†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† HUGH McGINN.

Could not find where Hugh McGinn was one of the early stockmen located around Arkansas City. He only attended the meeting in Arkansas City in 1883. He did not show up in Caldwell for any of the meetings there. It could be that he was at meeting in order to find out information to convey to John Florer.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 28, 1883.

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Stockmenís Meeting.

Pursuant to call a number of stockmen met at the office of C. M. Scott, in Arkansas City, Kansas, and organized by calling Mr. John H. Tomlin, of Winfield, to the chair and C. M. Scott, Secretary.

The following gentlemen were present: W. J. Hodges, John Myrtle, John Love, J. M. Love, Weathers, Tipton, Chinn, Wicks, D. Warren, Hugh McGinn, J. H. Saunders, Moorehouse, Dr. Carlisle, and others.

On motion a committee of three was appointed to settle all claims of stockmen with the parties proposing to fence, or any other whose interests might conflict.

Committee: W. J. Hodges, Chairman; Drury Warren, and C. M. Scott.

Mr. Weathers thought the Oil Company had no right in the Territory, and did not believe in adjusting matters with them. Thought they should not be recognized in the meeting at all.

Mr. Hodges thought if they paid the tax and complied with the law, they had as much right as anyone to the unoccupied range, and that we should not expect the range to lay idle, and that it would not, and anyone claiming it and paying for it would be protected, whether they were of Kansas, Pennsylvania, or England.

Mr. Chinn said if a man paid, he had no protection against Texas cattle, to which Mr. Hodges replied; only through the Stock Association.

Mr. Warren didnít see any harm in the Oil Company occupying the range as long as they interfered with the rights of no one legally there.

Mr. Love is on the west side of the range they propose to fence. He hasnít paid his tax. When he stopped there, he did not expect to remain longówas going farther west, but finally concluded to remain. He then rendered payment to the Treasurer of the Cherokee Nation, and his offer was refused, although he was first on the ground, and had conflicted with no one; and after they had refused, the grant and privilege was given to Mr. Gore. He did not believe in discriminating in favor of a monopoly, and that too, when they were not on the ground, and have not yet a hoof of stock on the range. He said there was no fairness in it, and that the Oil Company were only acting fair since they could do no better. That they had tried to shut out all alike and would have done it if they could, and he appealed to the stockmen to stand by him as he had stood by them.

Mr. Hodges thought Mr. Loveís case one of merit, and that his right would not be ignored.

On motion the meeting elected Mr. Tomlin, Mr. Love, and C. M. Scott a committee of three to forward the grievance to Major John Q. Tufts at Muskogee, Indian Territory.

On motion Drury Warren, Mr. Wicks, and Mr. Weathers were appointed a committee of three to attend the meeting of the Cherokee Strip Stock Association, to be held at Caldwell March 6, 1883.


The following resolutions were introduced and passed.

Resolved, That it is the sense and desire of this meeting that no quarantine ground be established east of Bitter Creek.

Resolved, That no through Texas cattle be permitted to be driven along the State Line east of Bitter Creek, or within four miles of the line during the summer months and that we will use our best endeavors to prevent such doing.

Resolved, That each and everyone of us become a member of the Cherokee Strip Association, and that we stand by one another in the protection of our rights.

On motion the meeting adjourned.

Arkansas City Republican, January 10, 1885.

Hugh McGinn, of Florer, Indian Territory, was in the city the first of the week. He left $5 with us for two copies of the REPUBLICAN. He is an employee of Florer, Gould & Co.ís ranch.