††††††††††††††††† J. P. SHORT, OWNER OF THE LOTS ON EAST 9TH AVENUE.

[1st Building east of Drug Store.]

BLOCK 128. East 9th Avenue.

JANUARY 1878.

In December 1877 J. P. Short leased ground on Ninth Avenue to J. T. Weston and J. F. Hyskell, who erected a hardware and stove store. J. T. Weston & Co. opened their new store in January 1878.

Winfield Courier, January 24, 1878.

Notice the new ďad.Ē of J. T. Weston & Co. They are the best kind of workmen and will supply tin work and stoves at prices and of quality that will be sure to please.

AD: LOOK To Your Interest! J. T. WESTON & CO. have just opened a new Stove and Tin Store. Job Work & Roofing a Specialty. Prices Lower than the Lowest. Ninth Avenue, Winfield, Kansas. Next Door East of McCommon & Harterís drug store.

Winfield Courier, October 17, 1878.

J. T. Weston has built a sheet-iron storehouse back of his store.

In January 1879 J. T. Weston Hardware, Stove, and Tin Store moved into the Page Building on Main Street. His partner, Hyskell left in 1878.

OCTOBER 1880.

In October 1880 C. Trump, formerly with S. H. Myton, started a tin shop, hardware, and stove store one door east of Harter Brothersí Drug Store [the former McCommon & Harter Drug Store].

Winfield Courier, November 25, 1880.

C. Trump, formerly with S. H. Myton, has started a tin shop, hardware, and stove store first door east of Harterís drug store. Mr. Trump is acknowledged to be the best tinsmith in town. Give him a call when you want good honest work at 25 percent less than you have been paying.

C. Trump sells tin ship and hardware store. Goes back to work for Sam Myton, who bought his hardware. N. C. Myers takes the tinware to Nebraska.

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

Mr. Trump has sold his tin shop and hardware store and will quit the business. Myton buys his hardware and N. C. Myers takes his tinware to Nebraska. Mr. Trump will work for Mr. Myton.

FEBRUARY 1, 1883.

Judge S. Bard and T. J. Harris, realtors, rent room back of Harterís drug store, formerly occupied by Cornelius Trump...

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

Bard and Harris have rented the room back of Harterís drug store, formerly occupied by Trumpís tin shop, and will move their real estate office to that location soon.

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

Bard & Harris are now cosily fixed up in their new office back of Harterís drug store. This firm by liberal advertising and obliging treatment of customers are gaining an enviable reputation as land and loan agents, and are gentlemen with whom it is a pleasure to do business.


Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.

Bard & Harris have covered the front of their office with an immense land sign. It shows off well.

 

[2nd Building east of Drug Store.]

BLOCK 128. East 9th Avenue.

DECEMBER 1877.

In December 1877 J. P. Short put up a building adjoining Weston & Hyskell, which was occupied by Col. J. C. McMullenís bank, the Citizenís Bank.

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1877.

J. P. Short has leased ground on Ninth Avenue to Weston & Hyskell, who are erecting a hardware and stove store. He is also putting up a building adjoining, which will be occupied by Col. McMullenís bank. This makes six new business buildings that have gone up on that street within the last thirty days.

MAY 1879.

E. E. Bacon moved into room lately occupied by Citizenís Bank...

Winfield Courier, May 15, 1879.

E. E. Bacon, the ďbossĒ silversmith, has left Goldsmith and moved into the room lately occupied by the Citizenís Bank, where he exhibits a splendid stock of silverware, clocks, watches, and jewelry.

Mrs. Mary J. Bacon, wife of E. E. Bacon, starts an ice cream parlor in former Citizenís Bank...

Winfield Courier, May 15, 1879.

Mrs. E. E. Bacon gets up the best ice cream you ever saw or tasted, and if you donít believe it, go around to the late Citizenís Bank-room and try it. We did so the other evening, and that is how we came to know about it.

 

[3rd Building East of Drug Store.]

BLOCK 128. East 9th Avenue.

JANUARY 1877.

John E. Allen, attorney, moved Lacyís ice house to East 9th Avenue and made it his office. Allen was located one door east of the ďCitizenís Bank,Ē later owned by E. E. Bacon and his wife, who put in a jewelry store and an ice cream parlor.

[I was really confused about the Allen building inasmuch as there was an ad placed in paper stating that he was located west (instead of east) of the Citizenís Bank.]

By March 1878 J. Hoenscheidt, architect, had office in rear of Allenís law office.

John Allen moved into Lynn & Loose building [corner of Main Street and Eighth Avenue] in September 1880, occupying the two front rooms on second story.

 

I found it impossible to tell much about the other buildings that ended up on Shortís lots and were put up for sale in 1885. Do not even know on which of the two lots they might have ended up: Lot 11 or Lot 12.

 


HEADRICK BUILDING.

Dr. Headrickís office was moved to one of Shortís lots. It appears that Dr. Headrick had been located on the lot on which Fahey built his stone and brick building and that eventually became the Ninth Avenue Hotel.

Winfield Courier, February 27, 1879.

Dr. Headrickís office is being moved away to make room for the new stone and brick building going up on Ninth Avenue.

BLISS & WOOD GRAIN OFFICE.

I could not find any information on the above building. It appears that they did have a telephone in the office in 1885. I have no idea when the building was moved to one of Shortís lots. The building was one of those purchased by A. P. Johnson, attorney.

HARNESS SHOP.

I could not find any information on the above building. It was purchased by A. H. Doane.

LITTLE TIN SHED.

H. G. Fuller paid $5.00 for the above item. Have no idea if it might have been owned by Trump, Weston & Hyskell, or someone else.

Winfield Courier, October 17, 1878.

J. T. Weston has built a sheet-iron storehouse back of his store.

 

Below is the article that started my search for owners of buildings on Shortís lots east of the McCommon & Harter Drug Store...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The J. P. Short landmarks were all sold Monday and will be moved off to make room for an imposing block, an honor to the city. A. P. Johnson bought the Headrick building, $87; the Harris & Clark office, $100; and the Bliss & Wood grain office, $51. A. H. Doane got the harness shop, $101; and H. G. Fuller got the little tin shed, $5. The buildings will likely be moved onto residence lots. Work on the bank and Short lots will commence at once. The Harter building will be moved over in Ninth avenue.