts.

N. T. Snyder...

                                      STEAMBOAT: “KANSAS MILLERS.”

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 18, 1885.

                                                  DOWN THE ARKANSAS.

         The “Kansas Millers” Takes a Delegation of Businessmen Down the River Tuesday.

Monday an excursion on the “Kansas Millers” down the Arkansas by the businessmen was originated as the next day’s programme. Bright and early two bus loads of our citizens wended their way to the Harmon’s Ford landing and boarded the steamer. All together there were some 60 passengers. At 8:10 the steamer heaved anchor and in a very few moments we were out of sight of the many spectators who came down to see the excursionists start. We steamed down the river at a lively rate. In twenty minutes we were out of the mouth of the Walnut. On entering the Arkansas the speed of the vessel was increased and in a few minutes we were steaming along at the rate of 18 miles per hour. The passengers gave themselves up entirely to the enjoyment of the trip. All were inclined to be jolly and forget business cares one day at least. Cracking jokes, perpetrating harmless tricks, enjoying the beautiful trip down the Rackensack. The steamer had a canvas awning put up to keep out the scorching rays of the sun, and as the cool breezes came up the river, one and all felt it was good to be there.

At 9:15 we landed at the Grouse Creek ferry, about 20 miles downstream, to put off some freight which V. M. Ayres had shipped to Gilbert’s and Newman’s ranches. This was the first consignment of freight to the “Kansas Millers.” It consisted of 50 bushels of corn and several hundred weight of flour. The passengers, full of life, took the place of deck hands and soon had the cargo landed.

Once more we heaved anchor and steamed down the river about five miles, and landed in a beautiful grove on the Kaw reservation. When the steamer had been made fast, all clambered ashore, and ran and jumped like school boys. While ashore C. A. Burnett took advantage of our absence and in a short time had spread a picnic lunch. All ate their fill. It was a splendid bill of fare, and Charley and his efficient cook deserve mention for their efforts to refresh the inner man. After partaking of the bounteous feast and the remnants being cleared away, we steamed up the river for home.


Capt. Moorhead ran the boat across several sand bars to show the passengers that it was impossible to stick the steel-bottomed steamer. After this had been fully demonstrated, the passengers were called to order by A. V. Alexander and a meeting was held for the purpose of organizing a stock company to build steel-bottomed barges. Mayor Schiffbauer was chosen to preside and N. T. Snyder was chosen to be secretary. Mayor Schiffbauer made a few remarks stating what great advantages Arkansas City would gain by having navigation opened on the Arkansas. He stated that Capt. T. S. Moorhead informed him that coal could be bought in quantities for $2, and laid down in Arkansas City so that it could be sold by dealers for $5 or $6 per ton. It was good coal, better than that which we had been paying $8 per ton for. Over 12 tons of the coal had been burned on the “Kansas Millers” and out of that not a clinker had been found. He spoke also of lumber trade with Arkansas. Jim Hill next occupied the attention of the passengers. He was followed by T. S. Moorhead, Dr. Kellogg, Judge McIntire, and several others who spoke in glowing terms of the steamer and the navigation of the river. After the question of building barges had been thoroughly discussed, the meeting proceeded to subscribe stock. Shares were taken until over $2,000 had been subscribed. The sum needed was $5,000. The meeting adjourned then until 7:30 p.m., when they met in Meigs & Nelson’s real estate office to finish up the $5,000 stock company.

After the adjournment of the meeting, the crowd gave themselves up once more to enjoyment. At five o’clock we anchored at Harmon’s Ford. Getting aboard Archie Dunn’s busses, we were soon uptown. And thus ended a day of great recreation and profitable pleasure.

                                                                 NOTES.

The sun was very warm coming upstream, compelling all passengers to seek shady nooks.

Alexander was the story-teller. He was not a success—cause audience went to sleep.

Spencer Bliss, Dr. Evans, and J. W. Millspaugh of Winfield were down and took in the excursion.

Frank Greer, of the Courier, and Prof. B. T. Davis, of the Tribune, were the representatives of the Winfield press and were busy all day with paper and pencil.

The REPUBLICAN office furnished the bill of fare cards.

                                                NAVIGATION COMPANY.

Searing & Mead, Wood & Bliss, of Winfield, V. M. Ayres and the Arkansas City Roller Mill Company compose the navigation company. V. M. Ayres is president and C. H. Searing Secretary. These four milling firms, having practicably demonstrated that the Arkansas is navigable by steamers on the pattern of the “Kansas Millers,” and having used $7,000 to further the enterprise already, naturally turn to the town most benefitted for assistance in the furthering of the enterprise. The directors are B. F. Wood, Maj. W. M. Sleeth, and James Hill.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.

Snyder & Hutchinson have traded J. P. Musselman property known as the Olde Livery Stable, for 160 acres of land in Butler County, near Augusta. Consideration, $12,000.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.

We have a good new frame house of three rooms, good cellar, good well, four common lots, one block north of the brick schoolhouse, which we will trade for stock. Will take a good team of horses in the trade; balance in cattle or part cattle and part cash. Price $1,500.

                                                        Snyder & Hutchison.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.

We now have $30,000 to loan on improved real estate in Cowley and Sumner Counties. Interest and principal paid at home. Call and see us when wanting a loan.

                                                        Snyder & Hutchison.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.


Wanted. A party with about $1,800 to $2,000 wishing to engage in business in Arkansas City, to call on us. We have a special business offer—the right party can make from $1,800 to $2,500 per year. Snyder & Hutchison.

N. T. Snyder, Secretary, Arkansas City Live Stock Exchange...

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.

Farmers and Stock Men! If you have any stock cattle, horses, or fat stock of any kind for sale, leave a list of the same with N. T. Snyder, secretary of the Arkansas City Live Stock exchange. We do a general commission business, and if you place description of your stock on our books, it will be sure to sell, or if you are wanting to buy, call on us. Office at present with Snyder & Hutchison.

Snyder & Hutchison...

                                                           LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers, filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Julia E. McLaury and husband to Snyder & Hutchison, lots 26 and 27, blk 140, A. C.: $160.00.

Excerpts. Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, July 25, 1885.

                                                               THE FIRE.

                          Arkansas City Visited Once Again by the Devouring Flames.

Last Monday night between 11 and 12 o’clock the cry of “fire” rang out upon the still night, and the gentle Kansas zephyrs wafted the sound to the ponderous ears of the REPUBLICAN reporter. Springing from our bed, of down—on the floor—we hastily donned the first article we placed our hands on and started on a dead run for the scene of the conflagration. We were among the first to arrive and we found the St. Louis Restaurant and Grimes & Son’s Drug Store almost enveloped in flames. The fire had gained so much headway that it was impossible to put it out.

The predominating idea was to save Mowry & Sollitt’s brick drug store, and leave the old frame buildings go. In accordance with the view, the hose was turned on the Pickle building while the excited populace attempted to tear down the building occupied by A. G. Heitkam with his tailoring establishment, but the heat from the burning buildings was so excessive that the crowd turned its efforts to tearing out the Diamond Front building.

The fire spread in both directions and in 20 minutes after the origin of the fire, the St. Louis Restaurant, Grimes & Son’s Drug Store, Chas. Bundrem’s Meat Shop, D. L. Means’ Implement House, and O. F. Lang’s Restaurant were in ashes.

By the time the fire had got a good hold on Heitkam’s Tailor Shop, the Diamond Front building had been torn out and the brick drug store was saved.

The nine buildings were burned in about one hour and a quarter. After once getting a start, they went as if they had been saturated with coal oil. They were so dry and old that it is a wonder that the fire was not conveyed across the street by the great heat. The wind hardly stirred and by persistent efforts of everyone, the fire did not get into the brick buildings.

Frank Hess had about $6,000 worth of insurance in the “burnt district.” Snyder & Hutchison about $2,000; Meigs & Nelson, $850; Collins & Perry, $1,000; and J. L. Howard, $400.


We frequently hear those non-excitable people telling just how they could have put out the fire, but they took good care to stand off at a safe distance while the fire was raging. It was the excitable people who did the effective work.

Now is a good time to talk a system of water works. If we must have fires, we must have something to fight them with.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, July 29, 1885.

TRANSFER LINE. The undersigned has again started the Old Reliable Transfer Line, with increased facilities, and asks the patronage of the public. He is prepared to do teaming of all kinds and a general jobbing business. Two new and commodious wagons put on the route. Prompt attention to business. W. WARD.

                              Leave orders at Beatty Bros., or Snyder & Hutchison’s.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, July 29, 1885.

                                                           Fire Losses Paid.

Frank Hess reports the following claims paid to his burnt out customers.

D. L. Means, $1,000, by the North American.

Dr. Shepard, $800 by the Springfield.

Charley Bundrem, $260 by the New York Alliance.

The losses of Kroenert & Austin and J. T. Grimes & Son are under adjustment. The Commercial Union has paid Charles Bundrem $275 on his refrigerator. This risk was carried by Snyder & Hutchison. The claims of the other losers insured with them are now being adjusted and will be promptly paid.

Excerpts: N. T. Snyder and other fire insurance spokesmen...

                                               CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 29, 1885.

The council appropriated $5 to pay five night watchmen, appointed by the mayor on the night of the fire, to guard property.

James L. Huey, on behalf of the insurance men of the city, said the ordinance taxing each insurance company represented in the city $10 a year, is resisted, and the best companies refuse to take fresh business. They say if all the cities where they have agents should impose a similar tax, they could not do business. In this dilemma, the agents of the companies in this city had resolved to present the matter to the council, and ask that the occupation tax levied on them suffice for purposes of city revenue. To drive insurance companies away would be unwise, we have lately had experience of the necessity of placing our property in the hands of reliable underwriters.

N. T. Snyder said not the best companies alone, but all the insurance companies represented here, have ordered their agents to take no fresh business, and not to renew existing policies. They pay a state tax, and this they declare is all that justice demands of them.

Mr. Huey said further that the occupation tax as now assessed would absorb 20 percent of all the premiums paid.

Mr. Dunn moved that the matter be referred to the equalization committee of the council.


The mayor said it was talked by taxpayers that this committee had no right to affix a tax; it must be done by the council.

A suggestion was made that the committee could look into the matter and make recommendations to the council.

After some discussion Mr. Dunn withdrew his motion.

Major Schiffbauer said there was no question of the legality of the occupation tax; its equitable adjustment was the matter to be considered. If the insurance companies resist the assessment and have resolved to withdraw, the business of the council was to consider whether the ordinance should be amended.

Mr. Snyder said a similar tax on insurance companies had been imposed in Emporia, but it was found inexpedient and oppressive, and it had been repealed.

The application was finally referred to the committee on ordinances.

Mr. Hight called attention to some frame additions being made by W. M. Sawyer, proprietor of the Empire Laundry. His intention was to put in a steam engine, and the work he was doing was in violation of the fire ordinance. The marshal was instructed to enforce the ordinance.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, August 1, 1885.

I. R. Deming & Son have sold their grocery stock to J. G. Carter, who lately came here from New Salem. Mr. Deming retires from business because his wife is having ill health, and is desirous of trying a change of climate for her benefit. Snyder & Hutchison made the sale.

Phil. L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, August 1, 1885.

Phil Snyder was so charmed with the wonders and grandeur of the Indian Sun Dance, that it made him ill.

Arkansas City Republican, August 1, 1885.

Phil. Snyder, Ed Kingsbury, Herm Wyckoff, Lute Coombs, Leavitt Coburn, John Ingliss, Frank Freeland, Owen Sheppard, F. C. Deering, and W. H. Nelson went down to Ponca Agency Wednesday night to witness the sun dance by the Ponca tribe next day. They were doomed to disappointment. The dance comes off today.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 5, 1885.

                                                 Law and Order Association.

Union services were held in the Baptist Church on Sabbath evening, which were attended by a crowded audience. After some excellent music by the choir, Rev. J. O. Campbell announced that the meeting was held in the interest of law and order, and to give permanency and effect to the movement, an organization should be effected by the election of officers. The meeting then elected the following officers.

President: W. M. Sleeth.

Secretary: N. T. Snyder.

Executive committee: Messrs. Adams, Barron, Jenkins, and O. P. Houghton.

Prayer was offered by J. P. Witt.

The following resolutions were read and adopted.


Resolved, That we call the attention of the county attorney and the probate judge to the necessity of an immediate investigation of the open and notorious violation of the prohibition law in our city.

Resolved, That we respectfully ask our municipal authority to use all diligence in the enforcement of all Sabbatarian laws on the statute book.

Resolved, That these resolutions be published in the city papers, and forwarded to the proper persons.

Brief and effective addresses were made by Revs. Campbell and Buckner, W. M. Jenkins’, and Councilman Jacob Hight. Great interest in the proceedings was manifested by the entire audience.

N. T. Snyder: Secretary, Arkansas City Live Stock Exchange...

      Arkansas City Traveler, August 5, 1885.

Farmers and Stock Men! If you have any stock cattle, horses, or fat stock of any kind for sale, leave a list of the same with N. T. Snyder, secretary of the Arkansas City Live Stock exchange. We do a general commission business, and if you place description of your stock on our books, it will be sure to sell, or if you are wanting to buy, call on us. Office at present with Snyder & Hutchison.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 8, 1885.

                                                    Law and Order Meeting.

A large and enthusiastic meeting was held in the Baptist Church, last Sabbath evening, in the interest of law and order in our community. The meeting was organized by calling Maj. Sleeth to the chair, and appointing N. T. Snyder, secretary.

Some excellent music was rendered by the choir, after which Rev. Fleming read the Law of Mt. Sinai and the thirteenth chapter of Romans, and Rev. Witt led in prayer. Short speeches were made by Messrs. Hill, Jenkins, Campbell, Fleming, Buckner, Witt, Kreamer, Hight, and others.

The meeting developed the fact that there is a deep and wide-spread feeling bordering on indignation in the hearts of the people at the lawlessness apparent on every hand. Notable in connection with the Sabbath and prohibition laws was this spirit developed. While law-abiding citizens have nothing to fear, and can rely upon the moral strength of the community; yet the individual who wilfully and wantonly violates the laws upon our statute books need ask no favors or quarter as this will not be shown. That this is the case seemed to be the conviction of those who were present in the meeting. There is unquestionably a wicked and wanton violation of both the prohibition and Sabbath laws which is fast giving to our fair young city an unenviable reputation abroad; and against this wholesale iniquity the combined moral force of the community will make itself felt.

It is not the disposition of outraged public feeling to be lenient toward those who have so flagrantly violated not only the spirit but the letter of the law and therefore all law breakers must take the consequences if caught in the toils of an outraged public sentiment when it rises to enforce the law.

As expressing the sense of the meeting, the following resolutions were read and adopted.


Resolved, That we call the attention of the county attorney and the probate judge to the necessity of an immediate investigation of the open and notorious violations of the prohibition law in our city.

Resolved, That we respectfully ask our municipal authorities to use all diligence in the enforcement of all sabbatical laws on the statute books.

Resolved, That these resolutions be published in the city papers, and forwarded to the proper persons.

The meeting was adjourned to meet the next Sabbath evening in September, place to be announced hereafter.

N. T. Snyder...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

N. T. Snyder and H. J. Donnelly were up from A. C. Wednesday.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, August 15, 1885.

The ladies of the First Baptist Church will give one of their popular socials on the lawn at the residence of N. T. Snyder, Friday evening, August 21. A general invitation is extended to all. It is expected that a large party will be in attendance from Winfield.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 19, 1885.

Snyder & Hutchison, a few days ago, sold C. M. Scott another piece of land, 427 acres in extent, the property of A. T. Stewart, of Kansas City, to add to his cattle ranch.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 19, 1885.

Don’t forget the lawn social at the residence of N. T. Snyder, on Friday evening next, and the grand lawn illumination. Ice cream, peaches, and cream, and other refreshments will be served. All are invited.

N. T. Snyder...

                       WATER AND GAS PROPOSED FOR ARKANSAS CITY.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 19, 1885.

                                                  THE WATER QUESTION.

           A Proposition to Erect Water and Gas Works Considered in a Citizens’ Meeting.

Agreeable to the call of the mayor, about one hundred of our citizens assembled at Highland Hall on Friday evening, to listen to the proposals of Theodore Plate, of St. Louis, and J. B. Quigley, of Belleville, Illinois, to construct gas and waterworks in this city, and to express their views on the same. Precisely at 8 o’clock, Mayor Schiffbauer called the meeting to order and proposed that James L. Huey be appointed chairman. This motion being approved, N. T. Snyder was then chosen secretary of the meeting.


Mayor Schiffbauer being called on to explain the object of the gathering, said he had been corresponding with the gentlemen above named for some time, and since their arrival in the city, at noon the previous day, had been put full in possession of the nature of their offer. They were men of ample means, fully able to carry out any undertaking with our citizens they might embark in, and experienced in the construction and conduct of gas and waterworks. They proposed to furnish the city both water and gas, and asked no aid in erecting the machinery. He (the speaker) had been favorably impressed with the offer made by the gentlemen, and he would describe it as well as he was able to the citizens present.

For the supply of water they propose to put in two duplex compound pumps, so arranged as to be run separately or together, and capable of raising one million gallons of water every twenty-four hours. These pumps will be run by two boilers, also to run separately or together, capable of running both pumps at their full capacity with easy firing. They agree to furnish 14,000 feet of standard iron water pipe, 2,250 feet of which is 8 inches bore, to be laid along Summit street, the size of the remainder of the pipe to be determined by the requirement. The stand pipe will be made of the best boiler iron, 8 feet in diameter and 100 feet high. The city is required to take sixty fire plugs at a yearly rental of $50 each.

The quality of the gas to be furnished by these gentlemen will be standard, or 16 candle power, and the city will be required to take thirty street lamps at a yearly cost of $30 each. The price of the gas to private consumers will be $2.75 per 1,000 feet for the first 5,000 feet daily consumption, and this price to decrease two cents per 1,000 feet until the daily consumption shall reach 55,000 feet, when the price will be and remain at $1.75 per 1,000 feet.

The parties ask fifteen days to file an unencumbered real estate bond in the amount of $20,000 in each franchise of the contract, and as a guaranty that the works shall perform the requirements of the test. They engage to throw a stream of water 50 feet high from any fire hydrants the council may select, from the standpipe pressure alone, the pumps not to run at the time of the test, and to throw water 85 feet high, with 65 lbs. of steam, independent of the standpipe pressure.

They further engage to have both gas and water works completed and ready for testing by the first of January next.

A pause followed this statement of the mayor, and the chair then asked for an expression of opinion.

Major Sleeth arose and said the great want of the community was pure water; but it was necessary first to determine where shall be the source of supply, before we build our water works. He would like a chemical analysis made of the water before it is adopted for use, in order that we may proceed with some certainty. Gas, he thought, was in advance of our present wants; we have enough of that commodity around already. He was pleased to see his fellow citizens assembled to deliberate on this matter, the city council had wrestled with it to slight purpose. He wanted to hear others speak.

Major Searing said the unfortunate experience of our neighbor cities in the construction of water works should teach us caution on the present occasion. In Wichita the mistake had been made of not getting elevation enough. He favored an elevation of at least fifty feet. Also, he would not have the main pipe less than 12 inches in diameter, and the distributing pipes should never be less than four inches.

Mr. T. H. McLaughlin wanted this work prosecuted with caution. The proposition before the meeting would cause an outlay of $3,000 a year, and it might not give a corresponding benefit. Other parties might be willing to furnish a water system for less than the offer made by these men.


Mr. A. D. Prescott favored competition, and did not approve of determining this matter hastily. Before we build water works, we must make up our minds where we are to get our water from. But he did not favor both propositions.

Mr. Plate being called for, said before he and his friend, Mr. Quigley, started for this city, they were under the impression that our water works were constructed. Mr. O’Neil had called several times at their office, who represented that he had built our water works, and he offered the franchise to build gas works for sale at a low price. This franchise allows till September 24th to begin their construction, and requires that they be completed by November 21st. He had been suspicious of the gentleman from the low price he asked for his franchise, and on arriving here found that he had misrepresented facts. He called the attention of those present to the fact that the proposition submitted to our citizens required no bonus, no expenditure of money to build the works from the city. The only privilege he and his partner asked was leave to put in the works and lay the pipes at their own expense, and to sell water and gas to consumers at the lowest price it could be afforded. They had put down the price of the plugs $10 below Mr. O’Neil’s offer. No profit was to be derived from furnishing a city of our present size, and they expected to make no profit for two or three years. But they proposed to erect works of adequate capacity to supply a city of 20,000 to 25,000 inhabitants, and if our city attained to any such size then our contract with them would be remunerative. But they declined to furnish water on the terms offered unless their gas proposition was also accepted. As a matter of fact, he believed the gas franchise given to O’Neil was still valid and could be held to, but he and his friend had no thought of undertaking any work that was not sustained by the good will of the people.

Several other speakers having urged deliberation, Mayor Schiffbauer inquired if in going as slow as was recommended, there was not danger of going down. We had paid a heavy penalty for slowness in the recent fire, and it was necessary to bestir ourselves if we would avoid another such a calamity. The contract he would make with these parties would bind them to supply a sufficient amount of good wholesome water, and we could safely trust to their judgment in locating their works. But no one is going to dig around and prospect and plat unless some assurance is offered them that their time and money will not be wasted. The machinery these men engaged to put up would furnish a barrel of water a day to every man, woman, and child, and then leave enough to put out fires.

Some mechanical details having been entered into by Mr. J. G. Danks and others, Mr. Quigley explained that the works he proposed to build, with a cut off from the main, and a pressure of fifty pounds, would throw a stream fifty feet. The pressure increased to 150 pounds would give a stream 192 feet high. He thought there would be no trouble experienced in procuring a supply of pure water, as in these western rivers there is always an undercurrent which is comparatively free from impurities. He understood there was a stratum of rock underlying this city, beneath which there was a constant flow of water. To test whether this would suffice for a supply, he would take three or four threshing machines and pump continuously several million gallons of water. If no exhaustion [?] was produced, he would consider that source adapted for the city use. The speaker explained his plans at some length, which it is not necessary to report here.


The mayor said as a number of our citizens was gathered to discuss the water question, he desired an expression of their will to aid the deliberations of the city council. After a long discussion of the matter, Messrs. Sleeth, McLaughlin, and J. G. Danks were appointed a committee to act with a committee of the city council, and combine in a report recommending a plan of action to the city council. The meeting then adjourned.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 22, 1885.

                                                         The Water Works.

A good representation was had of the businessmen at the water works meeting in Highland Opera House last Friday evening. Mayor Schiffbauer called the meeting to order at 8 p.m., and J. L. Huey was chosen chairman and N. T. Snyder, secretary. Mayor Schiffbauer stated that the meeting had been called to discuss the water works question; that Messrs. Plate and Quigley were here from St. Louis with a proposition which they wished to submit to the citizens of Arkansas City for putting in gas and water works. The proposition was to the effect that they put them in for the franchise, the city agreeing to take 60 fire plugs, at a rental of $50 a year and also take 30 street lights at $30 each per annum. Speeches were made on the subject by Maj. Sleeth, J. G. Danks, A. D. Prescott, J. P. Johnson, O. P. Houghton, Maj. Searing, Mayor Schiffbauer, and others. The gist of their remarks was that we needed and must have water works; but at present we were unable to put in gas works.

Messrs. Quigley and Plate did not want one without the other on this proposition so the matter was ended in regard to it. These gentlemen desire to put in a bid when we have water works put in. They propose what we think is a good system, and by their talk they showed that they were perfectly conversant with the water works question. They propose the stand-pipe system and explained it in detail to those present.

During the meeting a motion was made and carried that a committee be appointed from the citizens meeting and city council to investigate the different systems of water works of our neighboring cities and report which they thought was the best. J. G. Danks and Maj. Sleeth were selected to represent the citizens, and Monday night Councilmen Dean, Dunn, Thompson, and Mayor Schiffbauer were taken from the city council. On motion the meeting was adjourned to await the report of the committee.

The time has come for some action to be taken. The citizens of Arkansas City have expressed their desire for water works. The start has been made to get them. Let the ball be pushed forward rapidly. Protection from fire for our town we must have and right now is the accepted time to get it.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, August 22, 1885.

C. M. Scott purchased 427 acres of land, adjoining his Otter Creek Ranch, of A. T. Stewart, of Kansas City, Monday, for $3,200. Snyder & Hutchison were the sale agents.

Arkansas City Republican, August 22, 1885.

S. H. Hines has purchased the stock of groceries belonging to Isaac Eldridge and will move them out west and go into the grocery business. Mr. Eldridge has retired from business. Snyder & Hutchison were the sale agent.

N. T. Snyder...

                                                    KIOWA EXCURSION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.



In answer to many questions, and for the benefit of those that could not avail themselves of the opportunity of taking in the excursion of Kiowa, I will try and give a few outlines of the trip. On Tuesday morning, August 25th, we boarded the 10:40 train, hearing that the regular excursion train from Kansas City, which was 20 minutes behind the regular train, was full, we boarded and started for Kiowa, which is located in Barber County, and at the terminus of the K. C. & S. K. Railroad. At Kellogg several parties joined our company. Among them was our friend, W. P. Gibson, of Protection, Comanche County. When we told him we were going to Kiowa, his face was almost as long as a fence rail, and he felt sorry for Protection. At Oxford a number of her citizens joined us, and so on at every station we passed until we neither had sitting nor standing room on our train. We arrived at Kiowa at 3:30 p.m., and the other train 20 minutes later. The citizens of Kiowa met us in grand style at the railroad. I won’t say depot for they have none yet; but they were there with all the buggies, carriages, and hacks they had in town, together with the Wellington Band, which had gone over the day before. We unloaded right in the midst of the worst prairie that a great many of the excursionists has ever looked upon. We were now about half a mile from what they called New Kiowa. We started on the march, headed by the Band. We marched up through Main street, and there, let me tell you, we saw wonders to behold such as we never will forget. As they marched us into the town, they said they proposed to show us the production of their county, which they did to perfection. Across Main street they had erected an arch about forty feet high in the center. This was handsomely decorated from base to base with all the cereals of the soil, such as none but Kansas lands can produce—corn, wheat, millet, beans, cane, melons, cotton, pumpkins, etc. This they claim was the production of 1885, and the production of their county for 1884. They had on exhibition the bear, cayote, wild cat, deer, and numerous others too numerous to mention, and to go back as far as 1881, and to show to this grand excursion party—especially to those who had forgotten the production of these past years—they had on public exhibition, with doors wide open, seven saloons and gambling houses, selling whiskey and beer over the bar by the drink, as they did of olden times. I must confess that this seemed to be the most lively part of the exhibition. On top of the arch they had a stuffed beef hide. There it stood natural as life, 40 feet in the air. After passing through this arch, we filed right and were brought to a halt in front of the Hardwick House, a fine, large two-story hotel, fitted up for all contingencies, with a bar and billiard room on the first floor, with all the necessary conveniences about a first class hotel on the second floor. After some very fine music from the band, the excursion party started for the four corners of Kiowa. I want to tell you some of them saw the elephant before morning, but I am not going to tell you who they were. Ask J. J. Johnson and Sam Phenix about it. The first place I saw these two gentlemen in the morning was crawling out of a stockade that had been bedded with sand the night before for shipping Texas cattle. Of course, we did not know whether the people of Kiowa would give us a free lunch or anything of the kind, but it was suggested by some of the party that it was such a great cattle region that they would as much as have a roasted beef anyway. When we all got off of the train and beheld that beef standing forty feet in the air, the whole party thought it was a sign of a roasted beef. It was a sight to see the greedy eyes feasting on that stuffed beef as we passed under it; but we were to be pitied as the train had stopped nowhere for dinner, and we had eaten up all the roasted and unroasted peanuts that the peanut vendor had on the train. You may know what a hungry looking crowd we were, but we did not see any roast beef nor have a barbecue. I think if that striped animal had fallen off of the arch in the crowd, it would have been devoured in less time than a gang of cayotes could devour a buffalo carcass. But we got full—that is, we all got plenty to eat by paying $2 for our supper, bed, and breakfast. We were glad of the accommodations, even at that price. When you visit Kiowa, you don’t want to care for expenses.

After supper the crowd was called together—all that could get together—at the Hardwick House and after some very fine music by the Wellington band, the excursionists were addressed by Mr. Dobson, mayor of the city, in which he stated that he was completely surprised to think that 1,500 people would drop down on them at one time just to see their little city. He said their town was only six months old and had already about 1,000 inhabitants. Judge Reed, of Wellington, also addressed the crowd, making some fine remarks about the southwestern country. Some gentleman from Kansas City also made some remarks in which he said there were three great cities. First, the city of Chicago; Kansas City; and, last, but not least, the city of Kiowa. Then the chairman suggested that after some more music from the band there would be a free dance on the platform adjoining the hotel, and those who had no place to stay “could dance all night and go home in the morning.” The platform was 40 x 100 feet. They had fine music and the Kansas City, Wellington, Winfield, Oxford, and Kiowa people all joined hands and had a jolly old time by the sweet, silvery light of the moon.


My object in taking this trip west was for my own satisfaction and to see if all reports were true that we had been hearing. I had been told by many that they had been having much more rain than we had and that the crops were much better. Now, after seeing with my own eyes, I emphatically deny the reports. I do not think they have had any more rain than we have had. I saw some pieces of corn that were green and nice yet, and some that were dried up, some were well eared, and some had no ears at all on it, just the same as in this county. The early corn is good, but the late is a failure. Some say the soil is just as good out west as it is here. Now I can deny this. I paid particular attention to the crops and soil and want to say right here, I would not give a good quarter section of Cowley County soil for any section of land I saw west of a little town called Crystal, about fourteen miles west of Harper, for agricultural purposes. At this place and on west the soil is a deep red, with not an inch of black soil to be seen. The water that stands in pools is a red color and did not look even fit for stock to drink. If the soil was only a Mulatto color with a little black mixed in, I would think it better for agriculture. I did not see any grass west of Attica that was tall enough to cut. I noticed that there was not much fall plowing done, on account of the dry weather. The ground is just as dry out there as it is here. I examined some ground that had lately been plowed and it looked as though it has had no rain on it this summer. I think that country, to make a good farming country, wants a rain every day in the week and one on Sunday for a change. Between Attica and Chrisfield we passed through quite a valley, which A. J. Thompson called “Wild Horse Valley,” as there was a herd of Texas ponies running away from the train, and he took them for a genuine herd of wild horses; but he was informed by someone that they were only Texas ponies. Between Chrisfield and Hazelton we ran into the prairie dog towns and Jap Cochran thought they were pigs following the cattle until he was told better by some bystander, who informed him that they did not raise hogs in that country.

Among the excursionists from Cowley, I noticed the following persons: J. J. Johnson, New Salem; F. M. Fall, Cambridge; J. Hiatt, Cambridge; S. Phenix, Floral; J. Finkleburg, Arkansas City; N. T. Snyder, Arkansas City. From Winfield: A. J. Thompson, Walter Denning and wife; Uncle Billy Moore and wife; Jap Cochran and mother; Barnthouse, the soda man; Sol Fredrick; John Eaton and wife; C. W. Stolp and son; Jake Goldsmith; Sam Stivers and brothers; and Gray, of the Telegram.

We left Kiowa at 12:30 and arrived home at 5:30, all except Jap Cochran. I think he got off on the way to get some of those pigs. I don’t think there was an investment made out of the whole party on account of the high prices. A. J. Thompson don’t value lots out in Kiowa like he does in Winfield. They tried to sell some lots at auction the day we left, and Thompson bid $100 for a lot on Main street, but I think one of the town company over-bid him and he did not get it. Now if anyone that was on this grand excursion can give a better  description of the trip, I am ready to hear from them.

                                                             T. J. HARRIS.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 5, 1885.

FARMERS, WE HAVE LOANED $10,000 This month, and yet we have $100,000 to loan. Our terms are EASY to you, and LOW in rates. We ask for no Second Mortgage for commission. If you are wanting money, call and see us.

INTEREST AND PRINCIPAL Can be Paid at our Office.

                                                  SNYDER & HUTCHISON.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, September 5, 1885.

The slough just east of the 3rd ward across the canal is the cause of a great deal of malaria, which is now existing in our city. N. T. Snyder comes forward with an idea that would forever do away with this breeder of chills and fever. His plan is to scour the dirt out for a considerable distance surrounding the springs into a basin or a small lake. The dirt taken from the basin is to be used to fill in north of the springs. From the south end of the basin, let a drain be made, running into the Arkansas. In this way the city can have pure running water. H. [?] G. Wetmore, whose land is just south of the springs a short distance, offered to make the drain across his land at his own expense. This is a good scheme, we believe. If the basin should be made large enough, trees could be set out around and make a beautiful park.

Excerpts: N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 9, 1885.

                                                      COUNCIL MEETING.

A committee consisting of ex-Police Judge Kreamer, Amos Walton, N. T. Snyder, and Meigs, applied for assistance in the work of laying an oak flooring on the west bridge. Its present insecurity kept trade away from the city, and a pine floor was continually wearing into holes. At a meeting of citizens held in Meigs & Nelson’s office on Saturday evening, it was computed that an oak floor would cost $700, and the above named committee was appointed to collect the amount by enlisting subscriptions from our businessmen. About $300 had been subscribed; but all referred the committee to the city council for aid.


Mr. Dunn thought the expenditure of such a sum on a bridge that was likely to be carried away next winter, injudicious. The piling was loose and the whole structure in an insecure condition. He would rather see money spent in permanent improvement.

The mayor said the council had no shadow of authority to devote the public money to any such purpose. If the gentlemen chose to assume the responsibility, well enough. The council had voted $65 to the repair of the bridge on a similar occasion, and it could exercise a similar discretion again. He was satisfied that taxpayers would raise an objection.

Mr. Dean said the repair of the west bridge was more essential to our businessmen than mending the city streets. A large amount of trade was lost to our city because of its dangerous condition, and money voted by the council to put it in fit condition for travel would certainly be approved.

Mayor Schiffbauer remarked that the people of Arkansas City would soon find themselves without bridges, and they wanted stirring up to a knowledge of this fact. There is no law in the state to define the duty of county or township in the matter. Last year Senator Jennings introduced a bill in the legislature, requiring county commissioners to appropriate money towards building necessary bridges, and if the cost was over a certain amount to bill them entire. But the measure did not pass. Now that our city is set apart from the township, the council is without authority to devote money to such a purpose, the township won’t do it, and the county cannot. There is thus no way on God’s earth to build necessary bridges, or keep old ones in repair.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 9, 1885.

D. L. Kretsinger, secretary to the Cowley County Fair Association, was in town yesterday, and appointed N. T. Snyder his assistant. Persons wishing to make entries can call on Mr. Snyder, who will attend to their business, and save the delay of correspondence on a visit to Winfield. The fair opens on Monday, the 21st inst., and closes the following Friday. Fare there and return will be 1-1/3 rates. Liberal premiums will be paid, and an unusually fine display is promised.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, September 12, 1885.

D. L. Kretsinger was in the city Tuesday making arrangements for Cowley County’s coming fair. He empowered N. T. Snyder to take the entries for Southern Cowley. Parties in this vicinity who desire to make exhibits at the fair need not go to Winfield to make entries but come to N. T. Snyder. All railroads leading to Winfield will give reduced rates. The fair commences Tuesday, Sept. 22, and continues five days. A special train will most likely be run from here on that day.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, September 12, 1885.

                                                      Water Works Wrangle.


Thursday evening in Highland Hall a goodly number of citizens congregated to hear a submission of Mr. Quigley’s proposition to put in water and gas works in our city. At previous meetings a committee had been appointed to prepare plans and specifications for water works, which it did, and the report was accepted. Advertisements had been prepared stating that the city clerk was ready to receive bids. Just at this stage of the proceedings Mr. Quigley appears on the scene from St. Louis and makes the citizen’s committee and council a much better proposition by at least $1,000 in cash than he made to our citizens some six weeks ago. Besides, he offers to put in a much better system of works than he proposed heretofore. As a consequence of this proposition, a meeting was held Thursday night to see if our citizens were desirous of accepting Mr. Quigley’s proposition. J. L. Huey was chosen chairman of the meeting and N. T. Snyder, secretary. Everyone present considered Mr. Quigley’s proposed system of water works a good one for this city, but the meeting was about evenly divided when a motion was made to accept the proposition. Mr. Quigley proposed that he receive the franchise of the city for 21 years for the putting in of gas and water works. The city was to take 65 fire plugs at an annual rental of $50 per plug, making the water works cost the city $3,250. The system was to be the Standpipe and Holly system. The gas works were to be put in without any cost to the city, and at any future time the city should desire, we were to take 30 street lights. In the meantime, the gas company was to derive their profit from private consumption. Mr. Quigley’s proposition had to be accepted then and there or not at all, and yet he asked for 30 days in which to file his bond of $5,000 for the faithful performance of his contract with the city. This was where the kick came in. Many thought that if Mr. Quigley saw a good thing in putting in water works of this kind here, there were other companies who could see a better thing and put in the same system a great deal cheaper. In other words, they desired to exercise the right of competition, place Mr. Quigley’s proposition on file, and proceed to receive propositions from other parties. But this was not as the other side desired. They wanted Mr. Quigley’s proposition accepted then and there, claiming that it was a good one, and no competition was necessary. That no better proposition could be secured. When a vote was called upon the question, it resulted in a tie. At this time the war began. R. U. Hess claimed that minors, non-residents, and non-taxpayers voted that the city accept Mr. Quigley’s proposition, which was unfair. Pat. Franey demanded that Mr. Hess show his property; upon which that gentleman said he did not vote upon the question. Champions of both sides began to make speeches as to who had a right to vote. When the discussion had reached fever heat and an opportune moment presented itself, a motion was made to adjourn, which was unanimously carried. Thus nothing was done except to widen the breach between the two factions of Arkansas City.


The REPUBLICAN thinks, as it always has, that competitive bids should be secured. We think that Mr. Quigley made a good proposition. Yet the 30 days which he asks of the city in which to file his bond, he should allow us the same time in which to secure bids from other companies. His proposition should have been placed on file. If Mr. Quigley wanted to establish gas and water works here $1,000 cheaper on his second visit to our city than he did on the first, why is it not reasonable to suppose that there are other persons who will furnish the same system of works at a less figure. It was evident that our friend from St. Louis was slightly afraid he would lose the job if any other bids were put in and probably that was why he left no alternative but to accept his offer then and there. If bids had been received and not opened until Oct. 12 as some desired, the putting in of water works would not have been delayed any, because Mr. Quigley asked for 30 days, which a portion was ready to grant to him but not to the city. We see no objection to the city securing bids and we think it should. The matter would not have been delayed any at all by so doing even if Mr. Quigley’s proposition had been accepted.

Excerpts: N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 16, 1885.

                                                        Delegate Convention.

The primaries were held in this city and in Creswell Township on Saturday evening, notwithstanding the severe rain storm. The proceedings were orderly and the selection of delegates was gone through with as a routine matter.

Third Ward. The meeting in the ward was held in Hilliard’s Stable, L. E. Woodin presided, Ed. Kingsbury, secretary. Following is the list of delegates and alternates. Delegates: L. E. Woodin, T. J. Gilbert, C. S. Searing. Alternates: Ed. Kingsbury, G. W. Cunningham, N. T. Snyder. In this ward a committeeman was elected, N. T. Snyder being the member chosen.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 16, 1885.

                                               WATER WORKS QUESTION.

                               The Citizens Reject Mr. Quigley’s Second Proposition.

The meeting of citizens held in Highland Hall on Thursday evening was called by the water works committee to learn their views on the proposition submitted by Mr. J. B. Quigley, of St. Louis. This gentleman was here some months ago with his partner, Mr. Platter, and then the pair submitted a proposition to build gas and water works for the city, owning the franchise, and charging $4,000 for the public use of the water and gas. That is, they agreed to furnish a water system, which was generally approved by those competent to form an opinion, on condition that the city pay $50 a year rental for 60 fire hydrants, making an annual tax of $3,000. They also offered to build gas works, and furnish consumers with an excellent quality of illuminating gas for $2.50 a thousand feet, the city being required to pay for 30 street lamps, at the rate of $30 a year each. This would be an additional charge of $900. They refused, for good reasons given at the time, and repeated by Mr. Quigley at the meeting on Thursday evening, to accept one franchise without the other.

The matter was debated with due deliberation at the former meeting, and the conclusion arrived at was that the city was not then ready to bear the burden of lighting the streets, and before the offer to build water works was adopted, they preferred to invite bids from other responsible parties. A committee was appointed to formulate a plan for the water supply, and advertise in the proper channels for proposals to construct the same.

The work assigned the committee was being intelligently and diligently performed, when Mr. Quigley, who happened to be in Hutchinson, and hearing that our citizens were still laboring on a water works system, inquired of Mayor Schiffbauer by telegram whether a modified proposition would be received. The latter expressed his doubt, in a reply, but invited the gentleman to come and make his offer. He arrived here on the Wednesday train, and that evening laid his proposition before that body. It may be briefly given as follows.


An iron standpipe, ten feet in diameter and 110 feet high. Two compound duplex pumps, each capable of raising 1,000,000 gallons of water in 24 hours. Two boilers capable of running the machinery with easy firing. The main to consist of 5,800 feet of 10-inch pipe, 3,200 feet of 8-inch, 6,200 feet of 6-inch, and 7,400 feet of 4-inch pipe. The machinery is guaranteed to throw water from five plugs 65 feet high by standpipe pressure alone, and 100 feet from pump power. Mr. Quigley asks 30 days to file a bond for $20,000 for the satisfactory fulfillment of his contract. The city will be required to take 65 fire plugs and a rental of $50 a plug per annum. All the mains to be standard condition, and to be extended 600 feet for every six consumers.

The committee was favorably impressed with the offer, but feeling that their instructions did not warrant them to act without authority, they thought it proper to call another public meeting and take the sense of the people. The meeting was held on Thursday evening, about 150 persons being in attendance.

All of the committee was there, except Major Sleeth, and several of the members set forth their reasons for recommending the acceptance of Mr. Quigley’s offer. They may be summarized as follows. The plan originally proposed, the details of which were in print for mailing to pump makers and contractors, involved too great an outlay, and would impose too heavy cost on the city. The standpipe of the dimensions given above, and the water mains graduated from ten to four inches, would suffice for a city of 30,000 to 40,000 inhabitants, and would certainly answer our wants for many years to come. It would be well to accept the offer now because there was the prospect of a dull winter before us; the erection of the machinery and the laying of the pipes would afford employment to scores of our workmen, and the evidence of progress and enterprise, made manifest by such a work, would give our city a good name abroad and be apt to attract capital and population hither. While to decline this offer and advertise for this would cause a delay of two months, the winter is a bad time to prosecute such an undertaking, and it was most likely that nothing would be done in the way of procuring a water supply till next year.

These statements were met by arguments from Messrs. Meigs, T. H. McLaughlin, Prescott, Cunningham, and others, that as the city had waited so long, the further delay of a few weeks would not be detrimental. Mr. Quigley had made his offer, but there might be others who were willing to do the work for less. It would be in conformity with business rules to put it up to competition and take the lowest bidder. Mr. Quigley’s present one was nearly $1,000 a year better than the offer he made before; under the spur of a little wholesome competition, he might find it to his interest to make a still better offer, and the delay involved would be fully justified by the possible advantage to be gained.


The above is the substance of the reasoning used on both sides, until to bring the matter to an issue. Mr. J. P. Johnson moved that the committee be held to their former instructions to advertise for bids, which was amended by G. W. Cunningham restraining that body from opening any bids before October 12th. Both amendment and the original motion were negatived by the meeting. Judge Kreamer then moved that Mr. Quigley’s offer be accepted, which was submitted to a rising vote. The chair and the secretary (James L. Huey and N. T. Snyder) counted noses and pronounced the vote a tie. It was then proposed that the vote be taken by ballot, but on Mr. Dean’s suggestion that so indeterminate an expression of public sentiment would have no weight with him as a councilman, but he should be left to the exercise of his own judgment, a motion to adjourn was entertained and the meeting broke up leaving the committee to act as they thought best in the matter. As their instructions were not modified by the citizens they called together to consult with, we cannot see that they can act in any other way than to go on and advertise for bids.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 16, 1885.

                                                                Fair Week.

N. T. SNYDER. Dear Sir: I have made arrangements with the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad for a passenger coach each day on the morning train during the fair, and for six coaches on the Thursday morning train. Thursday will be Arkansas City and Winfield day. I would like to see Arkansas City and vicinity well represented on that day. For the round trip 51 cents. We have room for everybody. D. L. KRETSINGER, General Manager.

N. T. Snyder...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Thursday of next week will be Winfield and Arkansas City day at the Cowley County Fair. Arrangements have been made for a special train of ten coaches, leaving Arkansas City at 7 a.m., returning at 7 p.m. N. T. Snyder has been appointed assistant at Arkansas City and is working up a boom. Friday will be Children’s Day for the entire county. All children under fifteen years of age, when accompanied by their parents, will be admitted free. Special attractions have been arranged for these two days, of which we will mention in full, later.

Excerpts: N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 19, 1885.

                 The Delegates to the Republican Convention to be Held at Winfield Today.

Last Saturday evening the Republican primaries were held in the four wards of Arkansas City and Creswell Township. The following are the delegates chosen.

THIRD WARD. The voters assembled at the REPUBLICAN office. L. E. Woodin was made chairman, E. L. Kingsbury, secretary. L. E. Woodin, T. J. Gilbert, and C. H. Searing were elected delegates while Geo. Cunningham, E. L. Kingsbury, and N. T. Snyder were designated to serve as alternates. The convention also chose N. T. Snyder as a committeeman.

Philip L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, September 19, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hilliard were surprised by a very pleasant party last evening. They were spending the evening very pleasantly with Mr. and Mrs. Powell and Miss Laura King, relations of Mrs. Hilliard, from Chicago, when the party took them by storm. Those invited were Messrs. Philip Snyder, Will Daniels, Chas. Mead, Herman Wycoff, Charlie Chapel; Misses Mollie and Linda Christian, Clark and Cora Thompson, Jessie Miller, Lucy Walton, Fannie Cunningham, Minnie Stewart; Mrs. Fred Miller, Mrs. Gooch; Mr. and Mrs. Capt. Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. Topliff, Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Parsons, Mr. and Mrs. Worthley, Mr. and Mrs. Ayres, Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Alexander, Mr. and Mrs. Perry, Mr. and Mrs. Grubbs, Mr. and Mrs. Landes, Mr. and Mrs. N. T. Snyder, Mr. and Mrs. Matlack, Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Farrar, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Searing, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Cunningham, and Mr. and Mrs. Wyckoff.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 23, 1885.


On the adjournment of the county convention, the delegates from the second commissioner district met in the same hall, to choose a candidate to succeed Commissioner Walton. Louis P. King presided, N. T. Snyder was appointed secretary. The names of J. D. Guthrie, of Bolton, and W. M. Sleeth, of Arkansas City, were presented, the choice rested on the former by a vote of 42 to 8. This closed the business of the day.

Excerpts: N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 26, 1885.

                                                Republican County Convention.

The following were elected members of the County Central Committee for the ensuing year.

                                    Arkansas City: Theo. Fairclo and L. E. Woodin.

After the election of the Central Committee, the convention adjourned, and the delegates from the 2nd district proceeded to nominate a commissioner. Louis P. King was chosen chairman, and N. T. Snyder, secretary. J. D. Guthrie of Bolton Township and William Sleeth were named for commissioners. A vote being taken resulted 42 for the former and 8 for the latter, and Mr. Guthrie was declared the nominee, which, upon motion, was made unanimous.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 30, 1885.

The enterprising real estate men, Snyder & Hutchison, have resumed the publication of their Farm and Home, and last week the TRAVELER press ran off an edition of one thousand copies. They advertise a number of desirable properties for sale, and show zeal in behalf of their patrons by spreading the information far and wide.

N. T. Snyder...

                    Our Magnificent Fruit Display to Go to the Hoosier State Fair.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

A meeting was held at THE COURIER office on the Fair Grounds today to arrange for exhibiting the display of Cowley County fruit at the Indiana State Fair next week. H. G. Fuller was chosen chairman and N. T. Snyder secretary. The meeting was enthusiastic. Mr. Snyder stated that the real estate men of Arkansas City would bear their share of the expense. Mr. Manser moved that the real estate men should pledge the sum necessary to carry the exhibit east. A committee consisting of Messrs. Manser, Fuller, and Snyder was selected to attend to the finances. President Jas. F. Martin, J. D. Guthrie, and Capt. Huffman were selected to take the exhibit to Indianapolis. This idea is one of the best ever proposed in the interest of our county. A finer exhibit of fruit than ours was never made, and its display, appropriately decorated with banners, will make the Hoosiers’ eyes bug out. The committee start Saturday.

N. T. Snyder...

                                           OFFICIAL LIST OF PREMIUMS

                                          Awarded at the Cowley County Fair,

                                                 September 21st to 25th, 1885.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.


The list given below shows money premiums only. Checks for same will be ready after October 1st, and must be claimed by November 1st, 1885, or forfeit to the association. (See rule 12.) Diplomas for exhibits having no competition may be had by calling at the Secretary’s office.

                                                       Class B.—CATTLE.

                                                  Lot 6. Jerseys and Alderneys.

                                    Bull, 3 years old and over. Norton & Snyder 1st.

                                    Cow 3 years old and under 2. N. T. Snyder 1st.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, October 3, 1885.

The Courier, in its write-up of the fair, talks thus wisely:

“N. T. Snyder’s Jerseys were beauties, and took the ribbon all around. His herd received universal attention and were praised by all. The Jerseys are by long odds the best domestic animals.”

Philip L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, October 3, 1885.

Phil. Snyder now says, “Shake,” and “walk in,” to quinine as he opens his mouth to swallow it.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 7, 1885.

Phil Snyder appears on the street after a week’s confinement with the shakes.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, October 10, 1885.

J. D. Guthrie has left several fine displays of fruits at different places in the city. One at the real estate agency of Snyder & Hutchinson is exceedingly fine. Of the assortment, there are four Ben Davis apples, which weigh three pounds; four Missouri Pippins, weighing two pounds and two ounces; and four Wine Saps, which weighed two pounds. They are fine samples of what Cowley can do in the fruit line. Mr. Guthrie’s farm is just across the Arkansas River west of Arkansas City in Bolton Township.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 14, 1885.

J. D. Guthrie has left a tempting display of apples in the Cowley County Bank, the land offices of Frank Hess, and Snyder & Hutchison, and other places—the product of his own orchard. As an agronomist our future county commissioner may be pronounced a success.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, October 17, 1885.

                                                           Railroad Meeting.


The citizens of Arkansas City have just awakened to the fact that they are about to be left out in the cold in the matter of the K. C. & S. W. Railroad. It has now become known that the Geuda Springs branch is only another name for the K. C. & S. W., and that while the company will fulfill their agreement to the letter, and build the road through Arkansas City to the state line, they have intentions of making the junction at least three miles north of here and thus make the Geuda Springs & Caldwell branch the main line, while this will be only a stub with not sufficient length to justify a separate service. The effect will be that when the road is in operation that only such trains as are absolutely necessary will ever be run down here, a local freight perhaps. This is a direct stab at Arkansas City from the Winfield element in the company headed by the road’s attorney, Henry E. Asp, our present county attorney. To devise some means to have the junction here or south of here, provided a western branch is built, was the object of a meeting held in the office of Meigs & Nelson Thursday evening.

The meeting was called to order by N. T. Snyder, Judge Kreamer being called to the chair and N. T. Snyder, secretary.

George Cunningham stated the object of the meeting, which was to devise some way to prevent the junction from being north of Arkansas City, and asked Mr. Hill to make a statement of what the company intended to do.

Mr. Hill said that the company intended to build the road through Arkansas City to the state line, and that the Caldwell branch would also undoubtedly be built, and that it would be to his interest, and to the company’s interest, to have the branch start from here, as it would require but one bridge. He also stated that the company, outside of the Winfield element, was favorable to Arkansas City. He acknowledged that the company was morally, if not legally bound, to make the junction here, because it was upon these express promises that they had obtained the aid of Arkansas City in voting the bonds.

Rev. Fleming made a forcible speech, charging it as conspiracy on the part of Winfield to leave Arkansas City out in the cold and a violation of the promises made by Asp and others when they obtained our aid.

Amos Walton said that it was a conspiracy that was entered into at the time the company approached Winfield. Every opposition was made to Mr. Hill’s efforts to get the road through the east part of the city and east of the Santa Fe. The city council was even in the conspiracy, as shown by the fact that they would not grant the right of way of street crossings unless the road went west of the city. The road going west, he estimated, cost $25,000 more than the east route. “Winfield voted $20,000 bonds to get them in there and charged them $25,000 to get out.”

A. A. Newman moved that a committee of five be appointed to confer with Mr. Hill as regards the best means of attaining the object of the meeting. The chair appointed A. A. Newman, Geo. W. Cunningham, Amos Walton, Rev. Fleming, and S. Matlack as that committee.

The following resolution was passed.


Resolved, That the K. C. & S. W. Railroad Company is not treating the city of Arkansas City fairly, and in the same generous spirit which the citizens treated them in the inception of the road in the matter of building a road diverging from their line north of this city. In support of this proposition, would say that it was promised and agreed by Mr. Asp, attorney for the road, in order to obtain our aid, that the line of road should come down east of the A. T. & S. F., and yet the leading citizens of Winfield antagonized the road sufficient to prevent its coming through Winfield on a line to accomplish that object and to the injury of the company forced it upon the west side of the city of Winfield, and then as a part of the scheme for the injury of Arkansas City proposed and looked up a line leading west only three miles north of the city of Arkansas City. Feeling that it is a violation of the good faith pledged to the city, we would respectfully state that the said line should be left open until the line to the territory on the south of us is built. We would further state as to the matter of expense that in case the company will make a survey and establish the cost of the road from the point in Beaver Township, to the west line of Walton Township, Sumner Co., and a corresponding survey from Arkansas City or south of it, west through Walton Township, Sumner County, that we will willingly make the difference in case it should be favorable to the first mentioned line. W. D. KREAMER, Chairman.

N. T. SNYDER, Secretary.

Phil L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, October 21, 1885.

Stacy Matlack and Phil Snyder hobbling along Summit Street on Saturday, supported on canes and crutches, led to the inquiry whether they had been engaged in a railroad war. They made some explanation about having sprained their ankles, but the bystanders all expressed the fervent hope that the malady was not catching.

Excerpts: Phil L. Snyder...

[MARRIED: ANNA MEIGS AND L. V. COOMBS.]

Arkansas City Republican, October 24, 1885.

                                                “Two Hearts that Beat as One.”

MARRIED. Once again the REPUBLICAN is called upon to chronicle the oft repeated story that shy Cupid has pierced two hearts with his heavenly dart. A public acknowledgment of this union of hearts, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Meigs, was made last Wednesday evening, at 8 o’clock, in the presence of invited guests, by Miss Anna Meigs and L. V. Coombs. By the sacred tie of marriage, Rev. J. O. Campbell, in his most approved style, joined this most estimable couple in a new and holy relation.

The following is a list of the names of the donors and their presents and will show in what high estimation the receivers were held by their many friends.

                           Silver and glass berry dish: Mollie Christian and Phil Snyder.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 31, 1885.

                                                      A Citizens Committee.

Last Monday evening several of our leading citizens met in the office of Judge Pyburn, for the purpose of organizing a citizens committee, its object to be to protect and promote the interest of Arkansas City, in any way that would tend to help and sustain the rapid growth of the Border City. A. J. Pyburn was called to the chair, and M. N. Sinnott was elected secretary. A temporary organization was made and an adjournment was taken until Tuesday evening at the same place, when a permanent organization was made by electing A. J. Pyburn, president; H. D. Kellogg, vice president; M. N. Sinnott, secretary; N. T. Snyder, assistant secretary; W. D. Mowry, treasurer. A finance committee was also appointed consisting of the following: A. A. Newman, H. O. Meigs, and W. D. Kreamer. Also an executive committee as follows: G. W. Cunningham, Wm. Sleeth, Amos Walton, H. D. Kellogg, N. T. Snyder, T. H. McLaughlin, W. D. Mowry, A. D. Prescott, and F. P. Schiffbauer. Committee made an assessment of $5.00 on all members and it was also decided that any citizen of good standing could become a member by paying the same fee.

The following are the charter members.


Names selected by the committee: Chas. Sipes, Geo. Howard, Geo. Cunningham, Wm. Mowry, Rev. Fleming, F. P. Schiffbauer, A. J. Pyburn, H. O. Meigs, Jas. L. Huey, Wm. Sleeth, W. D. Kreamer, A. A. Newman, A. D. Prescott, Jacob Hight, T. H. McLaughlin, O. S. Rarick, Jamison Vawter, J. P. Johnson, H. D. Kellogg, Ed. Grady, O. P. Houghton, M. N. Sinnott, Geo. W. Miller, N. T. Snyder, Amos Walton, Jas. Ridenour.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, November 4, 1885.

                                                 CITIZENS’ COMMITTEE.

                               A Popular Movement to Advance the City’s Interests.

On Monday evening of last week, about a score of our prominent citizens held a meeting in Judge Pyburn’s office to consider the most practicable means of advancing the interests of this city. The views expressed were that in a rapidly growing country, where incoming population is apt to seek new channels, and business interests are created by the changing tide of affairs, it is necessary for every city that seeks growth and prosperity to be on the alert and lend its hand in shaping matters to its own advantage. It was agreed that to put the forces of a community to the best avail, it is necessary to have some organization to depute some number of men of good judgment and business acumen to watch the changes in the kaleidoscope of social life, and suggest means for turning them to proper advantage; to perform the duty of a picket guard in the army. In fact, holding themselves in an advanced position, and watching every movement that comes under their notice. As an initial step to the organization sought after, the meeting chose of the persons present, Messrs. A. A. Newman, A. D. Prescott, G. W. Miller, N. T. Snyder, and Amos Walton as an executive committee, with power to add to their number, and report to a public meeting to be held in the Opera house the following evening.

On Tuesday the Buckskin Border Band stationed outside that popular place of amusement, gave notice to the public that business was to be done by playing several choice airs in their usual artistic style. Several score of people gave heed to the summons, and by 8 o’clock there were about a hundred assembled. The meeting was called to order, Mayor Schiffbauer was chosen chairman, and our new postmaster, M. N. Sinnott, appointed secretary. Amos Walton, on behalf of the originators of the movement, was called on to explain the object of the meeting. He told what had been done the evening before, and handed to the secretary a list of names selected by the committee to add to their number, and said he would then ask the sense of the meeting on the choice made. The secretary read the following names.

C. R. Sipes; G. W. Cunningham; Rev. S. B. Fleming; A. J. Pyburn; H. O. Meigs; W. M. Sleeth; Jacob Hight; O. S. Rarick; J. P. Johnson; Ed Grady; Geo. Howard; D. Mowry; F. P. Schiffbauer; James Ridenour; Jas. L. Huey; W. D. Kreamer; T. H. McLaughlin; Dr. Jamison Vawter; Dr. H. D. Kellogg; O. P. Houghton; M. N. Sinnott.

Mr. Walton said he commended the object of the proposed organization because it gave our citizens the benefit of the counsel and services of two dozen of our most experienced citizens (He wished to exclude himself from self commendation.) who would be on the lookout for opportunities to turn to the public good. The plan as he sketched it was for those two dozen sagacious men to mature among themselves whatever movements would advance the public good, and then call a public meeting to whom their plans could be unfolded and action taken on them. On motion the list of names read by the secretary was approved.


Several other speakers followed in like strain.

Frank Austin preferred to have the organization placed on a broader basis. It had been called a board of trade by some speakers, and he wanted it made one in fact. He wanted membership thrown open to all eligible persons, and stated times of meeting. To create a fund for any sudden use he would have an initiation fee and an annual subscription.

But this proposition was generally opposed on the ground that it was taking the organization out of the hands of those who framed it. The meeting having nothing further before it, adjourned.

At a subsequent meeting of the executive committee, on the 29th, an organization was effected by electing A. J. Pyburn, president; H. D. Kellogg, vice president; M. N. Sinnott, secretary; N. T. Snyder, assistant secretary; W. D. Mowry, treasurer. It was also decided to increase the membership by admitting any fitting person on payment of $5 initiation fee. The following committees were appointed.

Finance Committee: A. A. Newman, H. O. Meigs, W. D. Kreamer.

Executive Committee: G. W. Cunningham, W. M. Sleeth, Amos Walton, H. D. Kellogg, N. T. Snyder, T. H. McLaughlin, W. D. Mowry, A. D. Prescott, F. P. Schiffbauer.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, November 7, 1885.

Maj. Sleeth and N. T. Snyder visited Wellington Monday and Tuesday in the interest of the Ft. Smith & Wellington road. They met the president of the company, who assured them that the road would positively be built in the next 16 months. Messrs. Sleeth and Snyder were also informed that the railroad desired to come to Arkansas City; but since the defeat of their bonds in Walton Township, had had some notion of changing the route to go through Guelph Township. Surveyors are making this way from Ft. Smith through the territory. A survey will be run on the north side of the Arkansas first, and then on the south, in order to ascertain which is the most available route to Ft. Smith. In four townships in Sumner County bonds have already been voted and an election will occur in another on the 11th. The company asks for $4,000 per mile, from the county through which it passes. We should get this railroad connection. It is a trunk line, and since our citizens have ascertained that the road is a certainty, they will make a mighty strong pull to get it.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, November 21, 1885.

The plat of View Hills can be seen at our office. Snyder & Hutchison.

Arkansas City Republican, November 21, 1885.

For homes, buy lots in the View Hill addition. Snyder & Hutchison.

Arkansas City Republican, November 21, 1885.

Over 100 lots in View Hill addition. These lots are 50 x 132 feet, and are the choicest in the city for suburban residences. For prices and terms, call on Snyder & Hutchison.

Arkansas City Republican, November 21, 1885.

Come round to our office and let us give you a ride over and around View Hill addition, known as the Beecher fruit-farm. If you see the lots, you will purchase. Snyder & Hutchison.

Arkansas City Republican, November 21, 1885.

Before it is too late, purchase a home in View Hill addition. Snyder & Hutchison.


N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, November 25, 1885.

                                               THE RAILROAD AT HAND.

                       Excursions Over the New Line from Arkansas City to Beaumont.

                               Steel Rails and Oak Ties, and a Finely Equipped Road.

On Monday Mr. Henry E. Asp, on behalf of the managers of the Kansas City and Southwestern Kansas railroad, then within a few miles of Arkansas City, tendered Mayor Schiffbauer and the city council an excursion over the line to Beaumont and return. The mayor said he should like the invitation extended so as to include our principal businessmen. Mr. Asp said a general excursion to our citizens would be given as soon as the road was completed to the city, and arrangements could be made for the entertainment of a large number of guests, but at the present time not more than a score of excursionists could be provided for. This being the case, Mayor Schiffbauer invited the city council, authorizing each member to take a friend along, and also included in the invitation the railroad committee of the board of trade. This filled out the allotted number.

The following gentlemen composed the excursion party.

Mayor Schiffbauer, Councilmen Thompson, Bailey, Dunn, Dean, Davis, and Hight. (Councilman A. D. Prescott was unable to take part, through business engagements, and Councilman Hill was found superintending the construction of the road.)

The friends they invited and who were present for duty, were mine host Perry, J. Frank Smith, J. H. Hilliard, Frank Thompson, and City Clerk Benedict.

The railroad committee consisted of A. A. Newman, N. T. Snyder, Major Sleeth, G. W. Cunningham, W. D. Mowry, and T. H. McLaughlin. These with the present writer (nineteen in all) formed the invited party, Henry E. Asp accompanying them as host and guide.

At 7:30 on Tuesday morning, omnibuses were in waiting at the Leland Hotel to carry the excursionists to the end of the track, and the party being seated, a brisk drive of three miles carried them to an animated scene. The day’s labors had begun, upwards of 100 workmen being employed. A construction train of ten or a dozen cars was on hand, loaded with implements and material: ties, rails, fish-plates, bolts, spikes, shovels, and so on. The ties were of well seasoned oak brought from Arkansas, which were being unloaded by lusty arms, and thrown onto tracks, which was distributed along the grade. The train was standing on the foremost rails that were spiked, and in advance of this was a rail truck drawn by two mules, which recovered the iron from the flat car, and carried it forward over the loose rails, a force of men standing by the truck and laying the rail as fast as the ties were in place.

Track laying, in these days of railroad building, is reduced to an exact science. The ties are laid along the road bed under the direction of a foreman; another crew extends the nails, which is followed up by the spike-drivers. A sufficient force can lay two miles of track a day without extraordinary effort, and the onlooker has to maintain a steady sauntering pace to keep up with the workmen.


Some delay was caused on Tuesday morning by a disagreement between two foremen, which resulted in a fisticuff encounter. The aggressor in the unpleasantness was discharged, and his crew, numbering about thirty men, refused to work under another boss. They were all sent to Winfield to receive their pay, and a fresh force brought from there to take their place. This delayed the work about an hour and a half.

At 8:30 a.m. the whistle of the excursion train sounded about one-fourth of a mile along the track, and our party of pleasure seekers made good time walking in the direction of the cars. T. H. McLaughlin stumped along, with his one live leg, as agile as the best of them; but Councilman Davis, another mutilated war veteran, jumped into a vehicle to save a fatiguing walk. The track to Winfield is not yet ballasted, and the running time to that city was slow. The bridge over the Walnut is a substantial piece of work, being raised on trestles 45 feet above the stream, and the approaches being supported on solid masonry. The two miles of road south of Winfield cost $65,000.

At Winfield a brief stay was made to take on passengers, and here Mr. Latham joined the party, who was heartily greeted by his Arkansas City guests, and who spent the day in their company. From Winfield a good rate of speed was put on, the road being well ballasted and running as smoothly as a bowling green. The first station reached was Floral, nine miles from Winfield. This is a thrifty place, which has sprung into existence since the road was built, is well situated, and surrounded by a good country. Wilmot is 8½ miles distant, and Atlanta, 7 miles along. Latham is in Butler County, also a railroad town, built on a broad creek, and already containing 400 or 500 inhabitants. Commodious stone stores are in process of erection, an extensive lumber yard is well stocked, and other business lines are well represented. At Wingate (between the two places last named) there is a flag station. Beaumont was reached about 11:30, the distance from Latham being 13 miles. Here the K. C. & S. W. Road forms a junction with the St. Louis & San Francisco road, and here the journey terminated. Several miles of the Flint hills were traversed in reaching here, a surface formation of brecciated and abraded rock, which proves that at some time in the geological periods this whole region was overflown. Dinner was ready for the excursionists when they stepped off at the station, their dining hall being a commodious room on the upper floor of that building, under charge of Noah Herring and his very excellent and capable wife. Two tables furnished room for the score of hungry guests, and a good dinner, promptly served, was in waiting to allay their hunger.

Here four hours was afforded to take in the town, and enjoy the fine scenery that surrounded it. A party of the most robust pedestrians, under conduct of Henry Asp, took a breezy walk over the hills into Greenwood County; where a fine panorama of scenic beauty lay spread before their gaze, with Eureka, in the distance, nestling in the valley, like a sylvan deity. Those less enterprising visited the post office, made acquaintance with store keepers, talked with the oldest inhabitant, and then played the games of billiards, pigeon-hole, and quoits. Major Schiffbauer, at the first named game, made some extraordinary shots in missing the balls he aimed at. At quoits G. W. Cunningham did great execution, bombarding with his rings an extensive region of country around the pin he professed to aim at.


Our narrative of this very enjoyable trip must be brought to a close, as space fails. At 4:30 the train started on return. Mr. Young, of Young, Latham & Co., the builders of the road, who came in on the Frisco train, joined the party. Winfield was reached at 7:30, where our friends belonging to that city, left us, and Ed Gray came on board, escorting W. H. Nelson (of Meigs & Nelson), who had been spending a day in the county clerk’s office, making a transcript from the tax list. Towards the close of the journey a vote of thanks to the officers of the road was proposed by Mayor Schiffbauer for their hospitality to the excursionists, and polite attention to them as guests of the day. This was heartily responded to by the party. The day’s labors of the track layers brought them 1¼ miles nearer the city. Omnibuses were in waiting to convey the tired travelers to the city, and by 9 o’clock they were deposited at the Leland Hotel, all clamorous for supper, but unanimous in declaring they had spent a delightful day.

Excerpt: N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 28, 1885.

                                                   BOOMING BEAUMONT

                             VISITED BY SOME OF OUR CITIZENS TUESDAY.

                   An Excursion Over the K. C. & S. W., that Long Fought For Railroad.

                                  Beaumont Found to be a Booming Metropolis (?),

                        Fast Growing in Opulence upon the Flint Hills of Butler County.

Early on last Tuesday morning, two omnibuses drew up to the Leland Hotel and took on board the following gentlemen, who had been invited by the managers of the K. C. & S. W., to take a pleasure trip over that road to the famous and booming Beaumont: Mayor Schiffbauer, Councilmen Hight, Davis, Thompson, Bailey, Dean, and Dunn, and their friends whom they invited, H. H. Perry, J. Frank Smith, J. H. Hilliard, Frank Thompson, and City Clerk Benedict; also, the railroad committee, consisting of A. A. Newman, N. T. Snyder, Major Sleeth, G. W. Cunningham, W. D. Mowry, and T. H. McLaughlin. Bro. Lockley, too, was among the honored ones, and was to chronicle the thrilling incidents of the trip, furnish intellectual food for the party, and report the impressive appearance, the “sights” and widely spread influence, of flourishing Beaumont. After a drive of about three miles, the gleeful party reached the end of the track, where over 200 railroad hands were busy at work, rapidly advancing the “iron bands” towards Arkansas City.

Excerpts: N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 28, 1885.

                                  BOARD OF TRADE, OF ARKANSAS CITY.

                                         The Constitution and By-Laws Adopted.

                                                              PREAMBLE.

Believing in the necessity of an association of citizens to give tone and energy to their efforts in securing the advantages which the position of the city offers to commerce, trade, and manufacturers, as well as to promote unity of action and to cultivate a more intimate and friendly acquaintance among the businessmen of the city, and to maintain a commercial exchange to promote uniformity in the customs and usages of merchants, and to inculcate principles of justice and equity in trade, and to facilitate the speedy adjustment of business dispute, to acquire and disseminate valuable commercial and economic information, and generally to secure to its numbers the benefits of co-operation in furtherance of their legitimate pursuits, and to use our influence, energies, and means for the furtherance of all enterprises that we believe will add to the prosperity of our city, and that these ends may be obtained by the establishment of a board of trade; we, the citizens of Arkansas City, do therefore agree to form such an association, and to be governed by the following constitution and code of by-laws. [Skipped constitution and by-laws.]


                                                              OFFICERS.

A. J. PYBURN, President; H. D. KELLOGG, 1st Vice-President; WM. M. SLEETH, 2nd Vice-President; M. N. SINNOTT, Secretary; N. T. SNYDER, Assistant Secretary; A. D. MOWRY, Treasurer.

                                                   BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

A. J. PYBURN, Chairman; W. M. SLEETH; H. D. KELLOGG; T. H. McLAUGHLIN; F. P. SCHIFFBAUER; JAMES HILL; C. S. BURROUGHS; G. W. CUNNINGHAM; AMOS WALTON; N. T. SNYDER; W. D. MOWRY; A. D. PRESCOTT; J. L. HUEY; A. A. NEWMAN.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, November 28, 1885.

The plat of View Hills can be seen at our office. SNYDER & HUTCHISON.

Arkansas City Republican, November 28, 1885.

For homes, buy lots in the View Hill addition. SNYDER & HUTCHISON.

Arkansas City Republican, November 28, 1885.

Over 100 lots in View Hill addition. These lots are 50 x 132 feet, and are the choicest in the city for suburban residences. For prices and terms, call on Snyder & Hutchison.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, November 28, 1885.

N. T. Snyder and Will D. Mowry went over into the land of Guelph Wednesday evening and held a rousing meeting in the interest of the K. C. & S. W. Extension to Caldwell.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, December 5, 1885.

By the burning of the skating rink, John Landes’ barn was scorched considerably. The company in which it was insured was notified of the fact by their agents, Snyder & Hutchison, and it immediately gave instructions to have the barn repaired and repainted. The name of the company in which the policy was held by Mr. Landes, was the Orient.

Arkansas City Republican, December 5, 1885.

                                                       The Discovery of Coal.


Drury Warren, who resides in Silverdale Township, on his farm, near the mouth of Grouse Creek, about nine miles east of here, was in the city Wednesday, and informed a representative of the REPUBLICAN that an employee on his farm had found an 18 inch vein of coal, but refused to divulge its whereabouts unless well paid. Mr. Warren refused to credit the story and thought it was only a scheme to extort money. Waldon, the name of the employee, made the discovery while Mr. Warren was in Arizona looking after his cattle interests, and it was only last week that he learned of it. Waldon was so positive in his assertions and made them in such a way concerning the discovery, that later on, Mr. Warren was induced to take some stock in the matter. While in the city Wednesday, he met an ex-coal miner, with whom he made arrangements to have him visit his farm and search for the black diamonds. Waldon has left Mr. Warren’s employ, but says he is ready at any time to go and show the whereabouts of the vein, provided he receives the sum of money he asks. If it is not just as he represents it, he asks no pay. We were shown samples of the coal by Mr. Warren, which was furnished him by Waldon, and they in appearance resemble the Canon City coal. It was very hard and the black would not rub off. The miner whom Mr. Warren engaged to visit his farm and make the research, tested the coal, and pronounced it of a better quality than any soft coal we are burning in this vicinity. The REPUBLICAN has always held that there was coal lying imbedded in the hills east of the Walnut, and at different times advocated the boring for it. It was only a few days since that some quarrymen north of town struck a small deposit and brought samples, which are now on exhibition at Ridenour & Thompson’s jewelry store and Snyder & Hutchison’s real estate agency. Should the discovery on Mr. Warren’s farm prove to be a realism, the future destiny of Arkansas City is fixed. With her grand water power facilities, aided by cheap fuel being obtained right here in our midst, there would be no bounds to our growth. We would suggest that the board of trade take steps to assist Mr. Warren in bringing this discovery to light, for the question of getting a cheaper fuel here has long been one of vast importance. Coal is known to exist plentifully in the Indian Territory, and this fact alone is good evidence that there is coal in this vicinity.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, December 12, 1885.

Over 100 lots in View Hill addition. These lots are 50 x 132 feet and are the choicest in the city for suburban residences. For prices and terms call on Snyder & Hutchison.

Excerpts: N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, December 12, 1885.

                                                 TELEPHONE DIRECTORY.

                                                    Snyder, N. T., Residence.

Winfield. Connections also with Belle Plaine, Caldwell, Hunnewell, Mulvane, Oxford, South Haven, Wellington, and Wichita.

                                                    N. T. SNYDER, Manager.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, December 19, 1885.

N. T. Snyder, manager of the telephone exchange, is taking steps to establish night service at the exchange. We are now connected by telephone with Wichita, Wellington, Winfield, Caldwell, Hunnewell, Mulvane, Geuda Springs, and Belle Plaine. A night operator would be of great service to our citizens. Service of our Doctors are now connected with the exchange and by this arrangement, parties having telephones in their residence can get connected with any of the Doctors’ offices anytime during the night.

Excerpts: N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 23, 1885.

                                            CITY COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS.

The following petition was read to the council.

                               ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS, December 15, 1885.

To the Hon. Mayor:


We the undersigned citizens of Arkansas City respectfully request that city ordinance No. 3 be so amended as to read that all auctioneers of dry goods, hardware, boots and shoes, clothing, hats and caps, furnishing, fancy goods and notions, agricultural implements, wagons and buggies, jewelry, groceries, drugs, and all other goods carried by legitimate business houses of this city shall pay a license of $25 per day. We pray the honorable Mayor and council to act immediately on this matter in the interest of the businessmen of Arkansas City.

[SIGNATURES TO PETITION.] Ridenour & Thompson, Youngheim & Co., Mrs. W. M. Henderson, John Gallagher, O. P. Houghton, S. Matlack, J. W. Hutchison, N. T. Snyder, and many others.

The matter was debated at considerable length. Councilman Dunn said he was desirous to act for the best interests of the city, to protect the rights of the buyer as well as those of the seller. He believed in free competition; low prices were a benefit to the consumer though they might cut down the profits of the merchant. He was not a buyer of cheap auction goods himself, but he was acquainted with some who were, and he mentioned several cases where a large saving was effected in the price of goods.

Mr. Dunn was in favor of keeping peddlers and auctioneers in wagons off Summit Street. They gathered large crowds around them and impeded travel. But the petition just read he thought was directed more particularly against men who came here to sell bankrupt stock. They paid the taxes imposed by the city, and he didn’t know how you could get at them.

Mr. Prescott said it was a question in his mind whether the council could stop their operations.

Mr. Hill said the law will not allow you to impose a license of $25 a day; it was oppressive.

The mayor said this class of merchants can evade any kind of tax you choose to impose. The man who puts up goods at a certain price and comes down to the views of his customers; who offers an article for sale at $1, then falls to 75 cents, 50 cents, and finally sells it for two bits, is not an auctioneer in the eyes of the law, and the courts have many times so decided.

On motion the petition was referred to a special committee to be chosen by the mayor. His honor named Messrs. Hight, Prescott, and Dunn. The two first named asked to be excused, and gave their reasons.

The mayor stated, “Everybody else would be in the same fix; I guess the committee is good enough as it stands.”

Phil. L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 2, 1886.

The junior editor of the REPUBLICAN has grown tired of people taking him for Phil. Snyder. While we admit the people are conferring a great honor upon Phil by the mistake, we must refuse to be taken for him. Only the other day a man wanted us to attend to his telephone, another desired that we should repair his pump, and yesterday a large Irish lady stepped up to us and demanded that “Mister Snyder, pay the 50 cents ye owe me.” That same Snyder has time and again imposed upon the subscribers of the REPUBLICAN because he looks like us. We have grown tired of it and we desire to say that there is a distinction. Snyder wears his head in his shoes, and we on our shoulders.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 2, 1886.

Nate Snyder received a very peculiar Christmas gift from the tree at the Presbyterian Church Thursday evening: a small candy sack containing a quartette of colored babies. Nate wants to know what this is significant of. It was a cruel friend who perpetrated this “goak.”


Arkansas City Republican, January 2, 1886.

Notice. There will be a meeting of the Arkansas City Board of Trade, Monday evening, January 4, at 7 p.m., at Judge Pyburn’s office, for the election of officers and to consider other important business. Every member is earnestly requested to be present.

                         A. J. PYBURN, President., N. T. SNYDER, Asst. Secretary.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 6, 1886.

                                                            Home Industry.

Our neighbor, the Republican, shows good sense in enforcing on the merits of our citizens that the job offices in this city can do as cheap and as good work as can be procured from the larger establishments of Kansas City or Emporia. He mentions with becoming pride some of the work turned off his own presses during the holidays, and we may also mention that the TRAVELER presses have not been idle. In addition to a large amount of ornamental work, we have printed five items and promissory note blanks for the Arkansas City Bank, and as many notices to note holders; one thousand blank warranty deeds for a real estate house, and two thousand copies of the FARM AND HOME, for Snyder & Hutchison. All the work done at this office is at rates that bear comparison with those of outside rivals, and the quality of the work and of the material used, will bear the test of close scrutiny. Merchants and professional men who want to see their town grow and flourish must patronize home industry.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, January 16, 1886.

The Western Union weather report is now furnished at the real estate agency of Snyder & Hutchison.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, January 16, 1886.

J. A. Hollister, of Danville, Illinois, the grading contractor of the A. T. & S. F., whom the REPUBLICAN referred to last week as having received the contract for grading a portion of the Santa Fe extension through the territory, writes to N. T. Snyder again this week, telling him to have “five houses ready for rental purposes.” Mr. Hollister will bring four families with him. They will all locate in Arkansas City.

                    [UNFORTUNATELY, WE DO NOT HAVE PREVIOUS ISSUE.]

[AD. SNYDER & HUTCHISON.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 23, 1886.

                                                  SNYDER & HUTCHISON,

 -HAVE- MONEY TO LOAN AT 7, MONEY -AT- 7-1/2, MONEY -AT- 8, MONEY -AT- 9, MONEY -AT- 10, MONEY -AT- 12 PER CENT. ALL HOME MONEY. ALL INTEREST AND PRINCIPAL CAN BE PAID AT OUR OFFICE in Arkansas City. LOANS MADE -ON THE- INSTALLMENT PLAN, If desired.

                                     Money in 24 hours if wanted on Farm Security.

                                                    OUR EXCHANGE LIST:

160 acres of raw land valued at $2,000, near El Dorado, Butler Co., for trade for improved city property.


80 acre improved farm, near Augusta, Butler Co., to trade for city property.

160 acres improved farm near Rose Hill, Butler Co., to trade for good city property. Farm valued at $3,000.

320 acres near Atlanta, Cowley Co., to trade for city property; land valued at $5,000, mortgaged for $2,000 for three years at 8 percent, will take part cash and part city property for balance; all good, smooth land.

We also have several improved properties in the city, which we wish to exchange for improved farm in this county.

                                                   SNYDER & HUTCHISON

                                                      Land and Loan Brokers.

Arkansas City Republican, January 23, 1886.

Snyder & Hutchison sold to Seth Briggs, Thursday, the business lot on 5th Avenue just east of Star Livery barn. The consideration was $1,700. Mr. Briggs is from Maine and a friend of Leavitt Coburn.

Arkansas City Republican, January 23, 1886.

Over 100 lots in View Hill addition. These lots are 50 x 132 feet, and are the choicest in the city for suburban residences. For prices and terms, call on Snyder & Hutchison.

Arkansas City Republican, February 20, 1886.

One of the best improved farms in Iowa for trade for a stock of merchandise of any kind; farm contains 140 acres, all well improved, and in good location; farm valued at $9,000.

                                                  SNYDER & HUTCHISON.

N. T. Snyder...

                                                 OUR FAMILY CALLERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 4, 1886.


THE COURIER would express its thanks to the following named reliable and honored citizens of grand old Cowley for recent favors: T. R. Carson, Wilmot; Jno. A. Smith, Silverdale; A. W. Beswick, Kellogg; W. B. Norman, Udall; D. S. Sherrard, Pleasant Valley; G. A. Lindsey, Winfield; P. Belveal, Walnut; W. J. Orr, Fairview; J. W. Evans, Dexter; Henry Ireton, Seeley; John H. Tharp, Kellogg; George Erickson, Cedarvale; H. Falkingham, Milton Drew, Pleasant Valley; Z. Oldham, Vernon; N. B. Robinson, Walnut; J. P. Henderson, Walnut; J. B. Daniels, Dexter; J. M. Barrick, Akron; N. B. Hammond, Tannehill; J. O. Barricklow, Winfield; Gibson & Co., Winfield; Zeb Foster, Udall; D. M. Adams, Winfield; H. C. Castor, Liberty; J. A. Simpson, Winfield; Joseph Anglemyer, Winfield; Sampson Johnson, Pleasant Valley; R. B. Waite, Winfield; S. W. Pennington, Vernon; Sid Cure, Walnut; J. M. Harcourt, Rock; W. H. Waite, Udall; W. H. White, Ninnescah; Charles A. Peabody, Dexter; R. B. Hanna, Burden; N. T. Snyder, Arkansas City; W. H. Moore, Winfield; W. R. Lorton, Wilmot; R. S. White, Winfield; G. C. Cleveland, Cedarvale; Nelson Utley, Winfield; J. O. Barricklow, Winfield; S. C. Smith, Winfield; W. H. Dawson, Winfield; T. W. Maddux, Winfield; J. R. Taylor, Winfield; J. L. Huey, Arkansas City; L. D. York, Maple City; Greer Fleming, Winfield; Jas. Hollister, Seeley; T. M. Graham, Winfield; Thos. Larimer, Winfield; W. M. Stout, Udall; William Carter, Kellogg; H. D. Syron, Winfield; J. H. Hall, Tisdale; W. H. Fry, Dexter; V. F. Ogburn, Glen Grouse; M. A. Holler, Rock; W. H. Grow, Rock; J. M. Mark, Liberty; E. W. Woolsey, Burden; E. H. Gilbert, Winfield; W. H. Bolton, Dexter; J. F. Stodder, Burden; Geo. W. Moore, Udall; W. B. Lewis, Dexter; J. C. Snyder, Constant; Geo. R. Stevens, Wilmore; Mrs. B. McKee, Dexter; S. S. Condit, Winfield; R. W. Flener, Silverdale; Philo Winter, Tisdale; Dennis Shaw, Arkansas City; W. H. Campbell, Grand Summit; John Shoup, Udall; J. S. Herron, Tannehill; J. W. Stansbury, Arkansas City; Jas. Greenshields, Tisdale.

Philip L. Snyder and Mollie Christian get married...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 4, 1886.

Philip Snyder and Mollie Christian, daughter of Judge Christian, of Arkansas City, were granted, by Judge Gans Monday, the authority to wed. Mr. Snyder is a brother of Nate T. Snyder and one of Arkansas City’s best young men.

[Note: Arkansas City Traveler had “Philip R. Snyder,” which according to all previous mentions of N. T. Snyder’s brother, is incorrect. His name was “Philip L. Snyder. He married Judge Christian’s daughter, “Mary R.,” commonly called Mollie Christian. I have corrected my record in paper to show “Philip L. Snyder.” MAW]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 10, 1886.

                                                             Marriage Bells.

MARRIED. It is somewhat late in the day to mention the wedding of our debonair young friend, Philip L. Snyder, to Miss Mary R. Christian, daughter of Judge and Mrs. Christian, a couple who have long been held in high respect in this city, which occurred on Wednesday evening, the 3rd inst. The contracting parties being prominent in social circles, the interesting ceremony was regarded as an important society event. A numerous and brilliant concourse of friends gathered at the residence of the bride’s parents to witness the tying of the nuptial knot, and during the reception which succeeded, many and hearty were the good wishes bestowed on the happy pair. The bridegroom is well known through his connection with the real estate house of Snyder & Hutchison, of this city, and shows his good sense in taking to his bosom one of the fair daughters of Arkansas City, instead of going a thousand miles away to find a wife. Miss Mollie (now Mrs. Snyder) is a lady of many amiable qualities, endued with excellent sense, and well fitted for home life; and the bridegroom, with business aptitude and irreproachable habits, combines social virtues which have won for him hosts of friends. The wedded pair start on the voyage of life under auspices of great promise. We should have mentioned that Rev. J. O. Campbell performed the marriage ceremony, and that the presents bestowed on the bride were costly and numerous. They have taken up their abode at the residence of N. T. Snyder, brother to the bridegroom. The TRAVELER also wishes happiness and prosperity to this amiable pair of lovers.

Arkansas City Republican, February 20, 1886.

We desire to exchange a number one farm for city property. Farm is near Atlanta, on the Frisco R. R.; is valued at $3,200; mortgage for $1,300 at 7 percent. Will take city property or live stock of any kind, prefer sheep. SNYDER & HUTCHISON.

Arkansas City Republican, February 20, 1886.

CITY LOTS—sold on time, weekly or monthly payments. SNYDER & HUTCHISON.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, March 6, 1886.


Dr. J. A. Mitchell has purchased one acre of land in View Hill addition and will sell it in lots. Snyder & Hutchison made the sale.

Arkansas City Republican, March 13, 1886.

                            CITY LOTS—sold on time, weekly or monthly payments.

                                                  SNYDER & HUTCHISON.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, March 13, 1886.

The Coterie will meet at the residence of N. T. Snyder on next Monday.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, March 20, 1886.

FOR SALE. A good house of three large rooms, cellar, well, stable, and four lots. Good location in 1st ward. Inquire of Snyder & Hutchison, or J. P. Musselman, owner, Rose Hill, Butler County, Kansas. Will trade for stock, or sell on time payments. Price, $1,500.

                              [Paper had Mussleman...believe Musselman is correct!]

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, March 20, 1886.

                                                        The Cracker Factory.

Thursday Geo. W. Cunningham and L. B. Davidson received the charter for the Arkansas City cracker factory. The capital stock is $20,000. The directors are L. B. Davidson, of New York; James L. Huey, H. P. Farrar, G. W. Cunningham, N. T. Snyder, and F. J. Hess. The stock is all subscribed and the company is now looking up a building site. It proposes to erect a building suitable for the business and place the machinery in and commence operations as soon as possible. Mr. Davidson is an experienced cracker manufacturer and will have charge of the factory. He will go east Monday to make the necessary purchases of machinery and also to remove his family here. Thus does Arkansas City’s great boom go on.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, March 20, 1886.

C. D. Burroughs purchased eight lots in Pleasant View addition this week, per Snyder & Hutchison. The consideration was $550.

Arkansas City Republican, March 20, 1886.

J. G. Danks has purchased three lots in the 4th ward of J. H. Trask. The consideration was $500. Snyder & Hutchison made the sale. Mr. Danks will build a residence.

Arkansas City Republican, March 20, 1886.

J. P. Kirkpatrick purchased the resident property belonging to F. B. Hutchison in the 4th ward Thursday. The consideration was $1,125. Snyder & Hutchison made the sale. Mr. Kirkpatrick recently removed here from Illinois.

Arkansas City Republican, April 10, 1886.

$5,000, of private money to loan on good farm security all at 7 percent interest, and a small commission. Call early if you want a loan. SNYDER & HUTCHISON.

Excerpts: Phil Snyder, Frank Hutchison, Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, April 17, 1886.

                                                              “PICK UPS”

                     This will make you Laugh and Grow Fat, and Drive away the Blues.


A book agent, selling the life of the great temperance lecturer, John B. Gough, went into the real estate agency of Snyder & Hutchison Thursday and struck G. W. Cunningham to make a purchase. In the talk following the canvasser expressed a desire to meet the ministers of the city and secure their names. At that moment one passed along the street and George pointed him out to the canvasser. The latter dropped his book on the table and started after the minister. While the agent was out getting acquainted with the expounder of the gospel, Cunningham picked up the “Life of Gough” and laid it upon a shelf and put in its stead a report of the State Board of Agriculture. The binding was similar and when the canvasser came in accompanied by the minister, he grasped the copy of the State Board of Agriculture, handed it to the minister, and began his stereotyped harangue. He never stopped for about five minutes and became so earnest in crying the merits of the book that he never noticed the exchange. In the meantime the minister had glanced at the book and as the agent waxed warm in his exhortation, telling of the beautiful illustrations, etc., a broad grin illuminated the former’s face. At the end the minister handed the book to the agent with the remark, “My friend, you are surely mistaken.” The agent glanced at the fly-leaf and the man of mighty cheek collapsed.

Frank Hutchison is quite a ladies’ man, yet when in the presence of the gentler sex is quite bashful and nervous. This was exemplified Thursday when he came down to the real estate agency of his father, accompanied by a lady friend, to get a horse and buggy to show her around the city. Frank aided the lady in the buggy, jumped in himself, and would have driven off if he had unhitched his horse from the telegraph pole. As it was, he gave the animal a slap with the lines and resumed his conversation with his lady friend. The horse only moved a couple of steps and stopped. Frank was so fascinated he did not notice it, and talked away with a vengeance, keeping his eyes on his charming companion. He noticed her blushing, but supposed it was caused by not driving rapidly enough. He grasped the whip and gave “Jumbo” a stinging blow. This frightened the horse and he lunged forward, but was again stopped by the hitching rein. Several bystanders, noticing the predicament into which Frank had gotten himself, began to smile quite “audibly.” At this moment the young lady remarked that if they were going a buggy-riding he had better get out and unhitch the horse before starting. Frank carried out the suggestion.

Phil Snyder is having a rough road to travel. He has been taken for the junior editor of the REPUBLICAN so long that he is gradually fading away. Soon he will be a withered flower. Phil has to come uptown in the evening to attend to the telephone. The other day someone informed his wife that they saw him out at the theatre with another woman. When Phil went home that night, he discovered the same thing we did some time ago, that it is dangerous to the felicity of domestic life to have a man in town that “looks like me.”

N. T. Snyder and children [Ruby and Pearl]...

[Previous stories about children follow item about N. T. Snyder.]

Pearl Snyder, Pearly Snyder, Ruby Snyder. I did not know at the time that they were the daughters of N. T. Snyder.

Arkansas City Republican, April 24, 1886.

N. T. Snyder is down with an attack of diphtheria. He was taken the latter part of last week. The two children, Ruby and Pearl, are somewhat better.

[Next three items out of date sequence.]...


Arkansas City Republican, July 25, 1885.

Mrs. E. J. Ingham and little Pearl Snyder left Tuesday afternoon for a visit to Jersey City and Saratoga.

Arkansas City Republican, April 10, 1886.

Little Miss Pearly Snyder is suffering from an attack of diphtheria. Dr. Parsons is attending.

Arkansas City Republican, April 17, 1886.

Little Miss Ruby Snyder has been very ill this week. Dr. Graham, of Winfield, came down Thursday to assist Dr. S. B. Parsons in holding a consultation. At last reports the little patient was some better.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 28, 1886.

THE OLD RELIABLE TRANSFER LINE, is now running three new and commodious wagons, and does a general training and jobbing business. Public patronage solicited, and orders promptly attended to. Leave orders at Snyder & Hutchison’s. W. WARD, Proprietor.

N. T. Snyder and children...

Arkansas City Traveler, April 28, 1886.

N. T. Snyder and his two children have been seriously ill the past week, but are now recovering. Their illness is attributed to a defective drain.

Arkansas City Republican, May 8, 1886.

N. T. Snyder and two children have about recovered from their attack of diphtheria. Mr. Snyder is able to attend to his duties at his real estate agency.

Excerpts: N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, May 8, 1886.

Since the bonds have been voted in the border townships for the Kansas State Line road, real estate has changed hands at an astonishing rate and at exceedingly good prices. Our town has been alive this week with capitalists seeking purchases.

N. T. Snyder paid $700 for six lots in Beecher addition.

N. T. Snyder and Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, May 22, 1886.

                                     Real Estate Transfers of Monday and Tuesday.

                                     AT SNYDER & HUTCHISON’S AGENCY.

H. P. Goeden to S. B. Scott, 2 houses and 3 lots, $1,050.

H. C. Deets to W. B. Scott, 3 lots, $1,000.

Geo. E. Hasie to H. R. Laft, 1 lot, $450.

D. D. Keeler to Geo. E. Hasie, 1 lot, $400.

J. W. Hutchison to M. S. Bond, 2 lots, $150.

John Daniels to F. Innis, 3 lots and house, $850.

Fred Innis to J. Daniels, 5 acres, $1,250.

D. W. Stevens to N. T. Snyder and M. S. Davidson, business house on Summit Street, $6,000.

J. A. Young to L. Wilson, 1 lot, $250.

F. P. Rost to H. C. Deets, 1 lot, $250.


J. A. Young to H. E. Thompson, 1 lot, $225.

J. A. Young to W. H. Townsley, 1 lot, $225.

J. F. Beecher to C. D. Ayers, 1 lot, $360.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, May 22, 1886. From Thursday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder went up to Wichita this afternoon to complete a real estate transaction.

Mr. and Mrs. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, May 29, 1886.

Wednesday night will be remembered by all having the pleasure to attend Miss Nellie Thompson’s reception, as “a pearly in memory’s casket.” Although following one of the hottest days of the season, the evening was not extremely warm—thanks to our climate. We will not attempt to describe the costumes of the ladies, indeed, all present showed good taste in dress, while many of the trousseaus were elegant. The company was musically entertained by Miss Hamilton, Mrs. Meeker, and Mrs. Nellie Wyckoff, discoursing waltzes, which were enjoyed by all, and utilized by those who delight in the “mazy.”

Following are the parties who were present.

Mr. and Mrs. Hess, Mr. and Mrs. Meeker, Mr. and Mrs. Kingsbury, Mr. and Mrs. Coombs, Mr. and Mrs. Snyder, Mr. and Mrs. Daniels, Mr. and Mrs. Wyckoff, Mr. and Mrs. Childs, Miss Love, Miss Theaker, Miss Thompson, Miss Fannie Cunningham, Miss Berkey, Miss Eva Hasie, Miss McMullen, Miss Young, Miss Hamilton, Miss Grosscup, Miss Kingsbury, Miss Walton, Miss Guthrie, Miss Martin, Miss Funk, Miss Beale, Miss Gatwood, Miss Wagner; and Messrs. Adams, Balyeat, Behrend, Burress, Chapel, Coburn, Deering, Gould, Hoover, Hutchison, Hawk, Rhodes, Salisbury, Love, Wagner, Rogers.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, June 5, 1886.

                                                        Republican Primaries.

The Republican primaries of the city were held Thursday evening.

                                                            THIRD WARD.

The meeting was held in Lowe, Hoffman & Barron’s real estate office. Geo. Cunningham was chosen chairman and N. T. Snyder secretary. The delegates elected were: Maj. L. E. Woodin, G. W. Cunningham, N. T. Snyder. Alternates: W. B. Hagins, O. P. Houghton, J. C. Pickering. On motion the meeting adjourned.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 5, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

Now is your chance to go east. The A. T. & S. F. will sell, in connection with the excursion to Pittsburg Station, Ohio, round trip tickets to all points east as far as Buffalo, New York, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Parkersburg, West Virginia, inclusive. Sale of tickets commences Monday, June 7, and continues all the week, giving parties the privilege of going on any train, thus avoiding the rush of the excursion, which leaves at the A. T. & S. F. Depot on the afternoon of the 10th. For further particulars, call on or address

                                                     O. INGERSOLL, Agent,

Or Snyder & Hutchison.

Mr. and Mrs. Phil. L. Snyder...


Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 12, 1886. From Thursday’s Daily.

Mr. and Mrs. Phil. Snyder will leave Monday for a visit at Penn Yan, New York.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 12, 1886. From Thursday’s Daily.

Snyder & Hutchison will soon place on sale lots in a new addition in the north part of the city known as the Bittle farm. This addition is the finest in the city and many lots have already been taken.

Mr. and Mrs. Phil. L. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 19, 1886. From Monday’s Daily.

Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Snyder left this afternoon for Penn Yan, New York, on a visit of a month.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 19, 1886. From Monday’s Daily.

Before leaving on his eastern trip, P. L. Snyder consummated the lease for the coal yard of Edward Grady. On his return he will assume charge of the yard and enter the coal business. Phil is a rustler after business and will do well no matter in what business he may engage. The REPUBLICAN wishes him and his most estimable wife a very pleasant visit in the Empire State.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 26, 1886. From Monday’s Daily.

Irving French has accepted the position of bookkeeper in Snyder & Hutchison’s real estate agency.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 26, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

Snyder & Hutchison have just put up a handsome new sign.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, June 26, 1886.

The following is a list of transfers made by Howe & Drury, in the town of Maple City, June 19, 1886.

N. T. Snyder, lots 11, 12, block 3; lot 15, block 1. $100.00

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 3, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder and L. M. Dailey went over to Geuda Springs this afternoon to try the efficacy of the springs for a few days.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 3, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

                                                          The K. C. & P. H.

Arkansas City is going to build a railroad to Kamchatka by way of Burden and Behring’s Straits. When this is done Burden will be the capital of Cowley County and the sand hill the capital of the United States. The road will only cost $5,000,000,000, including the bridge across the Behring straits, and Nat. Snyder, A. A. Newman, and Jim Hill have the money deposited in Jim Huey’s bank to do it with. Mud-hole Courier.


Oh, no, Courier, you are partly mistaken in the above. Arkansas City does not intend building the road mentioned; the Missouri Pacific folks are going to do it for us, you know. Then again, you get your I. & S. W. Route mixed up with our Kansas City & Pan Handle line. For the information of the Mud-hole denizens, the REPUBLICAN states that the line spoken of above will run from Arkansas City via Burden direct to Reece in Greenwood County. The remainder of the above items is true.

Phil. L. Snyder and wife...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 17, 1886. From Monday’s Daily.

Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Snyder came home on the noon train today from their visit back in the Empire State. A very pleasant trip is reported, but there was no place as good as Arkansas City to be found.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 17, 1886. From Thursday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder took the afternoon train today for a three weeks’ ramble in the mountains of Colorado.

Philip L. Snyder to open up coal company...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 31, 1886. From Thursday’s Daily.

P. L. Snyder & Co., will open up their Coal business Aug. 1.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 7, 1886. From Saturday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder came home from Colorado last night. He enjoyed his visit in the Rockies hugely.

Philip L. Snyder coal company...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 7, 1886. From Monday’s Daily.

Frank Waldo is the company portion of the coal firm of P. L. Snyder & Co. Frank has concluded that he would remain in Arkansas City as he has gone into business. The REPUBLICAN takes pleasure in recommending this firm to the public. They are gentlemanly, courteous, and enterprising.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, August 11, 1886.

                                               W. WARD. TRANSFER LINE.

The Old Reliable is now running three new and commodious wagons, and does a general train and jobbing business. Public patronage solicited, and orders promptly attended to. Leave orders at Snyder & Hutchison’s.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, August 11, 1886.

          SNYDER & HUTCHISON, THE OLD RELIABLE REAL ESTATE AGENCY.

Land, Loan and Insurance Brokers. City and Farm Property for sale or exchange. If you want bargains come and see us.

Collections made, taxes paid, and rents collected. Money loaned on easy terms.

                       Two doors north of First National Bank. Arkansas City, Kansas.

Phil L. Snyder, brother of N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 25, 1886.

P. L. Snyder & Co., report a good business in their new coal yard. Both of the young men owning the business are popular, and there is no bar to their success.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 18, 1886. From Tuesday’s Daily.


Two watermelons were on exhibition yesterday at Snyder and Hutchison’s real estate agency, which weighed 70 pounds each. There is only one today. Tomorrow there will be none.

Mrs. N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 18, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

Miss Celina Bliss, of Winfield, is visiting in the city, a guest of Mrs. N. T. Snyder.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 2, 1886. From Tuesday’s Daily.

The businessmen’s excursion to the St. Louis Fair next Monday promises to be a very enjoyable affair. A Pullman sleeper will be engaged if enough can be secured to fill it, to run through without change and to stand on track during the time parties wish to say and to return in same way. Call and see N. T. Snyder and get full particulars.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 2, 1886. From Thursday’s Daily.

Thos. Potter and wife, of Jersey City, are visiting in the city. They are friends of N. T. Snyder and family. Mr. Potter is a well-to-do gentleman and is out in Kansas on a prospecting tour. We hope he will locate with us.

N. T. Snyder and wife...

Arkansas City Traveler, October 6, 1886.

G. W. Cunningham, with his wife and sister, were among the excursionists to St. Louis, on Monday. N. T. Snyder and wife were also in the company.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 9, 1886. From Monday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder and wife left this morning for St. Louis. They will go on to New York for a short visit to friends and relatives.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 9, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder returned from St. Louis last evening.

Philip L. Snyder: now handling coal and feed and flour store...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 9, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

P. L. Snyder & Co., have rented the storeroom of the Grady building and will open up a feed and flour store in connection with their coal business. P. L. Snyder & Co. are getting their Eli, and don’t you forget it.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 16, 1886. From Tuesday’s Daily.

THE LATEST. N. T. Snyder was up to Winfield recently. Of course, he found Winfield’s citizens blowing with a vengeance about street cars, electric lights, colleges, railroad to the moon, etc. On the corner of Ninth and Main streets he was surrounded by a gang of hoodlums, who appeared to be very solicitous about Arkansas City and many were the questions propounded to him about here. When Nate began to expatiate upon the truths concerning the booming Sandhill, each man (a dozen or more in number) pulled from beneath his vest a small card attached to his watch charm, bearing the following inscription: “I am something of a liar myself.” Alas, tis but too true. The average Sandhiller stands but a poor show in Winfield.


Philip L. Snyder: now handling wholesale items...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 16, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

P. L. Snyder & Co., claim to be the first wholesale house established in Arkansas City. They wholesale flour, grain, feed, etc.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 23, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

P. L. SNYDER & CO. Wholesale dealers in COAL, FLOUR, FEED, AND GRAIN.

                                                  OFFICE: GRADY BLOCK.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 30, 1886. From Saturday’s Daily.

                                                                The Boom.

The rain has no effect on our real estate boom. Snyder & Hutchison closed the following sales yesterday.

F. W. Farrar and Geo. Howard, two lots on South Summit Street, to G. C. Scott, of Iowa, for $4,000.

D. Bell, three lots on Fifth Avenue, to W. D. Mowry, for $3,500.

R. A. Gilmer to W. H. Richards, of Iowa, 10 acres in Creswell Township, $1,500.

B. C. Lent, one lot in Beecher’s addition, to A. D. DeBruce, $500.

D. G. Wetmore, house and two lots, block 128, for $600.

John A. Young, 10 acres in Creswell Township, to Mary M. Shupe, $1,050.

H. S. Davenport, one acre in McGrath’s addition, to Dr. J. A. Mitchell, $500.

B. C. Lent, lot 1, block 4, McGrath’s addition, to Mrs. Kimmel, $450.

N. T. Snyder: telephone business growing...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 30, 1886. From Tuesday’s Daily.

The Telephone Exchanges both in Newton and Caldwell have been removed for the want of patronage. We are informed by N. T. Snyder, the manager here, that this exchange has grown from 30 to 60 subscribers during the past year, and that he has already one board of fifty members filled, and ordered the second from Kansas City. The company have also ordered a carload of 35-foot poles sent here, and as soon as they arrive, the old poles will be replaced with new. N. T. Snyder informs us that the work of the office is now more than Miss Emma can handle, and he has been obliged to put on an assistant operator and message boy.

Philip L. Snyder & Co....

Arkansas City Traveler, November 3, 1886.

P. L. Snyder & Co., have their coal wagon propelled by a powerful roan horse, whose avoirdupois is 1,450 pounds.

Philip L. Snyder coal firm...

Arkansas City Traveler, November 3, 1886.

The new coal firm of P. L. Snyder & Co., last week made the big sale of 6,000 bushels of corn and oats to the Fairmount [Fairmont?] and Saginaw Cattle Companies, to each company 3,000 bushels. On Saturday 15 freighters’ wagons were loaded at their warehouse, each placarded with P. L. Snyder & Co.’s name, and about noon they started out for the territory to deliver the grain near the Pawnee agency. Upwards of a hundred wagons will be required to haul the entire order.


Philip L. Snyder: Delivering to ranchers in Indian Territory...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 6, 1886. From Saturday’s Daily.

P. L. Snyder & Co., this morning contracted to furnish 3,000 bushels of grain and feed to the Saginaw Cattle Company and the Fairmont [Fairmount?]Cattle Company, to be delivered within the next thirty days. All told, there will be 168,000 pounds, which will have to be freighted to the cattle ranches of the above companies down in the Territory.

N. T. Snyder: Snyder, Hutchison & Co. opening up in Bluff City...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 6, 1886. From Thursday’s Daily.

W. S. Upp, Geo. E. Hasie, N. T. Snyder, D. Hollenbeck, of this city, Jas. Glover and Wm. Cain, of Udall, will go over to the new town of Bluff City this evening. Snyder, Hutchison & Co., will open a real estate office there. Mr. Glover, of Udall, will have charge of the firm’s business there. The contracts for 30 buildings have been signed up and will be built in the next month or so. The Frisco will extend its line from Caldwell to Bluff City and there stop for a time.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 13, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

H. DeWeese, of Bolton Township, is the champion beet raiser in this valley. He has one on exhibition at Snyder & Hutchison’s real estate agency that weighs 21½ pounds. It is about two feet in length. Cowley County beats the world.

Pearl Snyder, N. T. Snyder’s daughter...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 20, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

Little Miss Pearl Snyder is quite sick.

N. T. Snyder: visit to Bluff City...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 20, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder and others went over to the new town of Bluff City several days since. They say it is booming in grand style. An $8,000 hotel is to be put up by the railroad company immediately; other buildings are also contracted for.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, December 4, 1886. From Thursday’s Daily.

J. H. Trask, who removed to Winfield recently, telephoned down to Snyder & Hutchison on yesterday to sell his property for $1,500. Before the middle of the afternoon the property was disposed of. If there are any more men in Winfield who have property to sell, just let us know.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 15, 1887. From Wednesday’s Daily.

A grand excursion will be run to Bluff City over the Frisco next Tuesday. All those who wish to see this much-talked-of booming town can take advantage of this opportunity. The rate there and return is only $1.50. Apply to Snyder & Hutchison.

Mrs. N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 15, 1887. From Wednesday’s Daily.


The following named ladies, Mrs. H. D. Keeler, Mrs. N. T. Snyder, Mrs. Jas. Chapin, Mrs. Wm. M. Henderson, Mrs. J. L. Huey, Mrs. Daniels, Mrs. J. P. Smith, Mrs. A. A. Newman, Mrs. Halloway, Mrs. Pyle, and Mrs. L. J. Miles, composing the visiting committee of the King’s Daughters, are requested to meet at the home of Mrs. H. D. Keeler Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 15, 1887. From Wednesday’s Daily.

The ladies of the city who were interested in the founding of a benevolent society for home work, met yesterday afternoon at the residence of Mrs. H. P. Farrar and organized. Mrs. C. H. Searing was chosen president; Mesdames J. P. Witt, Wm. Jenkins, N. T. Snyder, E. F. Shindel, W. H. Cline, A. D. Prescott, and J. O. Campbell were made vice-presidents; Mrs. H. P. Farrar, secretary; and Mrs. S. B. Fleming, treasurer. The society adopted the name of “The King’s Daughters,” and now that the organization is perfected it is ready for action. The intentions of the society are for the relief of the poor and needy of the city. The basement in the Topliff block, beneath Mr. Davidson’s dry goods store, will be open every Tuesday afternoon to receive clothing, etc., from charitably inclined citizens. The King’s Daughters will take charge of the clothing and distribute it to the distressed. The society has its next meeting on Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the residence of Mrs. N. T. Snyder. Everyone invited.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 15, 1887. From Thursday’s Daily.

A. V. Alexander has sold his first ward resident property to E. C. Wagner. Snyder & Hutchison made the sale.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 15, 1887. From Thursday’s Daily.

Snyder & Hutchison will run a special train to Bluff City, next Tuesday, leaving Arkansas City at 10 a.m., arriving at Bluff City about noon. The Mechanic’s band will go with the excursion. Fare from Arkansas City and return $1.50. The excursion will be free to all who purchase lots in Bluff City.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 22, 1887. From Friday’s Daily.

C. Atwood has retired from the grocery business. J. O. Wilson and S. S. Wilson arrived in the city yesterday from St. Louis, and purchased Mr. Atwood’s store. The new firm will be Wilson & Co. Snyder & Hutchison made the transfer. The REPUBLICAN extends its best welcome to our new businessmen.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 29, 1887. From Wednesday’s Daily.

J. H. Sneavely, of Kansas City, purchased a large amount of real estate in Arkansas City yesterday through the agency of Snyder & Hutchison.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 29, 1887. From Wednesday’s Daily.

Geo. Lowery, excursion agent, writes from Decatur, Illinois, to N. T. Snyder, that he will start next week for Arkansas City with about 40 excursionists and prospectors. Business boometh.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 29, 1887. From Wednesday’s Daily.

John Bottom [? Could be Bettom?], of Breckenridge, Missouri, was in the city yesterday, prospecting and making real estate purchases. He was shown over the city by Snyder & Hutchison. He bought a block of lots in McGrath’s Addition for $1,200.


Philip L. Snyder & Co....

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 5, 1887. From Tuesday’s Daily.

Y. G. Miller, who located in our city a few days ago, has rented half of the storeroom of P. L. Snyder & Co., in the Grady block and will commence business shortly. He will put in a stock of stoves, tinware, etc.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 5, 1887. From Thursday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder returned from St. Louis last evening. While away Mr. Snyder made arrangements with Geo. Lowery, the Frisco general excursion and land agent, to start an excursion party from Decatur, Illinois, for Arkansas City on the 29th of each month. This month it will start on the 28th.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 19, 1887. From Wednesday’s Daily.

Chas. Dennis has sold his farm east of the city to R. A. Gilmer. Snyder & Hutchison manipulated the transaction.

Philip L. Snyder & Co....

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 19, 1887. From Friday’s Daily.

Texas oats at P. L. Snyder & Co.’s.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 5, 1887. From Monday’s Daily.

Still they come. Messrs. Mitchell and Fowler were prospecting in the city Saturday and today. Mr. Mitchell is the president of the Richard’s Cattle Co., of Barber County. Mr. Fowler is a prominent real estate agent of Cullison. He was formerly of Topeka. This morning these gentlemen completed the purchase of the David Hammond farm just across the Arkansas River west of the city. This tract has 240 acres and $18,000 was paid for it. It is the John Brown farm and two years ago it sold to Mr. Hammond for $9,500. Snyder & Hutchison made the sale.

Philip L. Snyder: Buys out partner, F. B. Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 5, 1887. From Friday’s Daily.

F. B. Hutchison has sold out in the coal business to his partner, P. L. Snyder. Mr. Snyder will continue the business. Mr. Hutchison will enter the real estate business at Bluff City. He left for that town this morning.

N. T. Snyder [Visiting another brother]...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 12, 1887. From Saturday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder left this afternoon for Penn Yan, New York, where he has gone to visit his brother. He will be gone a week or ten days.

Parents [N. T. and P. L.], James H. Snyder, visiting...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 19, 1887. From Monday’s Daily.

Mr. and Mrs. Jas. H. Snyder, parents of N. T. and P. L. Snyder, came home with the first mentioned Sunday evening and will visit here a portion of the summer.

N. T. Snyder...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 19, 1887. From Monday’s Daily.


N. T. Snyder informs us all over the east Arkansas City was the talk. Many people will be here the coming season to invest. One gentleman informed him he had $25,000 to invest in real estate in Arkansas City and would be here next week. When he had arrived east of Cincinnati, Mr. Snyder met G. W. Mitchell, of Connecticut, and sold him one acre tract west of the city for $1,200. It seems impossible to meet a capitalist who did not intend to come to Arkansas City soon to make real estate investments.

N. T. Snyder: resigns as manager of telephone service...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 26, 1887. From Wednesday’s Daily.

N. T. Snyder, who has for the past four years been manager of the Telephone Exchange in this city, has resigned, his resignation to take effect April 1st. Nate found that with his booming land business, he could not give the attention to the exchange that it ought to have, therefore he concluded to quit, as will be seen by the following communication. Miss Emma Theaker will succeed Mr. Snyder.

                                           Kansas City, Mo., March 21st, 1887.

N. T. Snyder, Mgr., Arkansas City, Kansas.

DEAR SIR: I am sorry that you find it necessary to give up our business, but I suppose your booming land business must occupy all of your time. I will arrange to relieve you by the first as you request, and will try and be there by that time. I agree with you and think that Miss Theaker would make us as good a manager as any one; and I will talk with her about it when I come. Yours truly, Chas. W. McDowell, Supt.

Snyder & Hutchison...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, April 2, 1887. From Monday’s Daily.

Snyder & Hutchison are fitting up their office in elegant style.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, April 2, 1887. From Tuesday’s Daily.

Edgar Pinkston is the new assistant in Snyder & Hutchison’s real estate agency. He is from Lawrence.