Chapter ?. COLONEL JOHN CORNELIUS McMULLEN & FAMILY.

[NOTE: NEEDS MUCH MORE WORK DONE ON BEGINNING OF CHAPTER, SO I AM NOT PAYING ALL THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO PAGE BREAKS. MAW]

                                                   PATRICK McMULLEN.

The first McMullen known of was Patrick McMullen, born 1792, in Limerick, Ireland. He died in 1880 in Winfield, Kansas. Patrick McMullen married Ellen McGirl, born in Ireland (died in California). Patrick and Elen McMullen emigrated to the United States in 1831. In 1847 or 1848 the McMullen family moved to Wisconsin, where Patrick received a 40-acre farm from the government.

Patrick and Ellen McMullen had seven children: Joseph F., born August 1, 1831, in New York City; Matilda, born in 1833, who died in 1905; Mary, born in 1834, who died in 1905; John Cornelius, born in 1835, who died December 30, 1912, in Oakland, California; Alex-ander, born in 1836, who died in 1913; Helen, born 1840, and Jane, born in 1842.

[Note: The interest of Cowley County historians centers around the fourth child of Patrick and Ellen McMullen: John Cornelius. RKW]

 

                                     COL. JOHN CORNELIUS McMULLEN.    

McMullen family historians believe that John Cornelius McMullen was born in the family home March 15 or March 17, 1835, located in Wilmington, Delaware, near the New Jersey border. However, he was listed as being born in Jersey City, New Jersey.

John Cornelius McMullen was educated at Lawrence University from 1853 to 1860, receiving a degree. He enlisted September 16, 1861, at the age of 26, for three years as a Private in Company H, First Wisconsin Infantry, from Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin. He became a Second Lieutenant October 8, 1861; First Lieutenant March 20, 1862; a Captain October 27, 1863; was wounded at Jonesboro, Georgia, and mustered out of service at Camp Washburn, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 14, 1864. His regiment was involved in numer-ous engagements in Middle Kentucky and Tennessee and Northern Georgia, including the Atlantic Campaign of 1864 under Gen. Sherman.

J. C. McMullen was soon after employed by the Government in the Treasury Department of Tennessee, which position he held for seven years. He married Miss Mary E. Loomis, in 1865, and they had three children, Nellie C., Robert J. and Mary B. (Mary E. Loomis was the daughter of I. C. Loomis and Nancy L. Cochran Loomis. I. C. Loomis died at his farm two miles northwest of Arkansas City, on Monday, October 9, 1882, aged 83. His wife, Nancy L. Cochran Loomis (1828-1896), was buried nearby in Riverview Cemetery, Arkan-sas City, along with two of J. C. McMullen’s children: Charles, died May 18, 1872, aged 1 year, 3 months, 10 days; and Hubert, died June 26, 1874, aged 6 months, 21 days.

          Background on Col. McMullen and Loomis Families by Family Historians.


In 1871 the McMullen and Loomis families moved to Arkansas City. Col. J. C. McMullen started a private bank called “The Citizens Bank.” In 1877 Col. McMullen bought residential land in Winfield from E. C. Manning. He moved his bank to Winfield in January 1878, closing the Arkansas City bank. On April 1, 1879, he consolidated with the private bank owned by J. C. Fuller. They formed the “Winfield State Bank,” which was chartered under State law. The officers were J. C. McMullen, President; J. C. Fuller, Cashier.

J. C. McMullen started construction in 1879 of a brick home at 509 West Ninth, Winfield, Kansas. It was rumored that this caused a dispute between McMullen and Fuller inasmuch as McMullen borrowed J. C. Fuller’s house plans and the completed home, finished in 1880, was larger than Fuller’s home. The McMullen family  moved in and lived there until Col. George W. Miller (of the 101 Ranch) purchased the house from McMullen in 1888. When the Miller family moved to the ranch in Oklahoma, they sold the house to the J. W. Hiatt family, whose descendants owned the property until 1998.

[Note: Our research on the McMullen and related families has been gleaned from microfilm kept by the Kansas Historical Society and information from descendants of the McMullen and Kinne families. RKW, MAW, and WWB.]

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                        Col. J. C. McMullen One of the Proprietors of New Town.

Emporia News, September 2, 1870. A new town, called Sumner, has just been laid out in Sumner County. The proprietors are: J. M. Steele, C. S. Roe, and J. H. Liggett, of Wichita; J. Jay Buck and E. W. Cunningham, of Emporia; James C. Fuller, Addison Richards, and Mr. Millington, of Fort Scott; Col. J. C. McMullen, of Clarksville, Tennessee; and Maj. Woodsmall, of Gosport, Indiana.

This town is situated in the geographical center of Sumner County, on Slate Creek, and about thirty miles south from Wichita. A stock of goods is already on the ground. A full and complete newspaper outfit is already secured, and it is the intention of the proprietors to have a hotel up and a saw mill in operation soon. This place is immediately on the Texas cattle trail, and may soon be a brisk town. The finest wood and water claims are there to be had. We look for the organization of Sumner County at the next session of the Legislature.

Emporia News, February 17, 1871.

Col. J. C. McMullen, an attorney at law of Clarksville, Tennessee, and Judge Cunning-ham intended to start Saturday morning on a tour through Sumner County, the promised land in which some of their possessions lie, but when the stage-driver called for them they concluded they would not start that day—there being twelve passengers inside of the vehicle and three on the outside. We understand that Col. McMullen is making arrangements to locate in Kansas, and we hope he will.

                           ---

                                       I. C. Loomis, Father of Mrs. McMullen.

From the Margaret Russell Stallard book, Remembering Geuda Springs, it was learned that Mrs. McMullen’s father, I. C. Loomis, built the Loomis Hotel at Remanto, the first name given to town—soon to be called Salt City, due to the fact it was located near numerous salt springs. In time the area containing the salt springs was called Geuda Springs.

Records uncovered by Mrs. Stallard reveal the following:

March 19, 1872: Legal Instrument between Daniel Grable, Brainard Goff, and W. J. Walpole of Cowley County, parties of the first part, and I. C. Loomis, party of the 2nd part, in consideration of the sum of $248.00; Southeast quarter of Section I, Township 34, South Range 2E, containing 160 acres. Grant intended as a mortgage to secure payment of $248.00 at 12 percent interest. Executed by Daniel Grable, Brainard Goff, and W. J. Walpole to I. C. Loomis.


March 13, 1873: The mortgage held by I. C. Loomis was released. I. C. and Harriet R. Loomis, his wife, assigned to Samuel Hoyt, attorney at law, their power of attorney.

                                                            Loomis Hotel.

The Loomis Hotel was later remodeled and called “Hotel Geuda.” Later it was called the “Gilbert Hotel.” It was built in the East Geuda Springs addition, placing it in Cowley County, Kansas. [Note: Part of Geuda Springs is in Sumner County, Kansas.] The Loomis Hotel and other buildings nearby were destroyed by a fire in 1908.

                                            Luke Short Arrived in Caldwell.

The Caldwell Journal, May 24, 1883.

Luke Short, about whom the fuse at Dodge City was kicked up, arrived here on Monday. Mr. Short is a quiet, unassuming man, with nothing about him to lead one to believe him the desperado the Dodge mob picture him to be. He says the whole trouble arose from business jealousy on the part of Webster Nixon and others. As to his plans, he has nothing to say, but he is determined to take all legal measures possible to secure his rights.

The Caldwell Journal, August 30, 1883.

The Dodge City Times is mad because Luke Short had Police Judge Burns arrested on the charge of misconduct in office and the collection of illegal fees. Judge Burns had his examination and was discharged. The Times says the arrest was a piece of spite work.

                                             Luke Short Has Gone to Texas.

The Caldwell Journal, September 20, 1883.

Luke Short, disgusted with the moral reform recently instituted at Dodge, has sold out his saloon and gone to Texas to engage in the cattle business.

                   Luke Short Died in Geuda Springs at the Renamed Loomis Hotel.

Luke Short (suffering from dropsy) resided at the renamed Loomis Hotel shortly before he died in an attempt to restore his health at the Springs. He went virtually unnoticed by the overflow crowd from Arkansas City who stayed at Geuda Springs prior to their participation in the race for the Cherokee Strip September 16, 1893.

Known as a friend of Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson, Luke Short was an early-day gunman who killed a number of men. He managed to escape the law when he sold whiskey to Sioux Indians. Raised in Texas, he roamed from one western town to another, operating a bar of some kind. His death notice in the Arkansas City Traveler stated: “Luke Short died 8 September 1893 of dropsy in the Gilbert Hotel, was embalmed by W. A. Repp, a Geuda Springs undertaker, and his body was sent to Fort Worth, Texas, for burial.”

The Geuda Springs Herald stated that his wife and two of his brothers were in Geuda Springs at the time of his death and accompanied his body to Texas.

                                           District Court: John C. McMullen.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 16, 1873. Listed among cases that would stand for trial at the October term of the District Court of Cowley County: Civil Docket, Fourth Day: “John C. McMullen vs. W. D. and R. L. Wilson.”

The October 30, 1873, issue of Winfield Courier noted that the case of J. C. McMullen vs. W. D. and E. L. Wilson was continued.

Winfield Courier, March 27, 1874. District Court Proceedings. Second Day.

J. C. McMullen vs. W. D. and R. A. Wilson, Judgment by default.

                             Col. McMullen, Kinne, Loomis, find Judge McIntire

                                                   At Salt Springs At Work.


Winfield Courier, July 10, 1874. [From Traveler.]

Judge Peffer, Col. J. C. McMullen, E. P. Kinne, Mr. Loomis, and several ladies, also the “Special Contrib­utor,” visited the salt works on the 6th. We found Judge McIntire superin-tendent of the works. Our July sun is doing the handsome thing for these just now, giving a product of a ton per week.

There are also springs containing, apparently, glauber’s salts and other minerals in solution. We concluded the “warm spring” to be caused by the action of the solar heat.

                                                 District Court: J. C. Loomis.

The September 18, 1874, issue of Winfield Courier listed the following case for September term of the District Court, starting September 28th.

Civil Docket. Fourth Day. J. C. Loomis vs. E. S. Chesney.

     E. P. Kinne and Mrs. Helen M. Loomis Married at Col. McMullen’s Residence.

Winfield Courier, September 25, 1874. Married on Tuesday, September 22nd, 1874, at the residence of Col. J. C. McMullen, by Rev. Platter, of Winfield, Mr. E. P. Kinne and Mrs. Helen M. Loomis, both of Arkansas City.

            Col. J. C. McMullen Hires Bad Boys to Go to Church & Sunday School.

Winfield Courier, April 8, 1875. Col. J. C. McMullen hires the bad boys of Arkansas City to go to church and Sunday school by giving them, each, a new suit of clothes.

                  Endicott Accepts Col. McMullen’s Proposition to Attend Church.

Winfield Courier, April 8, 1875. [Item From the Traveler.]

GOES TO CHURCH. Col. McMullen made a proposition to Henry Endicott, that if he would attend church regularly once every Sabbath, he would give him a new suit of clothes. Henry accept­ed, and has a new suit, and attends church. We know of several others who would like to make a similar bargain.

      Cowley County District Court. Trial Docket Includes John C. McMullen Cases.

Winfield Courier, September 16, 1875. The following is a list of cases that will stand for trial at the September term of the District Court, to be holden on and from the 27th, and have been placed on the Trial Docket in the following order.

Civil Docket. Third Day. John C. McMullen vs. Richard Woolsey.

Civil Docket. Fourth Day. John C. McMullen vs. Wm. M. Gray, et al.

                          Col. J. C. McMullen & G. H. McIntire Among Signers.

Winfield Courier, September 16, 1875.

                             Recommending Frank Gallotti for Next County Treasurer.

                                    TO THE VOTERS OF COWLEY COUNTY.

This is to certify that we, whose names are hereto sub­scribed, do most heartily recommend for our next County Treasurer, FRANK GALLOTTI, who has for the last year and a half faithfully and satisfactorily preformed the duties of said office while acting in the capacity of Deputy; and we do hereby further certify that his character during that time has been such as to fully entitle him to the recommendation. The records of said office kept by him, bears ample testimony of his capability and efficiency. We consider him well qualified to fulfill the duties of said office, and therefore cheerfully recommend him to the voters of Cowley County as well worth of their cordial support, and who, if elected, will most faithfully and systematically perform the duties of said office.



Jno. D. Pryor, E. D. Kager, H. C. Irvin, H. D. Gans, E. S. Bedilion, A. J. Pyburn, B. F. Baldwin, J. M. Fahnestock, W. M. Boyer, T. K. Johnston, G. S. Manser, C. A. Bliss, J. E. Saint, N. Roberson, W. G. Graham, S. D. Cochran, W. D. Mowry, W. J. Mowry, H. Godehard, W. H. Walker, K. F. Smith, J. H. Bonsall, E. D. Eddy, E. J. Hoyt, J. C. Evans, Henry Mowry, Albert Horn, J. C. Mitchell, R. Page, L. C. Wood, L. W. Currier, John C. McMullen, H. P. Walker, James S. Simpson, Chas. Harter, A. T. Shenneman, S. Darrah, T. J. Jones, J. A. Beck, C. M. Sloan, P. Hill, Geo. Youle, A. F. Tryon, J. P. McMillen, Joseph Requa, A. N. Deming, R. L. Walker, D. M. Hopkins, J. N. Beemen, J. W. Curns, J. Manley, Jas. L. M. Hill, H. Brotherton, J. W. Johnston, P. J. Copple, Allen B. Lemmon, David S. Brown, T. A. Wilkinson, Petyer Paugh, Chas. E. Love, R. Rogers, C. L. Bliss, Philip Stump, M. L. Robinson, M. L. Read, W. C. Robinson, S. H. Myton, H. P. Farrar, T. C. Bird, D. M. Purdy, E. M. Bird, W. E. Gooch, Jno. N. J. Gooch, A. H. Buckwalter, Antonio Buzzi, W. G. Kay, Frank Lorry, Thomas Baird, G. W. Harmon, Samuel Kuhns, John Annis, W. E. Chenoweth, Alfred Pruden, C. R. Sipes, A. W. Burkey, W. S. Thompson, E. R. Thompson, C. J. Beck, Charles Gallert, Alfred B. Woolsey, J. C. Topliff, S. P. Channell, W. M. Burkey, M. Y. Hurst, G. H. McIntire, W. H. Speers, D. R. Baird, R. Hoffmaster, Chas. R. Williamson, B. A. Davis, George L. Walker.


                                              Traveler Item: Col. McMullen.

Winfield Courier, September 30, 1875. Col. McMullen called and paid for 100 Travelers last week, and distributed 75—all we could spare him. If a dozen men would do so weekly, the effect on immigration would soon be realized.

                         McMullen a Participant at El Dorado Railroad Meeting.

Winfield Courier, November 18, 1875. Last Friday, Nov. 14th, a large and earnest rail-road meeting was held at El Dorado. Messrs. Meigs, Channell, McMullen, and Christian, from Arkansas City; Millington and Manning of Winfield, and Holmes and Lee, of Rock Township, were the repre­sentatives from Cowley County.

A large turn-out of active men of Butler County were pres­ent, and C. V. Eskridge, P. B. Plumb, E. P. Bancroft, and others from Emporia, and Messrs. Danford and Schenk of Osage City, and C. K. Holliday and Lakin, of Topeka, were present.

The meeting organized at 2 p.m. by choosing Neil Wilkie, of Douglass, as chairman. Mr. Bancroft, of Emporia, in a clear and comprehensive manner, presented statistics showing the advantage to the people and company of constructing a narrow gauge railroad in comparison to a wide gauge road.

Gov. Eskridge then spoke at some length demonstrating the ability of the people along the line to build and own a road from Emporia into the Walnut Valley.

Interesting speeches were made by Col. Plumb, D. A. Millington, and others.

Finally the citizens of Butler County present selected eight persons to cooperate with the representatives of Cowley in drafting articles of incorporation for a railroad company. After several hours of conference the two counties by their representatives agreed upon a charter form road beginning at Emporia, and run by the Walnut Valley to the south line of the State below Arkansas City.

The following named gentlemen were chosen directors.

P. B. Plumb, H. C. Cross, and A. A. Baker: Emporia.

J. C. Becker: Chelsie.

T. B. Murdock and A. L. Redden: El Dorado.

E. L. Akin: Augusta.

A. Cox: Walnut City.

Neil Wilkie: Douglass.

J. E. Platter and J. C. Fuller: Winfield.

J. C. McMullen and S. P. Channell: Arkansas City.

The corporation is named the Walnut Valley R. R. Company.

The directors are to meet in Emporia on 23rd inst., to put the enterprise in motion. Of their action, we shall keep our readers posted. If possible, we shall attend the meeting.

                                Col. J. C. McMullen & Judge Timothy McIntire.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 6, 1876. Front Page.

                                                     CENTENNIAL ISSUE.

                                        Excerpt from “History of Cowley County.”

Arkansas City.


A splendid brick church, the best edifice of the kind in the country, a substantial frame church, a cut stone bank (J. C. McMullen’s), the City Hotel, a three-story structure, kept by Mantor & Son, the Central Avenue, a commodious two-story build­ing, Houghton & McLaughlin, immense dry goods store, J. H. Sherburne & Co.’s two-story business house, J. C. McMullen’s elegant private residence constructed of brick with cut stone trimmings, costing $6,000, are among the most prominent and expensive of the buildings upon the town site. It contains about 550 population.

The first bank and brick residence were built by J. C. McMullen in 1873. The first temperance meeting was held Feb. 21, 1871. W. P. Hackney was the first lawyer; Dr. John Alexander the first physician; Mrs. S. P. Channell opened the first millinery store. The first Sunday school was organized in Rev. B. C. Swarts’ cabin, T. A. Wilkinson, superinten­dent; first jeweler, Perry Woodyard.

Creswell Grote, born October 5, 1870, was the first native of the town. On the 20th day of July, 1871, the town site was entered at the Augusta land office. June 10, 1872, it was incorporated as a city of the third class. First city election took place July 1st, 1872. A. D. Keith, mayor; Amos Walton, police judge. The office of mayor is successively filled by A. D. Keith (second term), H. O. Meigs, S. P. Channell, Judge Timothy McIntire has been police judge since April 8, 1873.

McMULLEN, J. C., the first banker in Arkansas City, built the first brick residence in the town. He came from Clarksville, Tennessee (but not a native thereof), September, 1871. The bank is in a flourishing condition, pays more taxes than—but we promised not to draw comparisons.

Arkansas City Bank: Jno. C. McMullen, President; James A. Loomis, Cashier.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 26, 1876.    

ARKANSAS CITY BANK of Arkansas City.

Does a General Banking Business. Makes Collections.

Loans Money on Real Estate Security. Loans for Capitalists A Specialty.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, January 26, 1876.

“In the Savings Department of the ARKANSAS CITY BANK of Arkansas City, there will be re­ceived Sums as low as One Dollar, upon which will be paid Seven per cent interest.

          JNO. C. McMULLEN, PRESIDENT. JAMES A. LOOMIS, CASHIER.

DIRECTORS:  L. B. Kellogg, L. C. Norton, J. Jay Buck, J. C. McMullen, Jas. A. Loomis.

              Music Teacher, Georgie Christian, Next to McMullen’s Bank.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 26, 1876. Music. I take pleasure in announcing to the citizens of Arkansas City and vicinity that I will give instructions on the piano to a limited number of scholars, either boys or girls, at the resi­dence of my parents, one door south of Mr. McMullen’s bank. Terms, $8.00 for 24 lessons for beginners.

          Georgie Christian. Late of the Conservatory of Music, Lawrence, Kansas.

                   For Sale: Residence Lots south of McMullen Residence.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 26, 1876. For Sale: 221 acres of land 2½ miles southeast of Arkansas City, well watered; twenty acres in wheat. Also 8 good residence lots, fenced, and trees set out, just south of Col. McMullen’s brick residence; one house and lot on Sixth street, and my large stock of furniture, which will be sold cheap. Inquire of L. McLaughlin.

                                              J. C. McMullen, Agent.


Arkansas City Traveler, January 26, 1876. Notice is hereby given that the farm in the Walnut Valley formerly owned by W. J. Keffer is now, and has been for the past year, the property of E. N. Darling. All persons are strictly forbidden, under the severest penalty of the law, to take from said premises any timber, logs, or rails, either by the consent or otherwise of the said W. J. Keffer, as he has no authority to sell or otherwise dispose of any of the above named materials. J. C. McMULLEN, Agent.

                                 Col. McMullen Recovers from Serious Illness.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 2, 1876. Mr. J. C. McMullen was very ill last week, and for a short time it was feared he would not live. We are glad to state he has recovered.

                          Letter Written by H. B. Norton to Col. J. C. McMullen.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 9, 1876. Front Page.

                                      SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA, Jan. 19, 1876.

Col. J. C. McMullen: DEAR OLD FRIEND: I have been waiting for Saturday to come, that I might have leisure to write to you without hurry and pressure. . . .

We are very comfortable and happy here, having pleasanter quarters than for several years, and better prospects also. I have, to my own great surprise, emerged into a field of work that more than satisfies me. My effort in the pulpit and on the lecture stand are received in such a way as makes me wonder. In the line of scientific illustrated lectures, I seem to have no competitor on this coast, and calls come from all sides, of which I can answer very few indeed. I am very well, busy, and happy; and thankful for the good Providence which has led me from the Cimarron to this beautiful city. I feel “in my sphere” here rather than there.

This is a city of churches. We are members of the Congrega­tional Church, presided over by a thoroughly cultured Bostonian. My wife is happier and more hopeful than for years—seeming, however, somewhat dissatisfied with the sparse population of California. Our little people are very well indeed, and are progressing in their studies. My boy now plays all easy music at sight, and seems to be gradually outgrowing Kansas malaria.

The landscape outside looks queer enough: The mountains are piled deeply with snow, but the orange trees are full of ripe fruit on the foot slopes, and the valley is as Eden-like as grass and flowers can make it.

From our window we look out upon such a panorama—more than a hundred miles of snowy mountains, both verges being covered, and rising abruptly to the east and west, more than 4,000 feet; while in the adjoining yards superb callas and perpetual bud and blossom. We have much rain, but only upon one day has a snow­flake come down to the valley, and then the snow melted as it fell.

Fuel is the one costly item on this coast: good coal, $16 to $20 per ton, and wood $10 to $12. However, we live on manna: Water and gas come in pipes; milk, during the night, miraculously appears in a can placed on a veranda; dirty clothing is carried off by a Celestial being in wooden shoes and a long pigtail, and returns in a fluted and enameled condition fit for the New Jerusalem; bread, the daily paper, meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, wine—all are delivered at our door by similar angels, more or less in disguise; though I must admit that our Providence pres­ents weekly or monthly bills, as that of the Hebrews did not. . . . H. B. NORTON.

                                 Col. McMullen Publishes List of Land for Sale.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 23, 1876.

LAND. Col. McMullen publishes a list of cheap lands in this issue that everyone should read. The lands were obtained at a bargain, and will be sold at a small advance.

                                              Social at McMullen Residence.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1876. There will be a social given by the M. E. Society at the house of Mr. McMullen, on Wednesday evening, March 22. By order of the Secretary: All are cordially invited.


Winfield Courier, March 23, 1876.

The following is a list of cases that will stand for trial at the April term A. D. 1876, of the District Court of Cowley, and have been placed on the Trial Docket in the following order.

CIVIL DOCKET. SECOND DAY.

Jno. C. Hays vs. E. P. Kinne.

Jno. C. McMullen vs. Wm. M. Gray.

CIVIL DOCKET. FIFTH DAY.

J. C. McMullen vs. Julia A. & A. N. Deming.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 29, 1876.

There would have been an over-crowded house at Col. McMullen’s last Wednesday, had the weather been favorable.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 5, 1876. The election of city officers passed off very quietly last Monday, with the following result.

FOR MAYOR: S. P. CHANNELL, 49 VOTES. H. D. KELLOGG,  24 VOTES.

FOR COUNCILMEN:

T. H. McLAUGHLIN, 48 VOTES, W. M. SLEETH, 48 VOTES, H. D. KELLOGG, 48 VOTES, J. A. LOOMIS, 45 VOTES, J. I. MITCHELL, 49 VOTES, R. HOFFMASTER, 26 VOTES, JAS. BENEDICT, 27 VOTES, L. C. CURRIER, 21 VOTES, L. C. WOOD, 23 VOTES, FRANK SPEERS, 24 VOTES, I. H. BONSALL, 1 VOTE.

FOR POLICE JUDGE: JAMES CHRISTIAN, 71 VOTES.

     Whole number of votes cast: 73.

The city officers now are: S. P. Channell, Mayor; T. H. McLaughlin, W. M. Sleeth, Dr. H. D. Kellogg, Dr. J. A. Loomis, and James I. Mitchell, Councilmen; Jas. Christian, Police Judge.

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1876.

MAHLON STUBBS, of Emporia, very well known about Arkansas City, has received a summons to appear before the Committee of Indian Affairs, at the House of Representa­tives, at Washington. The summons should have included Col. McMullen and C. M. Scott, of the city, so that “the other side” of the Indian question could have a chance to speak.

Cowley County Democrat, April 6, 1876. Arkansas City Items.

The school is having a vacation, and Prof. Hulse and pupils are having a few weeks recreation.

The Arkansas River is higher than it has ever been since the white man settled in its valleys. In some places it only lacks a few feet of running over its banks, and is still rising. It is thought if it rises much more, the bridge south of town will be materially damaged.

After some little excitement, caused by the whiskey ring of this place, the following officers were elected to the respective offices.

Mayor: S. P. Channell.

Councilmen: T. H. McLaughlin, W. M. Sleeth, H. D. Kellogg, Dr. J. A. Loomis, J. I. Mitchell.

Police Judge: Judge Christian.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 12, 1876.


Col. McMullen has sold five quarter sections of land to one man (Mr. Bowers), 960 acres in all, and most of it is improved.


Arkansas City Traveler, April 26, 1876.

                          COUNCIL ROOMS, ARKANSAS CITY, April 19, 1876.

Called meeting. Present, S. P. Channell, Mayor; H. D. Kellogg, J. A. Loomis, J. I. Mitchell, Councilmen.

Moved and seconded that Dr. J. A. Loomis be elected Presi­dent of the Council; carried.

I. H. Bonsall was recommended as City Clerk by S. P. Channell, and confirmed by unanimous vote of Council.

E. D. Eddy was elected Treasurer by a unanimous vote.

The following committees were appointed.

Finance Committee: T. H. McLaughlin, W. M. Sleeth.

Committee on Ways and Means: Dr. Kellogg, J. I. Mitchell, J. A. Loomis.

Committee on Public Improvements: T. H. McLaughlin, Dr. H. D. Kellogg, J. I. Mitchell.

Adjourned to meet at 8 o’clock Thursday evening, April 20th, to receive report on sidewalks from Committee on Public Improve­ments, and all other business of a general nature that may be brought forward.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 24, 1876.

The Young People’s Christian Association have the following programme for next Friday evening. All are invit­ed. Music, prayer, roll call and response, minutes of previous meeting, song, essay, recitation, duet. Discussion: “Resolved, That the work of the teacher affords a better field for useful­ness than the work of the preacher.” Affirmative, J. C. McMullen, W. H. Harrison; negative, J. T. Shepard, F. B. Hutchin­son. Volunteers will then be invited to speak, after which there will be a quartette, select reading, declamation, followed by adjournment. E. W. HULSE, Pres.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 14, 1876.

The marriage ceremony of Mr. Kennedy and Miss Norton was performed by Rev. J. E. Platter, last Wednesday evening, at the residence of Mr. L. C. Norton, and was highly complimented by the competent judges who were in attendance. Mr. and Mrs. Haywood, Mr. and Mrs. Loomis, E. D. Eddy, Miss Sherburne, Mr. Kennedy’s brother, J. H. Sherburne, Mr. and Mrs. Newman, Mrs. Sherburne, and Mr. Burgess, constituted the party, with the parents and members of the family of the bride.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 14, 1876.

We call the attention of the Road Overseer to the small bridge north of town near L. C. Norton’s. Col. McMullen’s horse got one leg through it last week, and others are complaining.

[CHEROKEE STRIP LANDS: COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 28, 1876.

                    Transcript of Cherokee Strip Lands in Cowley County, Kansas,

                                   Sold Under Sealed Bids, November 30, 1875.

#1: Amount paid.

#2: Tract entered; Section of; part of Section.

#3: No. of Section.

#4: No. Township.

#5: No. of Range.


#6: QUANTITY (Acres, 100ths.)

    #1                #2                    #3  #4  #5        #6        NAME OF PURCHASER.

$146.96     NW 1/4 of SW 1/4

& Lot 53                  4  35  5E    73.48       J. C. McMULLEN

$240.00     S ½ of NE 1/4 &

NW 1/4 of SE 1/4    8  35  5E      120        J. C. McMULLEN

Arkansas City Traveler, June 28, 1876.

WE WISH TO STATE to the public that we have thoroughly revised and corrected the set of Abstract Books prepared by Messrs. Meigs & Kinne. We have carefully compared each instru­ment on record in the Recorder’s office twice, each time by a different person, and know our books to be correct. We have also prepared, at much cost and labor, a complete list of all lands sold for taxes since the county was organized. Parties procuring abstracts of us get the benefit of this history of tax sales in this county. Our system of Abstracting is as thorough and complete as the system of book-keeping; mistakes are almost impossible.

These books are in charge of Mr. A. W. Berkey, who will devote all his time in the future to the Real Estate busi­ness. Any parties having land for sale can leave the same with him, and parties wishing to purchase will do well to give him a call before purchasing elsewhere.

                                                         J. C. McMULLEN.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 28, 1876.

We take pleasure in calling the attention of the people of this vicinity to the set of Abstract Records kept at the Arkansas City Bank. We have personally examined these books, and find the simplicity and thoroughness of the system commend them to the judgment of all businessmen. They are kept up at an expense of not less than one dollar per day, and should be patronized by all having this kind of business to do, instead of paying their money elsewhere for someone to hastily look through twenty sets of larger books at the county seat, which necessarily must be very imperfect, unless time and great pains are taken. But in the set of books referred to, the history of each quarter section and town lot has a certain place devoted to it, hence at a glance all the transfers may be seen. A set of books of this kind is indispensable in a town so far from the Registrar’s office, and parties interested in this town and vicinity should obtain abstracts of all lands bought and sold, and show that they appreciate a home institution.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 5, 1876.

Col. McMullen and Prof. Hulse, accompanied by their wives, left for the North and East this week.

Winfield Courier, July 6, 1876.

J. C. McMullen and family, of Arkansas City, passed here last Tuesday en route to the Centennial.

Winfield Courier, July 27, 1876.


COL. J. C. McMULLEN, of Arkansas City, writes from the celebrated summer resort, Creson, Pennsylvania, to his brother-in-law, E. P. Kinne, that his child is improving in health. He describes the resort as a three hundred acre tract of land, situated on the highest point of the Allegheny Mts., and beauti­fully laid out into walks, drives, natural and artificial. The curative properties of its mineral springs attracts hundreds to it every year. Its visitors are rich, gay, and fashionable, and their fine clothes and turn-outs contrast strangely with the plain suit of a western man. The Col. is spending a pleasant summer, and hopes to return soon with his little boy entirely recovered.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 2, 1876.

FOR RENT. Peter Pearson’s storeroom and basement; inquire of James A. Loomis.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 2, 1876.

Col. J. C. McMullen, of Arkansas City, writes from the celebrated summer resort, Cresson, Pennsylvania, to his brother-in-law, E. P. Kinne, that his child is improving in health. He describes the resort as a three hundred acre tract of land, situated on the highest point of the Alleghany Mountains, and beautifully laid out into walks, drives, natural and artificial. The curative properties of its mineral springs attract hundreds to it every year. Its visitors are rich, gay, and fashionable, and their fine clothes and turn-outs contrast strangely with the plain suit of a western man. The Col. is spending a pleasant summer, and hopes to return soon with his little boy entirely recovered. Courier.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1876.

We received a letter from “Scott” last Friday evening, dated Cadiz, Ohio, July 31, stating that he had “done” the Centennial, and was of the opinion that it was “some pumpkins” of a show. Scott met Rev. Platter, J. C. Fuller, and Mr. Hitchcock, of Winfield, in Philadelphia, and saw Col. J. C. McMullen, of this place, in a street car. He also reported the weather cool and delightful.

[ORDINANCE NO. 48: ARKANSAS CITY. SIDEWALKS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 16, 1876.

RECAP: On July 13, 1875, an ordinance for the construction of sidewalks on the west side of Summit Street, from 6th avenue to 7th avenue, except in front of lot 1 in block 79, and numbered Ordinance 38 on page 102 of the Journal of Council Proceedings, and on page 90 of the book of Ordinances for the City of Arkansas City, was passed by the Mayor and Councilmen.

COST WAS 70 CENTS PER FRONT FT. FOR THE FOLLOWING:

BLOCK 69, LOT 3, 25 FT. FRONT, $17.50

BLOCK 69, LOT 2, 18 FT. FRONT, $12.60

BLOCK 69, LOT 5, 25 FT. FRONT, $17.50

BLOCK 69, LOT 6, 25 FT. FRONT, $17.50

BLOCK 68, LOT 11, 25 FT. FRONT, $17.50

COST WAS 90 CENTS PER FRONT FT. FOR THE FOLLOWING:

BLOCK 79, LOT 2, 25 FT. FRONT, $22.50

SAME COST FIGURES, AMOUNTS ALSO APPLIED TO:

BLOCK 79, LOTS 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, AND 14...ALL BEING 25 FT. FRONT, EACH $22.50.

J. A. LOOMIS, ACTING MAYOR, AND I. H. BONSALL, CITY CLERK, GOT AROUND TO LEVYING THE TAXES FOR THE ABOVE-NOTED SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION ON AUGUST 16, 1876.

[ORDINANCE NO. 49: TAX OF EIGHT MILLS—GENERAL REVENUE]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 16, 1876.


MAYOR AND COUNCILMEN OF ARKANSAS CITY IMPOSED A TAX OF EIGHT MILLS ON THE DOLLAR FOR GENERAL REVENUE PURPOSES TO BE LEVIED AND COLLECTED FOR THE YEAR 1876 ON ALL THE REAL, MIXED, AND PERSONAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 6, 1876.

COL. McMULLEN AND WIFE returned last week from the Centennial and the East.  During their absence, Mrs. McMullen and her child were very sick, and they are glad to get back safe.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 13, 1876.

YOU can purchase at the Arkansas City Bank a farm of 160 acres of first-class land, thirty acres in wheat, some fencing, most excellent spring water, in good neighborhood, for $800 down, the balance in yearly payment of $100 at 12 percent interest.

                                                         J. C. McMULLEN.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 20, 1876.

COL. McMULLEN offers some cheap lands for sale in Cowley and Sumner counties.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 4, 1876.

PARTNERS. Doctors Alexander and Loomis are partners in dentistry.

[PROCEEDINGS OF THE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 11, 1876.

                OFFICE OF COUNTY CLERK, WINFIELD, KANSAS, Oct. 2, 1876.

Board met in regular session; all present, with A. J. Pyburn, County Attorney, and M. G. Troup, County Clerk. Journal of two last special sessions read and approved.

Petition of Isaac C. Loomis and others, of Creswell Township, asking for view and survey presented, granted, and D. Logan, John Nichols, and Wm. Wilson appointed viewers, and the County Clerk ordered to give legal notice.

[EDITORIAL COLUMN: WIRT W. WALTON, EDITOR.]

Winfield Courier, October 12, 1876.

                                                  SCOTT TAKES WATER.

                                              He is Afraid to Face the Music!

                                         His Readers To Be Kept In the Dark.

Last week, October 4th, the Arkansas Traveler devoted about six columns of space to the object of misrepresenting Mr. E. C. Manning. As soon as Mr. Manning saw the Traveler, Thursday, October 5th, he wrote the following communication and sent it to Col. McMullen, of Arkansas City, accompanied with a request that he present it to Mr. Scott with the request that it be published in the Traveler. Mr. Scott refused to publish it, giving an excuse that he had not room in the paper. The letter was presented to him on Friday evening or Saturday morning of last week. We therefore publish the communication and shall send a copy of the COURIER to each of the Traveler subscribers in the county. The Traveler has room for six columns of misrepresenta­tion against a Republican candidate and no room for one column of reply. Let the readers be the judges. Scott’s refusal to make the publication and accept the propositions therein made, ought to close his lips and change the tone of his paper. Here is the communication:

                                               A Letter From E. C. Manning.


                                            WINFIELD, KAN., Oct. 5th, 1876.

C. M. SCOTT,

Editor of Arkansas City Traveler:

In your issue of the 4th inst., you publish about six columns of reading matter which is a false presentation of history and facts concerning myself.

You select certain sentenc­es from what appears to be evi­dence (but which is not evidence) that are derogatory to my character and reflect upon my record, and publish them. Certain other sentences and paragraphs that contradict the unfavorable sentenc­es, or, which taken in connec­tion with the unfavorable sentences make me appear in a far different light, are left unpublished. You choose to present to your readers whatever portions of any act of my life as will make me appear to be a bad man, but you withhold such portions of the account of the same act or transac­tion as may give them a far different look or convey a favorable impression. If I should say, “I saw Mr. C. M. Scott stealing,” and end the sentence there, it would be rather a reflection upon Mr. Scott if I should complete the sentence by saying, “I saw Mr. C. M. Scott stealing—along the street to avoid meeting a personal enemy,” it would have quite a different meaning, though perhaps not less characteristic.

In a former issue of your paper of recent date you publish what you call ten charges against me. In your October 4th issue you startle the world with the 11th charge. Therein you say: “We charge that you (Manning) as a member of the State Senate of 1866, committed the gross offense of lying most shamefully, and by your vote, in connection with other members of the legisla­ture, you robbed the present and future unborn (the latter are Scott’s, the “present unborn” are better off—fatherless) genera­tions of the children of Kansas of 500,000 acres of land, worth $1,500,000.”

You further say: “How did he (Manning) do it? Just as he did later in 1871, by forthwith trying to use his position as the servant of the people to make money out of an office they elected him to. And how did he do it? At that time the state school fund owned the 500,000 acres of land referred to in the above section of the constitution, and that constitution says that it shall be a perpetual school fund which shall not be diminished, and shall be inviolably appropriated to the support of the common schools.”

You further say: “At the time he (Manning) voted for that bill (dividing the 500,000 acres of so called school land among four railroad companies); he (Manning) was a member of one of said corporations, and his company, under that bill, received by its provisions 125,000 acres of land, which the constitution he swore he would support and protect, said should never be divested from the common school fund of the state. By that act he (Manning) helped rob the children of Kansas and divided this property among the licensed plunderers of the public treasury, with whom he at that time was and ever since has been found.” But you say also, “personally we have no quarrel with Col. Manning.”

In reply to this “charge eleven,” I have to say:

1st. You are right about my vote and about my being at the time a member of one of the corporations.

2nd. The land did not belong to the school fund of the state.

3rd. If, under the constitution, it did belong to the school fund, the legislature could not by law dispose of it. A law conflicting with the constitution is void.


4th. Not one acre of the land, nor one dollar of the money arising from the sale of that land, ever came to me. For every acre that you can trace to me individually, or out of which I received any benefit, I will give you ten acres adjoining Winfield. For every dollar arising from the sale thereof that you can trace as coming to me, I will give you ten dollars.

I “stole” that 125,000 acres of land to build a railroad for my constituents in Marshal County. The company that built the road received the land, or the proceeds thereof, and my constitu­ents got the railroad; neither was I a member of the company that built the road.

And I might as well say right here that there are about 12,000 acres of land left as the property of the state of Kansas, and if I am elected to the Senate again, I will, if opportunity offers, “steal” it to build a railroad into Cowley County.

5th. Among the “licensed plunderers with whom he (Manning) at that time was” and who “helped rob the children of Kansas,” there were about seventy-five pretty good men, of which James M. Harvey was one; but the people of the state have since that robbery elected him twice Governor and once U. S. Senator.

And now Mr. Scott, without answering in detail all the infamous charges you make against me, I have this proposition to make to you: Let the Republican Central Committee of Cowley County be convened at once and then present to them all your eleven charges against me with all your evidence of their truth and I will present all of my evidence of their untruth. If they shall find upon hearing both sides that my conduct in any of the acts attributed to me by you has been dishonorable or disreputa­ble, I will then get off the Republican ticket, provided you will first agree to support my nomination and election and take back all you have said about me in case they shall exonerate and sustain me. Or if you object to the committee of twenty-two Republicans, then lay the matter before three disinterested Republicans who reside outside the limits of Cowley County, who shall be selected by said committee. Yours in earnest, E. C. MANNING.

[EDITORIAL: “MANNING TAKES PHYSIC.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 18, 1876.

Col. Manning comes out again this week in a column and a half article, evading the charges made against him, and trying to mislead the people by publishing falsehoods. He says we “refused to publish his article, giving an excuse that we had not room in the paper.” That is not true. We told Col. McMullen that it was the most unreasonable and preposterous demand we had ever known for one publisher to ask another publisher to publish his arti­cles in a political contest. Such a thing was never known. He has his own paper and it is taking no advantage of him whatever, as any reasonable mind can readily see. Besides, all the Courier’s sent to our subscribers are made from the list we gave him ourselves, in order that he could have every opportunity of refuting the charges.

The balderdash he puts forth to explain that we publish only portions of any act of his life, is too foolish. We made our charges of what he has done, and if he can explain them satisfac­torily, why doesn’t he do it?


His continual whining and declar­ing himself a pure, perse­cuted man avails nothing with those who have time and again had their trust betrayed by him. He is a smooth, oily talker, and to one unacquainted generally gains sympathy. There was a time when most people of this county trusted Mr. Manning, but owing to his repeated trickery, he has breached the confidence and lost the faith of three fourths of all who know him.

Mr. Manning said in a speech at this place that he did try to borrow money at Topeka. That he tried to borrow of political aspirants, and “would try it again,” without asking anyone whether he should or not. That is just what we are afraid of, and just what we want to prevent. We don’t want our representa­tives to be “borrowing” money. We have explained this “borrow­ing” business, and don’t want it repeated. If Mr. Manning is hard up again, we don’t want to trust him at Topeka. And again, in the last issue of the Courier, he says:

“I ‘stole’ that 125,000 acres of land to build a railroad for my constituents in Marshall County. The company that built the road received the land, or the proceeds thereof, and my constituents got the railroad—neither was I a member of the company that built the road. And I might as well say right here that there are about 12,000 acres of land left as the property of the State of Kansas, and if I am elected to the Senate again, I will, if opportunity offers, ‘steal’ it to build a railroad into Cowley County.”

Now he frankly says he did steal 125,000 acres of land to build a railroad, and openly declares he will, if opportunity offers, steal 12,000 acres for Cowley. My God, what more confes­sions do the people want. A man going to the capitol of the State of Kansas, to represent Cowley County, by “borrowing” money and stealing land. Supposing the representatives of every county in the State go there for the same purpose, and what will become of us.

If “Scott takes Water,” the Colonel should take something stronger that will cleanse his system and restore his reason, if he has any.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 18, 1876.

COL. McMULLEN had an adventure with a fractious colt this week. No damage, however, except the buggy pole was broken.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 25, 1876.

SAFE TEST. Mr. A. O. Porter made a test trial of J. C. McMullen’s new safe, last week, to see if it could not be drilled into. A small portable lathe of great power was brought to bear on it, with one of Col’s number two drills, and in 15 minutes they cut through the two outer iron plates, when everyone thought they were going right through it, but as soon as the steel plate was reached, the drill stopped and was drawn out with the point worn off. The drill was retempered and tried again with the same result and like effect, when they gave up the test until morning. Bright and early the workmen were at work again with new drills, but could go no further, when they were satisfied it could not be entered. Mr. Wood then made a trial by pouring nitro muriatic acid in the hole, but could do nothing. The safe is a beautiful piece of workmanship, with a Yale time lock, weighs 4,200 pounds, is sold at $1,600, and made at Cincinnati, Ohio.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 8, 1876.

One large fine work team for sale; enquire of J. C. McMullen.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 8, 1876.


ROAD. ISAAC LOOMIS and others have petitioned the County Board for a public road commencing at the quarter section stone between sections 24 and 25, in Township 34, thence north along quarter section line across sections 24 and 13. D. Logan, John Nichols, and Wm. Wilson are the viewers, and meet at the place of beginning November 15th, at 10 o’clock a.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 20, 1876.

                                      New Years Festival of the M. E. Church.

                                                 Programme of Committees.

                                                       HALL COMMITTEE.

Mr. Wolf, W. York, C. Swarts, Wm. Gibby, S. Hunt.

                                                 SOLICITING COMMITTEE.

Mr. and Mrs. Grimes, Mrs. J. Nichols, Mrs. N. Shaw, Mrs. Horn, Samuel Endicott, H. Carder, Ida Grimes, Katy Myers, Mrs. Demott, Mrs. Pepper, R. Carder.

                                                 RECEIVING COMMITTEE.

Wm. Gray, Katy Myers, Harvey Grimes, Ida Grimes, Rachael Carder, H. Carder, Nelly Wood, Frank Wood.

                                                              GRAB BAG.

Hattie Wilson, Nelly Porter.

                                                      TABLE COMMITTEE.

Mr. & Mrs. Porter, Mrs. Alexander, Mrs. Fitch, Charles Swarts, Harvey Grimes, Mrs. McMullen, Mrs. Wood, Mrs. Wilson, Mrs. Hoffmaster, Mrs. Endicott, Mrs. Collins, Mrs. Lizzie Mitchell, Wm. Gray, Mr. & Mrs. Ward, Mr. & Mrs. Godehard, Mr. & Mrs. Purdy, Mr. & Mrs. T. Mantor, Mrs. Morgan.

                                                    OYSTER COMMITTEE.

J. Gibby, Mrs. McMullen.

                                                   CARVING COMMITTEE.

Henry Endicott, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Bowers, C. Endicott.

                                                 RECEPTION COMMITTEE.

Mr. Felton, Bitha Bowers, Josie Howe, Charles Swarts, Miss Kennedy, F. York.

                                                     MUSIC COMMITTEE.

Rev. J. J. Winger, Lizzie Mitchell, Georgie Christian, Ret Burkey.

                                                TREASURER: J. C. McMullen.

                                                 TICKET AGENT: W. J. Gray.

                                                           ART GALLERY.

Mr. & Mrs. Bonsall, W. S. Hunt, Miss T. Bowers.

The post office will be conducted by H. Carder, C. Endicott, Mowrie Bowers, Miss Kennedy.

If any additions or slight changes may be necessary, parties will receive personal notice.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 10, 1877.

There will be a Lady Washington tea party given in honor of Washington, on his birthday, Feb. 22, by the ladies of the M. E. Society, for the benefit of the M. E. Church. Managing Commit­tee: Rev. J. J. Wingar, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. McMullen, Mrs. Alexander, Mrs. Fitch.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 31, 1877.


There will be social of the M. E. Society at Pearson’s Hall this (Wednesday) evening; also a meeting of the ladies at the residence of J. C. McMullen on Thursday afternoon. A cordial invitation is extended to all who would be pleased to meet with us. By order of Society.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 21, 1877.

COL. J. C. McMULLEN, of Arkansas City, was in town this week. He reports a deep interest in the narrow gauge enterprise in Cowley County. Emporia News.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 3, 1877.

CITY ELECTION. The election of city officers took place last Monday, quietly and peaceably, with the following result.

Mayor: Dr. Kellogg.

Police Judge: Jas. Christian.

Councilmen: James Benedict, H. P. Farrar, James I. Mitchell, H. Godehard, I. H. Bonsall.

There was another ticket in the field, composed of Wm. Sleeth for Mayor, Judge Christian for Police Judge, and A. A. Newman, O. P. Houghton, E. D. Eddy, J. A. Loomis, and J. T. Shepard, for Councilmen; but as one was composed of, or was generally understood to be “license” men, the issue was made “license” and “anti-license,” and the vote stood 70 for the former and 41 for the latter. Both tickets were composed of the best men of the community.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 3, 1877.

In the race for Mayor last Monday, H. D. Kellogg received 72 votes, Major Sleeth 40, and Rev. Thompson 1.

For Police Judge, James Christian received 112 votes, and Rev. David Thompson 1.

For Councilmen, Jas. Benedict received 72, E. P. Farrar 72, Jas. I. Mitchell 72, H. Godehard 71, I. H. Bonsall 71, A. A. Newman 40, O. P. Houghton 40, E. D. Eddy 40, J. A. Loomis 40, Dr. J. T. Shepard 40, Rev. Wingar 1, Rev. Swarts 1, Rev. Will York 1, L. C. Norton 1, J. C. Topliff 3, Sherb Hunt 1.

[EDITORIAL COLUMNS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 3, 1877.

A committee composed of Wm. Allison, Cliff. Wood, Frank Williams, Rev. Platter, E. C. Manning, and Dr. Mansfield from Winfield visited this place Tuesday, March 27, for the purpose of combining an east and west railroad proposition with the Walnut Valley project. A meeting was held in Pearson’s Hall in the afternoon, and a committee of seven elected to meet and confer with them, composed of Amos Walton, James Benedict, Frank Lorry, S. P. Channell, C. R. Mitchell, J. C. McMullen, and C. M. Scott.

The committee from this place agreed to unite the two propositions if they could be voted on at the same time on the same ballot, and if it was not legal to vote for both on the same ballot, then they wanted the Winfield people to vote for the Walnut Valley project first, and our people would give them every reasonable assurance and pledges that they would support the proposition offered, or any definite project from the east.

No positive agreement could be made and the matter was adjourned.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 3, 1877.

                                                         Railroad Meeting.

A meeting was held at Pearson’s Hall on Tuesday, March 27th, to consult with a delegation from Winfield on railroad matters. S. P. Channell was elected chairman and I. H. Bonsall, secretary.


Rev. Platter requested Col. Manning to address the meeting, and explain a proposition he had with him for an east and west road; also to inform our citizens of the actions of meetings held at Winfield on railroad matters. He said that Winfield wished to avoid a clash, if possible, and to come to some understanding with this part of the county in regard to railroads. Mr. Millington and himself were sent by the people of Winfield to the eastern part of the State, to see what the prospects were for an east and west line. They went to Fredonia first, and found things too uncertain there to make it worthwhile to wait on the uncertainty; from thence to Parsons, where they found the people holding a conference with Eastern contractors; from there they proceeded to Oswego, and found the situation such as to give no hope of help from that quarter. They then returned to Parsons, and had a full conference with the Parsons men, and found as good prospects for a road from that point as from Emporia.

Col. Manning admitted that a proposition he read for the Parsons road had not been accepted by the railroad company, but that he would make the company accept it.

They returned by the Parsons route proposed, and in their estimation found a good route. The franchise is being worked up as far as the east line of Elk County.

In Elk County the peti­tion had been signed by a sufficient number, but they preferred to change the proposition from town­ship bonds to county bonds, as the recent change in the railroad law made it possible to carry county bonds.

Winfield feels that an election for railroad bonds at this time would be premature, and prefers to wait until the other counties have voted and secured a line to Cowley County.

Rev. Platter thought Col. Manning had given a true version of the case as it now stood, and said that Mr. Hamilton, a civil engineer, wanted Winfield to call an election for the Parsons road. He believed that the present proposition of the Emporia road was such as would not be sustained at all, there being clauses which, in his estimation, could not be changed to suit at all.

He said Winfield wanted an east and west proposition submit­ted at the same time that the north and south proposition was submitted, and that if Arkansas City wanted a north and south road, she must consent to an east and west road to secure the support of Winfield.

C. M. Scott moved to appoint a committee of seven to confer with the Winfield delega-tion, and see if a compromise could not be agreed upon. After considerable discussion, the motion was seconded, and the following committee appointed: Frank Lorry, of Bolton, Amos Walton, C. R. Mitchell, S. P. Channell, James Benedict, C. M. Scott, and Col. McMullen.

On motion meeting adjourned, to give the committees time to confer.

                                                 S. P. CHANNELL, Chairman.

I. H. BONSALL, Secretary.

[Note: The paragraph wherein Winfield would not back a north/south road unless Arkansas City went along at the same time with an east/west road to Winfield. Other papers picked up on this movement by the Winfield people and objected!]

[“A. W.” LASHES OUT AT EDITOR E. C. MANNING.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 11, 1877. Editorial Item.

                                                     CLEAR THE DECKS!

                                                  Nail Down the Hatchways!


                                                        Prepare for Action.

This is the language of the heading of an unfair article in the Courier of March 29. If it means anything, it means a deadly, bitter fight; and it would be well if all the fair and impartial citizens of Cowley County would honestly consider what this man, who thus pretends to represent the city and citizens of Winfield and the people of Cowley County, is determined to fight in such a bitter way. Surely the city of Winfield must be in great danger to thus have to prepare her decks for action. What is it? you ask. Well it is simply this: Certain gentlemen of known wealth and reputation, having secured the confidence and franchises of Lyon County, proposed to build a road of three feet gauge to and through the city of Winfield. The Courier man has said himself that the men who are backing the road are able to build it.

Then flows an enumeration of Winfield objections to the proposition of the company, which is characterized as an arbi­trary provision. Now will the people of Cowley County go back on the record a few years and test the sincerity of the citizens of Winfield, and of the writer of the article, “Clear the Decks.” He and they not only advocated such a proposition before, but he, the aforesaid writer, was very anxious to have the escrow part fulfilled. He hankered more after crow a year or two ago than he does now. Then it was perfectly proper and safe; now it is dangerous. Now, again, go back on the record a little over a year ago, when the writer of “Clear the Decks,” was anxious to form a local company and build a narrow gauge road from Emporia. If this gentleman and one or two others who were intimately connected with him will refresh their memories, they will find that they stated over and over again that $150,000 was not enough for building through the county.

You see it makes some difference who is to handle the bonds as to how much the county ought to give—according to some people’s notions. Now we will make a quotation to show the unfairness of this article, and the evident determination of the writer, whose malignant feeling toward Arkansas City is shown in every line. We quote:

“Without coming to any agreement, the gentlemen went to Arkansas City, and soon thereafter we find men in every township in the county from Arkansas City, circulating petitions.”

An omission of the writer makes a lie and a misstatement in the above as much so as though he had put it into words. He should have been sworn to tell the whole truth.

He forgot to tell the people of Cowley County that the gentlemen representing the road returned to Winfield, and with them a deputation of the best citizens of Arkansas City, and that they stayed all day; and that the citizens of Winfield would not even get together in a room and state what modifications they wanted, nor listen to any terms of agreement, but treated the citizens of their neighboring city with such marked disrespect as to amount almost to insult; that they said, in effect, “Winfield controls the county—when we get ready to say the word, Arkansas City and the country townships can walk up to the trough and drink, and not until then.”


After this, in the same article, comes a statement in regard to a committee from Winfield visiting Arkansas City, and again the writer’s memory proves treacherous, and he only states that their committee offered to put in $100,000 each for an east and west and a north and south road—forgetting entirely to state that they offered to give $120,000 to a north and south road, and take just enough to bring an east and west road to the city of Winfield, and no further.

He forgot, also, to state that they had no reliable, reason­able project to present at Arkansas City, or anywhere else, in regard to a road from the east.

To conclude this article, I would make this one observation in the shape of an appeal to all fair minded citizens, and especially to the farmers and producers of the county: There is in the article referred to a feeling of malignity exhibited against a thriving village in your midst, in which you cannot share. It may be only the members of a bitter political contro­versy, only existing in the mind of one man, and it may be the feeling of property holders in the city of Winfield, who think that they will be largely benefitted by anything which will destroy the growth of a sister town. But neither reason applies to the large majority of the citizens of the county. Every dollar of taxable property added to either city helps the county so much towards lightening the burden of taxation, and is an aid to them.  A. W.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 11, 1877. Editorial Item.

                                                         Railroad Matters.

The committee who went from this place to Augusta, learning that Mr. Young and Gov. Eskridge intended going to Winfield to confer with the people of that place, at the urgent request of one of the citizens and a member of the Railroad Committee of Winfield, sent word for a delegation to come up to agree to a new proposition. A number went, but upon their arrival, found that no agreement could be made, as the Committee of Winfield had stated they could not entertain any proposition from the north, as they had one from the east. Mr. Young and Gov. Eskridge then came to this place and submitted the proposition to Creswell Township to build their road down the west side of the Walnut by Township aid. The same proposition will be submitted to Rock, Nennescah, Vernon, Beaver, Creswell, Bolton, and probably Pleasant Valley Townships, and if the aid is rendered, the road will be built.

In the evening a large and enthusiastic meeting was held at the church, during which a stirring speech was made by Mr. Eskridge, and remarks by Mr. Young, Rev. Fleming, Judge Chris­tian, Amos Walton, Mr. Channell, and others, after which a committee of eleven were appointed as follows, as Managing Committee, with power to appoint Finance, Canvassing, and Sub-Committees: Dr. Hughes, O. P. Houghton, C. M. Scott, A. A. Newman, James Christian, J. C. McMullen, S. B. Fleming, M. R. Leonard, Amos Walton, R. C. Haywood and S. P. Channell.

The Committee then elected Dr. Hughes, President, J. C. McMullen, Vice President, Amos Walton, Secretary, and R. C. Haywood, Treasurer. The hour being late, the Committee then adjourned.

[ATTORNEYS IN ATTENDANCE AT DISTRICT COURT.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 23, 1877.


The following attorneys were in attendance upon the present term of the District Court: Hon. Alfred L. Redden, of Eldorado; Mr. White, Howard City; Judge M. S. Adams, Wichita; Mr. McBryan, Sedan; Hon. C. R. Mitchell, Amos Walton, Judge Christian, E. B. Kager and Col. McMullen, of Arkansas City; and Messrs. Hackney & McDonald, Pryor & Pryor, Jennings & Buckman, Pyburn & Seward, Jas. McDermott, Henry E. Asp, E. S. Torrance, J. E. Allen, L. J. & Linus Webb, D. A. Millington, A. H. Green, W. M. Boyer, J. M. Alexander, of Winfield.

[BOLTON TOWNSHIP CELEBRATES FOURTH OF JULY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 11, 1877 - FRONT PAGE.

                                                The Fourth of July in Bolton.

                                                       [For the TRAVELER.]

                                                 A WOMAN’S VIEW OF IT.

Mr. Editor:

I attended the Fourth of July in Bolton last Wednesday, and took a few notes I want to tell you. I did not go for fun; I did not go for frolic; but for sober, solid information and instruc­tion, and to see the people and things. I saw you there, to begin with, and concluded from appearances that the local depart­ment of the paper would be neglected, as you had your hand full, mind full, and from the monstrous basket you towed around, I took it for granted you would soon have a stomach full. An editor is always hungry, they say, and I believe it. But I don’t want to write this article entirely about you, for there were others equally as handsome as yourself and lady.

Do not censure me if I am too critical, for you know half a woman lives for is to see and be seen, talk a great deal, and hear much more. Men are slow, stupid beings, capable of talking only one at a time, but we, the fairest of God’s creatures, can talk all together.

Isn’t it delightful to go to a picnic, sit down under a shady bough, and watch the people, and make comparisons? I had just such a location when I made these notes.

First on the scene was Mr. Skinner, senior. You can assure yourself he would be first if he came at all. Then came Frank Denton, Mr. Parvin, Capt. Hoffmaster, Mr. Steiner, and “Jim,” with their amiable wives all neatly dressed. Soon after came what the TRAVELER has dubbed the “young bloods” of Bolton and Creswell.

There was that wild and reckless Will Stewart, who drives as though he was running a passenger coach, followed by modest (?) O. C. Skinner and the constable of your town, with gayly attired ladies.

Soon the dignity of Creswell appeared, with covered car­riages and fine horses. Among them Col. McMullen, Dr. Alexander, Rev. Fleming, O. P. Houghton, and last, but not least, his Honor, Judge Christian, and Amos Walton, speakers of the day.

I did like Judge Christian’s oration, and was surprised at the ability of the old gentleman and his powers of delivery. Anyone could see it was a speech prepared by hard study, and a great amount of reading. If the ground committee had done their duty and prepared seats, many more would have heard the speech, but for elderly persons to stand in a grove without a breath of air stirring is too much for comfort, much less to pay attention to an oration.


Among the audience there was the handsome young widow with money to loan, the belles of Bolton and their adored, the bois­terous town roughs, and wives of distinguished citizens, who came alone, leaving their husbands to remain at home to look after the “by-bie.” There were good, bad, and indifferent persons among the crowd. At the table also was a sight. On one side, mild, kind, and lovely women could be seen, and nearby the uncouth, voracious individual whose mouth looked as though he had his throat cut, every time he opened it.

There were many strangers I had never seen before, and familiar faces I have not had the pleasure of seeing for some time. One fine appearing, Christian looking gentleman, I learned, was from Illinois, and others I was informed lived across the Arkansas. Understand me when I say across the Arkan­sas, to mean on the north side, for I am a resident of Bolton Township.

But I have scarcely referred to my notes. Rev. McClanahan, a new preacher, began the exercises with prayer. The Declaration was then commendably read by Mr. Parvin, of our side; then the brass band of your place, after a series of toots, and yells for “Charley,” “Frank,” “Ret,” “where’s Lyman Herrick?” and “where’s Ed. Thompson?” worked up a tune. We supposed “Charley” and “Frank” and “Ret” to be single men, and imagined they might be promenading with someone’s sister, but we do not know it. Yes, they worked up a tune finally. I would give you the name of it, if I could, but I could not find anyone who knew it.

After prayer, Dr. Shepard, who was appointed Chairman, introduced Hon. James Christian. His speech lasted about half an hour, and was appreciated by all who heard it. Hon. Amos Walton then spoke in a strong, pleasing tone, after which the gathering began to separate and seek their homes.

This, Mr. Editor, is all I have to say. If at any future time you wish me to express my sentiments, I may be in the mood to favor you. I desire to thank the people of your township for the patriotism they manifested in coming to Bolton Township for a Fourth of July Celebration when they couldn’t have one at home, and the good wives of the Bolton men who worked to make it a success.

I also want to say that the visit paid us by your most estimable ladies, Mrs. and Miss Revs. Thompson, Mrs. Fleming, Mrs. Shepard, Mrs. Hughes, Mrs. Sipes, Mrs. McMullen, and a number of others, will be returned, as they added much to the enjoyment of the occasion. I also desire to thank the band boys, for they meant well in their heads, but their hearts, I fear, troubled them. There were a number of young ladies, also, whom I would be gratified to have call on me at any time, and the young boys know they are all cherished and loved by AUNT MARY.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 11, 1877.

COL. McMULLEN now owns Murdock’s race horse, “Sleepy Jack.”

Arkansas City Traveler, July 11, 1877.

AUNT MARY was the TRAVELER reporter on the 4th, in Bolton Township.

Winfield Courier, August 16, 1877.          

                                                              LAUS DEO!

                                     A MEMORABLE DAY FOR WINFIELD.

                                           The M. E. Church Free From Debt.

On Sunday last in the new stone church one of the largest audiences that ever met in Winfield congregated to help dedicate the new and imposing edifice to the good of man and the glory of God.


C. R. Pomeroy, D. D., of Emporia; C. C. McCabe, D. D., of Chicago; Presiding Elder Walters, of Wichita; J. E. Fox, P. E. at Hutchinson; Rev. J. Kirby, and Rev. J. P. Harson, of Wichita; Rev. H. J. Walker, Wellington; Rev. J. W. Stewart, Oxford; Reverends B. C. Swarts, Arkansas City; E. Nance, Maple City; ____ Long, of Tisdale; W. H. McCamey, of Dexter; J. E. Platter, C. J. Adams, P. Lahr, and J. L. Rusbridge, pastor, of Winfield, assisted in the labors of the day.

Chaplain McCabe spoke for an hour to an attentive and interested audience, pointing in forcible and glowing terms to the work of the church, the needs of our people, the dangers to our Republic, and the saving power of religion in matters of dollars and cents, of bread and butter. True is it, as he said, that the demon of intemperance finds its most untiring and relentless antagonist in the church of Christ. As a social, a political, an economical, and an educational investment, our church capital is productive beyond all other investments.

The sermon of the morning was followed by a statement from Mr. Rushbridge concerning the financial condition of the M. E. Church of Winfield. A building had been erected at an expense of $7,000, of which some three thousand dollars remained unpaid. The work of this day, the prefatory exercises of the dedication, was to raise the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars, which would practically cancel the immense debt of the church and free the building from all encumbrances.

At this announcement from Mr. Rushbridge, the hearts of the most hopeful failed them, and few felt that the work of this day would remove this immense burden. In a few minutes contributions and subscriptions began to pour in. One hundred dollars was reached—then five hundred, and soon a thousand had been subscribed, and then the hopes of all grew stronger, and the purses of the many grew liberal, while rich and poor, male and female, saint and sinner, gave of their means to aid the noble cause. By the close of the morning services about eight hundred dollars had been given. At the afternoon exercises a few hundred more was given, and at night the entire amount of twenty-five hundred dollars was reached, and then the audience rose up and sang that grand old song, “Praise God from whom all Blessings Flow.” The work was done! The church was free! The service of dedication was finished, and the people departed to their homes proud of the beautiful edifice which adorns our city, but prouder still of that generosity and liberality which adorns the hearts and minds of our enterprising citizens.

Of the music, of the songs, of the sermons, of the vast crowd assembled, we say nothing, as the entire city seemed to have been present and to enjoy the occasion, and so our readers need no comments upon these matters.

An elegant silver set for communion service, presented by F. M. Friend, and a fine clock from Will Hudson were among the donations.

The building is 40 x 80 feet in size, with an arched ceiling 27 feet high. It is beautiful in outline and harmonious in its appointments.

[Note: Of interest with respect to church are the following two items. MAW]

Winfield Courier, October 25, 1877.

Rev. N. L. Rigby exhibited to us his patent for his invention in lamps, issued to him by the government of Great Britain. To those who have never seen such a document, it is worth a visit to Mr. Rigby to see it. The document itself would do for a table-cloth, and is neater, whiter, and more substantial than most table-spreads. The seal weighs about four pounds, and the whole is enclosed in and fills up a neat case about twelve by sixteen inches, five inches deep.

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1877.


The new M. E. church is lighted by the latest style Rigby & Pryor lamps. A brass pipe,  about an inch and a half in diameter, suspended from the ceiling by four rods, passes through the center of the building, upon which, about four feet apart, are a number of lamps, which illuminate the building as well as gas.

[PERSONALS.]

Winfield Courier, August 16, 1877.

Col. J. C. McMullen and family, of Arkansas City, were up to Winfield last Sabbath to attend the dedication.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 22, 1877.

SECOND HAND two seated spring wagon for sale. Inquire of J. C. McMULLEN.

Winfield Courier, August 30, 1877.

The following attorneys have arrived since Monday, and are in attendance at the District Court this week: Thos. George, of Wellington; Chas. Wilsie, of Oxford; A. L. Redden, of Eldorado; J. C. McMullen and James Christian, of Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 5, 1877.

Mr. Marques, of Denver, is visiting his relatives at this place. He is a brother-in-law of Col. McMullen.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 3, 1877.

LARGE CORN. Russell Cowles left a sample of corn with us, grown on the Arkansas bottom land that contains 880 grains, and weighs one pound and twelve ounces. It can be seen at the Post Office. Anyone having extra samples of wheat, corn, rye, barley, potatoes, vegetables, or fruit can help advertise the country by leaving them with us.

Since writing the above, we have sent the corn to Wisconsin by Col. McMullen.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 3, 1877.

Col. McMullen has gone to Wisconsin. His father will return with him.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1877.

RETURNED. Col. J. C. McMullen returned from Wisconsin last week, after a visit of several weeks. Cowley County is good enough for him.

Winfield Courier, November 1, 1877.

RETURNED. Col. J. C. McMullen returned from Wisconsin last week, after a visit of several weeks. Cowley County is good enough for him.

Winfield Courier, November 1, 1877.

We got hold of the wrong Berkey last week as the democratic candidate for Register of Deeds. A. W. Berkey is a clerk for the bank of J. C. McMullen, of Arkansas City, not a merchant at Salt City. He will go up Salt River all the same.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 7, 1877.

                                                   The Race in South Bend.


The TRAVELER reporter arrived at South Bend last Saturday afternoon in time to witness the races, examine the horses, and hear the general talk of the bystanders. Nearly seventy-five people had gathered to see the trial of speed, and although all were interested, very little money exchanged hands. The track was on the Walnut River bottom, on the farm formerly owned by Fislar, and was one of the best we have seen in the Southwest. While it was hard on top, it had a spongy appearance, and gave slightly to the horses’ hoofs, enabling them to strike firm and strong without damaging the feet. The tracks were one-quarter of a mile in length, and far enough apart to prevent the riders striking one another’s horses, and level as a floor. At the starting point on one track was a shoot, or pen, made to prevent the horse from flying the track. This was used by the sorrel colt. For some time considerable parleying was done on how the horses would start, and the race was finally given up on account of a dispute. Simms, who made the race, contended they were to turn on a twelve foot score and run. Phaler, the owner of the gray horse, claimed they were to come up to the score and run. The bets had been a wagon, team, and horses, against a mule and wagon. Finally by allowing Phaler to withdraw the wagon and bet the mule against the wagon, team, and horses, the race was made up, and the horses taken to the end of the tract to start.

“John Bascom,” owned by Howard, is a small chestnut sorrel stallion, four years old, weighing 1,000 pounds. He was in a splendid condition, well trained, and was handled nicely.

“Jack Rabbit,” owned by Dan Phaler, of Dutch Creek, is a gray horse, six years old, weighing 860 pounds, and remarkably well muscled. He is the same horse formerly owned by Hackney & McDonald, for which Phaler paid $360, and mortgaged his farm to pay for. The horse, to our eye, was not in good order for running. The horse was poorly handled and made the race as though he had been overworked or strained.

Some time was taken to get the horses started. Repeatedly they came to the scratch, but something would be wrong. One horse would not get started on the right foot or the other was not far enough ahead.

Finally the “go” was given and both horses sprang into the air and came bounding over the level surface as though shot from a canon. For awhile they ran nearly even; then the little sorrel hugged the ground like a greyhound, and began gaining inch by inch until near the middle of the track, when he ran away from the gray and reached the score several seconds before his adver­sary. Very little whipping was done, but the speed was good, the sorrel horse making the quarter of a mile in less than 30 sec­onds.

T. M. Vaughn, Jake Keffer, and Tom Shales were the judges, and gave the race to “John Bascom” by ten feet, although it appeared more like twenty from where we stood.

Other horses were on the ground, and two or three scrub races were run after the main race.

Col. McMullen’s “Sleepy Jack,” was generally admired, and many offered to bet he could outrun anything on the ground. But as no one seemed inclined to risk anything, and the Colonel did not propose to let him run, the matter was dropped.

Lewis Shales, of Rock Township, had his roan pony on hand, but did not have an opportunity to run him. His horse is a small, heavy built pony, branded “L. W. ALLEN,” and has good action.

It was late in the evening when the races were run, and everyone sought their homes as soon as it was over, congratulat­ing themselves that they had seen one fair race if nothing more.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 14, 1877.

TEN FINE FARMS FOR SALE. Ten percent cash of the purchase money required as first payment; balance on five years’ time. J. C. McMULLEN.


Arkansas City Traveler, November 14, 1877.

A SPAN of fine young brood mares and a span of mules for sale, on time with good security.  J. C. McMULLEN.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 14, 1877.

AMOS WALTON received one vote for township treasurer, Col. McMullen one for constable, H. P. Standley one for road overseer, and Ed. Gray one for coroner.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 21, 1877.

                                   TWENTY-SIX BUILDINGS UNDER WAY.

A BUILDING ASSOCIATION WAS FORMED A FEW WEEKS AGO, and entered into by twelve parties, agreeing to build a house each. Since then fourteen more have declared their intention to build. The original twelve were:

S. P. Channell

W. M. Sleeth

A. A. Newman

L. H. Gardner

O. P. Houghton

Gardner Mott

H. P. Farrar

Silas Parker

J. L. Huey

C. R. Sipes

R. C. Haywood

James Wilson

The additional fourteen are:

J. C. McMullen

Thomas Baird

J. Dodwell

Mrs. Dean

C. C. Wolf

E. J. Fitch

Mr. Ray

Wm. Speers

T. A. Gaskill

D. Logan

J. T. Shepard

Kendall Smith

Jas. Benedict

David Finney

Mr. Gaskill has his house almost enclosed, and the founda­tions and preparations are being made for several others.

Winfield Courier, November 22, 1877.


Col. J. C. McMullen, the leading banker of Arkansas City, has purchased in this city a block of land, which he will immediately improve with a splendid residence for himself and family. He will also build a bank building and open business in this place. He understands this “queen of the valley” matter.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1877.

                                             AN OLD IRISH GENTLEMAN.

We had the pleasure of an hour’s conversation with Mr. McMullen, father of J. C. McMullen of this place, whose age is ninety years. He was a resident of this country before Lafayette came to our relief; left New York City when the Astor House was yet unfinished, and saw Wisconsin grown into a State. His mind is active still, and he readily refers back to events that have transpired sixty years ago. It is a surprise and wonder to him to see the growth this country has made in seven years. In speaking of his sons, now forty years old, he calls them his boys, and thinks they are getting old enough to look out for themselves.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1877.

In conversation with Col. McMullen we learned the statement so widely circulated in this place and the county seat, in reference to his intentions of moving from this town, are not definite. Simply because he made a purchase at the county seat does not decide that he will reside on the purchased tract. Col. McMullen owns property in almost every town in this county, as well as in Sumner and elsewhere, that he bought with no idea of moving to them.

[COMMUNICATION FROM “M”—SOUTH HAVEN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, December 12, 1877.

                                               SOUTH HAVEN, Dec. 8, 1877.

Mr. James Bateman, of South Haven, was married to Miss Mary Doll, of Knox County, Missouri. Jim and his bride are expected every day. The cow bells are being tuned.

BORN. To Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Burdick on the 4th inst., a daughter.

The S. W. Stock Raisers Association meet at Caldwell on Saturday, Dec. 22, at 10 p.m. All stock men are invited to be present.

Mr. McMullen sold his farm of 160 acres to Mr. W. H. Page for $240. Raw prairie.           Several arrivals of late from the east.

Messrs. Kay, Lardon, and McClark returned last week from a successful buffalo hunt. Bringing about 1,500 lbs. each, and a wild horse which they succeeded in capturing.

[IMPROVEMENTS IN AND AROUND OUR TOWN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, December 12, 1877.

We are pleased to record the fact that a number of our citizens are building themselves new dwellings. In our ramble around town yesterday, we counted some twelve dwellings underway, and two new store rooms.

The Berry Brothers, an enterprising grocery firm that came here about a year ago, are erecting a commodious frame store room, 24 x 50 feet, one story high, on the lot south of Wilson’s dry goods store.

Dr. Shepard is erecting a two-story frame store room on the vacant lot between Gardner’s drug store and Benedict & Co.’s hardware establishment.

Finney, Stafford & Hopkins are putting in quite an addition to their livery stable, in the shape of a carriage house some 20 x 40 feet. This firm seems to be getting along finely and enjoying the public confidence. This is as it should be, as they are clever, accommodating gentlemen.


The addition to the old Meigs building—now the property of Mr. Tisdale, the proprietor of the stage line—adds very much to the looks of things on that side of the street. When it is painted up completely, this will be one of the neatest store rooms in town. Judge Christian, the agent of Mr. Tisdale, cannot bear to see anything under his charge so slipshod. Hence this improve­ment.

Mr. Gaskill has just completed his new residence in the western part of town, and moved in the other day.

Jerry Logan will soon have his new residence in the same locality completed and ready to move in.

Col. McMullen is also pushing along a new stone dwelling to rent, which will add much to that street.

We also notice a new stable going up on the vacant lots opposite the Arkansas City House, owned by Williams & Maricle.

We are pleased to see such evidence of increasing prosperity on the part of our citizens.

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1877.

J. P. Short has leased ground on Ninth Avenue to Weston & Hyskill, who are erecting a hardware and stove store. He is also putting up a building adjoining, which will be occupied by Col. McMullen’s bank. This makes six new business buildings that have gone up on that street within the last thirty days.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 19, 1877.

OLD MR. LOOMIS, a gentleman of 75 years of age, carried eighty bushels of wheat, a distance of eighty feet, carrying one and a half bushels at a time, last week, and claimed he did not feel much fatigued either. When even old men come to Kansas, they get young and strong again.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 26, 1877.

DR. LOOMIS purchased the drug store of Kellogg & Hoyt’s. The latter named gentlemen are going into business at Junction City, Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 2, 1878.

CHEAP LANDS. COL. McMULLEN offers twenty-five tracts of land, comprising grain farms, stock farms, timber and pasture lands, very cheap. The lands were purchased when they could be bought very low and are now offered at prices that will make it pay to buy.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 9, 1878.

                                               CHOICE LANDS FOR SALE

                                                                     -IN-

                                                  COWLEY AND SUMNER

                                                              COUNTIES.

One-fifth of the purchase money required as FIRST PAYMENT, Balance on FIVE YEARS’ TIME.


Below will be found a partial list of our lands and town lots, both improved and unimproved, we have for sale. This property is situated in the most desirable portion of Kansas, the great Arkansas River Valley, and adjacent thereto. The climate in this locality is unsurpassed, and the land is as fertile as any in the West. This portion of Kansas is keeping pace with the civilization of the age in building Railroads, Churches, and School Houses. Come here if you want a very desirable home for a very small amount of money.

West 1/2 of section 36, township 34, south of range 3 east; 230 acres, joining Arkansas City; all bottom land; plenty of water and timber; 100 acres in cultivation; very desirable tract of land; price $3,000. As soon as a railroad reaches here, this place will be worth double this sum.

S 1/23 of SE 1/4 sec. 5, tp 34, S R 3 D. This tract is in the finest portion of the Arkansas Valley. Known as the Sweet land; price $600.

E 1/2 of NW 1/4 sec 5, tp 34, S R 4 E. Upland; known as the Waldo tract. Price $300.

NW 1/4 sec 31, tp 33, S R 3 E. Very fine bottom land; plenty of timber and water; price $4 per acre; known as the McLane tract.

SE 1/4 sec 22, tp 34, S R 4 E. Seventy acres in cultiva­tion; good house, plenty of water, price $1,300; 3-1/2 miles east of Arkansas City; known as the Kerr place.

E 1/2 of SW 1/4 sec 17, tp 35, S R 4 E. All in cultivation; on State line; a most excellent piece of land for stock: $700.

SE 1/4 sec 7, tp 34, S R 3 E. This is a most excellent tract of land near Salt City, in an excellent neighborhood; price $1,200. Known as the Sweet farm.

Lot 1 and 2, and S 1/2 of NW 1/4 sec 13, tp 35, S R 4 W, in Sumner county, Kas. Known as the James W. DeHoney tract; price $400.

NE 1/4 sec 9, tp 35, S R 2 W, in Sumner county, Kansas; known as the James R. Prange farm; price $400.

Lot 2 block 80; lot 25, block 132; lots 5 and 6, block 17; lots 9 and 10, block 150; and 5 acres of timber land on Arkansas river, near Max Fawcett’s farm.

NW 1/4 sec 11, tp 35, S R 3 E. Known as the Buckwalter farm; price $1,500.

NE 1/4 sec 13, tp 34, S R 4 E; 80 acres in cultivation; price $800. Known as the W. G. Gooch tract.

NE 1/4 sec 33, tp 33, S R 5 E. Known as the Park farm; price $300.

E 1/2 of NE 1/4 sec 7, and W 1/2 of NW 1/4 sec 8, tp 35, S R 4 E. Known as the Edwards land; price $600.

NW 1/4 sec 27, tp 34, S R 4 E. Thirty acres in cultivation; price $1,200. Inquire of Rev. David Thompson.

                  Inquire of J. C. McMullen or Jas. Christian, Arkansas City, Kansas.

NOTE: The above was only a partial list of properties in ad.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 16, 1878.

We neglected to call special attention to the new ad of Dr. J. A. Loomis last week. If you want anything in the line of drugs, patent medicines, paints, oils, varnishes, lead, etc., the Doctor can supply you. He also has a fine lot of stationery and toilet articles. It is the only place in town where school books are kept. Mr. Will Mowry has charge of the prescription depart­ment, and will be found at the store, ever ready to accommodate his many friends.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 16, 1878.

MONEY TO LOAN. J. A. LOOMIS, LOAN AGENT.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 16, 1878.

THE PEOPLE’S DRUG STORE.

                                                           J. A. LOOMIS,


                                      SUCCESSOR TO KELLOGG & HOYT.

                                                            -DEALER IN-

                                                DRUGS AND MEDICINES,

                                     PAINTS, OILS, AND WINDOW GLASS.

                                        LAMPS, SHADES AND CHIMNEYS,

                                      SCHOOL BOOKS AND STATIONERY,

                                    TOILET ARTICLES AND PERFUMERY,

                          And everything usually kept in a first-class Drug Store.

W. D. Mowry, who has had six years’ experience in this line, will superintend the Prescription Department.

            Physicians’ Prescriptions and Family Recipes Compounded at all Hours.

                                             DON’T FORGET THE PLACE.

                                                                    -AT-

                                        KELLOGG & HOYT’S OLD STAND.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 23, 1878.

BOOKS and Miscellaneous Articles furnished to order at Loomis’ Drug Store.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 23, 1878.

R. A. Houghton goes into Stafford’s house, and Stafford goes into Col. McMullen’s house. MR. STAFFORD purchased Col. McMullen’s residence for $2,500. It is the best dwelling house in this locality.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 23, 1878.

MR. LIPPMANN took the contract to haul both of Col. McMullen’s safes to Winfield for $30. He has six yoke of oxen to each wagon. The safes weigh 4,400 and 4,460 pounds each.

Winfield Courier, January 24, 1878.

The first load that passed over the new south bridge was Col. McMullen’s safe, headed by six yoke of heavy oxen. The weight of the team and load was not less than twenty thousand pounds.

Winfield Courier, January 24, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

J. C. McMullen to H. W. Hutchinson, w. of s. w. 2, 34, 3, 80 acres, $200.

[REMOVED: COL. J. C. McMULLEN CLOSES ARKANSAS CITY BANK.]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1878.

REMOVED. The Arkansas City Bank closed its doors at this place last week for the purpose of temporarily removing to the county seat to extend its business. Col. J. C. McMullen, its president, during his residence here for the past five years, proved himself a valuable citizen, and a prudent, careful businessman. We owe to him the credit of building one of the finest residences in Southern Kansas, and locating some of the best and most extensive farmers in this section. By his liberal advertising and constant efforts, he brought many to Kansas and Cowley County that might never have been here, had he not been with us himself. Being a man of reputation and means, besides an affable gentleman, he is bound to succeed wherever he goes, as we earnestly hope he will. Traveler.


All of which we heartily endorse except “temporarily removing.” Well, that is good. Do not be consoling yourself with the hope that Col. McMullen will ever return to Arkansas City. He is sacrificing his property there at any price that he can get for it and has come to Winfield to stay. Welcome, Col. McMullen, to the present and future business center of the Southwest. Your head is level.

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1878.

Notice the new advertisement of the Citizens Bank. Col. McMullen has come to stay and do business. He has invested largely in real estate in this town and will make still further investments, while he is selling at a sacrifice the improvements he has left. He is a gentleman of large means, large business experience, and a large heart. He will of course command a large business patronage in his new location. Mr. Berkey, his assistant, pleases everybody, and will soon attain an enviable popularity.

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1878.

J. C. McMULLEN, PRESIDENT        A. W. BERKEY, ASSIS’T CASHIER

                                                     WINFIELD, KANSAS.

                                           CITIZENS BANK OF WINFIELD,

                          (Successors to Arkansas City Bank, Arkansas City, Kansas.)

                                    DOES A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS

Pays Interest on Time Deposits, Loans Money on Well Improved Farms.

Has a Very Superior Burglar-Proof Safe, With all the Recent Improvements.

CORRESPONDENTS: American Exchange National Bank, New York. First National Bank, Emporia.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 13, 1878.

NOTICE the new card of Col. J. C. McMullen in this issue. The Colonel expects to offer good inducements to his old patrons.

AD: J. C. McMULLEN, PRESIDENT.

     A. W. BERKEY, ASSISTANT CASHIER.

                                           CITIZEN’S BANK OF WINFIELD,

                                                     WINFIELD, KANSAS.

                           (Successor to Arkansas City Bank, Arkansas City, Kansas.)

Does a General Banking Business.

Pays Interest on Time Deposits.

Loans Money on Well Improved Farms.

Has a very superior new burglar proof safe, with all the recent improvements.

Correspondents: American Exchange National Bank, New York; First National Bank, Emporia.

Winfield Courier, February 14, 1878.

Col. McMullen’s bank brings a good many people from south Sumner and Cowley to this place on business.

Winfield Courier, February 21, 1878.

There are in Winfield perhaps the oldest couple in the State. Mr. McMullen, father of J. C. McMullen, who is ninety-six, and his wife, who is over eighty. Mr. McMullen thinks nothing of walking up town each day, and is as hale and hearty as a man of sixty.

Winfield Courier, February 21, 1878.


Col. McMullen has a new burglar-proof safe, which is quite a curiosity. It is about four feet high by three feet wide, weighs 4,800 and cost $1,200. It is furnished with the “Yale Time Lock,” which is a marvel of the most delicate mechanism, and locks and opens the safe automatically.

[Winfield, Southern Kansas.]

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1878.

MILLINGTON & LEMMON, PUBLISHERS.

                                                     SOUTHERN KANSAS.

                             THE REMARKABLE PROSPERITY OF WINFIELD.

ITS INCREASE IN POPULATION AND WEALTH THE PAST YEAR.

A Glimpse at a Few of Her Palatial Residences—Episode in the Life of One of Her Citizens.

                            “A Fine Old Southern Gentleman, One of the Olden Time.”

                                  [From the Kansas City Journal of Commerce.]

                     CENTRAL HOTEL, WINFIELD, KANSAS, February 13, 1878.

A recent census shows a population of 1,611 in this town—an increase of about fifty percent within a year. Without question, it is the most prosperous interior town in the State, and presents more evidence of wealth and permanence and offers greater inducements to businessmen and capitalists than any other.

Real estate is appreciating rapidly, and comfortable tenement houses are in demand and high. Some enterprising mechanic with a little capital could make a fortune by building cottages to sell. There are two dozen houses in course of building now, one-half of which are residences to cost from three to seven thousand dollars, and transfers of lots to parties intending to build others are of daily occurrence. As several of these buildings are being gotten up on a scale of elegance (very unusual for a new county, and especially the frontier), I may be pardoned for a brief description of them.

Mr. J. C. Fuller is building a mansion in the eastern part of town. It is a frame with brick veneer—a style new to Kansas, but in successful use in Northern Illinois and Wisconsin for the last ten years. It is elegant in all its appointments and will be supplied with hot air furnace, water, baths, speaking tubes, and all modern conveniences. The interior will be finished with walnut and ash, and the grounds will be handsomely ornamented with terraces and fountains.

M. L. Robinson has chosen the southwestern portion of town for his residence, and is building a stately mansion upon an eminence which commands a landscape of surpassing loveliness. The building has only recently been commenced, but the designs according to the drawings of the architect are elaborate and costly. A large force of workmen are engaged and the pleasant weather is being improved.

A short distance south of this, and far enough removed from the heart of the town to give it a suburban air of quiet and seclusion, Col. McMullen has decided to build his home. This also can only be seen on paper as yet, but the contract has been awarded and the material is being delivered. The design is no less extensive than the others, and in some respects shows a more elaborate style of architecture.

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.


W. M. Gray to J. C. McMullen, lot 11, block 66, Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 6, 1878.

CALLED. We received calls from Col. J. C. McMullen, E. P. Kinne, Senator Pyburn, Hon. Wm. P. Hackney, James Hill, Burt Covert, John Allen, of Winfield; Mr. Haskell, the Kansas archi­tect, and Mr. Smith, the contractor of the Pawnee school build­ing, last week.

Winfield Courier, March 7, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, furnishes the following report.

J. C. McMullen to B. L. Deming, ½ of se. ¼  20, 35, 4; 40 acres, $330.

[COMMUNICATION FROM “RAMBLER” RE WINFIELD.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 20, 1878.

                                                 WINFIELD, March 16, 1878.

Our town looks lively and bustling every Saturday and Monday. Today is a little more so.

The usual crowds of gaping, idle country louts and village loafers are gathered around the cheap stationery man with tinsel helmet and coat of many colors, who is slyly taking in their quarters. The auction nuisance has its crowd of idlers listening to half a dozen whiskey-nozed gentlemen, all of them brawling at the top of their voices at the same time, trying to sell some wind-broken, spavined, hip shot, broken down, and worn-out horses.

Another attraction is added to this day’s proceedings for the sightseers: The removal of an “Old Land Mark” in Winfield’s history. The old log building belonging to Col. Manning, that has been used as a post office, printing office, courthouse, and I believe a hotel at one time, has been yanked out of its old place and carried up Main Street further.

Col. Manning’s shirt sleeves are engineering the job, and Col. Hudson is the contractor.

The great event of the day to the fast men is the trial of speed against time, on a bet between B. M. Terrell and Jim Hill for $100. Terrell is to drive his fast team from Wichita to El Dorado, some 47 miles, in five hours. Three of our sporting men started in a buck this morning to be at Eldorado as judges. Bi Terrell and his team started promptly at 11 a.m. in a light open wagon. It is the general belief that Bi will rake in the cash, as the conditions (weather, roads, etc.) are all in his favor.

Times are a little dull, but our merchants are hopeful, and farmers are jubilant over the prospects for a big wheat crop.

Col. McMullen, our new banker, is preparing to erect a new dwelling on his Manning lots. It will be one of the handsomest in the city, as the Colonel never does anything by halves. His cashier, A. W. Berkey, also talks of building this spring. RAMBLER.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 3, 1878.

They have a new lamp chimney and burner at J. A. Loomis’s that is the handsomest we have seen yet. Owing to the shape of the chimney, it seldom breaks from the flame of the wick. They have a lot of novelties on hand.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 10, 1878.

                                                               FOR SALE


One dapple gray mare, 14-3/4 hands high, Copperbottom and Canadian stock; an extra saddle animal, drives double or single, has been accustomed to heavy farm work. Only reason for sell­ing—unless driven every day is too spirited for a woman’s use. I would be glad to exchange for a gelding, less spirited, but equal in other respects. J. A. LOOMIS.

Winfield Courier, April 11, 1878.

Mr. E. S. Bedilion, District Clerk, furnishes us with the following list of cases which will probably be for trial at the next term of the District Court commencing on Monday, May 6th, 1878.  CIVIL DOCKET.

J. C. McMullen v. Jas. Steener et al.

J. C. McMullen v. Jas. Morgan et al.

J. C. McMullen v. P. F. Endicott et al.

J. C. McMullen v. M. A. Bowers et al.

Winfield Courier, April 11, 1878.

Col. McMullen is improving his place in the west part of town preparatory to building a fine residence.

[NEW CITY COUNCIL.]

Winfield Courier, April 11, 1878.

The new city council met on the 3rd inst., and organized. Hon. J. B. Lynn, mayor, in the chair; present councilmen, T. C. Robinson, G. W. Gully, H. Jochems, C. M. Wood, and E. C. Manning. C. M. Wood was chosen president pro tem; J. P. Short, clerk; J. C. McMullen, treasurer; and N. C. Coldwell, attorney. The following committees were constituted: Streets and alleys, Messrs. Wood, Robinson, and Manning; Finance, Manning, Gully, and Wood; fire department, Jochems, Gully, and Robinson.

Winfield Courier, April 11, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

Oscar Vail to C. B. Vail, nw 4 30 4, 131 acres, $750.

A. A. Newman and wife to Mahlon Hunter, part of nw 21 34 4, 40 acres, $325.

J. C. McMullen and wife to Petty Cozy, part of se 7 38 4, 1 acre, $1.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 17, 1878.

                                                            District Court.

Mr. E. S. Bedillion, District Clerk, furnishes us with the following list of cases which will probably be for trial at the next term of the District Court, commencing on Monday, May 6, 1878.

                                                          CIVIL DOCKET.

J. C. McMullen v. Jas. Steiner et al.

J. C. McMullen v. J. Morgan et al.

J. C. McMullen v. P. F. Endicott et al.

J. C. McMullen v. M. A. Bowers et al.

Winfield Courier, April 18, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

J. C. McMullen to Silas Kennedy, w ½ sw 1 35 4, 70 acres, $800.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 24, 1878.

Col. McMullen has been elected city treasurer of Winfield. They seem to appreciate the Colonel at his new home.


Arkansas City Traveler, April 24, 1878.

                                                      For Sale at a Bargain.

230 acres of land joining the town site, 80 acres improved, 70 acres of timber, and a stone house in town with 4 lots; one of the best corn farms in the county, all for $2,500. Inquire of Judge Christian, Arkansas City, or at the Citizens’ Bank, Winfield. Also 40 acres of growing wheat on this tract, price $3.00 per acre. J. C. McMULLEN.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 24, 1878.

COAL OIL 35 cents per gallon at Loomis’ Drug Store.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 25, 1878.

MILLINGTON & LEMMON, PUBLISHERS.

                                                      COWLEY COUNTY.

                           THE BANNER COUNTY OF SOUTHERN KANSAS.

                                 Winfield, the Best Town of Its Size in the State.

                                   [Special Correspondence Kansas City Times.]

WINFIELD, KANSAS, APRIL 10. Winfield is the county seat of Cowley County. It is situated on the Walnut River, about fifteen miles from the south line of the state. It contains a population of sixteen hundred people. It is one of the best and most prosperous towns in Kansas. The streets are crowded with teams, and the entire appearance of the place gives evidence of life, thrift, and prosperity. There are a large number of residences in process of erection, many of which are fine, commodious buildings, among which may be mentioned the house of J. C. Fuller, banker, which, when completed, will be one of the best in the county.

A large number of good business houses have been built since my last visit here, among which is the fine two-story store by W. H. H. Maris, and occupied by the leading dry goods house of Winfield, Lynn & Gillelen. Also, a large, fine brick hotel, kept by Frank Williams; a large two-story brick by E. C. Manning, who is building a fine public hall, with stores. There is a great demand for business rooms in Winfield, and money could be invested to a good advantage here in putting up buildings. There is an inexhaustible supply of the magnesian limestone, which is equally quarried and which is admirably adapted to building purposes or for flagging. The streets of Winfield are being paved with this splendid stone, giving them a decidedly metropolitan air. Since my last visit two fine churches, the Methodist and Presbyterian, have been built.

The schoolhouse is a large, commodious two-story stone, and is occupied by a corps of most excellent teachers. There are about three hundred and fifty pupils.

The society of Winfield is as good as can be found in towns of its population in the East.

                                                              BUSINESS.

The business of Winfield is as good as in any town of its size in the state. The businessmen are intelligent and enterprising. Most of them have large stocks of goods and are having a fine trade.

The leading dry goods house in the city is that of Lynn & Gillelen.

Boyer & Wallis have a fine stock of clothing; are selling at low prices.

C. A. Bliss & Co. have a fine stock of dry goods, clothing, and groceries. Mr. Bliss is proprietor of one of the Winfield flouring mills.


A. A. Jackson is keeping an excellent restaurant.

                                                                 BANKS.

There are three banks here, viz: M. L. Read’s, Citizens’ Bank, and J. C. Fuller.

Read’s Bank is located in a fine two story brick. The gentlemen connected with it, including Mr. Read and the Robinsons, are genial gentlemen and successful businessmen.

J. C. Fuller is the oldest banker in the county. He is prudent, safe, and responsible.

The Citizen’s Bank was formerly located in Arkansas City, J. C. McMullen is President and A. Berkey cashier. It has about twenty-five farms for sale on long time and low rates.

The principal drug stores in Winfield are kept by Giles Bros. and T. K. Johnston.

B. M. Terrell, formerly of Wichita, is running a livery stable in connection with Ferguson at Wichita. He claims to have the best teams in the state, and offers passengers the same rates as the stage to any point from Wichita to Winfield.

Harter & Hill also run a first-class stable.

W. L. Mullen is one of the principal stock men in Cowley County.

H. S. Silver, with Brotherton, is doing a splendid business in agricultural implements.

There are a number of good lawyers in Winfield, among whom are Hackney and McDonald, Senator A. J. Pyburn, and Webb & Black.

                                                           REAL ESTATE.

I am unable to write anything too complimentary of Cowley County. It embraces the finest body of land in the west, containing about 800,000 acres.

The western one-third of the county is what is called first and second bottom lands, being the location of the valleys of the Walnut and Arkansas rivers. Some picturesque mounds and bluffs appear and in places along the vicinity of the streams, but very little of the surface is unsuitable for cultivation. The central one-third is more rolling, being a succession of gradual slopes forming the fertile valleys of numerous small streams of water, but is mostly first-class land for the production of corn and wheat. The eastern one-third is still more rolling, having very rich valley lands and high ridges. The flint hills extend along the east line of the county, but are intersected by many rich valleys, while the slopes are fertile and produce abundant crops. This part of the county is especially fitted for stock raising, and many large herds of cattle are found there already.

The bottom lands of the county are considered the most valuable and usually produce the heaviest crops, but the uplands have produced heavy crops of corn, wheat, and most other agricultural products; in fact, sometimes even better than those of the rich bottom lands.

Land can be had here at prices quite as low as those at which the land in the distant west is selling, and one acre here is worth twice as much as the same quality of land three hundred miles west of Kansas City. Parties wishing information on this subject should address A. H. Green, at Winfield, who is one of the most enterprising and reliable real estate dealers in the West.

Curns & Manser are also heavy operators in real estate, being the oldest firm in the county.

                                                              RAILROAD.


The people of Cowley County are exceedingly anxious for a railroad connection with Kansas City. They have given up the narrow gauge project from Emporia and have lost faith in the proposition for an East and West road. They are looking to the most feasible road for them to secure. It is an air line from Kansas City through Burlington and Eureka to Winfield. I am informed that the route is quite practicable and passes through a magnificent country. This enterprise should be agitated until it is completed to this point.

Winfield has received some very interesting additions to its society within the past month. S. M. F.

Winfield Courier, April 25, 1878.

Notice the call for sealed proposals for work on the palatial residence of Col. McMullen.

Winfield Courier, April 25, 1878.

                                                           Sealed Proposals.

For the carpenters’, plumbers’, and roofers’ work the residence building to be built for J. C. McMullen, at Winfield, Kansas, will now be received by the undersigned, at whose office the plans and specifications for the same are now ready for inspection.

                                             JNO. HOENSCHEIDT, Architect.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 1, 1878.

NEW SETTLERS. Our county is being settled this spring with some of the very best of citizens of older States. A few months a Mr. Terwilliger, of Altoona, Illinois, bought a farm of Col. J. C. McMullen and located in Bolton Township. He wrote to his friends that he liked the country; that he found it just as the TRAVELER said it was, and advised the rest of them to come. The result is we now have Dr. Griffith—another subscriber of the TRAV­ELER—his son, and Mr. Baker, his son-in-law. Mr. Baker has for years been engaged in telegraphy on the Vincennes road. At the end of each year he found he had made but little more than a living, and now he proposes to work a Bolton farm and endeavor to have something for a “rainy day.” Mr. Griffith, Jr., is a jeweler by trade, and may engage in his business if he is not too much attracted by the wonderful products of the soil. Besides these gentlemen we have the friends of Mr. Leander Finley from the same State, and the relatives of Rev. Fleming, of Pennsylva­nia, who are among the best people of the county.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 1, 1878.

Machine Oils:

J. A. Loomis will be prepared to supply all demands for oil during the coming harvest.

Winfield Courier, May 2, 1878. Editorial Page.

                                                       DISTRICT COURT.

Mr. E. S. Bedilion, District Clerk, furnishes us with the following list of cases which will probably be for trial at the next term of the District Court commencing on Monday, May 6th, 1878.

                                             CIVIL DOCKET. THIRD DAY.

J. C. McMullen v. Jas. Stiner et al.

                                           CIVIL DOCKET. FOURTH DAY.

J. C. McMullen v. Jas. Morgan et al.

                                              CIVIL DOCKET. SIXTH DAY.

J. C. McMullen v. P. F. Endicott et al.

Winfield Courier, May 2, 1878.


The foundation of Mr. J. C. McMullen’s new residence is complete. Work on the house will be commenced at once. The entire cost of the house will not be less than ten thousand dollars.

Winfield Courier, May 2, 1878.

Col. McMullen has been elected city treasurer of Winfield. They seem to appreciate the colonel at his new home. Traveler.

We do, most assuredly, and we are going to keep him right with us.

Winfield Courier, May 2, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

J. C. McMullen and wife to Chas. Snyder, s w 2 35 3, 160 acres, $900.

J. C. McMullen and wife to W. Snyder, lot 2, block 74, Winfield.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 8, 1878.

The card of Dr. J. H. Griffith appears this week, announcing himself ready to attend all calls for medical assistance. The Doctor comes well recommended from his former home in Altoona, Illinois, as well as from those who know him here. At present his office will be at Loomis’ drug store. His residence is on South Summit street, in Dr. Kellogg’s cottage.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 8, 1878.

                                                      Dr. J. H. GRIFFITH,

                                                   ARKANSAS CITY, KAS.

                                                       Late of Altoona, Ills.

Office at Loomis’ drug store on Summit street. Chronic and female diseases a specialty.

Winfield Courier, May 9, 1878.

                                                  District Court Proceedings.

Monday, May 6th, 10 o’clock a.m. His Honor, W. P. Campbell, on the bench. Present: C. L. Harter, sheriff; E. S. Bedilion, clerk; Jas. McDermott, prosecuting attorney; attorneys C. Coldwell, W. F. Hackney, Henry E. Asp, J. E. Allen, D. C. Beach, E. S. Torrance, J. M. Alexander, A. J. Pyburn, N. C. Coldwell, Jas. Christian, G. H. Buckman, S. D. Pryor, J. Wade McDonald, C. R. Mitchell, J. D. Pryor, C. C. Black, R. C. Story, L. J. Webb, W. M. Boyer, F. S. Jennings, and D. A. Millington.

The docket was called. The following cases were dismissed: Geo. Stewart vs. R. B. Waite, Jas. Renfro vs. M. J. Renfro, J. E. Cox vs. Mary J. Cox, State ex rel. Cessna vs. A. H. Thurman, Nancy McManus vs. John S. Harmon, Parker & Canfield vs. R. B. Scott, Margaret W. Vessels vs. T. J. Vessels, Houghton & McLaughlin vs. L. Maricle, S. P. Channel vs. L. Maricle, S. L. Brettun vs. Adam H. Beck, R. Crapster vs. Clara E. Houx et al, M. Harkins vs. Elizabeth C. Hunt, J. C. McMullen vs. P. F. Endicott et al., S. L. Brettun vs. L. D. Darnall et al, T. H. Barrett vs. W. D. Mowry et al.

Judgment for plaintiff by default was ordered in the following: M. L. Read vs. R. Hudson et al, B. C. Cook vs. W. F. Worthington, S. L. Brettun vs. J. C. Groce et al, Lizzie M. Martin vs. Peter Paugh, J. C. McMullen vs. J. Morgan et al, L. G. Yoe et al vs. T. E. Gilleland, A. W. Hoyt vs. Israel Tipton et al, E. Howland vs. J. W. Pearson et al, A. F. Faris vs. Julia A. Deming et al, Hackney & McDonald vs. W. W. Andrews, Mary H. Buck vs. M. Luckey, Samuel Hoyt vs. J. B. Gassaway, Buck, McCouns et al vs. T. E. Gilleland, Geysecke, Meysenburg & Co. vs. T. E. Gilleland, Charles Barr vs. T. J. Raybell, A. P. Dickey vs. T. A. Wilkinson.


The following cases were continued: H. Schieffer vs. J. F. Berner, L. McMasters vs. Nathan Hughes, Mercy M. Funk vs. Cynthia Clark et al.

The following cases stand on demurrer: H. B. Kay et al vs. D. B. McAllister, J. H. Hill vs. Geneva Jackson et al, J. C. McMullen vs. Martha Bowers et al, Elizabeth Meyer vs. W. H. Brown et al.

J. C. McMullen vs. Martha Bowers, administratrix, et al.; F. S. Jennings appointed guardian, ad litem, of minor heirs of Reuben Bowers.

The Daily Winfield Courier, Saturday Morning, May 11, 1878.

                                                  District Court Proceedings.

State vs. Samuel Houston. Plea in abatement overruled.

J. C. McMullen vs. James Stiner et al., judgment for plaintiff by default.

The Daily Winfield Courier, Saturday Morning, May 11, 1878.

                                                       DISTRICT COURT.

                                           CIVIL DOCKET. FOURTH DAY.

J. C. McMullen v. L. Tipton et al.

                                              CIVIL DOCKET. SIXTH DAY.

J. C. McMullen v. M. A. Bowers et al.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 15, 1878.

                                                        Court Proceedings.

                                            [From the Cowley County Telegram.]

The following is a report of the disposal of the cases which have come up so far during this term.

John C. McMullen vs. James Morgan, et al, judgment.

J. C. McMullen vs. P. F. Endicott, et al, settled.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 15, 1878.

Notice the change of J. A. Loomis advertisement. He has the finest and best assortment of drugs, medicines, and machine oils to be found in any town in the Southwest.

AD: ATTENTION!

     A full line of Machine Oils just received at Loomis’ Drug

     Store: Kellogg & Hoyt’s Old Stand.

                                                  District Court Proceedings.

Winfield Courier, May 16, 1878.

Thursday, May 10th.   

J. C. McMullen vs. James Stiner et al. Judgment for plaintiff by default.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 22, 1878.

REUBEN A. HOUGHTON, the popular grocery man, sold the two-story building adjoining Al Horn’s shoe shop to ARTEMUS WARD PATTERSON, last week, to be occupied as a saloon. Artemas Ward Patterson has purchased some of the finest chromos of Dr. Loomis’ stock, and will adorn the room in style.

Winfield Courier, May 30, 1878.

                                                REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

For the week ending May 27, 1878.

J. C. McMullen and wife to J. F. Snyder, lots 5 and 3, block 91, Arkansas City; $70.


[COMMUNICATION FROM “SILAS”—WINFIELD.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 5, 1878.

                                            WINFIELD, KAS., June 3rd, 1878.

Since the small pox epidemic, business has been rather quiet, and our usually thronged streets have been nearly deserted in comparison with a few weeks ago when, of Saturdays, one could hardly get along main street without elbowing through large crowds. But at present there is no alarm on account of the small pox, and business is renewing again.

The large area and the fine condition of the wheat crop caused many farmers to buy a great deal of farm machinery of all kinds. There have been more harvesters sold this season than usual, and one can hardly imagine where so many are taken.

M. L. Robinson’s beautiful residence is nearly completed, and Col. McMullen is pushing the work on his palatial residence as fast as money and men will allow. When completed it will be one of the most beautiful and commodious residences in Southern Kansas.

About a month ago the city council licensed three saloons for one year in this city. Jay Page at considerable cost had built a nice two story brick, and fitted up the lower room for a saloon, and furnished a suite of rooms above for gambling rooms. He opened four weeks ago last Saturday; and since then no two saloons in the county ever did such a rushing business. It was thronged from daylight to midnight, and frequently the gambling rooms were in full blast the entire night. It was the duty of the city council, when these facts were brought to their notice, to revoke the license; but they winked at it and allowed it to continue. Last Saturday about 4 p.m., Hon. L. J. Webb walked from the gambling room into the bar room where Page was standing, and shot him dead, and immediately gave himself into the hands of the Sheriff, James Hill. There is good evidence that Webb had been drugged and in a game of poker had been robbed of his money by Page. A coroner’s jury was empaneled and found in their verdict that Page came to his death by a pistol shot in the hands of lawyer Webb. The preliminary examination was set for trial today, before W. M. Boyer, but on account of the illness of Mr. Webb, it will be heard tomorrow, Tuesday, at 9 o’clock a.m.

There is a very strong feeling here in the matter, and there are some things in which all agree and that is that the city government should not have allowed such a hell hole to exist so long here, and that Jay Page was a notorious desperado and unsafe for any community, one who would not only gamble, but deliberate­ly picked men’s pockets.

Page’s funeral was preached Sunday by Rev. Rushbridge, and he was buried immediately afterwards.

Hon. L. J. Webb is in jail waiting until the preliminary examination. SILAS.

Winfield Courier, June 27, 1878.

                                                        Real Estate Transfers.

J. C. McMullen and wife to Anna E. Raupe, se. 16, 35, 4; 160 acres, $570.

J. C. McMullen and wife to Samuel H. Baker, lot 11, block 66, Arkansas City, $115.

Winfield Courier, July 4, 1878.

                                                      A Threatened Famine.


C. A. Bliss, G. S. Manser, A. B. Lemmon, E. P. Kinne, J. C. Fuller, M. L. Read, T. R. Bryan, W. M. Allison, J. W. Curns, C. C. Black, D. A. Millington, E. S. Bliss, E. S. Torrance, A. E. Baird, J. B. Lynn, M. G. Troup, M. L. Robinson, J. C. McMullen, E. C. Manning, and probably many others, all with their wives, will make a raid upon Arkansas City, the steam boats, and Newman’s dam on the Fourth. They will seize all the provisions they can find in the city, capture both the “Aunt Sally” and the—the—well, Amos’ steamship, will rip out Newman’s dam, and steam up the Walnut to Winfield, driving a large herd of catfish. Bliss and Harter & Harris will load the steamers with flour at their mills. The party will start at about 9 o’clock a.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

W. D. MOWRY has received a fresh lot of the cigars at Loomis’ drug store. Lovers of the weed had better drop in and see him, not forgetting to bring the price of a smoke with them.

Winfield Courier, July 11, 1878.

J. C. McMullen’s magnificent residence is progressing finely and begins to show up well.

Winfield Courier, July 11, 1878.

                                                   That Trip on the Aunt Sally.”

We “let off” our surplus patriotism on the Fourth by going to Arkansas City and taking a ride on the “Aunt Sally” beneath the classic shades of the “raging Walnut.” The said “Aunt Sally” is not exactly like the Sound steamers that ply between Fall River and New York. We did not see the elegant staterooms, dining-hall, furniture, and such; but she paddled along just as well as though arrayed in gay plumage. The passengers stood up on deck and sweltered in the heat; taking two or three small showers for variety; then the whistle made most unearthly screams and the band played patriotic airs. The boat was manned by Channell, Sleeth, Swarts, Farrar, Mowry, and many others of the old sailors of Arkansas City. Many Winfield ladies and gentlemen were on board with us, exhibiting more enthusiasm, we thought, than did our “seaport” friends. When we returned to the landing, Bonsall was on hand with his camera to take a picture of the boat and its passengers, but we shall never believe he got a good picture until he furnishes us with a copy. When that infernal whistle shrieked, it was with difficulty that we prevented our unsophisticated Winfielders from following the example of the Indians down the river by jumping off and wading ashore. Troup jumped about 18 feet, Harris 14, Baird 12, Bliss 10, McMullen & Lemmon 3, Hudson 2. The rest of them were on the other side of the boat and we were not able to record their feats of ground and lofty tumbling.

Winfield Courier, August 8, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

J. C. McMullen and wife to Annie M. Burrough, 85 acres, lots 1 and 2, s. 31-34-6; $500.

Winfield Courier, August 15, 1878.

I. C. Loomis, near Arkansas City, after harvesting his wheat in the latter part of May, plowed up some of the wheat ground and planted it to corn of the common field variety on May 27th. Last Sunday, August 11th, J. C. McMullen ate roasting ears from that field of corn.

Winfield Courier, August 22, 1878.

                                                                Trial List.


The following is a list of cases that will stand for trial at the August A. D. 1878 term of the District Court of Cowley County, and have been placed on the Trial Docket in the following order.

                                           SECOND DAY - CIVIL DOCKET.

John C. McMullen vs. Martha A. Bowers et al. [Webb & Black; C. R. Mitchell.]

                                                             THIRD DAY.

John C. McMullen vs. Alfred Carry et al. [J. E. Allen; Hackney & McDonald.]

                                                           FOURTH DAY.

James A. Loomis vs. E. B. Kager et al. [James A. Loomis; Hackney & McDonald, Torrance, and Pryors.]

                                                     E. S. BEDILION, Clerk.

Note: Lawyers—first named (for first party mentioned).

          After semicolon: lawyers for second party.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 4, 1878.

                                             YOUNG PEOPLE’S MEETING.

There will be a young people’s meeting at the Presbyterian church next Sabbath evening, Septem­ber 8, which will take the place of the regular service. There will be several addresses, plenty of singing, and a good time is expected. All are invited, both old and young. At the close a collection will be taken for the yellow fever sufferers in the South. Any contributions left at Dr. Loomis’ drug store before next Tuesday, for the yellow fever sufferers, will be sent along with the above collection.  J. S. McCLUNG.

Winfield Courier, September 5, 1878.

                                                            District Court.

J. C. McMullen vs. A. Carry et al. Dismissed.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 11, 1878.

                                                      NOW IS THE TIME.

Parties desiring Picture Frames of any particular size or style can be supplied by leaving their orders at Loomis’ drug store. Call within the next 30 days.

Winfield Courier, September 12, 1878.

                                                            District Court.

                                               MONDAY, September 2, 1878.

Sept. 5.

      J. C. McMullen vs. M. A. Bowers et al. Judgment for plaintiff, $918.51, and foreclosure.

James A. Loomis vs. E. B. Kager et al. Judgment for plaintiff against 20 defendants; continued as to 4 defendants.

Winfield Courier, October 3, 1878.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

M. G. Troup, county clerk, to James A. Loomis, s. ½ of sw. 6, 36, 4.

Robert E. Howe to J. C. McMullen, lots 3 and 4 in 4, 35, 6.

[ITEMS FROM THE WINFIELD COURIER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 28, 1878.

I. S. Loomis, near Arkansas City, after harvesting his wheat in the latter part of May, plowed up some of the wheat ground and planted it to corn of the common field variety on May 27th. Last Saturday, August 11, J. C. McMullen ate roasting ears from that field of corn.


John Byard, of Dexter, has purchased one of the new patent dryers and has gone into the peach-drying business on a large scale. He has 500 bearing peach trees and will have at least 1,500 bushels of peaches, many of them the largest and finest kinds. He will preserve them in cans. Winfield Courier.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 28, 1878.

The following is a list of cases that will stand for trial at the August A. D. 1878 term of the District Court of Cowley County, and have been placed on the Trial Docket in the following order.

                                          SECOND DAY—CIVIL DOCKET.

John C. McMullen vs. Martha A. Bowers, et al.

                                                             THIRD DAY.

John C. McMullen vs. Alfred Cary, et al.

                                                             FIFTH DAY.

Oliver A. Pratt vs. John C. McMullen.

[DISTRICT COURT PROCEEDINGS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, September 11, 1878.

The following cases were tried before Judge Campbell during the term of court, up to September 5, 1878.

J. C. McMullen vs. A. Carey et al. Dismissed.

Winfield Courier, October 10, 1878.

BIRTH. J. C. McMullen is the happy possessor of a brand new baby.

Winfield Courier, October 10, 1878.

                                                             Citizens’ Bank.

This institution is now organized as a corporation under the laws of the State of Kansas, with a capital of $50,000. J. C. McMullen is elected president, John D. Pryor, vice president,

B. F. Baldwin, Cashier, and A. W. Berkey assistant cashier. All these gentlemen are stockholders in the bank and are gentlemen of honor and excellent business qualifications. This will become the popular institution of the county and we expect to record its abundant success.

Winfield Courier, October 31, 1878.

                                                               Serious Fire.

On last week Wednesday evening about 10 o’clock a fire occurred in the new barn on


J. C. McMullen’s place in the west part of the city. The barn was a large building, well constructed, had been used as a shop by the mechanics at work on his palatial residence nearby, and there were shavings and pieces of lumber therein; besides, it was stored nearly full of the fine work for the house such as mouldings, inside finish work, windows, doors, and ornamental work for ceilings, paints, oils, carpenter’s tools, and a large quantity of house furniture and winter clothing. Two boys were to sleep in the building as a guard, and as they were about to retire, to finally extinguish their light, one of them blew down the chimney of their kerosene lantern, which exploded, setting fire to the surrounding inflammable material, and the building was completely enveloped in flames before any force could arrive to extinguish them, and the building and contents were totally destroyed. Loss about $2,000. McMullen, Swain, Barclay, and Hetherington are the principal losers. A more serious loss of Mr. McMullen is not of a nature to be estimated in cash, consisting of family mementoes, which had accumulated for generations.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1878.

On last Wednesday night Col. McMullen’s new barn in the rear of his dwelling at Winfield was consumed by fire with all its contents, consisting of a lot of household furniture, books, and pictures that were stored in it until his new house was finished, together with a lot of paints, all the door sash, and windows for the new house. Loss was estimated at $2,500. The fire was caused by two boys who slept in the barn. In attempting to extinguish a lamp before going to bed, one of them blew down the chimney, when a sudden flash resulted, and the barn instantly was engulfed in flames, the floor being covered with shavings.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1878.

                                                  Fair Warning Notice to All.

I have been appointed agent of J. W. French for the protec­tion of his land, and will prosecute to the utmost extent of the law all persons found trespassing on said land, either cutting down timber, poles, or sapling, or hauling away timber, wood; laying or being on said land (that is, the land formerly owned by J. C. McMullen).

                                         JAMES CHRISTIAN, for J. W. French.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 27, 1878.

Col. McMullen was down from Winfield last Thursday looking after business matters. His head is level on the Cowley, Sumner & Ft. Smith R. R.

[LIST OF NEW BUILDINGS ERECTED SINCE 1/1/1878.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 2, 1879.

The following is a list of new buildings erected in the city of Winfield since January 1, 1878, with the name of owner and cost of building.

E. C. Manning, opera house, brick: $10,000.

J. C. McMullen, residence, brick: $13,000.

J. Page, store room, brick: $3,000.

J. C. Fuller, residence, brick: $10,000.

M. L. Robinson, residence, cut stone: $15,000.

J. C. McMullen, barn, frame: $450.

[CITY OFFICERS.]

Winfield Courier, January 2, 1879.

Mayor.—J. B. Lynn.

Police Judge.—W. M. Boyer.

Members of the Council.—T. C. Robinson, G. W. Gully, H. C. Manning, H. Jochems, C. M. Wood.

Clerk.—J. P. Short.

Treasurer.—J. C. McMullen.

City Attorney.—N. C. Coldwell.

Marshal.—C. C. Stevens.

     [Paper showed that the total cost of buildings was $180,200. It stated 201 were erected.]

Winfield Courier, January 2, 1879.


CITIZENS BANK is one of the best managed and safest banks in the state. It has a large safe, burglar proof, combination and time locks, and is thoroughly secure. J. C. McMullen, its president, brought a large capital to this place and has built a residence that would do credit to any city. B. F. Baldwin, the cashier, is a young man of means and industry well known in this city. John D. Pryor, the vice president, is a talented accountant and familiar with his business, and A. W. Berkey, the assistant cashier, is quite experienced in the business. All are gentlemen of honor and reliability.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 15, 1879.

We are told that Col. McMullen is negotiating with the authorities of Winfield for the sale of his new residence to the city for purposes of a schoolhouse. Winfield is greatly in need of such a building and we have no doubt the trade will be consummated at an early day. Should the Colonel close this sale, we are assured that he will return to this city for a permanent home as his valuable property here remains unsold.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 22, 1879.

FIRST AND LAST CALL. All accounts due me must be settled within the next thirty days, January 1st, 1879. J. A. LOOMIS.

[BAPTIST CHURCH OFFICERS FOR 1879.]

Winfield Courier, January 23, 1879.

The Baptist Church elected the following officers for the year 1879.

James McDermott, treasurer.

Rev. Mr. Rigby, clerk.

C. A. Bliss, Lewis Stevens, James McDermott, R. C. Story, and E. S. Bliss, trustees.

Col. J. C. McMullen and John D. Pryor have been added to the board of trustees as a building committee. Plans and specifica­tions for a new building will be submitted soon.

Winfield Courier, January 23, 1879.

                                                      Arkansas City Items.

[We suppose the Traveler and our correspondent allude to J. C. McMullen. We will say that the Colonel has no thought of leaving Winfield, that his residence is one of the finest in the state, and that he is one of our most valued citizens.—Ed.]

Traveler correspondent said: “I see by the shadow of what was once the Traveler that you are about to lose one of your citizens, who is about to return to his first love—not being appreciated as he thought his worth demanded.”

Arkansas City Traveler, January 29, 1879.

Col. McMullen, of Winfield, paid the city a visit Friday of last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 5, 1879.

Messrs. Wolf and Winton are fitting up the Green Front for T. H. McLaughlin. It will be occupied by Dr. Loomis as a drug store.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

The Citizens Bank is doing a red-hot real estate business. Col. McMullen has sold four farms in the last ten days, and still there’s more to follow.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 19, 1879.

                                                  PUBLICATION NOTICE.

STATE OF KANSAS, COWLEY COUNTY, In the District Court, in said County and State.


J. C. McMULLEN, PLAINTIFF, VS. CRESSWELL C. ENDICOTT, DEFENDANT.

To Cresswell C. Endicott, Defendant above named.

YOU are hereby notified that you have been sued by the above named Plaintiff, J. C. McMullen, in the District Court of the Thirteenth Judicial District of Kansas, sitting in and for Cowley County, in the State of Kansas, and that the said Plaintiff on the 15th day of February, A. D. 1879, filed his petition in the above named Court demanding Judgment against you the said Defen­dant, Cresswell C. Endicott, for the sum of Seven Hundred and Thirty-four and Fifty-nine Hundredths Dollars, with interest at the rate of Twelve per cent per Annum from February 15, 1878, on $684.55 thereof and on $25.80 thereof from June 12th, 1878, and from February 12th, 1879, on $24.24 thereof; and that a certain mortgage given by you, the said Defendant, to the Plaintiff, of the South West Quarter of Section Thirty-five, in Township Thirty-four South of Range Four East, in Cowley County, Kansas, be foreclosed; the said lands and tenements ordered to be sold, and the proceeds arising from said sale be applied First, To the payment of all costs. Second. To the payment of the debt due this Plaintiff, including taxes and for such further relief as Plaintiff is entitled to. You are hereby further notified that unless you answer said petition on or before the 4th day of April, A. D. 1879, the said petition will be taken as true, and Judgment rendered against you according to the demands of said petition.  PRYOR & PRYOR, Plaintiff’s Attorneys.

Attest, E. S. Bedilion, Clerk of District Court.    [SEAL.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 19, 1879.

Dr. Loomis has removed the People’s Drug Store into the Green Front, formerly occupied by Houghton & McLaughlin. He has a neat room and a fresh supply of medicines.

Winfield Courier, February 27, 1879.

                                                 ARKANSAS CITY ITEMS.

Quite a number of changes during the past week.

James A. Loomis has removed his drug store to the “green front”—Houghton & McLaughlin’s old stand; but if you want to buy drugs or borrow money, you will find nothing “green” inside—everything “true blue” and wide awake.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1879

Municipal election in the City of Winfield resulted in the election of the Citizen’s Ticket:

Mayor elected: J. B. Lynn.

Police Judge: W. M. Boyer.

City Attorney: O. M. Seward.

City Treasurer: J. C. McMullen.

Treas. Board Education: J. D. Pryor.

Council: H. Jochems, C. C. Black, M. L. Read, and S. H. Myton.

Board of Education: Rev. Rigby, F. S. Jennings, Mr. Randall, and M. G. Troup.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

The residence of Col. J. C. McMullen, when completed, will be one of the most con-venient houses in Southern Kansas. It is lighted throughout with gas, having jets in every room, from garret to cellar, is heated with hot air, and the system of warm and cold water pipes is equal to any we have ever seen. It is a credit to the city, as well as a monument to the enterprise of one of Cowley’s oldest and best citizens.


[CITY ELECTION.]

Winfield Courier, April 3, 1879.

The election last Tuesday was very warm and excited, but everything went off pleasantly. The result was:

1st w.         2nd w.

FOR MAYOR

John B. Lynn ....................   169             124

T. B. Myers .....................       94             117

POLICE JUDGE.

W. M. Boyer .....................    261             219

CITY ATTORNEY.

O. M. Seward ....................   165             116

Chas. Payson ....................      99             122

CITY TREASURER.

J. C. Fuller ....................        138             105

J. C. McMullen ..................   123             133

TREAS. B’D. OF EDUC.

J. D. Pryor .....................        262             241

COUNCILMEN.

Long Term, H. Jochems ...........   156             ...

Long Term, J. W. Craine .........     93             ...

Short Term, Chas. C. Black ......  152             ...

Short Term, W. E. Baird .........      84

Long Term, M. L. Read ............     ...            182

Long Term, Arckie Stewart ......     ...            104

Short Term, J. E. Allen ..............    ...            100

Short Term, S. H. Myton ..........     ...            135

B’D OF EDUCATION.

Long Term, M. G. Troup ..........   146             ...

Long Term, B. F. Baldwin ........   102             ...

Short Term, N. L. Rigby ...........   240             ...

Long Term, F. S. Jennings ........    ...            336

Short Term, H. Brotherton .......    ...            107

Short Term, I. W. Randall ........    ...            122

The majorities stand as follows:

Lynn:                 82

Boyer:       490

Seward:              60

McMullen:        13

Pryor:        502

Jochems:           63

Black:          68

Read:                 28


Myton:               35

Troup:          44

Rigby:       240

Jennings:        236

Randall:             15

Business of the Winfield post office for the quarter ending March 31st, 1879.

                                                              REVENUES.

Sales of stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes: $1,226.35

Unpaid postage collected: $2.70

Sales of waste papers: $1.00

Box rents collected: $147.75

Total revenues: $1,377.80

708 money orders issued: $7,165.04

Fees on same: $81.75

444 money orders paid: $8,650.42

The laboring men made a very good ticket for city officers, but some of the leaders in the movement had made such remarks about the determination of the laborers to rule the city in their own interests, while one of their resolutions would bear the same construction, that suspicion was cast upon all the laboring men on the ticket that if successful we should be subjected to high taxes and enormous debts for the purpose of making more work and higher wages for the laboring men.

For this reason the ticket became at once very unpopular (though injustly) and of course was badly beaten at the polls.

Winfield Courier, April 3, 1879.

Mr. I. C. Loomis, father-in-law of J. C. McMullen, and wife, started for Colorado last Monday to visit a daughter, and will be absent several months.

[CITY TREASURER’S STATEMENT.]

Winfield Courier, April 3, 1879.

                                          WINFIELD, KANS., March 24, 1879.

To Hon. J. B. Lynn, Mayor of the city of Winfield.

The undersigned would respectfully submit herewith his report of his receipts and disbursements as Treasurer of the City of Winfield up to the present date as shown by the enclosed itemized statement.

May 8, 1878. To cash rec’d of J. C. Fuller, former Treasurer: $750.21

May 13, 1878. To License, J. Likowski: $300.00

Sept., 1878. To cash of T. H. Bryan: $144.80

Oct. 13, 1878. To cash, J. Reynolds for pest house: $60.00

Jan. 13, 1879. To cash, N. C. Coldwell, City Attorney: $95.80

Feb. 6, 1879. To cash, Co. Treasurer, sidewalk tax: $223.53

To cash from all other sources: $290.22

Total: $1,863.56

CONTRA.

By cash paid on vouchers drawn by J. B. Lynn, Mayor, and J. P. Short, city clerk: $1,864.28


Leaving a deficiency in the Treasury of $.72.

                                             J. C. McMULLEN, City Treasurer.

I hereby certify the above to be a true and correct copy of the city treasurer’s report as filed in my office the 24th day of March, 1879.  J. P. SHORT, City Clerk.

                                                   SYNOPSIS OF REPORT.

At the regular council meeting, March 24th, the clerk was instructed to examine the itemized report and vouchers accompany­ing the above, and if found correct to certify to the same, and publish it, with a synopsis of the report, which is given below, the fully itemized accounts of which are on file in my office and open to the inspection of anyone interested. The following are the principal receipts and expenditures not specified above.

                                                               RECEIPTS.

License, Saloon: $900.00

License, Billiards and ten-pins: $67.50

License, Concerts, shows, etc.: $54.00

License, Auctioneers, peddlers, etc.: $98.75

Fines in police court: $84.00

From Brooks estate: $95.80

                                                         EXPENDITURES.

Small pox prevention: $587.04

Street crossings, gutter stones, etc.: $842.39

Sidewalks: $222.53

Official salaries to date: $480.00

Boarding prisoners: $64.74

Rent to date: $51.00

The unpaid salaries, rent, and other expenses will probably increase the total expenditures for the year ending March 31st, 1879, to $2,000. There are outstanding at this date unpaid city warrants to the amount of $100.15. All of which is respectfully submitted.

                                                     J. P. SHORT, City Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1879.

I. C. Loomis has started for Colorado to spend the summer months. We wish the old gentleman (whose genial face will be missed from among us awhile) a pleasant trip.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 16, 1879.

We understand that Col. J. C. McMullen has traded for valuable property just west of town.

Winfield Courier, May 1, 1879

The following is a list of cases that will stand for trial at the May, A. D. 1879, term of the District Court of Cowley county, beginning on the first Monday in May, and have been placed on the Trial Docket in the following order.

                                             CIVIL DOCKET. FOURTH DAY.

Chicago Lumber Co. vs. J. C. McMullen.

                                               CIVIL DOCKET. SIXTH DAY.

J. C. McMullen, adm’r., vs. Stephen Johnson.

                                             CIVIL DOCKET. EIGHTH DAY.


J. C. McMullen vs. C. C. Endicott et al.

Winfield Courier, May 8, 1879

The court commenced its session on Monday. His Honor W. P. Campbell presiding. Present: E. S. Bedilion, clerk; C. L. Harter, sheriff; E. S. Torrance, prosecuting attorney, and a full corps of local attorneys.

The docket was called and several cases were disposed of as follows: State vs. Creek. The defendant plead guilty to three indictments for cow stealing. He was returned to the jail to await his sentence.

Case dismissed. Chicago Lumber Co. vs. J. C. McMullen.

Judgment was taken for plaintiff in the following case in default.

J. C. McMullen, adm’r. vs. Stephen Johnson.

Winfield Courier, May 15, 1879

                                    REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS [CITY ONLY].

R. L. Walker and wife to J. C. McMullen, n 1/2 of lot 1, blk 7, and lots 10, 11, and 12, blk 48, Winfield. $1,000.

Winfield Courier, May 22, 1879

Capt. Samuel, an old army friend of Col. McMullen, is taking in Winfield and vicinity with a view of some paying investment for himself and children. The captain is a whole-souled, genial, energetic gentlemen, and though he has spent an active life as Indian trader, banker, broker, and a general dealer in stocks, yet he looks as young and as vigorous as a man of thirty.

It is said that he was the life of the regiment with which he was connected, with his songs, jokes, stories of travels in England, on the continent, and more particularly his wild and eventful experiences among the wild Indians of the west—made him always a welcome visitor and was better than medicine to the drooping energies of the soldiers. The captain is a man of large means and we hope he will settle among us. We think there is plenty of room here to give his large and varied experience full play. He is a bashful widower, but we trust this will prevent him from becoming a house-holder in Winfield. We extend a hearty welcome to him and his friends.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

                                                     Real Estate Transfers.

C. L. Harter, Sheriff, to J. C. McMullen, lots 4, 5 and 6, s1, t35, r3.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

J. C. McMullen and family were in town last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

We are informed that Charley Hollaway is now a partner of Dr. Loomis, and will mix at the old stand as usual.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Prof. W. D. Mowry has withdrawn from the employ of Dr. Loomis. He has been a drug clerk in this town for several years, and has made a host of friends. We are informed that he contemplates a visit to the mountains. We bespeak for him the kind consideration of those he may meet.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.


After long confinement to the house from ill health, Dr. Loomis is to be seen at his place of business again. The Dr. is one of our best citizens and those who deal with him will find him an affable gentleman and straight as a gun.

­      Winfield Courier, July 3, 1879

                                          REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS [CITY]

J. C. McMullen to Samuel Mullen, lot 1, blk 74, Winfield. $75.

J. C. McMullen and wife to W. G. Gooch, lot 13, blk 78, Ark. City. $100.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Knowing that success depends upon keeping one’s name and business constantly before the public, Daniel Grant comes out this week with another new advertisement. Mr. Grant is a pleas­ant man to deal with, and always endeavors to keep a full and complete stock.

AD: D. GRANT has removed into the building formerly occupied by J. A. Loomis, on west side of Summit street, where he has opened a very large new Stock of Glass & Queensware bought in St. Louis, at lowest prices, together with a large stock of STATIO­NERY and a full line of Legal Blanks for Justices, township, school districts, professional men, etc. Also Tobacco and Cigars, News and reading matter, all of which will be sold cheap FOR READY PAY. Corn taken in exchange for goods.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 20, 1879.

Cap. Sanford, formerly of Winfield, has purchased some residence lots opposite the McMullen house and proposes building.

[DISTRICT COURT CALENDAR - AUGUST TERM.]

Winfield Courier, August 21, 1879

                                          (Commencing Monday, Aug. 25, 1879.)

                                              TENTH DAY. CIVIL DOCKET.

J. C. McMullen (Attorneys: Pryor & Pryor)

     vs.

S. T. Endicott   (Attorney: C. R. Mitchell)

Arkansas City Traveler, September 24, 1879.

Col. J. C. McMullen was in town on Monday. The Colonel has hosts of friends down this way, who are always glad to see him.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 24, 1879.

Dr. Loomis has leased the lot north of Schiffbauer’s brick store, and will remove the old building and erect a new one, into which he will move his stock of drugs.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 8, 1879.

                                                               D. GRANT

has removed into the building formerly occupied by J. A. Loomis, on west side of Summit street, where he has opened a very large new Stock of Glass & Queensware bought in St. Louis at lowest prices, together with a large stock of STATIONERY and a full line of LEGAL BLANKS for Justices, townships, school districts, professional men, etc. Also: TOBACCO AND CIGARS, News and reading matter, all of which will be sold cheap FOR READY PAY.

Winfield Courier, October 9, 1879


Mrs. Schermerhorn, a lady of Chicago, an artist, a teacher of prominence, and a lady of refinement, wealth, and influence, who has landed property and bank stock in this county, has been visiting friends in this city for the past week. She is a former acquaintance and friend of J. C. McMullen and family, with whom she has been stopping. She is more than ever pleased with the place and will make further investments.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 22, 1879.

Dr. J. T. Shepard has purchased the McMullen property at this place.

Winfield Courier, October 23, 1879

North Main street has the “boom” bad since the location of the east and west depot. In addition to the building already commenced by Manning, Kinne, and Curns, which will be of brick, 75 x 60, Messrs. T. R. Bryan, W. L. Mullen, and J. C. McMullen will soon begin the erection of a block of buildings on the vacant land just north of the American House and south of the foundry. The buildings will be of uniform size, each 25 x 100 feet and of brick. Mr. W. M. Berkey will also build a brick building, 25 x 75, on North Main street. It looks as if things are inclined to go northward.

[MORE AFFIDAVITS RE C. L. HARTER.]

Winfield Courier, October 30, 1879

The following affidavits completely refute the charge in the Telegram in relation to Shenneman and confirm our former state­ments as to Harter.

                                         A. T. SHENNEMAN’S AFFIDAVIT.

STATE OF KANSAS,  )

    Cowley county.          )   ss.

A. T. Shenneman, after being first duly sworn, on oath says that he has read the affidavit of Amos Biddle, published in this morning’s Daily Telegram, and the facts in this matter are as follows.

Mr. Biddle came to me and wanted to rent my farm and buy a mule team I had in July, 1877. He proposed to pay a share of the crop as rent and buy my mules on one year’s time. I told him I would like to rent him the farm, but did not want to sell the team without the money as I needed it in my business. He then said if I would let him have the team, he would give me a mort­gage on the team and crop to secure me, and would pay the same interest that I would have to pay to get the money.

With this understanding I came to Winfield and made arrange­ments to get what money I wanted for twenty percent of Mr. E. C. Seward. I told Biddle of my arrangement with Seward, and he said he would take the team and allow me that rate of interest. The papers were drawn up. I sold him mules, wagon, and harness, cover and bows, for $450.00, he giving me a note for $540.00, due in one year, and I borrowed money of Seward from time to time as I needed it, to supply the place of this money that I should have had when I sold my team.


When this note came due, Biddle had not threshed his wheat and wanted me to wait and said he would pay the interest. I, at that time, was paying J. C. McMullen 18 percent for money I had borrowed of him. I extended the time. Two or three months after the note came due, Biddle threshed his wheat, took his time to haul it to Wichita, paid me $110.00, and I gave him a receipt. About two months after this, he again threshed and again took his time to get the wheat to market, and when through paid me $150.00, and I gave him a receipt therefore. Some six weeks after this he threshed the balance and hauled it away as before, but failed to pay me any money. One of his neighbors, knowing I had a mortgage on every-thing, informed me that he thought Biddle was using the money instead of paying me. I saw Biddle; he said he had other debts to pay and had used the money, and wanted me to take the mules back, stating the time he would come in and we would fix the matter up. This I did not want to do, telling him that I had trusted him to haul the wheat away and pay me the money; that he knew I needed it, and he ought to pay it; that it was in the dead of winter, and no sale for the mules; that I could not realize on them, and must have money with which to meet debts contracted by me in anticipation of the payment of his note.

Finding that he could not pay me and that there was no chance to get the money from him, at his earnest solicitation I consented to take the mules and harness at his own figure: $280. He wanted to keep the wagon, it being worth $65 to $75. He brought the team in, his brother-in-law, Robert Kerr, accompany­ing him. I threw off a part of the interest, which left, as we settled, a balance due of $322 or thereabouts, I think.

I took the mules and harness at $280, and he agreed to pay me $25 thereafter; and I threw off the balance and the matter was satisfactory to him, and his said brother-in-law afterwards told me that Biddle said it was. The matter closed, and I gave him a receipt for $280. He took the wagon home, and five days after, paid me $25; and I gave him his note. I gave Biddle a receipt for every cent he ever paid me except that $25 paid when I gave him the note and he can produce them if he chooses. I kept the mules until the following April, and in my settlement with Millspaugh of our partnership, I allowed $20 for feeding them. I paid Benj. Cox, of Winfield, $2 to take them to Wichita. He placed them in the hands of J. F. Reese to be sold. He sold them for $270, kept $10 for his trouble and expense, and gave me a check on the Wichita Savings Bank for $260, and if anyone will take the trouble this can be shown by Reese’s check book. I sold the harness for $10, thus realizing but $248 on the mules and har­ness, for which I allowed him $280 in our settlement, to say nothing of the interest I paid for money during the time I had to hold the mules.

The note, when due, called for just $540. I got my money in installments, as above stated; and realized, all told, but $533, to say nothing of the interest paid by me for money during all these months that I was accommodating this man, and which amount­ed to certainly not less than $50.

Hearing that it was reported that I had wronged Biddle, I took Moses Teter and went to him and stated the facts in the case so far as our dealings were concerned; and he admitted to Moses Teter, in my presence, that they were true, and as I have here stated them, and that he had no cause of complaint against me except that I knew he was on the road and had procured another man to haul a load of coal from Wichita to Winfield, whereas I ought to have given it to him.

This is a full, accurate, and complete statement of all facts and circumstances connected with, or in any wise appertain­ing to each and every circumstance growing out of my trusting and befriending this man, Biddle. A. T. SHENNEMAN.

Subscribed in my presence, and sworn to before me this 23rd day of October, 1878.

                                               HENRY E. ASP, Notary Public.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 26, 1879.


The beautiful weather has been very favorable to those engaged in building, and Dr. Loomis intends to take advantage of the same and place a good frame building on the lot north of the Post Office.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 26, 1879.

                                              SEALED PROPOSALS.

Sealed proposals will be received at my store in Arkansas City, Kas., for the erection and completion of a two story brick business building in accordance with plans and specifications to be seen at the office of S. W. Scott, in the old McMullen Bank Building. Bids will be opened on Friday the 5th of December, at 2 o’clock p.m. The contract will be awarded to the lowest responsible bidder. I hereby reserve the right to reject any or all bids. S. MATLACK.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 10, 1879.

RECAP: LADIES INVOLVED WITH THE LADIES’ SOCIAL SOCIETY, FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, FESTIVAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE.

COMMITTEE ON ARRANGEMENTS: Mrs. N. B. Hughes, Mrs. Huey, Mrs. A. A. Newman, Mrs. McClung, Mrs. James Benedict.

SOLICITING:East side of city: Mrs. W. Benedict and Mrs. C. R. Sipes. West side of city: Mrs. Hutchison, Mrs. J. T. Shepard. East Bolton: Mrs. Denton, Mrs. Dr. Carlisle. West Bolton: Mrs. Guthrie, Mrs. Marshall. East of Walnut: Mrs. E. Parker and Mrs. N. Kimmell.

FANCY TABLE: Mrs. Wilson, Mrs. L. McLaughlin, Mrs. Berger, Miss Annie Norton, May Benedict, Linnie Peed, Carrie Benedict, Annie Hutchinson, Mary Theaker.

SUPPER TABLE:  Mrs. J. I. Mitchell, Mrs. R. C. Haywood, Mrs. Dr. Chapel, Mrs. S. P. Channell, Mrs. C. Schiffbauer, Mrs. Matlack, Mrs. Howard, Mrs. E. B. Kager, Mrs. Dr. Kellogg, Mrs.T. H. McLaughlin, Mrs. J. T. Shepard.

PROCURING TREE: Mr. W. D. Mowry, C. H. Sylvester, F. Farrar, Charles Swartz.

RECEIVING PRESENTS: Mrs. I. H. Bonsall, Miss Clara Finley, Mr. Cal. Swartz, C. H. Sylvester.

DECORATING TREE: Mr. and Mrs. Bonsall, Mr. and Mrs. Scott, Miss Eva Swarts, Hattie Houghton, Flora Finley, Angie Mantor, Ella Grimes, Mattie Mitchell, Kate Hawkins, Alma Dixon, Blanche Marshall, Emma Hunt, Susie Hunt, Mr. B. Matlack, F. Farrar, W. Gooch, Mr. Rose, G. Howard, B. Maxell, W. D. Mowry, F. Hutchison, E. LeClare, L. Norton, Mr. B. Parker, C. McIntire.

PROCURING STOVES: C. R. Sipes and James Benedict.

PROCURING LIGHTS: Dr. Shepard and Dr. Loomis.

COLLECTING DONATIONS: Mr. Hutchison and J. J. Breene.

PROCURING OYSTERS: E. D. Eddy.

COOKING OYSTERS: Mr. Coombs.

TEA AND COFFEE: Mrs. Coombs and Mrs. Norton.

OYSTER TABLE: Mrs. Sipes, Mrs. W. Benedict, Mrs. T. C. Bird, Mrs. T. Mantor, Mrs. J. D. Sherburne, Mrs. C. Parker, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Watson, Mrs. Anna Patterson.

PROCURING DISHES AND TABLES: Mr. and Mrs. O. P. Houghton, Mr. and Mrs. Lafe McLaughlin, Mrs. Sipes, Mr. J. C. Topliff.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 17, 1879.


The old snag, that has so long been an eye sore on the lot north of the Post Office, was snatched out last Friday and the foundation was started for Loomis & Hollaway’s new drug store.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 24, 1879.

Loomis & Hollaway has the finest assortment of plain and fancy toy Candies. AT THE GREEN FRONT.

Winfield Courier, January 15, 1880

Col. McMullen left on the 3 o’clock train Monday morning for Kansas City. He will be absent several weeks and will take in Denver during his rounds. Miss Nellie and Master Robbin accom­panied him.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 21, 1880.

TAKE NOTICE. All persons indebted to us for Drugs and Medicines must call and settle before February 1st, 1880, and save cost. LOOMIS & HOLLAWAY.

[FIRE: IN WINFIELD.]

Winfield Courier, January 29, 1880

About three o’clock Monday afternoon the unwelcome sound of the fire bell brought everybody outdoors to see what was the matter. It proved to be a fire in Col. Manning’s barn, a shed building near J. C. McMullen’s residence, in the west part of town, which was nearly consumed before the alarm sounded. The stable contained a pony belonging to Benny Manning, a mule belonging to Mr. Lindsay, a pair of harness, saddle, and bridle, a lot of corn, and some household furniture that was stored in the granary. The fire was started by Freddie Manning, a little boy nine years old. He had rolled up some paper in the form of a cigar, and after lighting it, dropped the match into a bunch of straw. The sufferings of the animals in the barn were intense, but not very prolonged. This is the second time that our town has been treated to a first class fire through the carelessness of children playing with matches. The roof of Col. Manning’s house nearby was scorched and the building narrowly escaped being burned.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1880.

Loomis & Hollaway will get moved into their new building by the last of next week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1880.

A new clothing store has been opened by Mr. J. Lindauer, of St. Louis, in the building north of Loomis & Hollaway’s drug store.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1880.

If you want a first-class organ, buy the justly celebrated MASON & HAMLIN. If you want to RENT an Organ, and let the rent pay for the Organ, rent a MASON & HAMLIN, and I will give you TWENTY-SEVEN MONTHS time to do it in.

Office and sales-room at Loomis & Hollaway’s Drug Store, Arkansas City, Kansas.

                                                 J. O. WILKINSON, AGENT.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1880.

Loomis & Hollaway have moved into their new drug store, one door north of the post office. The internal arrangement of this store is a new departure from what is generally seen in this latitude, while it makes a good display of goods.

Winfield Courier, February 12, 1880


T. R. Bryan and Col. McMullen are making arrangements to build a brick business building on north Main street in the block south of the machine shop. It will be a one-story, 50 x 80.

Winfield Courier, March 4, 1880

Mr. David S. Sherrard, of Mercer County, Illinois, about ten days ago, and after visiting several days in the northern part of the state, came to Winfield to visit his old friend and pastor, Rev. J. Cairns, and look up the country with a view to a future residence, but thought he would not buy until after he returned; but after visiting around for ten days, he considered to take up his residence in our city. He has just bought By. Terrell’s house and lot in the east part of the city; also a quarter-section of land from Mr. John Pryor, near to Winfield; and 240 acres from Col. J. C. McMullen near the State line, for a stock farm. He is a first-class citizen, and more of the same kind will follow soon. Mr. Sherrard returned at once to settle up his business and return to the city and state of his adoption.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 24, 1880.

                                                        CASH ACCOUNT.

Amount of cash received by the City Clerk since March 15th, 1879, to March 14th, 1880, both inclusive.

1879.

March 16: For peddlers license, $2.00

May 6: For liquor license, A. W. Patterson, $200.00

May 22: Show license, $2.00

June 2: Liquor license, S. B. Pickle, $183.35

June 19: S. P. Channell for quit claim deed, $5.00

June 21: Peddlers license, $2.00

July 15: Police Docket, James Christian, $6.00

Sept. 17: Peddlers license, $5.00

Oct. 14: Druggist license, J. A. Loomis, $2.10

Oct. 14: Police Docket, I. H. Bonsall, $1.00

Oct. 23: Peddlers license, $3.00

Oct. 24: Peddlers license, $3.00

Oct. 25: Peddlers license, $3.00

Nov. 4: Peddlers license, $2.00

Nov. 8: Peddlers license, $2.00

Nov. 8: Peddlers license, $1.00

Nov. 21: Liquor license, J. Knisley, $100.00

Nov. 21: Show license, $2.00

Dec. 10: Peddlers license, $2.00

Dec. 29: Omnibus license, $20.00

TOTAL: $546.45

1880

Jan. 1: Express license, $15.00

Jan. 3: Express license, $15.00

Jan. 5: Express license, $15.00

Jan. 15: Police Docket, J. Christian, $56.00


Jan. 17: Express license, $15.00

Jan. 22: Peddlers license, $2.00

Feb. 17: Auctioneers license, J. H. McGuire, $2.50

Feb. 20: Police Docket, I. H. Bonsall, $15.00

Feb. 25: Express license, $15.00

March 1: Police Docket, I. H. Bonsall, $2.00

March 8: Police Docket, I. H. Bonsall, $5.00

March 8: Police Docket, I. H. Bonsall, $52.00

TOTAL: $209.50

GRAND TOTAL FOR 1879 AND 1880: $755.95

By cash paid to City Treasurer from March 15th, 1879, to March 14th, 1880, both inclusive, for which I hold his receipts:      $753.95

Cash on hand to balance:                      2.00

TOTAL:                             $755.95

Amount of Script issued by City Clerk from March 15th, 1879, to March 14th, 1880, both inclusive:

March 17: To railroad committee expense to Topeka: $60.00

March 17: Gardner Mott, hauling stone for Walker’s well: $4.75

March 20: D. B. Hartsock, repairing Walker’s well: $35.00

March 22: Mrs. Finney, for lumber used at Walker’s well.

March 22: James Morgan, salary as City Marshal, Feb. ‘79: $10.00

March 28: I. H. Bonsall, six months salary as City Clerk, room rent, light and fuel for     council meeting: $25.00

March 29: John M. Hollaway, plow beam broken while in use by city: $2.50

March 29: John M. Hollaway, hauling dead horse off of town site: $1.25

March 31: James Morgan, salary as City Marshal, March, 1879: $10.00

April 11: J. P. Eckel, services as judge of city election: $2.00

April 14: Amos Walton, services as judge of city election: $2.00

April 14: W. J. Gray, services as judge of city election: $2.00

April 14: J. W. Griffith, services as clerk of city election: $2.00

May 6: D. B. Hartsock, for concreting Walker’s well: $10.00

May 6: James Morgan, salary as City Marshal, April, 1879: $10.00

May 30: John Hoenscheidt, civil engineer, surveying and grading streets: $25.00

June 3: W. R. Scott, board bill for surveying while grading streets: $7.00

June 3: Speers & Mantor, rope for Walker’s well: $.60

June 3: D. Berger, repairing scraper: $5.60

June 3: E. R. Thompson, lumber for dump wagons: $8.17

June 3: I. H. Bonsall, for 3 days assisting surveyor: $6.00

June 3: Gardner Mott, 21 days as street commissioner: $31.60

June 3: Gardner Mott, boarding prisoner: $.40

June 3: Gardner Mott, 2-1/2 days work on streets, by J. Rose: $2.50

June 3: Gardner Mott, 1 month’s salary as City Marshal: $10.00

June 3: James Christian, room rent and fees as Police Judge: $9.05


June 3: W. J. Gray, fees as City Marshal, 1878: $8.50

June 3: James Morgan, fees from Police Docket: $2.10

June 4: To R. C. Haywood for tax to clear title: $47.15

June 6: Erwin French, work on streets: $1.00

June 10: C. M. Scott, stationery for city: $2.51

June 16: Gardner Mott, 6 days as street commissioner: $9.00

June 21: A. C. Brunaham, for work on streets: $5.00

June 26: Hughes & McIntire, Traveler, printing Ordinance: $2.00

July 2: John M. Hollaway, cleaning well: $3.00

July 9: W. J. Gray, special City Marshal, 4th of July: $1.50

July 10: Gardner Mott, for work on streets 12-1/2 days: $20.75

July 10: Gardner Mott, for work on street by Rose ½ day with team: $1.00

July 16: Gardner Mott, salary months of June and July: $10.00

July 16: Gardner Mott, 1-1/2 days work on streets: $2.25

July 18: W. H. Speers, flour for Mrs. Tush: $1.25

July 25: Mrs. Tierick, nursing Mrs. Tush: $3.00

July 26: Miss Alice Walton, nursing Mrs. Tush: $2.00

Aug. 12: K. F. Smith, black smithing for public wells: $3.60

Aug. 12: J. A. Stafford, meat furnished Mrs. Tush: $1.00

Aug. 12: R. E. Fitzpatrick, cleaning Stanton’s well: $3.00

Aug. 12: R. E. Fitzpatrick, cleaning J. E. Williams’ well: $11.50

Aug. 13: Thos. Collins, work on streets: $2.00

Aug. 13: Gardner Mott, work on streets: $5.25

Aug. 30: L. Knight, legal services: $6.00

Sept. 1: J. D. Rogers, taxes to clear title: $24.25

Sept. 2: Hughes & Gray, Traveler, city printing: $9.50

Sept. 2: I. H. Bonsall, council room rent, lights, fuel,

 and six months services as City Clerk: $25.00

Sept. 2: Gardner Mott, street commissioner: $7.50

Sept. 16: Schiffbauer Bros., merchandise: $6.30

Sept. 19: Mantor & Blakeney: $.30

Sept. 22: D. B. Hartsock, on account of salary as City Marshal: $5.00

Oct. 14: Speers & Mantor, groceries for Mrs. Tush: $1.00

Oct. 24: D. B. Hartsock, on account of salary as City Marshal: $50.00

Oct. 25: E. R. Thompson, lumber for sidewalks: $17.28

Nov. 5: D. Berger, repairing scraper: $3.25

Nov. 5: Louis Dolittle, work on streets: $1.00

Nov. 7: A. Walton, road tax return list: $3.00

Nov. 10: Gardner Mott, as street commissioner: $25.00

Nov. 10: Geo. Russell, 1-1/2 days with team on streets: $3.00

Nov. 13: B. B. Hartsock, bal. on salary to Nov. 12th: $45.00

Nov. 24: Gardner Mott, cleaning out well: $2.00

Dec. 4: K. F. Smith, blacksmith work on calaboose: $2.00


Dec. 15: D. B. Hartsock, City Marshal to Dec. 12, 1879: $25.00

Dec. 19: J. W. Hutchison, work on streets: $3.00

Dec. 19: A. A. Newman, stone for Walker’s well: $2.60

Dec. 20: D. B. Hartsock, on account grading Central Avenue: $50.00

1880.

Jan. 8: A. Wilson, blankets for calaboose: $6.00

Jan. 12: W. K. Jacobs, lumber for pauper grave: $.50

Jan. 14: Wm. Parmer, nursing pauper and washing corpse: $5.00

Jan. 15: Honn & Skipper, digging pauper graves: $3.00

Jan. 15: Thompson & Channell, lumber for street crossings: $21.61

Jan. 16: Chas. U. France, boarding sick pauper: $59.00

Jan. 19: D. B. Hartsock, City Marshal to Jan 21, 1880: $25.00

Jan. 22: Gardner Mott, work with team as street commissioner: $10.60

Jan. 26: D. B. Hartsock, grading Central Avenue, balance in full: $50.00

Jan. 29: D. B. Hartsock, chain for well: $.50

Feb. 6: Peter Pearson, bal. due on coffin, James Morgan, City Marshal: $4.75

Feb. 6: Geo. Russell, burying pauper: $1.50

Feb. 6: J. P. Eckel, work on Street crossing: $1.50

Feb. 13: A. T. Green, work on Street crossing: $1.60

March 1: C. McIntire, city printing: $12.50

March 2: C. McIntire, city printing, $5.25

March 3: Howard, Rexford & Howard, merchandise: $4.89

March 6: L. P. Stanton, clerk of bond election, Feb. 24, 1880: $2.00

March 6: M. Stanton, Judge of bond election, Feb. 24, 1880: $2.00

March 10: Gardner Mott, Judge of bond election, Feb. 24, 1880: $2.00

                                                           TOTAL: $980.56

                                                  I. H. BONSALL, City Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 21, 1880.

Shepard & Maxwell have moved their drugs into the building formerly occupied by Loomis & Holloway.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 12, 1880.

In this issue appears the professional card of Dr. James A. Loomis, who from this time forth will resume the practice of dentistry. The doctor is well known in this vicinity as a professional man of long experience, and we predict for him a large practice among his old friends and acquaintances.

CARD: J. A. LOOMIS, DENTIST. Office at his residence, one block west of the Bank.

                                                       FILLING a Specialty.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 19, 1880.   

That substantial institution, the Winfield Bank, has an advertisement in this issue. Messrs. McMullen & Fuller are men of wealth and sterling business principles, and enjoy a patronage second to no bank in Southern Kansas.

AD: J. C. McMULLEN, President, J. C. FULLER, Cashier.

            WINFIELD BANK, WINFIELD, KANSAS. PAID UP CAPITAL, $50,000.


[AUXILIARY FORMED: KANSAS ORPHAN ASYLUM.]

Winfield Courier, May 13, 1880.

Mrs. N. L. Reeder, of Burlingame, Kansas, addressed the people of Winfield at the M. E. Church, on Monday evening, in the interest of the Kansas Orphan Asylum at Leaven-worth. Notwith­standing the attendance was very meagre, the pathetic appeal of the speaker seemed to go straight to the hearts of all present, and as a result an Auxiliary Society was declared organized and the following officers elected.

President:               Mrs. M. G. Melville.

Vice President:       Mrs. E. T. Trimble.

Cor. Secretary:       Mrs. Anna Cooper.

Rec. Secretary:       Mrs. Van Doren.

Treasurer:        Mrs. Col. McMullen.

Due notice will be given in the morning papers, of the time and place of the first general meeting of this Auxiliary which, we are informed, sub rosa, will take the form of an evening social at the pleasant house and grounds of Col. McMullen. Ladies, it is hoped, will not fight shy of this society for the drafts upon their time and purse will be but light, while the gentlemen, although expected to contribute a nominal fee for membership, will find it less expensive than a Sunday stroll to the brauerei, and at the same time have the satisfaction of assisting in establishing, prospectively, a home for their orphan children. We commend this view of the case to our young men about town.

Winfield Courier, May 27, 1880.

The new stone building of Col. McMullen and T. R. Bryan, on north Main street, will soon be ready for occupancy.

Winfield Courier, June 17, 1880

The contract for building the school houses was let to John Q. Ashton, for $9,950. Mr. John H. Lee was appointed superinten­dent of erection. Mr. Ashton built the Arkansas City school house and the new stone buildings on north Main street for McMullen & Bryan.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 7, 1880.

DIED. We regret to learn of the death of Mr. McMullen, father of J. C. McMullen, at Winfield, last Saturday. There was no other cause than that of extreme old age, he being some ninety-seven years old. He was buried on Saturday.

[DEATH: MR. McMULLEN.]

Winfield Courier, July 8, 1880.

                                                            In Memoriam.

At the residence of his son-in-law, E. P. Kinne, Esq., Father McMullen, whose aged face was familiar to most of our citizens a few weeks since, departed this life at 4 p.m., July 3rd, 1880.


His life in many respects has been memorable. Born about the close of our War of Inde-pendence, he had met and conversed with many of the great men of the past. In 1814 he saw George III at Windsor Castle, and frequently heard William Pitt, Fox, and other celebrated men of those days speak, when England was at war with her neighbors on the continent. He was a man grown when Waterloo was fought, and read the news spread through London by the Rothschilds that Wellington was defeated so that they could buy up at a great discount British consols.

In the early part of this century, he made several trips across the ocean to this country as chief officer’s clerk, and his children have in their possession the log-book kept by him during these voyages.

He visited Jackson’s memorable battle ground at New Orleans, before the cotton bales were removed, and though he was a subject of Great Britain, no one in all this land rejoiced more than he at the result of this conflict. He said “his heart fairly leaped for joy” when the news was communicated by the pilot who came aboard their vessel to take them into port.

About 1818 he settled in New York, and at the time Lafayette made his first visit to this country, had one of the best livery stables in the city. It was his pride and boast that he was one of those that welcomed the great friend of our Revolution to our shores, and he regarded it as the grandest moment of his life when he passed under that living arch of flowers that read “Welcome to Lafayette.” He often spoke of the old wall that partially surrounded New York, after which Wall street was named, as being “out on the common,” but now the busiest spot on this continent. He was present when the foundation of the Astor House was laid, and often saw such men as Webster, Clay, and Benton sup their coffee in its saloons, and heard them tell their jokes as they rode in his four-in-hand to Long Island or Rockaway. Those were the happy days of coaching, when people were not destroyed in over crowded steamers.

An incident in his career will illustrate how different the practices then from those of our times. Having lost all his earthly possession by the big fire in the city, and being reduced in an hour from affluence to penury, he was asked in after years why he had not insured. He said he had hardly heard of insur­ance, and on making inquiry of his neighbors, found that not one in a hundred was insured. Having lost all, he removed with his young family to Lewis County, New York, where some of the citi­zens of Cowley County knew him forty years ago as an old gentle­man bowed down with the might and toil of years.

In 1846 he went to Chicago, “but the lands adjacent and even the village itself, were too swampy for farming,” hence he passed off to northern Wisconsin and settled in Sheyboygan County, where his youngest son now resides on a valuable farm purchased by him of the government thirty-three years ago.

In his extreme old age he came to Kansas to spend the last few months of his life among his children here. From the first he was enraptured by our broad and fertile prairies, and it was his common remark, that if these farms only had a “sugar bush” on them, they would be the finest in the world.

But few men have been blessed with a better constitution, or more happy and contented disposition. With an implicit faith in an over-ruling Providence and the promises of a Redeemer, he bore all the adversities of life in the spirit of a christian philoso­pher; with his deep abiding love for God and his fellow man, he saw blessings where others saw nothing but trials, and whenever, through his long life’s journey he could alleviate human suffer­ing by a kind or encouraging word or by any aid in his power to bestow, it was his delight to grant it. The last thirty years of his life was a blank in his memory, almost wholly forgetting the events of this period, his mind returning in great force to the early days of his boyhood and early manhood.


Surrounded by his children and grandchildren, with the beautiful prayers of his boyhood upon his lips, he died without a struggle. When too feeble to speak, he recognized by a bow the impressive emblem of a dying Savior almost in the last moment of his life. While we miss him, we believe his work was fully done and that he is now living in that Hereafter toward which he had turned his face for so many years with as much hope, trust, and asperance as he ever looked toward his earthly habitation.  J.

Winfield Courier, July 29, 1880

A first class brood mare and colt for sale. Inquire of J. C. Loomis, near Arkansas City, or of J. C. McMullen, Winfield.

Winfield Courier, July 29, 1880

WANTED. Girl for general housework. Best of wages will be given. Required at the residence of J. C. McMullen or at the Winfield Bank.

Winfield Courier, August 5, 1880.

Col. J. C. McMullen brought us from Mr. Burrel’s vineyard on the sand hills the largest Concord grape we ever saw.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 25, 1880.

Frank Baldwin, formerly of Winfield, wrote to Col. McMullen last week, telling him that some time last spring he was offered a half interest in a mine that needed developing for $100. He was afraid of mining stock, and refused. A few days ago an interest in the same mine was sold for the trifle of $100,000. Frank still says, however, that he is afraid of that kind of speculation, and prefers to make money slower and surer.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 1, 1880.

By reference to our card column, it will be seen that a partnership has been effected between Drs. Vawter and Loomis. These gentlemen are well known in this community as dentists of experience and ability. There are no better workers in the county. Give them a call, and keep your teeth in good preservation.

CARD: M. B. VAWTER. J. A. LOOMIS.

                                                             DENTISTRY,

                                           VAWTER & LOOMIS, DENTISTS,

                                                        ARKANSAS CITY.

                                              Office in Matlack’s Summit Street.

                                                    Artificial teeth $10 per set.

Winfield Courier, September 16, 1880.

Col. McMullen and family left for Bismarck Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, September 16, 1880.

Col. J. C. McMullen and wife, and Mrs. J. C. Fuller left on Monday morning to spend the week at the Bismarck fair.

Winfield Courier, September 23, 1880.

Col. McMullen and wife, Mrs. Fuller, Mrs. Manning and others, have returned from Bismarck.

[PARTY GIVEN BY COL. J. C. McMULLEN AND E. P. KINNE.]

Winfield Courier, October 14, 1880.


The social party of Col. J. C. McMullen’s was the most enjoyable of the season. There were present about fifty guests all in fine spirits and in jovial mood. Col. and Mrs. McMullen and Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Kinne were present everywhere attending to the pleasure of the guests. The supper was magnificent to which the visitors did full justice; and at the noon of night, when they took their departure, all felt that nothing had been wanting to make their enjoyment complete.

Cowley County Courant, November 17, 1881.

J. F. McMULLEN, ATTORNEY AT LAW, 9th avenue, Winfield.

Winfield Courier, November 25, 1880.

The ladies of the Baptist Church gave a social at the residence of Col. McMullen last Thursday evening. It was largely attended and the Colonel’s elegant parlors were filled to over­flowing with the elite of the city.

Winfield Courier, November 25, 1880.

Trial docket for December term, commencing on the first Monday (6th day) of December, A. D. 1880:

CIVIL DOCKET, SEVENTH DAY.

J. C. McMullen vs. William Tousley, et al.

J. C. McMullen vs. A. McCarney et al.

Cowley County Courant, December 1, 1881.

CHARTERS FILED. The following charter was filed yesterday in the office of the secretary of State: “Winfield Building and Loan Association,” capital stock $200,000. Board of Directors for the first year: J. E. Platter, R. E. Wallis, H. G. Fuller, J. F. McMullen, E. P. Greer, A. D. Hendricks, J. W. Connor, A. B. Steinberger, C. A. Bliss, J. A. McGuire, and I. W. Randall. Commonwealth.

Cowley County Courant, December 1, 1881.

W. H. Colgate and wife, of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, are here visiting friends, and will probably remain all winter. Mrs. Colgate is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. McMullen.

Winfield Courier, December 16, 1880.

A meeting was held in the council rooms last Thursday evening to consider means for temporary assistance to those in want in our city.

John B. Lynn was made chairman, and James Kelly, secretary.

By a vote of the meeting the city was divided into four wards by Main street and Ninth avenue, and committees were constituted as follows.

Northeast ward:  Mesdames T. R. Bryan, Dr. Graham, and Rev. J. Cairns.

Northwest ward:  Mesdames McDonald, McMullen, and Miss Service.

Southwest ward:  Mesdames Spotswood and Jillson, and Miss Mary R. Stewart.

Southeast ward:  Mesdames Hickock, Silver, and Swain.

Committees to solicit contributions were appointed as follows.

Northeast:  Mesdames Holloway, Linticum, and Troup.

Northwest:  Mesdames Short and Dr. Davis and Mayor Lynn.

Southwest:  Mesdames Earnest and Landers, and Mr. R. D. Jillson.

Southeast:  Mrs. Rigby, Miss L. Graham, and Mr. W. A. Freeman.

Lynn & Loose tendered their front basement for a storage room for the committees.

The committees were requested to meet in the council rooms on Tuesday, Dec. 14, at 2:30 p.m. to form plans of operation.


[WINFIELD BANK.]

Winfield Courier, December 16, 1880.

The stockholders of the Winfield Bank will take notice that the annual meeting of the stock holders will be held at the bank building in Winfield on Tuesday, January 4th, 1881, at 7 o’clock p.m. J. C. FULLER, Cashier.

Cowley County Courant, December 22, 1881.

Winfield Commandery No. 15, Knights Templar, held their annual installation of officers on Friday evening. The following are the officers: W. G. Graham, E. C.; J. C. McMullen, G.; James McDermott, C. G.; Chas. C. Clack, S. W.; J. W. Johnston, J. W.; S. H. Myton, Treas.; J. D. Pryor, Rec.; S. A. Cook, W.; Mr. Stafford, Std. B.; S. H. Myton, Swd. B.

Cowley County Courant, December 29, 1881.

At a regular meeting of the Masons at their lodge last Tuesday evening, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year. J. C. Hunt, W. M.; A. P. Johnson, S. W.; Lou Zenor, J. W.; J. C. McMullen, Treas.; E. T. Trimble, Secretary; C. C. Black, S. D.; F. C. Hunt, J. D.; Jas. Harden, S. S.; E. P. Hickok, J. S.; Rev. James Cairns, Chaplain; S. E. Burger, Tyler.

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1800.

With the earliest settlers of Winfield, came Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Millington, since which time their hospitable home has been a favorite with our society people.

At their reception last evening an unusually happy and enjoyable time was had. Mr. and Mrs. Millington, assisted by their daughters, Misses Kate and Jessie, were truly at home in the manner and method of receiving their friends, with a smile and a pleasant word for all. No wonder the hours passed so quickly by. All restraint and formality was laid aside for an evening of genuine good feeling and pleasure.

Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bliss, Mr. and Mrs. N. L. Rigby, Mr. and Mrs. McDonald, Mr. and Mrs. Hackney, Mr. and Mrs. Spotswood, Mr. and Mrs. Gene Baird, Mr. and Mrs. Bedillion, Mr. and Mrs. Moffit, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. McMullen, Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. H. Brown, Dr. and Mrs. Black, Mr. and Mrs. Hickok, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Pryor, Mr. and Mrs. Troup, Mr. and Mrs. Scovill, Mr. and Mrs. Lundy, Mr. and Mrs. Lemmon, Dr. and Mrs. Emerson, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Short, Mr. and Mrs. Kretsinger, Mr. and Mrs. Shrieves, Mr. and Mrs. Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Millington, Mrs. Huston, Miss McCommon, Wirt W. Walton, and J. R. Conklin.

Refreshments were served to the satisfaction and praise of all, and not until a late hour came the “good nights” and the departure of friends for their homes, each of whom will not soon forget the pleasant evening with Mr. and Mrs. Millington. Daily Telegram.

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

Adelphi Lodge No. 110, A. F. & A. M., elected and installed officers on Monday evening as follows.

J. S. Hunt, W. M.

James Kelly, S. W.

R. C Story, J. W.

J. C. McMullen, Treas.


E. T. Trimble, Secretary.

C. C. Black, S. D.

M. G. Troup, J. D.

J. Cairns, Chaplain.

W. A. Freeman, S. S.

W. W. Smith, J. S.

S. E. Berger, Tyler.

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881.

BANK ELECTION. At the annual election of the Winfield Bank last Tuesday evening, A. A. Wiley, J. J. Buck, D. A. Millington, J. C. Fuller, and J. C. McMullen were chosen directors.

The directors met and elected J. C. McMullen, president; J. C. Fuller, cashier, and D. A. Millington, secretary.

Winfield Courier, January 27, 1881.

MR. AND MRS. J. C. FULLER. Socially this has been one of the gayest winters in the history of our city. Almost every week has been made pleasant by a social gathering of some sort or other. One of the most pleasant of these was the reception by Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Fuller last Friday evening. The guests were many and the arrangments for their entertainment were complete.

Among those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Loose, Mr. and Mrs. James Harden, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. Hodges. Dr. and Mrs. VanDoren, Mr. and Mrs. McMullen, Mr. and Mrs. Eastman, Rev. and Mrs. T. F. Borcher, Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Bryan, Dr. and Mrs. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Gene Baird, Mr. and Mrs. Short, Dr. and Mrs. Graham, Mr. and Mrs. Boyer, Mr. and Mrs. Trimble, Mr. and Mrs. Moffitt, Mr. and Mrs. Speed, Mr. and Mrs. Doane, Mr. and Mrs. Kretsinger, Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Shrieves, Mr. and Mrs. Millington, Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Bliss, Mr. and Mrs. Scovill, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Allen Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Carruthers, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Black, Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Hamil­ton, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Fuller, Rev. and Mrs. Hyden, Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Williams, Mrs. Mansfield, Mrs. Mullen, Miss Mary Stewart, Miss May Williams, Father Kelly, O. F. Boyle, and Charles Fuller.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 2, 1881.

Dr. M. B. Vawter can still be found in his rooms over Matlack’s store, where he will be happy to receive calls from those needing the services of a dentist. See his card.

CARD: M. B. VAWTER, DENTIST.

 Office in Matlack’s brick, Summit street, Arkansas City.

 Artificial Teeth, $10 per set.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 2, 1881.

CARD: Dr. JAMISON VAWTER, Late Asst. Surgeon to the Louisville Eye and Ear infirmary. Tenders his professional service to the citizens of Arkansas City and vicinity. Surgical dressings, and diseases of the eye, ear, throat, and nose (nasal catarrh), a specialty. Office in Matlack’s brick.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 2, 1881.

                                                  DISSOLUTION NOTICE.


Notice is hereby given that the firm of Vawter & Loomis is this day dissolved by mutual consent. M. B. VAWTER, J. A. LOOMIS.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 2, 1881.

We take pleasure in calling attention to the professional card of Dr. Loomis in this issue. The doctor has removed his office into the room over A. A. Newman’s store, where he will be pleased to see all who may desire his services. Dr. Loomis has had fifteen years’ experience in dentistry, and we can confident­ly recommend him as a first-class dentist.

CARD: J. A. LOOMIS, DENTIST.

 Office, first door to the right, over Newman’s store, in Arkansas City, Kansas.

                                         Artificial teeth, $10. All work guaranteed.

Winfield Courier, February 3, 1881.

Mr. F. C. Flath, of Sheboygan, Wisconsin, spent Wednesday in town. He is an old scholar of Col. McMullen’s, and is loud in praises of the manner in which the Colonel wields the ferrule.

Winfield Courier, February 10, 1881.

Col. McMullen tells of a storekeeper on the border who ordered four bibles in making up his stock in trade. He ex­plained that there were no d       d fools there now, but when the first Indian scare comes, all the settlers will want bibles.

[MONITOR ITEM.]

Winfield Courier, February 10, 1881.

A new music house has been opened in the McMullen building, with Miss Nettie McCoy as manager.

Winfield Courier, March 10, 1881.

We received a pleasant call from Rev. Wm. P. Stowe, agent for the western Methodist book concern, last Tuesday. He is an old school-mate of Col. McMullen’s, and in days gone by they ate their cornbread and molasses from the same slab in an old-fash­ioned Tennessee school-house. Rev. Stowe now occupies one of the most important positions in the gift of the M. E. church. He spent some time viewing the city, and is loud in his praise of the thrift and enterprise displayed by our people.

[REPUBLICAN CITY CONVENTION.]

Winfield Courier, March 31, 1881.

RECAP: Judge Soward and Ed Greer were appointed tellers. On motion of Hackney, delegates were requested to deposit the ballot on the call of the secretary. Nominations being in order, the following gentlemen were placed in nomination for mayor: T. R. Bryan, S. C. Smith, J. C. McMullen, and M. G. Troup. On the fourth ballot Mr. Troup was nominated.

On motion rules were suspended and Lovell H. Webb was nominated for city attorney by acclamation.

T. R. Bryan received the nomination for city treasurer, and S. C. Smith for treasurer of the school board by acclamation.

For police judge J. T. Hackney and James Kelly were nominat­ed. Mr. Hackney received the nomination.

For justice of the peace, Capt. Tansey was nominated by acclamation.

For constables: J. H. Finch and Capt. Siverd, by acclamation.


Fred C. Hunt was made chairman of the central committee, when the convention adjourned.

[EDITORIAL PAGE: H. P. STANDLEY, PUBLISHER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 6, 1881.

                                                OUR STOCK AND BONDS.

The sale of our stock in the S. K. & W. R. R., sometime since, has resulted in quite a rumpus between the newspapers at the county seat, consequent upon alleged mistakes, or to say the least, in formalities committed by a certain county official. It is not our funeral, but if we read the signs of the times aright, the funeral knell to the hopes of some aspirants for county office in the future, have boomed loud and deep. In order that the TRAVELER’s readers may know what is transpiring in this matter, we insert the following from the Monitor, of March 26, 1881, which appeared over the signature of “BANSHEE,” and will sufficiently explain itself.

Editor Monitor: There seems to be a premeditated attempt on the part of the Courier, and those most interested in the success of certain county officers, to cover up the real delinquencies which jeopardized the sale of stock held by this county in the Southern Kansas & Western railroad. This attempt on the part of the Courier is two fold.

First, to vent its spleen against Read’s bank in the inter­est of McMullen, Fuller, Millington, and company.

Second, to shield Captain Hunt.

The Courier, blindly and in an unscrupulous spirit of hate toward M. L. Robinson, sought to attract the attention of the public from the real delinquent, Capt. Hunt, by attacking the county commissioners for sending James Harden and M. L. Robinson East to protect the interests of Cowley County.

It is true that in the first article in the Courier, in regard to this subject, they did not abuse the commissioners in express terms; but they published an editorial stating that it was reported on the street, and that great excitement existed among the people in consequence thereof, that the board of county commissioners had sent Messrs. Harden and Robinson East to perfect the sale of the stock held by the county in the Southern, Kansas & Western railroad, and that such statement was false, and that if they had gone East for such purpose, it was at their own expense and volition, and that the commissioners of Cowley County, being honorable men, would never be guilty of doing such a thing.

With a characteristic cheek which serves the senior editor of that paper so well in times of emergencies, he stated to a guileless public, if such order was made, it was with the under­standing that the committee would pay their own expenses as they had the right and were well able to do; when such editor well knew that the order was not only to send such committee East but also to pay their expenses.

Then the Monitor, true to the facts in defense of the action of the county commissioners, published the official order made by the board of county commissioners, attested by Captain Hunt, county clerk, showing that said committee not only went on order of the board, but also at the expense of Cowley County.


After the committee had returned from the successful trip, wherein they saved to the taxpayers of this county fifty-six thousand dollars, then it was the venerable old fossil of the Courier ate his own words, devoured his own offspring, turned tail on his former publication, and published to the world the action of the county commissioners and justified the same.

In this justification, every man in Cowley County, who is familiar with the facts, will heartily join. In order that the public may know the real status of the case, the writer of this article will state the facts. The people of the county by their votes ordered the commissioners to sell the stock, and they, in pursuance of such order, did sell such stock for sixty-eight cents, and Read’s bank gave to the county treasurer a certificate of deposit for the amount, for which they had Coler & Co.’s draft, and here is where the trouble began.

The county clerk in making out the papers showing the vote, and order of sale, failed to show affirmatively that the sale was legal. This may not have been his fault, for he is not a lawyer, neither has he had the necessary business experience to fill the position he holds, which is unfortunate for him and deplorable as regards the best interests of this county; but worse than all, instead of certifying the order of the board selling our stock in said railroad company, as he should have done, and as any ordi­narily careful clerk would have done, he made out the certifi­cate showing that we had sold our stock in the “Southern, Kansas & Fort Smith” railroad company.

These papers went East with the application for the transfer of the stock to Coler & Co., and, of course, were rejected on the ground that there was no such railroad as the “Southern, Kansas & Fort Smith,” and that the sale of the stock of the “Southern, Kansas & Fort Smith” railroad would not transfer the stock of the Southern, Kansas & Western railroad; hence, the rejection of Coler & Co.’s application, and having failed to obtain what they purchased, they threw back the stock upon the hands of Cowley County.

The time was up for the transfer of this stock, the South­ern, Kansas & Western railroad company had ceased to exist, and the stock held by Cowley County was utterly worthless. The contest for the control of the same on the part of Gould on one hand, and the Santa Fe on the other, which gave it its fictitious value, being ended by the success of the Santa Fe company, and the stock was of no further value.

At this juncture, M. L. Read’s bank, the wealthiest and largest tax-paying institution of the county, promptly took a hand to save the county; and M. L. Robinson, being one of the directors of the Cowley, Sumner & Fort Smith railroad, and being on intimate and friendly terms with the General Manager Strong, of the Santa Fe, went to Topeka and Kansas City, procured an order, delaying the closing of the books of the old Southern, Kansas & Western railroad company—now defunct—until the egre­gious blunder of our county clerk could be rectified.

Robinson came home, a meeting of the county commissioners was convened, and the necessary papers, under the advice of Judge McDonald, of Winfield, and Wallace Pratt, of Kansas City, were made out and the committee sent East, as heretofore stated, to save this county from great financial loss.

Instead of Mr. Robinson being abused in connection with this matter, he is entitled to the heart-felt thanks of all honest men in Cowley County; and but for the insane jealousy of the unfortu­nate occupants on the corner, they would be the first to accord the praise.


In conclusion, I have to state that I have no fight to make on Captain Hunt; I charge him with no criminal negligence, unless it be criminal negligence for a county official to be derelict in duty, either from want of knowledge or criminal carelessness. Certain it is that in this case, but for the prompt action by M. L. Robinson, the county would have absolutely lost fifty-six thousand dollars, as a direct result of Captain Hunt’s gross carelessness.

I have not been a supporter of Mr. Troup of late years; I, in common with many others, fell into the foolish notion that, because a man made a good officer, and held the office a long time, was no reason for his further retention; hence, I voted for Captain Hunt and against Troup, but I am forced to admit that Mr. Troup’s official record is without a blemish, and I, with others who thought as I did, regret the day that saw him step down and out. Certain it is, that the blunders now charged to the county commissioners, and which, if really chargeable at all, are chargeable to the inefficiency of the county clerk; and never would have happened had Mr. Troup retained his old position.

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

Several Winfield gentlemen have organized a coal company with their base of operation at Grenola. They have several fine specimens of surface coal from the shaft, taken out six feet below the ground. They intend to go down one thousand feet. Col. McMullen is president, and Dr. Mendenhall, secretary.

[ANOTHER EDITORIAL: M. L. READ - “BANSHEE.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 13, 1881.

M. L. Read and the banking concern, of which he is the head, has been the recipient of much taffy at the hands of “Banshee,” but feeling assured, upon further inquiry, that in this matter said correspondent was at fault, we give publicity to certain items from the Courier in reference thereto, which, we think, will enable our readers to judge intelligently. We have no feeling in this matter, more than to see that the general inter­ests of our county are well looked to and to give the news; having done which, we leave the case on its merits.

The items referred to above are as follows.

“The ponderous mass of taffy and soft soap with which “Banshee” deluges M. L. about his tremendous power and influence with W. B. Strong, the Santa Fe, and the bears and bulls of Wall street, about his overwhelming patriotism, illustrated by his superhuman efforts to save the county from a loss of fifty six thousand dollars, by first rushing to Topeka and then to New York, is wonderfully translucent. The county was in no danger of being swallowed up by the defaulting shark, Coler & Co. The county had no interest in the matter, and had no occasion to pay M. L.’s expenses to either place. It was Read’s bank that was in danger, and it was for that institution for which he exerted his wonderful powers, which was all right and praiseworthy.

“‘Banshee’ says that M. L. Read’s bank is the ‘wealthiest and largest tax-paying institution in the county.’  Read’s bank is indeed a very wealthy and large tax-paying institution, and ‘Banshee’ is so near the truth in this instance that we will only call it an error, and correct it by stating that the Winfield bank paid, in this county for the year 1880, some $300 more than Read’s bank, and that the former bank and McMullen and Fuller pay $626.25 more taxes than the latter bank with Read and the three Robinsons together. The total taxes of the Winfield bank and the two men is $2,371.08; that of Read’s bank and the four men is $1,744.45. This is a good showing for both and we repeat what we have often said, that Winfield has two of the solidest and soundest banks in Kansas.”


[COURIER ITEMS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 13, 1881.

The Winfield Bank declared its fourth semi-annual dividend, on April 1st, of ten percent, with a good surplus left. The bank stock is rising rapidly. An offer of $1.10 was refused last week. At the present rates of interest Winfield Bank stock, as an investment, is worth $2. The bank is booming and no mistake.

Several Winfield gentlemen have organized a coal company with the base of operations at Grenola. They have several fine specimens of surface coal from the shaft, taken out six feet below the ground. They intend to go down one hundred feet. Col. McMullen is president, and Dr. Mendenhall, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 27, 1881.

BIRTH. Col. McMullen steps a little higher than usual—all owing to a little bank president, of regulation weight. Telegram

Winfield Courier, April 28, 1881.

Col. McMullen has a new boy at his house. Born Friday. The Colonel was able to attend to business Monday.

Winfield Courier, May 19, 1881.

WANTED: A girl to do general house-work. Best of wages will be paid. Inquire at the residence of J. C. McMullen.

Winfield Courier, May 19, 1881.

Notice is hereby given that the stock books of the Caney Valley Prospecting Coal and Mining Company, of Elk and Chautauqua counties, Kansas, will be opened on the 21st day of June, A. D., 1881, at the office of the secretary of the company, in the city of Grenola, Elk County, Kansas, and at the Winfield Bank, in the city of Winfield, Kansas, for the purpose of receiving subscrip­tions to the capital stock of the company, and will be kept open at the above named places until all the shares of the stock are subscribed.

By order of the Board of Directors, J. C. McMULLEN, President.

W. S. MENDENHALL, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 1, 1881.

Drs. Vawter and Loomis have again entered into partnership, and their friends and patrons are invited to call upon them at their dental rooms over Matlack’s store.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 1, 1881.

Dr. M. B. Vawter, of the firm of Vawter & Loomis, of this city, has opened a branch establishment over Spotswood’s store, Winfield, Kansas. M. B. Vawter will look after the Winfield interests of the firm, and left for that place on Monday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 1, 1881.

                                                   FROM THE MONITOR.

Doctors Vawter & Loomis have opened a dental office in the second floor of Spotswood’s store. These gentlemen are already well known in this county, and will become still better. They are here to stay.

[COUNTY BOARD.]

Winfield Courier, July 14, 1881

The Board of County Commissioners, at their last session, transacted business as follows.


Approved the road reports in the R. S. Wells, J. M. Bair, and Daniel Mahar road cases, and granted the petition of Dr. Cunningham for a section line road.

They appointed viewers on the S. H. Sparks, Hallet Mathews, J. H. Rhems, and M. D. Goodnight road petitions.

The Julia A. Gilleland road was dismissed and the principal petitioner ordered to pay the costs.

Approved the official bonds of B. Fawcett, M. T. Hall, W. L. Dougherty, and J. H. Bilsing.

M. L. Read and J. C. McMullen were appointed a committee to assist the Probate Judge in counting the funds in the hands of the County Treasurer.

They remitted taxes for M. J. Gilkey and J. D. Pryor, and corrected several erroneous tax sales of school lands.

The commissioner districts were changed by taking Beaver township from District No. 1, and adding to District No. 2, and taking Otter township from District No. 2, and adding to District No. 3.

The Board also succeeded in getting possession of the balance of the lots in the Court House block, purchasing five lots from Mrs. Millington for $450; four lots from Mr. Fuller for $300, and one lot from Mr. Manning for $135, the City of Winfield on certain conditions, donating its lots. The city is to deed the two lots and jail to the county, which completes the block.

The above lots, bought at $90 each, would sell readily at $150 each, to other parties.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 20, 1881.

                                                    SOLDIERS REUNION.

                                       WINFIELD, KANSAS, JULY 14, 1881.

To the Union Soldiers of the late War:

We, the undersigned, your comrades and survivors of the late rebellion, believe that a reunion of the old soldiers now resi­dents of Cowley and surrounding counties, would meet your approv­al and serve to renew and strengthen a patriotic and brotherly feeling in the hearts of all old soldiers and lovers of the Union, we would, therefore call a reunion at Island Park, Winfield, Kansas, for the 7th and 8th of October, 1881.

For a more complete organization and the successful carrying out of this plan, we would ask all old soldiers residing in the limits above named, to meet at Manning Opera House, on Saturday, July 23rd, at 2 o’clock p.m., at which time to effect a permanent organization, and the appointment of such general and local committees as the meeting may deem proper, essential for the ultimate success of this—an old soldiers’ reunion—at the time and place above mentioned. The county papers are requested to publish this call.

J. W. Arrowsworth       Wm. P. Hackney

J. W. Millspaugh                 J. C. McMullen

T. Thompson                      W. H. Goodrich

W. W. Smith                      J. H. Finch

B. B. Daugherty                  John Ross

Walter Denning             J. M. Jones

J. F. Burroughs             H. Allen


G. W. Anderson                 J. H. Hill

T. A. Blanchard                  Al Ray

S. Smedley                   C. Trump

W. B. Pixley                       H. Harbaugh

S. Johnson                    B. M. Legg

W. F. Doorley              H. H. Siverd

W. E. Tansey                     T. B. Myers

Jake Nixon                   N. A. Haight

W. F. Baird                        D. L. James

C. E. Stevens                     J. S. Hunt

E. D. Rice [Race?]       A. B. Arnold

A. B. Stewart                     H. M. Perkins

G. L. Eastman              R. E. Brooking

J. W. Douglas                     C. M. Wood

L. Halcomb                        F. M. Bair

J. C. Roberts                      J. A. Graham

J. W. Hipps                        C. W. Richmond

J. Crites                              M. H. Frey

F. M. Friend                       L. Wise

B. McFadden

Winfield Courier, July 28, 1881

Col. J. C. McMullen and family were sniffing the breezes of Lake Erie at Put-in-bay at last accounts.

Winfield Courier, August 18, 1881

Sheriff Shenneman received a telegram Sunday from the Sheriff of Douglass County, stating that a boy had been captured under suspicious circumstances with a horse, which he said he had taken from a pasture north of Winfield. The sheriff investigated and found that the horse was one of Col. McMullen’s, which had been in Mr. Williams’ pasture. No one knew it had been taken.

Winfield Courier, August 25, 1881

Deputy Sheriff George McIntire returned from Emporia with Col. McMullen’s horse and the thief. The thief’s name is Joseph Best, and he says he had been lying sick near Burden for several weeks, felt bad, and thought he would steal a horse and get out of the country.

Winfield Courier, August 25, 1881

Col. J. C. McMullen and family returned from the east Saturday evening under sad affliction in the loss of their youngest child in their absence. They had been spending the heated term at Put-in-bay and Lakeside in Ohio. The child took sick at the latter place and remained so under the care of excellent physicians without relief. Thinking it would be better for the child, they left for home, but arriving at Lafayette, Indiana, the child was much worse and they stopped off and gave it the best care possible, but without avail. The child died in a day or two, and on account of the extremely warm weather, the railroad people would not transport it to this city and they were obliged to deposit the remains in the Lafayette cemetery until colder weather.


[THE OLD SOLDIERS.]

Winfield Courier, August 25, 1881.

The meeting at Manning’s hall on Saturday, August 20th, was well attended by the old soldiers. Capt. Haight with a section of his battery, put in a number of shots that sounded like old times to the boys. Messrs. Pixley, Requa, Woodruff, Roseberry, and others furnished old time martial music. At 11 a.m., the meeting was called to order with C. M. Wood in the chair, and Jake Nixon, secretary.

On motion a committee of seven was appointed as a permanent organization consisting of comrades Wells, Steuven, Stubblefield, Nixon, Waugh, Kretsinger, and Jennings. After some interesting remarks on the part of Capt. Stubblefield, J. W. Millspaugh, H. D. Catlin, and S. M. Jennings, the meeting adjourned until 2 p.m.

The afternoon meeting showed an increase of delegates and much more enthusiasm. The committee on permanent organization submitted the following report.

Your committee on permanent organization beg to submit the following.

For President: Col. J. C. McMullen, of Winfield; for Vice Presidents, we would recom-mend one from each township to be named by this meeting, and one from the city of Win-field. We submit the name of T. H. Soward. For recording secretary, Jake Nixon, of Vernon; corresponding secretary, A. H. Green, Winfield; treasur­er, J. B. Lynn, Winfield.

Executive Committee: Col. McMullen, Capt. Stubblefield, Capt. Hunt, Capt. Tansey, T. R. Bryan, D. L. Kretsinger, and C. M. Wood.

Finance Committee: J. B. Lynn, Capt. Siverd, Capt. Myers, James Kelly, and Judge Bard.

Encampment: Dr. Wells, Capt. Steuven, and Capt. Haight.

Printing: E. E. Blair and Jake Nixon.

Invitation and speakers: Hon. W. P. Hackney, Gen. A. H. Green, D. L. Kretsinger, M. G. Troup, Capt. Chenoworth, Capt. Nipp, Major D. P. Marshall, N. W. Dresie, and C. H. Bing.

That the executive committee be entrusted with the general management of the reunion and are authorized to call to their assistance such help, and any subcommittee in their judgment which may seem best for the success of the reunion; and may fill all vacancies in committees that may occur; that the vice presi­dents are charged with responsibility of prompt organization of their respective townships, and shall muster and make due report of all old soldiers to the secretary as soon as possible.

On motion the report was adopted.

Vice President Soward was called to the chair, which he accepted in a stirring and patriotic speech.

On motion comrades present from the various townships were requested to name their vice presidents.

Vernon: P. M. Waite.

Walnut: Capt. Stubblefield.

Richland: Dan Maher.

Ninnescah: J. P. Cook.

Fairview: W. White.

Windsor: Henry Wilkins.


Tisdale: W. R. Bradley.

Sheridan: R. E. Longshore.

Beaver: Chas. W. Roseberry.

Pleasant Valley: J. W. Feuqua.

Dexter: John Wallace.

Cresswell: Capt. Nipp.

Cedar: N. W. Dresie.

Bolton: Amos Walton.

Rock: J. M. Harcourt.

Liberty: S. F. Beck.

The following townships were referred to the Executive Committee for appointment of vice presidents, who appointed as follows.

Harvey: E. M. Annett.

Maple: Daniel Winn.

Omnia: J. C. Stratton.

Otter: C. R. Myles.

Silver Creek: Harvey Smith.

Spring Creek: Henry Sutliff.

Silverdale: H. N. Chauncey.

The time for holding the reunion as published in the call for the 7th and 8th of October was then discussed. The sense of the meeting seemed to indicate that the farmers would not be through seeding at that time, and that a later date should be named. On motion the 21st and 22nd of October was fixed as the time for holding the reunion.

On motion all county papers were requested to publish the proceedings of this meeting. The meeting then adjourned. JACOB NIXON, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, August 25, 1881

The old soldiers of Walnut township will meet at Island Park on Friday, September 2nd, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of organizing to attend the Soldiers’ reunion and State fair at Topeka. CAPT. STUBBLEFIELD, V. P.

Winfield Courier, August 25, 1881

                               A Partial List of our People Who are not at Home.

Miss Clara Brass is visiting her parents in Douglass County.

Miss Kate Millington is spending the summer at Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Miss Florence Beeny is visiting in Colorado.

Hon. W. P. and Mrs. Hackney are rusticating at Manitou Springs, Colorado.

Mrs. Vandeventer, mother of Mrs. Hackney, is at Manitou Springs.

Judge J. Wade McDonald and family are doing Colorado, with headquarters at Denver.

Mrs. M. L. Robinson and children are in southern California for the summer.

Mrs. Albro is visiting in New York.

Ex Saint represents Ridenou, Baker & Co. in Colorado and New Mexico, with head-quarters at Las Vegas, where his family is temporarily quartered.

M. L. Robinson, Dr. Davis, and 76 Horning are bracing up the wilds of New and Old Mexico.


T. B. Johnston is summering at Durango, Colorado.

Lafe and Charlie Pence are temporarily at Rico, Colorado.

Will Stevers is doing Chicago by gas light.

Bob O’Neil represents the Kansas Music House.

Col. McMullen and family were at the sea side, but the death of their baby brings them home this Saturday evening.

Capt. S. C. Smith is on the coast of Maine.

Ezra Meech, Sr., is in Vermont.

Frank Gallotti is at Durango, Colorado.

Col. Manning is looking after his interests in Colorado.

[THE OLD SOLDIERS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 31, 1881. Editorial Page.

                                                    THE OLD SOLDIERS.

Delegates meeting—a permanent organization elected, committees appointed, and the time fixed for the reunion of the old soldiers of Cowley.

The meeting at Manning’s hall on Saturday, Aug. 20th, was well attended by the old soldiers. Capt. Haight with a section of his battery, put in a number of shots that sounded like old times to the boys. Messrs. Pixley, Requa, Woodruff, Roseberry, and others furnished old time martial music. At 11 a.m. the meeting was called to order with C. M. Wood in the chair, and Jake Nixon, secretary.

On motion, a committee of seven was appointed on permanent organization, consisting of Comrades Wells, Steuven, Stubblefield, Nixon, Waugh, Kretsinger, and Jennings. After some interesting remarks on the part of Capt. Stubblefield, J. W. Millspaugh, H. C. Catlin, and S. M. Jennings, the meeting ad­journed until 2 p.m.

The afternoon meeting showed an increase of delegates and much more enthusiasm. The committee on permanent organization beg to submit the following.

For President, Col. J. C. McMullen, of Winfield; for Vice President, we would recom-mend one from each township to be named by this meeting, and one from the city of Win-field. We submit the name of T. H. Soward. For recording secretary, Jake Nixon, of Vernon; for corresponding secretary, A. H. Green, Winfield; treasurer, J. B. Lynn, Winfield.

Executive committee—Col. McMullen, Capt. Stubblefield, Capt. Hunt, Capt. Tansey, T. B. Bryan, D. L. Kretsinger, and C. M. Wood.

Finance committee—J. B. Lynn, Captain Siverd, Capt. Myers, James Kelly, and Judge Bard.

Encampment—Dr. Wells, Capt. Steuven, and Capt. Haight.

Printing—E. F. Blair and Jake Nixon.

Invitation and speakers—Hon. W. P. Hackney, Gen. Green, D. L. Kretsinger, M. G. Troup, Capt. Chenoweth, Capt. Nipp, Major Marshall, N. W. Dressie, and C. H. Bing.


That the executive committee be entrusted with the general management of the reunion, and are authorized to call to their assistance such help and any sub-committee in their judgment which may seem best for the success of the reunion, and may fill all vacancies that may occur; that the vice presidents are charged with the responsibility of prompt organiza­tion of their respec­tive townships, and shall muster and make due reports of all old soldiers to the secretary as soon as possible.

On motion the report was adopted.

Vice-President Soward was called to the chair, which he accepted in a stirring and patriotic speech.

On motion comrades present from the various townships were requested to name their vice presidents.

Vernon: C. M. Waite.

Walnut: Capt. Stubblefield.

Richland: Dan Maher.

Nenescah: J. P. Cook.

Fairview: W. White.

Windsor: Henry Wilkins.

Tisdale: W. R. Bradley.

Sheridan: R. R. Longshore.

Beaver: Chas. Roseberry.

Pleasant Valley: J. W. Flenque.

Dexter: John Wallace.

Creswell: Capt. J. B. Nipp.

Cedar: N. W. Dressie.

Bolton: Amos Walton.

Rock: J. M. Harcourt.

Liberty: S. F. Beck.

The following townships were referred to the executive committee for appointment of vice presidents, who appointed as follows:

Harvey: E. M. Anneu.

Maple: Daniel Winn.

Omnia: J. C. Stratton.

Otter: C. R. Myles.

Silver Creek: Harry Smith.

Spring Creek: Henry Sutliff.

Silverdale: H. N. Chauncey.

The time for holding the reunion as published in the call for the 7th and 8th of October, was then discussed. The sense of the meeting seemed to indicate that the farmers would not be through seeding at that time, and that a later date should be named. On motion the 21st and 22nd of October was fixed as the time for holding the reunion.

On motion, all county papers were requested to publish the proceedings of this meeting. The meeting then adjourned. JAKE NIXON, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, September 1, 1881

Judge J. Jay Buck, of Emporia, is in the city, a guest of Col. McMullen. Judge Buck is booked for an address during the temperance camp meeting.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 7, 1881.

                                          WINFIELD, KANSAS, Sept. 5, 1881.


The following described property, owned by the Winfield Bank, Winfield, Cowley Co., Kansas, was taken from near Salt City, Sumner Co., by one E. Collins—calling himself a physician.

A liberal reward will be paid either for the property (whole or in part) or the thief.

One iron gray horse, ten years old, about 14 hands high; one bay horse about 6 years old, 14-1/2 hands high; saddle mark on right side; one double Bain wagon; 3-1/4 Thimble; one set of double harness. Notify by telegraph. J. C. McMULLEN, President.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 7, 1881.

                                                              FOR SALE.

I will sell the n. w. 1/4 and lots 2 and 3, and n. e. 1/4 of s. w. 1/4 of section 36, township 34, range 3, lying immediately south and west of the town site of Arkansas City, Kansas, and owned by Sophia V. French, for six dollars per acre. Part of the purchase money may remain on time. Perfect title given. Must be sold within thirty days. Apply to

                                             J. C. McMULLEN, Winfield Bank.

Winfield Courier, September 22, 1881

Col. N. C. Kenyon and Aaron Schofield, of Chatsworth, Illinois, have purchased four hundred and eighty acres of land of Mr. J. C. McMullen, and will hereafter make southern Kansas their home. They are most estimable gentlemen and we are glad to secure them as citizens. Col. Kenyon is an old friend and neighbor of Mr. N. C. Meyers.

[SOLDIERS REUNION NOTES.]

Winfield Courier, October 6, 1881.

J. C. McMULLEN, Chairman, Reunion Committee, sent out final instructions. Finance committee was to raise not less than $300 for the absolute and necessary expenses of the reunion. Also, any person owning or having in their charge any tent or tents, who will either loan or hire the same for the use of the soldiers reunion to be held at Winfield Oct. 20, 21, and 22, was asked to report the same to J. C. McMullen or C. M. Wood, at Winfield, stating terms.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 19, 1881.

                                                         From the Courier.

Mr. J. F. McMullen, a brother of the Colonel’s, has opened a law office on Ninth avenue. He moved an immense safe into it Saturday.

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

Monday evening a number of gentlemen met at the office of Gilbert & Fuller and organized “The Winfield Building and Loan Association.” A constitution was drawn up and charter provided for, and a large amount of stock subscribed. The capital stock of the Association is $100,000 in two series of $50,000 each, the second series to be issued when the first series is paid up. The stock is divided into five hundred shares of $100 each, and are assessed at one dollar per month each. No member can own more than ten shares. The business of the Association is managed by a board of directors, and the following persons were elected as such board for the coming year: J. E. Platter, R. E. Wallis, H. G. Fuller, J. F. McMullen, Ed. P. Greer, A. D. Hendricks, J. W. Conner, C. A. Bliss, A. B. Steinberger, J. A. McGuire, and I. W. Randall.


The Board of Directors then met and elected H. G. Fuller president, A. D. Hendricks vice-president, J. E. Platter treasur­er, and J. F. McMullen secretary and attorney. The secretary was instructed to open the books of the Association for subscriptions to the capital stock. The first series only consists of five hundred shares, and these are being taken rapidly and will soon be exhausted.

The plan of this Association is one that has been in suc­cessful operation in many cities of the United States, and in Emporia, Fredonia, and many other towns in Kansas. Any persons may take from one to ten shares of stock and thereby become a member. An assessment of one dollar per month is made on each share. When sufficient amount is on hand, the Board of Directors meet and the money is put up at auction, bid on by the members, and the highest bidder takes it, giving therefor good real estate security and pledging his stock.

The profits are divided pro rata among the stockholders and each share receives its credit. Whenever the stock reaches par, or the accrued assessments and profits amount to $100 on each share, a division is made and each stockholder receives the par value of his share.

This plan offers special advantages for young men and laborers who desire to secure homes in this way. They can purchase one, two, or three shares, and pay in their monthly assessments of one, two, or three dollars. They can then secure a lot, go to the Association and bid off, say three hundred dollars, or enough to build a small house thereon, at, say 12 percent, per annum. If they hold three shares of stock and borrow three hundred dollars, they will pay each month in assess­ments and interest six dollars. At the end of four years, which is about the time it will take the stock to mature, they will have paid in assessments and interests $288. A division is made, they will receive from the Association their mortgage, and their home will be clear: thus having built a house and paid for it in four years at the rate of $6.00 per month. The ordinary rent for a house costing $300 is seven dollars per month. In four years a man would pay out in rent $336 and have no more at the end than he started with. With this plan he would pay out $288 in four years and own the house in the end.

The benefits of such an association as this will be apparent at a glance. You who have a boy growing up, buy a share of this stock for him and make him earn the assessment. Most any little boy can earn a dollar a month by carrying in wood or blacking your boots, or doing odd chores. Let him have his little book, walk up to the secretary’s office each month, and pay his dollar. At the end of our years his share will be worth $100 and he will hardly know where it comes from. It will be a lesson on economy worth far more than years of precept. We hope that the populari­ty with which this scheme is meeting here will cause other towns to organize associations. It cannot help but be of practical benefit to Winfield and to the individual member of the associa­tion in helping to build up homes in our midst, and creating a profitable investment for small sums that would otherwise be wasted.

Winfield Courier, October 20, 1881.


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. Wishing to secure to my pupils all the advantages of a first class music school, I have leased Col. McMullen’s store room opposite the Brettun House and fitted the same for a Concert Hall. Although our monthly concerts will be in reality examinations in the different branches of musical science, I shall make them as interesting as possible and hope that my patrons will encourage the enterprise by their never failing presence. The seating capacity of our hall being rather limited, we will not be able to send invitations to all of our friends at the same time but shall remember them all on the different occasions. C. Farringer.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 26, 1881.

Rev. Fleming has rented the room in the Newman block former­ly occupied by Dr. Loomis, and has fitted the same up for a study.

Winfield Courier, October 27, 1881.

Col. McMullen and E. P. Kinne are in Kansas City this week.

Winfield Courier, October 27, 1881.

The resolutions of the committee postponing the reunion did not reach some of the farthest townships, and a good many were here to participate. Dexter came in force Thursday night and awakened the echoes with fife and drum, calling many of our citizens from their beds in their night clothes to make speeches. The boys had a big time and the next day were dined at the Brettun by Col. McMullen and other “old vets.” In the afternoon such old soldiers as were in Winfield met at the Opera House, where Col. McMullen, on behalf of the committee, explained the reasons for the postponement, which were deemed sufficient. It was then decided that a regimental drill should be held in Winfield on Saturday, November 12th, and it was requested that all townships complete and send in their rolls at the earliest moment.

Winfield Courier, November 3, 1881.

Col. McMullen and E. P. Kinne are in Kansas City this week.

Winfield Courier, November 10, 1881.

Mr. J. P. McMullen is taking steps to organize a Building and Loan association. Such an association would be of much practical value to Winfield.

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

The young man who stole Col. McMullen’s horse plead guilty.

Cowley County Courant, November 17, 1881.

J. F. McMULLEN, ATTORNEY AT LAW, 9th avenue, Winfield.

           J. F. McMullen & Ed. P. Greer on Winfield Building & Loan Assn. Board.

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881. Monday evening a number of gentlemen met at the office of Gilbert & Fuller and organized “The Winfield Building and Loan Association.”

A constitution was drawn up and charter provided for, and a large amount of stock subscribed. The capital stock of the Association is $100,000 in two series of $50,000 each, the second series to be issued when the first series is paid up. The stock is divided into five hundred shares of $100 each, and are assessed at one dollar per month each. No member can own more than ten shares.

The business of the Association is managed by a board of directors, and the following persons were elected as such board for the coming year: J. E. Platter, R. E. Wallis, H. G. Fuller, J. F. McMullen, Ed. P. Greer, A. D. Hendricks, J. W. Conner, C. A. Bliss, A. B. Steinberger, J. A. McGuire, and I. W. Randall. The Board of Directors then met and elected H. G. Fuller president, A. D. Hendricks vice-president, J. E. Platter treasur­er, and J. F. McMullen secretary and attorney. The secretary was instructed to open the books of the Association for subscriptions to the capital stock. The first series only consists of five hundred shares, and these are being taken rapidly and will soon be exhausted.


The plan of this Association is one that has been in suc­cessful operation in many cities of the United States, and in Emporia, Fredonia, and many other towns in Kansas. Any person may take from one to ten shares of stock and thereby become a member. An assessment of one dollar per month is made on each share. When sufficient amount is on hand, the Board of Directors meet and the money is put up at auction, bid on by the members, and the highest bidder takes it, giving therefor good real estate security and pledging his stock.

The profits are divided pro rata among the stockholders and each share receives its credit. Whenever the stock reaches par, or the accrued assessments and profits amount to $100 on each share, a division is made and each stockholder receives the par value of his share.

This plan offers special advantages for young men and laborers who desire to secure homes in this way. They can purchase one, two, or three shares, and pay in their monthly assessments of one, two, or three dollars. They can then secure a lot, go to the Association and bid off, say three hundred dollars, or enough to build a small house thereon, at, say 12 percent, per annum. If they hold three shares of stock and borrow three hundred dollars, they will pay each month in assess­ments and interest six dollars. At the end of four years, which is about the time it will take the stock to mature, they will have paid in assessments and interests $288. A division is made, they will receive from the Association their mortgage, and their home will be clear: thus having built a house and paid for it in four years at the rate of $6.00 per month. The ordinary rent for a house costing $300 is seven dollars per month. In four years a man would pay out in rent $336 and have no more at the end than he started with. With this plan he would pay out $288 in four years and own the house in the end.

The benefits of such an association as this will be apparent at a glance. You who have a boy growing up, buy a share of this stock for him and make him earn the assessment. Most any little boy can earn a dollar a month by carrying in wood or blacking your boots, or doing odd chores. Let him have his little book, walk up to the secretary’s office each month, and pay his dollar. At the end of four years his share will be worth $100 and he will hardly know where it comes from. It will be a lesson on economy worth far more than years of precept. We hope that the populari­ty with which this scheme is meeting here will cause other towns to organize associations. It cannot help but be of practical benefit to Winfield and to the individual member of the associa­tion in helping to build up homes in our midst, and creating a profitable investment for small sums that would otherwise be wasted.

                         Charter: Winfield Building and Loan Association.

Cowley County Courant, December 1, 1881. [From Commonwealth.]

The following charter was filed yesterday in the office of the secretary of State: "Winfield Building and Loan Association," capital stock $200,000. Board of Directors for the first year: J. E. Platter, R. E. Wallis, H. G. Fuller, J. F. McMullen, E. P. Greer, A. D. Hendricks, J. W. Connor, A. B. Steinberger, C. A. Bliss, J. A. McGuire, and I. W. Randall.

Cowley County Courant, December 1, 1881.

W. H. Colgate and wife, of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, are here visiting friends, and will probably remain all winter. Mrs. Colgate is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. McMullen.

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

Mr. J. B. Colgate, of New York City, a son-in-law of Mr. J. F. McMullen, is visiting here and will probably locate perma­nent­ly among us.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 14, 1881.

                                                       A. F. & A. M.


At the last regular meeting of Crescent Lodge, A. F. & A. M., the following were elected officers for the coming year.

W M: James Ridenour.

S W: W. D. Mowry.

J W: I. H. Bonsall.

Treas: H. P. Farrar

Sec: Dr. Loomis.

S D: Cal Swarts.

J D: C. Hutchins.

S S: J. C. Pickering.

J S: H. Endicott.

Tyler: [LEFT BLANK].

Winfield Courier, December 15, 1881.

Col. McMullen is in Kansas City this week.

Winfield Courier, December 15, 1881.

Mr. Loomis and family returned from Colorado last week and are stopping with their daughter, Mrs. J. C. McMullen. Mr. Loomis is past eighty, but says he has come back to Cowley to “grow up with the country.” He is still well and hearty and bids fair to reach a hundred.

Cowley County Courant, December 22, 1881.

Winfield Commandery No. 15, Knights Templar, held their annual installation of officers on Friday evening. The following are the officers: W. G. Graham, E. C.; J. C. McMullen, G.; James McDermott, C. G.; Chas. C. Clack, S. W.; J. W. Johnston, J. W.; S. H. Myton, Treas.; J. D. Pryor, Rec.; S. A. Cook, W.; Mr. Stafford, Std. B.; S. H. Myton, Swd. B.

Cowley County Courant, December 29, 1881.

At a regular meeting of the Masons at their lodge last Tuesday evening, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year. J. C. Hunt, W. M.; A. P. Johnson, S. W.; Lou Zenor, J. W.; J. C. McMullen, Treas.; E. T. Trimble, Secretary; C. C. Black, S. D.; F. C. Hunt, J. D.; Jas. Harden, S. S.; E. P. Hickok, J. S.; Rev. James Cairns, Chaplain; S. E. Burger, Tyler.

Winfield Courier, December 29, 1881.

Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Winfield Bank for the election of directors and for any other business that may come before them, will be held at the rooms of said Bank on Tuesday, the 3rd day of Janu­ary, 1882, at 2 o’clock p.m.

                                                 J. C. McMULLEN, President.

The Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

Wanted. A servant girl to do general housework. Inquire of Mrs. J. F. McMullen  southeast corner of 9th Avenue and Steward [?] street.

The Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.


The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Winfield Bank was held at the bank building on Tuesday evening. J. C. McMullen, J. C. Fuller, J. Jay Buck, W. J. Wilson, and D. A. Millington were elected directors for the ensuing year. The financial condition of the bank was examined and approved. An order was passed restricting the allowance of overdrafts. The directors elected held a meeting and chose J. C. McMullen, president; J. C. Fuller, cashier; and D. A. Millington, secretary.

The Winfield Courier, January 12, 1882.

W. B. Caton has removed his marble works, house and all, to Ninth Avenue, opposite J. F. McMullen’s law office.

Cowley County Courant, January 19, 1882.

A charter has been filed with the Secretary of State for the Winfield Loan and Trust Company. Capital stock, $10.000. Charter members: J. C. McMullen, J. D. Leland, H. G. Fuller, A. B. Lemmon, and C. E. Fuller.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

                                                               A. O. U. W.

A Lodge of A. O. U. W., consisting of forty members, was organized last week in this city by J. F. McMullen and B. M. Legg, of Winfield. The following officers were elected.

Past M. W.: James Benedict.

M. N.: Capt. O. S. Rarick.

Foreman: Archie Dunn.

Overseer: J. G. Sheldon.

Financier: W. M. Blakeny.

Receiver: W. E. Chenoweth.

Recorder: B. W. Matlack.

O. G.: H. R. Robinson.

I. G.: G. H. McIntire.

Guide: A. W. Patterson.

Trustees: A. A. Davis, J. C. Pickering, and C. R. Sipes.

Medical Examiners: H. D. Kellogg, J. T. Shepard.

Meets every Friday evening, at the Masonic Hall, until further arrangements.

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

Mr. J. F. McMullen left for Topeka Monday evening to attend to some matters before the Supreme Court and represent Winfield Lodge of United Workmen in the Supreme Lodge meeting.

Cowley County Courant, February 16, 1882.

Suits have lately been commenced in the District Court as follows.

Mary A. Loomis vs. E. P. Greer, et al, foreclosure of mortgage.

Winfield Courier, February 16, 1882.

The Board of Directors of the Winfield Building and Loan Association will hold an adjourned meeting Saturday evening, Feb. 18th, 3 o’clock, at the office of the Secretary, to loan $150 to the stockholder making the highest bid therefor. Any member wishing to borrow the money should attend. J. F. McMULLEN, Secretary.

Cowley County Courant, February 23, 1882.


Information was filed in the District Court yesterday charging John Fleming with unlawfully selling intoxicating liquors. Also charging said Flemming and Drs. H. L. Wells, David V. Cole, and John Headrick for unlawfully prescribing intoxicat­ing liquors. The cases will be tried at the April term. We have no comments to make. The gentlemen are in the hands of the court and entitled to hearing without prejudice anyway. Dr. Cole has given bond and retained J. F. McMullen as attorney. We under­stand each of the others have also given bond except it may be Dr. Wells.

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

                                                           CRAB CREEK.

George Harris says he is agent for Mr. McMullen and has $20,000 to loan. Girls, here is a chance if you want to exchange single life for married. George is not old, very handsome, and besides has a good piece of land. NELLIE GRAY. Feb. 14th.

Cowley County Courant, March 2, 1882.

We call the attention of our citizens to the communication from Mr. Thorpe in this issue, and we are glad to see them investigating the matter. The prospect of such a manufactory is decidedly pleasant to us, and we would like to see the matter given full attention. We don’t think there is any danger of Winfield becoming a “way station,” but we would not lose an opportunity to build up this city or advance her interests. Winfield is flourishing now, and we want it to continue in so doing and we think all our businessmen are with us in that desire.

EDITOR COURANT: I find that there are some people who feel rather dubious as to the success of the enterprise which I suggested in the COURANT the other day. To these people I would kindly offer this explanation of the “modus operandi” of such an enterprise. All of the eastern manufactories of a like nature have to buy their leather, paying four profits for it, namely, the manufacturers, commissioners, wholesalers, and retailers. Now in my suggestion I propose manufacturing my own leather, and thereby combining all of the aforesaid profits with the profits derived from the manufacture of boots and shoes.

In regard to competition, we invite it, for in a country like this, where there is always a plentiful supply of hides at lower rates than can be procured at any point in the east; we candidly say we invite and defy competition.

The town of Winfield has about reached its limits as regards the population, and is allowing other adjacent towns, much smaller than she is, to out-rival her by the intrepidity of their citizens. What will be the consequences? The result will be that she will awake one day to find that during her slumber she has allowed her once inferior neighboring towns to become large manufacturing cities, while she receives the flattering title of a “way station.” Now the question is, are the citizens of Winfield going to allow this opportunity to pass by without the slightest effort on their part to save it from the four winds. I for one, am willing to risk all I have towards the furtherance of such an enterprise. Most every man, woman, and child in Kansas wears boots or shoes at some period of the year, and as Kansas gives great encouragement to home industry, the chances of disposing of goods would be great. I am speaking of Kansas as the home market. Such an enterprise would not alone fill the pockets of the stock holders, but would give employment to many men and women.

The following are some of the well known citizens who fully endorse my proposition and who also agree to take shares in the corporation.

J. C. McMullen.

J. C. Fuller.


Messrs. S. D. Pryor & Bro.

J. P. Baden.

J. S. Mann.

Messrs. Hendricks & Wilson.

W. H. Albro.

M. L. Reed.

C. C. Black.

J. B. Lynn.

J. A. Earnest.

Messrs. Hughes & Cooper.

Quincy A. Glass.

Messrs. Smith & Bro.

A. H. Doane & Co.

C. A. Bliss.

Messrs. Johnston & Hill.

A. T. Spotswood.

James E. Platter.

J. H. Bullen

J. L. Horning.

Trusting that others as well as the above citizens will endorse and subscribe to it, I remain

                Respectfully Yours,  EDWARD F. THORPE, Winfield, February 2, 1882.

Cowley County Courant, March 9, 1882.

Messrs. Horning, Read, McMullen, Robinson, and perhaps others will erect windmills for the purpose of irrigating their grounds the coming season. Frank Barclay has a carload of piping on the road which he will use for that purpose. With plenty of water the question of growing trees, shrubbery, and blue grass is solved.

Cowley County Courant, March 16, 1882.

WINFIELD LOAN AND TRUST COMPANY, OVER POSTOFFICE. [J. C. McMULLEN, PRESIDENT/H. G. FULLER, SECRETARY].

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

On the first page this week we publish a letter from a Cowley County lady who is in the Foreign Missionary work in Egypt. It contains many items of interest and comes from one who is giving her life to the work. The letter was addressed to Col. McMullen, who takes much interest in the work and makes large contributions toward carrying it on.

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

                        A LETTER FROM EGYPT. [SENT TO COL. McMULLEN.]


EDS. COURIER: Perhaps it is not known to many of our people that we have a highly accomplished missionary in the land of the Pharaohs from Cowley County in the person of Miss Anna Y. Thompson, who is a graduate of one of our best eastern seminaries. When we hear of what she and others have done, and are doing, to raise fellow humanity in other lands—spending the best years of their lives working for the elevation of their race upon unfriendly shores, we can realize how meager our yearly offerings are in comparison to their life-works. As the influence of the COURIER is always on the side of right, perhaps some of its many friends will desire to contribute something in addition to what is asked for, as that sum has already been secured. M.

                                                     AMERICAN MISSION.

                                           CAIRO, EGYPT, February 13, 1882.

DEAR FRIEND: Last mail I received from my brother-in-law, Mr. McKitrick, word that he had sent the $25. The same day a letter came from the American Exchange Bank in New York, enclosing a draft on London for 5 pounds. Please accept my thanks for your kindness to me in the past, and also at this present time. It may seem bad policy to send home for the money, but I had a good many expenses last fall, and it seemed necessary to keep me from running into debt here. I will try now to be more economical.

I reached Cairo safely Sept. 28th, the same day we landed in Alexandria. We sailed from Philadelphia August 31st, and we only spent one night in Liverpool, as a steamer was to sail the next day to Alexandria. We anchored for some hours at Gibraltar, Algiers, and Malta, and in Alexandria we had a short time after getting through the Custom House to see our missionaries there, and in Ramleh before coming to Cairo on the night train.

There were several changes for the better during my absence. One of them was the completion of our church, and this is much more suitable for our Sabbath services than the lecture room which had been used for some time. Some of the larger class of girls in our boarding school had left it while I was in America. One of these was married to one of our best native church members, and two had gone to other towns to teach in our schools. One of these was a pupil whose father was not able to pay all the tuition required including boarding. I had helped to educate her, and still send her about the same amount, $2.50 a month, to support her as a teacher and manager of a girls’ school in her native town, where she is doing a good work. Miss Conner, the lady who is with me in this school, went with me during the vacation at the beginning of the year to visit the town Sinneria, which is not far from the celebrated ancient labyrinth in the Fayoum, a place about 70 miles from here. I was formerly stationed there with one of our mission families, who are cousins of mine, and of course I feel interested to see the school I once had charge of successfully carried on by one of our pupils. Two of her former classmates are pupil teachers in this school, and one is in a town called Mansura in the old land of Goshen, where she gives satisfaction. We have now twenty-four boarders, besides two teachers, and we have ten or eleven different nationalities, one of them being a black girl, who was once a slave, but is now handsomely supported by a Swiss gentleman here, and another is a white slave from Constantinople, whose master is a Mohammedan boy. We have 80 day scholars this month, and they are mostly Mohammedans and Copts. Some of our boarders are supported by friends in America, either individually or S. S. Classes, and they pay on each, $50, for a school year of ten months. We have some few girls who pay a part, but not all of the tuition required, and some pay all. Miss Conner and I visit among the homes as much as we can, and quite a large work is carried on by Bible women, or “Zinana workers,” as some call them, who go from house to house teaching the women to read the Bible and explain it to them, and in this way many women are taught who never attend our church services from various reasons.


When we were in a part of Cairo called Bonlac on last Saturday, our Bible woman there again begged of me to open a school in that neighborhood for girls. She offered her court, which is partly covered, as a place where the children could meet, and she thought we could secure the services of one of our former pupils as teacher for the sum of $4 a month. Her talk had considerable effect on me, but I said to her, “Where will we get the money to carry it on?” When we hear the missionary gentleman say that the mission is doing all that it can afford for education in Cairo, and there is not much money to spare from private funds, it seems rather discouraging, but it occurred to me that this might be a good way of spending something over $14, which is being sent to me from a Sabbath School in Pennsylvania. That being only enough to carry on the school for a short time, I remembered that I was intending to write to you for today’s mail, and it seemed to me proper to ask you if you would not be willing to give a donation, however small, towards this object. Did you not ask me to write to you if I saw something that needed extra funds to carry it on, or is this all a dream on my part? You may think it strange, but it never occurred to me to write to ask you for anything until last Saturday night, and now you can use your discretion, and I would not wish to interfere with any of your benevolent work at home.

Our mission opened a boarding school for boys last September, in connection with the large boys’ day school here in another part of this building, and it promises to do well and be self-supporting. They pay $12 a month each. We have also a large day school for girls in another part of Cairo called “Haret es Sakkaeen,” which is superintended by Mrs. Watson.

I am afraid you will weary of my long letter and talk about our work. I would indeed rejoice if you could bring Mrs. McMullen and visit us some time in this strange old land.

I hope you are all quite well. How is your mother now? It makes me very sad sometimes to be so far away from my father and mother in their advanced years, but it seemed to be my duty to return to the work to which the church had sent me, and which requires sometime to acquire the language before a person is fitted to do anything, owing to the language and customs of the people. I was very sorry to hear in my last letter from home that father was not well, but trust he is better.

Please remember me to the Baptist minister. Give my kind love to Mrs. McMullen and the children and your mother. Hoping to hear from you soon even if only by a postal card, I am Yours sincerely, ANNA Y. THOMPSON.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Col. McMullen visited Arkansas City Thursday and looked over the canal and other public improvements.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Col. McMullen intends making many neat improvements in residence grounds this summer in the way of trees, shrubbery, etc. The Colonel is a thorough home man, and believes in making it the attractive center around which other worldly things should cluster.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.


NOTICE. Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors of the Winfield Building Loan Association have caused books to be opened for receiving subscription to the capital stock of said Association, at the office of the Secretary thereof on the south side of 9th Ave., 2nd door east of Millington Street, in the city of Winfield, Cowley County, State of Kansas, which books will be kept open till the whole amount of capital stock is subscribed by order of the Board of Directors. J. F. McMULLEN, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, March 30, 1882.

Wanted. A first-class fresh cow. Inquire of J. C. McMullen.

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

Servant Girl Wanted. Apply at J. F. McMullen’s house or office on 9th Avenue, Winfield.

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

J. F. McMullen tells a wicked story of an ambulance driver who was hailed by a soldier and asked to be carried to the surgeon for his foot was shot off. The driver loaded him in and drove away, but unnoticed by himself a stray cannon ball took off the wounded soldier’s head. Arriving at the surgeon’s quarters, the surgeon looked at the soldier and said: “What do you bring him here for? His head is shot off.” The driver looked around and responded: “That’s so. The infernal fool told me it was his foot.”

Cowley County Courant, April 6, 1882.

The election for city officers in Winfield Tuesday resulted in the election of the following named gentlemen.

Justices of the Peace: T. H. Soward and G. H. Buckman.

Constables: H. H. Siverd and Frank Finch.

Councilmen:

First ward—R. S. Wilson.

Second ward—J. C. McMullen.

Members of Board of Education:

First ward (long term)—J. C. Fuller.

                     (to fill vacancy)—George Emerson.

Second ward (long term)—B. F. Wood.

                      (to fill vacancy)—A. H. Doane.

The election was conducted in an unusually quiet manner, and the best of feeling prevailed through the entire day.

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

City Election.


The City election last Tuesday passed off pleasantly and quietly, but there was strenuous work done. As usual, the successful candidates are happy and the unsuccessful feel a little sore. There were no party nominations and the contest, so far as there was a contest, was mainly on the prohibition issue. The anti-prohibitionists on Monday evening made up a good strong ticket largely of prohibition candidates with the evident main object of beating Buckman for Justice, Siverd for Constable, and whoever might be nominated in the first ward for councilman by their opponents. The prohibitionists accepted their nominations so far as suited them, but substituted other names for five principal offices, as appears below, to make up a complete ticket. The long and short term candidates for school board happened to get reversed on the two tickets, which occasioned the votes for full term and vacancy for the same candidates. Every man on the prohibitionist’s ticket was elected by majorities ranging from 55 to 180. The average vote on contested candidates in the whole city was 245 prohibition to 145 anti, or 100 majority. This is the way we look at the matter, but others may view it differently. The following is the vote in full. Those names prefixed by * are elected.

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.

*G. H. BUCKMAN: 256

*T. H. SOWARD: 277

  W. E. Tansey: 201

  H. B. Lacy: 15

  E. S. Bedilion: 1

CONSTABLES.

*H. H. SIVERD: 293

*FRANK W. FINCH: 239

  Burt Covert: 97

  S. J. Hepler: 104

  Tom Wright: 58

  O. M. Seward: 23

  J. E. Allen: 1

COUNCILMAN [FIRST WARD].

*R. S. WILSON: 150

  S. Bard: 72

  Dan Maher: 1

  J. C. McMullen: 3.

COUNCILMAN [SECOND WARD].

*J. C. McMULLEN: 168

  W. J. Hodges: 6

  W. H. Smith: 1

SCHOOL BOARD. [FIRST WARD, FULL TERM.]

*J. C. FULLER: 140

  Geo. Emerson: 71

  J. E. Platter: 5

  B. F. Wood: 3

  A. H. Doane: 2

  S. Bard: 1

SCHOOL BOARD [FIRST WARD: TO FILL VACANCY.]

*GEO. EMERSON: 144

  J. C. Fuller: 68

  A. H. Doane: 3

  J. E. Platter: 1

  John Wilson: 1

SCHOOL BOARD [SECOND WARD, FULL TERM]

*B. F. WOOD: 95

  A. H. Doane: 72

  W. J. Hodges: 2

SCHOOL BOARD [SECOND WARD: TO FILL VACANCY]

*A. H. DOANE: 93


  W. H. Smith: 71

  B. F. Wood: 4

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

NOTICE. Notice is hereby given that the Board of Directors of the Winfield Building Loan Association have caused books to be opened for receiving subscription to the capital stock of said Association, at the office of the Secretary thereof, on the south side of 9th Ave., 2nd door east of Millington Street, in the city of Winfield, Cowley County, State of Kansas, which books will be kept open till the whole amount of capital stock is subscribed.

By order of the Board of Directors. J. F. McMULLEN, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

Col. J. C. McMullen entertained his class, with a few others of the Baptist Sabbath school, at his residence on last Thursday evening. His class is principally young ladies and gentlemen; therefore, the party consisted of young folks, with only a sprinkling of older ones—just enough to tone them down and make it very agreeable. The Colonel had a “crow to pick” with Capt. McDermott, the superintendent, on account of his often tapping the bell just as he was explaining to his class the most interesting part of the lesson. So he seized this opportunity of “heaping coals of fire on his head” by calling on McDermott for an address answering the question, “Why should we read the Bible aside from a religious duty? He limited him to five minutes, when all knew that it would take twice that length of time to do the subject justice. Mr. McDermott fully occupied the time and proved conclusively that all should read the Bible because it is a wonderful history, etc. The party were then entertained for a few moments with selected readings from some of our best authors by Mr. William Colgate, son-in-law of J. F. McMullen. He is a fine elocutionist, and his selections were highly appreciated by the guests. After the reading an excellent supper was served by the estimable hostess and her daughter, Nellie, and some splendid music was furnished by Master Ed., and Miss Zulu Farringer. The party was a very enjoyable one, and the guests fully appreciated the hospitable and agreeable manner in which they were entertained.

Cowley County Courant, April 20, 1882.

                                                                 JUDEA.

                                         A Paper Read by Mrs. H. E. Silliman,

                                         of Col. J. C. McMullen’s Bible Class,

                                           Sabbath Morning, April 18th, 1882.

[Put in first paragraph only. Paper very lengthy. MAW]

The name Juden, which, though in latter periods has been applied to the whole of Palestine, belonged, strictly speaking, to the southeastern part of it. Since the time of Christ the Land of Palestine has been called the Land of Israel, Judah, Judea, and the Holy Land.

Winfield Courier, April 20, 1882.

Recap Publication Notice, District Court of Cowley County. S. E. Schermerhorn, Plaintiff, versus Samuel T. Endicott, Nellie D. Endicott, F. S. Jennings, Travelers Insurance Company of Hartford, Connecticut, A. D. Wear, S. M. Jarvis & R. R. Conklin doing business under the name and stole of Jarvis, Conklin & Co. [Paper had “Endecott” at first. This was later corrected to show “Endicott.” MAW]


To the defendants, A. D. Wear, S. M. Jarvis, and R. R. Conklin in the above entitled action. Sued by Plaintiff (Endicotts) for $231.93 and interest thereon at the rate of 12% per annum from November 29, 1880, and for costs of suit and foreclosure of mortgage, etc.

Property: West half of Southeast Quarter, and Southwest Quarter and Northeast Quarter, all in Section 35, Township 34, south of Range 4E.

Plaintiffs’ attorney, J. F. McMullen.

Attested to by Cowley Co. District Court Clerk, E. S. Bedilion.

Cowley County Courant, April 20, 1882.

COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS. Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup presiding. Present, Councilmen Read, Gary, Mater, and Hodges, City Attorney Seward, and Clerk Beach.

The minutes of the regular meeting of April 3rd, and of the meeting of April 7th, to canvass the votes cast at the general election held April 8th, were read and approved.

Col. J. C. McMullen and Mr. R. S. Wilson, Councilmen elect, being present, were then inducted into office; Messrs. Hodges and Mater, vacating their offices.

Petition of J. W. Curns and ten others, for sidewalk and street crossings, to begin at the southeast corner of lot No. 6, in block No. 87, and running thence south on the west side of Manning street to the southeast corner of lot No. 18, in block No. 89, in the city of Winfield, was read and on motion the prayer of the petitioners was granted, and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance in accordance therewith.

Petition of E. P. Hickok and ninety-seven others, asking that the Council cause to be removed the powder house in the south part of Winfield, between Main and Millington streets, was read, and on motion of Mr. McMullen was granted, and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance providing for its removal to as great a distance from the city as the general safety demands, and the laws of the state will permit.

Ordinance No. 156 being an ordinance providing for the construction of certain sidewalks therein named, was read and on motion of Mr. Read, was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 were adopted. On the motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye, were Messrs. Read, Gary, McMullen, and Wilson; nays, none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

The finance committee reported on the reports of Treasurer, for the months ending January 15th, February 15th, and March 15th, 1882, that they had examined the same and found them correct. Report adopted.

The special committee, appointed to confer with the County Commissioners relative to the construction of a tank and wind mill on the courthouse grounds, reported adversely to the city having any connection with the matter. On motion, the report was adopted and the committee was discharged.

Bill of clerks and judges of election, 1st and 2nd ward, $20.000, was allowed and ordered paid.

Bill of W. L. Hands, for use of team, for burial of pauper, $3.00, was approved and recommended to the County Commissioners for payment.

Report of Police Judge for March was read and referred to committee on finance.


On motion of Mr. Gary, the City Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance prohibiting the lariating of stock, so that they may obstruct any street or alley, by crossing the same; prohibiting the stacking of hay within the city limits, and prohibiting the use of barbed wire for fencing, within the city limits, unless the same shall be protected by a board above it.

The City Attorney was, on motion of Mr. Read, instructed to amend the ordinance relating to fire limits, so as to bring it within the provisions of the statute concerning the same.

On motion of Mr. McMullen, Mr. Read was elected President of the Council for the ensuing year.

The Mayor then made the following appointments of standing committees for the ensuing year.

Finance: Gary, McMullen, and Wilson.

Streets and Alleys: Read, Gary, and Wilson.

Public Health: McMullen, Read, and Gary.

Fire Department: Wilson, Gary, and McMullen.

The Mayor appointed David C. Beach, City Clerk, for the coming year.

On motion of Mr. Gary, the appointment was confirmed by the Council.

The appointment of City Engineer was laid over for one meeting.

The Mayor then appointed James Bethel to the office of City Marshal.

Mr. Read moved that the appointment be confirmed; no second. On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

Col. McMullen is putting some improvements on the porches of his residence.

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

The Winfield Bank has put in a telephone and can now have connection with the outer world.

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

This is Court week and our lion-like attorneys are in clover. The following gentlemen are present: A. J. Pyburn of La Mars, Missouri; C. R. Mitchell, of Geuda Springs; Senator Hackney, Judge McDonald, Judge Tipton, Jas. O’Hare, Henry E. Asp, S. D. Pryor, J. F. McMullen, D. C. Beach, O. M. Seward, J. E. Allen, A. P. Johnson, James McDermott, P. H. Albright, T. H. Soward, Geo. H. Buckman, M. G. Troup, and County Attorney Jennings.

Numerous cases came before the court about this time concerning physicians who were issuing prescriptions for “liquor” to patients. Due to temperance taking a popular stance in Kansas, they were sometimes breaking the law in allowing those who drank a lot to continue. MAW

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

Dr. Vawter, of Arkansas City, seems to have been about the most reckless physician in issuing liquor prescriptions in the county. In several cases he prescribed for individuals from one to four gallons. It has been suggested that he be prosecuted for “issuing prescriptions with intent to kill,” as four gallons of Arkansas City whiskey would kill the stoutest patient in the county.

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.


The prosecutions against the physicians came up Tuesday. J. F. McMullen argued a motion to quash, which was sustained by the court and leave given the State to amend. The cases come up Thursday morning again.

Cowley County Courant, May 4, 1882.

In the cases of the State vs. Drs. Headrick, Holland, and Cole, the court held the informa-tion insufficient and allowed the prosecution to amend. The case of the State vs. Dr. Fleming for selling liquor contrary, etc., was, after the jury had been impaneled, dismissed. The information located the doctor on the wrong side of the street.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

                                                        Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, MAY 1, 1882.

Councilmen met in regular sessions, Mayor M. G. Troup presiding. Present, Councilmen Read, Gary, McMullen, and Wilson, City Attorney, and Clerk.

Minutes of last meeting read and approved.

Petition of A. E. Baird and six others for the construction of a gutter on Main Street was read; and the following resolutions concerning the same were adopted.

Resolved, That the City Council deem it necessary to provide by ordinance for the laying of a stone gutter five feet wide along the west side of Main Street, commencing at Seventh Avenue and running thence south to Tenth Avenue; also on the east side of Main Street, running from Seventh Avenue to Tenth Avenue, and that said gutter-stone be set on edge and be not less than six inches in thickness and laid adjacent to the sidewalk.

Resolved, That unless a majority of the resident owners of the property along said proposed line of improvement, subject to taxation for the same, do not within twenty days from the publication of these resolutions file their protest with the City Clerk, then each improvement shall be ordered.

Bid of COURIER COMPANY to do the City printing at legal rates was presented. Bid of Winfield “Courant” on same terms was also presented.

It was moved that the contract for the City printing for the ensuing year be awarded to the COURIER COMPANY. Carried.

The following claims were allowed and ordered paid:

City Officers’ salaries, April: $68.00

H. L. Thomas, street crossings, etc.: $45.98

G. F. Corwin, street work: $4.50

Max Shoeb, rent engine house grounds: $8.00

Mr. R. H. True tendered his resignation as City Marshal. On motion the resignation was accepted.

Report of City Treasurer for month ending April 15th was presented and referred to Committee on Finance.

The Mayor appointed James Bethel marshal for the ensuing year. On the motion of Mr. Read to confirm the appointment, the vote resulted in a tie.

The Mayor appointed Mr. D. A. Millington City Engineer for the ensuing year. On motion the appointment was confirmed.

Council then adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.


Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, May 11, 1882.

Mr. J. F. McMullen has gained high reputation as an attorney by the careful and efficient manner in which he has conducted the defense in the Cole case.

Winfield Courier, May 11, 1882.

ARKANSAS CITY DEMOCRAT.

The cases of the prohibition law against the physicians came up on Tuesday morning on a motion to quash the indictment on the grounds of unconstitutionality of the section of the law under which the indictment was framed. McMullen, brother of J. C., and attorney for the defense, made a very able argument. In addition to being a pleasing speaker, McMullen had fortified himself with logic and authority, certainly making his debut with credit to himself. The court quashed the indictment on all cases on technical grounds with leave to amend.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 17, 1882.

Dr. Loomis and Will McConn have challenged O. Ingersoll and Chas. Swarts to play a series of games of chess, one game a day. These persons are the most indefatigable chess players of the city.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 17, 1882.

The jury in the Dr. Cole case, for violating the prohibitory law, were discharged last Saturday; they being unable to arrive at a verdict.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

The Whiskey Cases.

The jury in the Cole case, after being out nearly two days, failed to agree and were discharged. The jury stood seven for conviction and five for acquittal. The cases against Wells, Holland, Headrick, Cole, Thompson, and Shepard were continued until next term.

Editor Millington speaks out about Cole case.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

                                     NEWSPAPER RULES—BULLDOZING.

We employed a stenographer to report the closing plea of Senator Hackney in the case of State vs. Cole with the view of publishing it this week in case that the speech and the circumstances were such that we thought proper to do so. As the jury did not agree on a verdict and the case must be tried again, we omit the speech for the present, for it is our rule to abstain from publishing the arguments used to establish the guilt or innocence of the accused until the case is finally adjudicated, as tending to prejudice the case on its final hear-ing. Our rule does not forbid us to state the names of the parties, the crime charged, the circumstances and rumors concerning the matter, the evidence offered, and all the proceed-ings in the case, all these as matters of news of interest to our readers. In this case a young man called on us and used a covert threat of paying us and Hackney off in some fearful way if we published the speech, and our curiosity to find out what the consequences would be, about determined us to publish it at once in violation of our rule, but another man, a gentle-man whose character and opinions we highly respect, requested us to omit the publication, and this restored our balance again.


But we want it distinctly understood that we shall publish whatever in our judgment ought to be published, even if we do have to make perambulating arsenals of ourselves. We have in our office an old rusty sword of Coronado’s time which has already done some execution in such cases, and we have many other instruments of torture. We know where we can get two field pieces, sixty revolvers, a dozen bowie knives, and other varieties of war-like implements besides a dozen fighting editors. We can keep our office force well drilled, keep sentinels posted around our office and dwellings, and have a body guard whenever we walk out, and we shall publish what we please. Heretofore the junior has done more than his proportion of the fighting for this office, and the senior, being in all cases equally to blame and in many cases, as in this article, only to blame, requests the privilege of expiating his proper share of the offenses of the COURIER.

We do not believe that there are any assassins hereabouts, but we do believe that there are a few mean and degraded individuals in this community. The painter who was hired to paint and post in a public place low caricatures of an attorney employed to prosecute alleged violations of the prohibitory law, and the parties who hired him to do it, whoever they are, the men who have bulldozed and threatened jurymen and witnesses, who have threatened shooting, killing, and pursued a general system of intimidation in aid of the M. D.’s charged with prescribing in violation of law, should be investigated and if there are any such, as we are compelled to believe, should be exposed to the contempt of all law-abiding people.

If these accused physicians are innocent of the charges against them, it would be an outrage to convict them, and we earnestly desire their acquittal. In such case they are only the victims of unfortunate appearances and circumstances which have caused them much trouble and expense, but with the various and complex difficulties in the way of getting in evidence against them the danger of their unjust conviction is reduced to a minimum. If they are guilty, justice and the well being of society requires their conviction and punishment, and any bulldozing which they or their friends indulge in, will and ought to prejudice their cases.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

PERSECUTING DEMOCRATS.

We are told that there is great complaint in some quarters, charging that the prosecutions of several physicians charged with prescribing intoxicating drinks in violation of law is a political move got up only for the persecution of Democrats. It is stated that only Democratic physicians are interfered with, etc. Dr. Wells, they admit, however, is an exception; but they say he is an enemy of Hackney, which is the reason he was classed as a Democrat.

Now we have known Dr. Wells, not only as a Republican, but as a friend of Hackney up to the time the Doctor was arrested, and we have known Dr. Headrick many years and have always understood him to be a Republican. Dr. Cole and Dr. Fleming are all whom we have known as Democrats, who have been proceeded against here. If the object was to persecute Democrats, Dr. Davis would have been the first one to strike at, for he is the most powerful and influential Democrat of the whole lot.


Now, we do not see what anyone in this county wants to persecute Democrats for. They are generally good fellows, some of them are very popular, and none of them are politically dangerous in a county which has eleven hundred Republican majority. We do not observe any ill feeling towards the Democrats. They are patronized in business by Republicans just as well as are Republicans. Who ever refused to employ or trade with Judge McDonald, or John B. Lynn, or A. T. Spotswood, because they are Democrats? Who refuses to eat dinner at the Brettun because the proprietors are Democrats? H. S. Silver sells just as many seeds as though he was a Republican, and the whole community seems just as friendly to Demo-crats as Republicans, and would resent an outrage on one just as strongly as the other. Some of our most valued friends are Democrats, and the thought of discrimination outside of politics never entered our mind.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

A Big Picnic.

The A. O. U. W. Society of Winfield are making arrangements for a grand basket picnic in Riverside Park, May 25th. Twenty-five neighboring lodges have been invited, special trains will be run, and a general good time indulged in. The following committees have been appointed.

Devotional exercises: Revs. Platter and Cairns.

Reception: J. S. Mann, W. R. Davis, J. F. McMullen, C. A. Bliss.

On grounds: Wm. Hodges, A. B. Snow, B. F. McFaden, John Burroughs, S. G. Gary, Wm. Caton, T. J. Harris, D. Dix.

On music: W. C. Carruthers, B. F. Wood, G. S. Manser, Chas. Green.

On Finance: B. M. Legg, A. D. Hendricks, J. N. Harter, D. L. Silvers.

On invitations: E. T. Trimble, W. J. Hodges, G. F. Corwin.

On Printing: A. B. Sykes.

The committees are hard at work perfecting arrangements, and intend making this a memorable event in the history of their Society.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

                                                        Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, May 15th, 1882.

Council met in regular session and was called to order by Mayor Troup. The following officers answered to the call of the roll: Councilmen Read, Gary, and Wilson, and City Clerk.

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

An ordinance relating to the storing of powder within the City limits was read, and on motion was referred to the Committee on Fire Department and City Attorney for modifica­tion and revision.

Petition of J. A. Case and others for the construction of a four foot stone sidewalk on the West side of Block No. 71 was read, and on motion of Mr. Read, the prayer of the petition was granted and the attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance in accordance therewith.

The Committee on Finance reported that they had examined the reports of Treasurer for month ending April 15th, and of Police Judge for March, and found them correct. Report adopted.

Report of retiring Marshal, True, of Dog tax collected was read and placed on file.

The following bills were allowed and ordered paid.

R. H. True, Marshal salary, one day: $1.50

Thomas Wright, rent room election: $2.00

H. L. Thomas, crossings and culverts: $84.30

Bill of C. W. Nichols and J. W. Hipps for street work, $17.50, was referred to the Committee on Streets and Alleys.


Councilman McMullen then came in and the Council went into executive session.

Mayor Troup appointed Benj. F. Herrod Marshal for the ensuing year. On motion of Mr. Gary, the Council confirmed the appointment.

Council adjourned to meet on Tuesday night, May 22nd, 1882. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Cowley County Courant, May 25, 1882.

Mrs. Judge Buck, and son, of Emporia, President of the W. C. T. U., is visiting with the family of Col. J. C. McMullen.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

                     COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, MAY 23, 1882.

Council met pursuant to adjournment. Mayor Troup in chair.

Roll called. Present, Councilmen Read, Gary, McMullen, and Wilson.

Bond of Benjamin F. Herrod as marshal, with Geo. T. Wilson, J. L. Hodges, and J. A. McGuire as securities, was presented and on motion of Mr. McMullen was approved.

Remonstrance of Jno. W. Curns and 17 others against the construction of the stone gut-tering on East side of Main street between 7th and 10th avenues was read and placed on file.

Ordinance No. 157 providing for the construction of certain sidewalks therein specified was read and on motion of Mr. Read was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson; nays none, and the Ordinance was declared adopted.

Ordinance No. 158 regulating the storing and keeping of powder was read, and on motion was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, Gary, McMullen, and Wilson; nays none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

Ordinance No. 159, Protecting life and property by regulating the maintenance and construction of wire fences and the lariating of stock was read and on motion of Mr. Read, was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, and 3 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson, nays none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

The following claims were allowed and ordered paid.

C. W. Nichols, street work: $11.25.

J. H. Rice & Sons, 2 J. P. Dockets: $32.00.

Adams Express Co., expressage: $.90.

C. W. Nichols et al., street work: $17.50.

On motion council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, MAYOR.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Cowley County Courant, June 1, 1882.


Capt. H. L. Wells, Adjutant of the old veteran regiment organized last fall, has, by order of Col. J. C. McMullen, addressed a circular letter to the company officers throughout the county, requesting reports from each as to the number of men they can muster to go to the reunion at Topeka next September. It is important that these reports be made as soon as possible in order that the Topeka managers may know how many men to provide for. There will also be an election for field and staff officers as soon as the roster is complete.

Am still puzzled by Loomis connection to McMullen/Kinne families. Dr. J. C. Loomis was a dentist in Arkansas City. MAW

Arkansas City Traveler, June 7, 1882.

We publish an article on another page in this issue cap­tioned “The Woman of the Future,” by “Elivar,” which we clip from Voice of Masonry. Apart from its merits, which are by no means small, it will be interesting to our readers as emanating from the pen of our townswoman, Mrs. J. C. Loomis.

I SKIPPED THE ARTICLE REFERRED TO!

Cowley County Courant, June 8, 1882.


The United Workmen have learned a secret outside of their lodge room, and that is, never postpone a picnic to beat the weather. If the weather proves bad on the day set, adjourn sine die. The Winfield Lodge of United Workmen took every step needful to make their picnic a success. It was evident on Tuesday night that the skies would not be propitious on Thurs-day, the 25th, the day first named, whereupon the committee on ar­rangements concluded to postpone the picnic till Tuesday, and at once either wrote or telegraphed the postponement to every lodge that had been invited. The Workmen lodge at Leon and the Select Knights of Wellington failed to receive the notice, and sent delegations over for Thursday. They had no picnic, but took the opportunity to go over Winfield and take it in under an umbrella. Mon-day afternoon everything looked favorable, and Tuesday morn­ing, the day last appointed, promised fine weather. All the committees were alive and put things in shape for a gala day at the Park. The stand was decorated with wreaths of flowers and emblems of the order. D. F. Best allowed the lodge to use one of his splendid organs, and that was taken to the stand. There were swings and croquet provided, and the Archery Club commenced to gather in their marksmen and women of the bow. The stands stood loaded with refreshments and the Park in its dress of green looked lovely enough for a section out of Paradise, and the Workmen were happy. At 11 o’clock a.m., the procession was formed on Main street under the leader-ship of W. J. Hodges, marshal of the day, and took up its line of march to the Park. Oxford and Arkansas City Lodges A. O. U. W. were in the ranks. The Good Templars of this city, with their band of hope, joined in. But soon after the Park was reached, black clouds began to darken the sky in the southwest, and low, threatening peals of thunder alarmed the gath-ered crowd, and it soon became evident that the picnic there must be given up. Announce­ment was then made that the program of exercises would be gone through with at the Opera House, and thither repaired all of the picnickers who did not go home. Baskets loaded full of good things were opened in the hall, strangers present invited to refresh the inner man, and the situation endured as well as possible. About half past 2 o’clock a broken program was carried out, while the rain was falling heavily outside. Rev. C. H. Canfield made the opening prayer. There was a song rendered in the usual excellent style by the Grace Church choir. Prof. Trimble addressed a few words in welcome to the visitors. The main features of the afternoon were the two fine addresses delivered, one by W. R. Sheen, of Lawrence, Kansas, Grand Master Workman of the order in the State, and the other by E. M. Forde, Grand Recorder. These we hope to give our readers soon in print.

A social and reception was called for in the evening and all Winfield invited to come, and that proved to be an enjoyable affair. From 8 o’clock to 12 o’clock crowds of young and old promenaded in the hall, partaking of ice cream, or of that even more delicious reflection, soft things whispered in contiguous ears, evolving rosy blushes and sparkling eyes. Between 9 and 10 o’clock the seats were put in place, and J. F. McMullen, Master Workman of the Lodge, and J. Wade McDonald entertained the audience with brief impromptu speeches. The audience resumed their promenading, flirting, chatting, etc. There was also some impromptu music and harp and banjo playing till a late hour when the affair broke up. Picnicking in an Opera House is much like skating on a parlor floor—a poor substitute for the real thing. Yet the Workmen did the best they could under the circumstances. An amphitheater or pavilion at Riverside Park would have been worth “millions” to them yesterday. When can we have it?

Winfield Courier, June 8, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

                    COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, JUNE 5TH, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup in chair. Present: Councilmen Read, Gary, Wilson, and McMullen; City Attorney and Clerk.

Minutes of last regular and of adjourned meeting read and approved.

Petition of Geo. A. Schroeter for appointment to the position of the City Time Keeper was read and on motion granted upon the same conditions and terms as last year.

Proposition of Hudson Bros., to furnish a time clock for the regulation of night police without expense to the city, was presented and accepted.

Ordinance No. 163 amending Sections No. 3 of Ordinance No. 111 and Ordinance No. 141 was read and on motion was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections No. 1, 2, and 3 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs Read, McMullen, Gary and Wilson; nays none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

Ordinance No. 161, prohibiting the stacking of hay and other combustible material and the covering of stables and other buildings with such materials, within the corporate limits of the City of Winfield, was read and on motion was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson; nays none, and the ordinance was declared adopted.

The following bills were allowed and ordered paid.

Joseph Barriclow, street crossings: $16.40.

City officer’s salary, May: $16.40.

Bill of Winfield “Courant,” printing: $11.00, was referred to committee on Finance.

Bill of A. H. Doane & Co., for wood and coal to city poor, $15.00, was approved and recommended to the County Commissioners for payment.

On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.


Winfield Courier, June 15, 1882.

                                                     FOURTH OF J. U. L. Y.

On Tuesday evening the citizens met at the Opera House to hear the report of the executive committee on 4th of July celebration. The committee reported as follows.

On Finance: M. L. Robinson, J. B. Lynn, J. P. Baden, S. H. Myton, J. C. McMullen.

On Speakers and Invitation: J. C. Fuller, D. A. Millington, A. B. Steinberger, M. G. Troup, and J. Wade McDonald.

On Grounds and seats: A. T. Spotswood, Jas. H. Bullen, A. Wilson, S. C. Smith, W. O. Johnson, and H. Brotherton.

On Police Regulations and personal comfort: D. L. Kretsinger, R. E. Wallis, H. S. Silver, J. H. Kinney, and A. T. Shenneman.

On Music: J. P. Short, E. H. Blair, G. H. Buckman, H. E. Silliman, and R. C. Bowles.

On Old Soldiers: Col. McMullen, Adjt. Wells, Judge Bard, Capt. Steuven, and Capt. Haight.

On Representation of 13 Original States: Mrs. H. P. Mansfield, Mrs. Caton, Mrs. Carruthers.

On Floral Decoration: Mrs. Kretsinger, Misses Jessie Millington, Amy Scothorn, Jennie Hane, Mrs. J. L. Horning, and Mrs. G. S. Manser.

Speeches were made by Judge J. Wade McDonald, Judge Soward, Mayor Troup, D. A. Millington, Capt. Hunt, and D. L. Kretsinger. The City is enthusiastic on the subject and are bound to make this a big Fourth. The committee on speakers will secure the attendance of some of our State’s best talent. Let everyone prepare to come, bring their lunch baskets, and enjoy themselves in the finest park in the State.

Winfield Courier, June 15, 1882.

                                                        Soldiers Take Notice.

                 HEAD QUARTERS 1ST REG’T, COWLEY COUNTY VETERANS.

                                                  GENERAL ORDER NO. 5.

The Line officers will meet at the office of the Adjutant in Winfield on the 24th day of June, 1882, at 1 p.m., for the purpose of filling vacancies and to attend to such business as may come before the meeting. By order of J. C. McMULLEN, Col. Com’d.

H. L. WELLS, Ad’jt., Winfield, Kas.

Winfield Courier, June 22, 1882.

Col. McMullen and lady left Tuesday morning for the east. Mrs. McMullen will visit in Kansas City while the Colonel goes on to Appleton, Wisconsin, in response to an invitation to attend the commencement exercises of Lawrence University.

Winfield Courier, June 22, 1882.


Mr. James Lorton, bookkeeper in the Winfield Bank, met with quite a serious accident while returning from Arkansas City Saturday night. He was riding a pony that had been purchased in the city and leading one of Col. McMullen’s fine black horses, which he had ridden down. Three miles this side of Arkansas City, he left the main road and took a nearer route. The road he followed had been recently closed by a barbed wire fence and, it being very dark, James did not discover this until he ran against it. The horses were going on a fast walk, and the pony was immediately checked, but the other became frightened and sprang through. The wire being very severe, the horse was lacerated in a horrible manner, a large piece of flesh was torn from his breast, and the muscle of one of his front limbs nearly severed, besides numerous other cuts. James managed to get the animal home, but it is in a critical condition. “Clyde,” as he was called by the family, is a very fine horse and was valued at $300. The misfortune will break one of the best matched and prettiest spans of horses in the town. Barbed wire is being made so severe that it is a dangerous thing, and when put across a recently traveled road, it certainly should have brush or something of that kind laid upon it, that a person could tell at night what they were running into.

Cowley County Courant, June 29, 1882.

Winfield is going to have a band. Wednesday evening a number of young men met at THE COURANT office, and organized a cornet band, with the following members: Ed. Farringer, R. I. Mansfield, Frank Barclay, Ed. McMullen, Will Farringer, Will Hodges, Ad. Brown, Chas. Dever, and Will Ferguson. The boys are all young, active, and composed of the right kind of material to make an excellent band. All they need to do is to practice diligently, and we have no fears that the day is not far hence when Winfield can boast of one of the best bands in the state. In order to make the organization strong, it will be necessary for the businessmen of Winfield to do all in their power to help the boys along. By unani-mous vote of the members, it was decided to christen it THE COURANT BAND.

Cowley County Courant, June 29, 1882.

RESOLUTIONS. Officers and comrades of Cowley Legion, No. 16, S. K. A. O. U. W. We your Committee appointed for the purpose, respectfully submit the following:

WHEREAS, We have heard of the death (after a long and severe illness) of Mrs. Julia Bliss, beloved wife of comrade C. A. Bliss, and although we recognize that the dissolution has long been expected and therefore does not fall with the overwhelming force of a sudden bereavement, we yet concede in the loss of a wife and counselor, an irreparable privation, and while we extend to our brother our consolations, we trust that his grief may be tempered by the peace and rest which has followed a long and wearied waiting.

Resolved, That we extend to comrade Bliss our paternal sympathies and condolence.

In token whereof Cowley Legion No. 16, S. K. A. O. U. W., will attend funeral in a body.

                        J. F. McMullen, J. Wade McDonald, C. C. Green, Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 19, 1882.

Messrs. Vawter & Loomis have dissolved partnership, and each one now has separate dental rooms. Dr. J. C. Loomis retains the room occupied by the late firm, and M. B. Vawter has fitted up an office further back over Matlack’s store.

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

A CARD.

Hon. Jas. McDermott, Winfield, Kansas.

DEAR SIR: We the undersigned citizens of Cowley County, Kansas, anxious that an able and faithful man represent us in the coming legislature, and ever mindful of the important legislation that will come before that body, unite in requesting you to become a candidate for the office of Representative from this district, July 11th, 1882.


Hackney, W. P.; Gridley, A.; Bethel, Jas.; Millington, D. A.; Greer, Ed. P.; Finch, Frank W.; Siverd, H. H.; Pryor, J. D.; Wilson, W. J.; Hunt, J. S.; Bryan, T. R.; Curns, J. W.; Harris,  T. J.; Arrowsmith, J. W.; Hendricks, A. D.; Soward, T. H.; Story, R. C.; Reynolds, E. M.; Buckman, G. H.; Haight, N. A.; Cook, S. A.; Webb, L. H.; Fuller, C. E.; Hudson, W.; Wood, B. F.; Kelly, James; Shot, J. P.; Platter, Jas. E.; Gridley, A., Jr.; Asp, Henry E.; Trimble, E. T.; Roberts, W. D.; Moore, Wm. H.; Hackney, J. F.; Waite, R. B.: McMullen, J. C.; Lee, W. A.; Holloway, S. S.; and others.

                                          WINFIELD, KANSAS, July 17, 1882.

Hon. W. P. Hackney, T. H. Soward, D. A. Millington, and others:

GENTLEMEN: I have received your very flattering call to become a candidate for the legislature in this district, and after due consideration, have concluded to consent to the use of my name in that connection. At first I did not regard the proposition favorably, owing to  business interests which I thought might suffer thereby but upon the representations of friends that I might be able to assist to some extent in making the temperance laws more effective; in guarding the interests of Cowley County in the Congressional apportionment; and in securing any other advantages that may be desired for the county and which may be attainable; I have overcome my reluctance and hereby authorize my friends to use my name as a candidate before the Republican District Convention—and if nominated and elected I will hold myself bound to consider the interests of the people of Cowley County as of paramount importance to all other interests, and will give my best efforts to maintain and protect them. Respectfully yours, JAMES McDERMOTT.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

Col. McMullen and lady spent Thursday afternoon at the farm of Mr. Henry Hawkins, in Vernon Township, and brought back with them a branch on which large, luscious pears were hanging as thick as they could stick. Mr. Hawkins has twelve acres in orchard, and forty pear trees that will yield at least two bushels of very fine pears per tree. At seven dollars a bushel, this will give him about $600 from his forty trees.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

          IT IS SETTLED. We Are to Have a Creamery, the First and the Best in the State.

           The Stock Made up and the Work to Begin at Once. The Town is “Waking Up.”

Last Saturday the final subscription to the Creamery stock was made and the enterprise became an assured fact. We fully believe that it will prove one of the best investments made in the county and furnish a valuable market for the dairy products of Cowley.

Mr. M. W. Babb, the originator of the enterprise, came here about a year ago and, after visiting various creameries throughout Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri, came home with the necessary papers and information and went to work, aided by a few of our public-spirited citizens; among whom Mr. J. P. Baden was first and foremost, with the success before mentioned. The following is a list of the stockholders.

M. W. Babb, 20 shares, $1,000.

J. P. Baden, 20 shares, $1,000.

Winfield Bank, 20 shares, $1,000.

J. E. Platter, 10 shares, $500.

M. L. Read’s bank, 10 shares, $500.

Samuel Lowe, 4 shares, $200.

J. P. Short, 2 shares, $100.


Wallis & Wallis, 2 shares, $100.

A. T. Spotswood & Co., 2 shares, $100.

W. G. Graham, 1 share, $50.

A. H. Doane, 2 shares, $100.

Frank Barclay, 2 shares, $100.

Horning, Robinson & Co., 5 shares, $250.

H. Harbaugh, 2 shares, $100.

S. C. Smith, 2 shares, $100.

Curns & Manser, 2 shares, $100.

Jas. H. Bullene & Co., 2 shares, $100.

A. E. Baird, 1 share, $50.

J. S. Mann, 1 share, $50.

G. H. Allen, 2 shares, $100.

Geo. Emerson, 2 shares, $100.

Bliss & Wood, 2 shares, $100.

TOTAL: 116 SHARES, $5,800

The plans and specifications for the creamery engine and ice house are completed. The contracts will be let at once and the work pushed forward with unabated vigor. It is hoped that it may be running in three months. As the manner of operating these creameries is new to most of our readers, we will attempt to give an outline of it. In the first place, creamery butter commands everywhere from seven to ten cents more per pound than common country butter. On this margin the creamery works. They go out through the country and engage cream from every farmer, paying him as much as he can get for the butter after it is churned. The creamery furnishes the cans and sends a wagon to the farmer’s door every day to get the cream. They then, with their superior appliances, can make the cream into butter cheaply and get an excellent article, besides selling and feeding the buttermilk. When Winfield teams are scouring Cowley County from north to south gathering cream, and every farmer has an account at the creamery to draw against for his contingent expenses, we rather think the old days of “corn pone and bacon” will be entirely forgotten.

The stockholders met Tuesday evening, adopted articles of incorporation, and elected seven directors for the first year as follows: J. C. McMullen, M. L. Read, J. E. Platter, M. W. Babb, J. L. Horning, J. P. Baden, G. L. Holt. The Board of Directors are appointed a commit-tee to act with Messrs. Holt and Hall in the selection of a site. Frank Barclay, A. H. Doane, and J. L. Horning were appointed a committee to superintend the erection of the creamery and accept or reject it when completed.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

Horticultural Society Meeting.

                                               WINFIELD, AUGUST 5, 1882.


Society called to order by President Martin. Minutes of last meeting read and approved. President appointed F. A. Williams, G. W. Robertson, and R. I. Hogue a committee to test and report on fruits placed on exhibition on table. Committee on State Fair collection re-ported by Secretary; good encouragement and cooperation of our orchardists, so far. State reports from State Horticultural Secretary for 1881 received and distributed to members present. Suggestion from President Martin that bees are necessary to fertilize flowers of tomato by carrying the pollen. General discussion on grape. It was suggested by a member that the Delaware grape should be planted on the north side of buildings to insure returns this far south. Invitation extended to society by T. A. Blanchard, Secretary of Agricultural Society for this Society to take charge of the Horticultural exhibit at County fair this fall. Mr. Hogue moved that “Resolved, That the Cowley County Horticultural Society take charge of and make an exhibition of fruits at our County Fair this fall.” Carried. Moved and carried that President appoint a committee of five to take charge of such exhibition at Fair. President ap-pointed Jos. Taylor, F. A. Williams, S. Maxwell, R. I. Hogue, and J. Nixon such committee. Motion prevailed that the Society meet at COURIER office each Saturday in August at 2 p.m. Committee on fruit reported as follows.

“The Committee find exhibited the following specimens of fruit.

“Apples. Chimney Strawberry and Pennoch, G. W. Robertson; White Pippins, J. F. Martin; Variety unknown, fine, S. H. Jennings.

“Peaches. Crawford’s Early, very fine, Mr. Howland and Mrs. Parker; Geo. 4th, Geo. W. Robertson; Large Early York; S. H. Jennings.

“Plums. Lombard, extra fine. J. C. McMullen; Noise Seedling, G. W. Robertson. Nectarine Early Violet, very fine, G. W. Robertson.

“Grapes. Unknown (supposed to be Early Amber), J. D. Guthrie.

                            F. A. WILLIAMS, G. W. ROBERTSON, R. I. HOGUE.

Jas. Kirk, Jas. M. Bair, A. H. [?M.?] Broadwell, Mahlon Fatout, H. C. Catlin, F. H. Brown, H. E. Asp, T. A. Blanchard, and F. W. McClellan enrolled as members of the Society. J. F. MARTIN, President.

JACOB NIXON, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

SKIPPED A LONG DISCOURSE GIVEN BY LEWIS BROWN, A MEMBER OF COL. McMULLEN’S BIBLE CLASS RE THE LAST HOURS OF THE “TWELVE.” (COVERED: PETER, ANDREW, JAMES THE GREAT, JOHN, PHILIP, BARTHOLO-MEW, THOMAS, MATTHEW, JAMES, SON OF ALPAHAEUS, JUDE, OR LABBAN, SIMON, THE CANAANITE, JUDAS ISCARIOT.)

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, AUGUST 7, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup in the Chair. Roll called. Present: Councilmen Read, McMullen, and Gary, City Attorney and Clerk.

Minutes of last regular and adjourned session read and approved.

It was moved that the Marshal be instructed to notify the Police Judge that he must make his reports to date and signify his disposition to try the cases ready to be brought before him as such Police Judge, or resign his office at once, or steps would be taken to oust him there-from. The motion was carried.

The following bills were allowed and ordered paid.

Joseph Barricklow, building sewer: $38.00.

Wm. Warren, street crossings, etc.: $55.30.


Mater & Kibbe, repairs city tools: $2.55.

City officers’ salaries for July: $67.90.

Bill of J. H. Land for digging grave for city poor, $4.00, was approved and recommended to the County Commissioners for payment.

Estimate of City Engineer of cost of constructing sidewalk on south side of 11th avenue, abutting on lot 10, block 51, was read and approved, and the Mayor was authorized to contract for the construction of the same.

On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 16, 1882.

Dr. J. A. Loomis is now prepared to administer nitrous oxide or laughing gas to patients at his dentist rooms over Matlack’s store. This is one of the best anaesthetics now in use.

Winfield Courier, August 17, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, AUG. 9, 1882.

Council met pursuant to adjournment. Mayor Troup in chair.

Roll called. Present: Councilmen Read, McMullen, and Gary, City Attorney and Clerk.

Resignation of W. E. Tansy as Police Judge was read.

“Having yesterday determined to permanently remove from the city, I hereby tender my resignation as Police Judge of the City of Winfield, so that you may take such action as in your judgment may seem best. . . . (Aug. 9, 1882) W. E. TANSY.

On motion of Mr. Read the resignation was accepted.

Reports of Police Judge for months of April, May, June, and July and to August 9th were presented and referred to Finance Committee.

It was moved that Mr. T. H. Soward be elected as Police Judge for the unexpired term. The motion prevailed.

It was moved that the City Attorney be instructed to prepare an Ordinance providing a penalty for violating section 16 of Chapter 89. Carried. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, August 17, 1882.

Special Horticultural Meeting. August 12, 1882. Society called to order in COURIER office. Minutes of regular meeting passed. Notice to Cowley County fruit growers by secretary, read by president. Messrs. Taylor, Gillett, and Hogue were appointed a committee to report on varieties of fruit on table, which was loaded with fine products of horticultural skill from orchards and garden. After an interesting discussion by members, committee and visitors present, among whom we noticed Mr. Myron Hall, of Newton, an old veteran horti-culturist, who labeled, named, and arranged Kansas’ exhibition of fruit at the Centennial exhibition. We hope and expect his aid and assistance in preparing an exhibit for Topeka in September. The committee on fruit reported as follows.

Part of report:


W. A. Ela, peaches, Mixon, Cling, and Indian, and one unknown. Jas. Adams, Snow peach. Jos. Taylor, Glori Mundi apple, very large and fine, 12-1/2 inches in circumference. Mrs. Col. McMullen, splendid plate of pears, peaches, apples, grapes, and plums tastefully arranged.

Winfield Courier, August 17, 1882.

Ed. Farringer had quite a trade in the piano line last Saturday, selling two instruments, one being a fine nine hundred and fifty dollar upright piano, which was purchased by Col. J. C. McMullen.

Winfield Courier, August 24, 1882.

More Improvements.

In making up the list of improvements we omitted mentioning several persons who have put in much time and money improving and beautifying their homes this season.

Col. McMullen has been especially active in this work, and has added over eighteen hundred dollars worth of improvements to his elegant residence. The Colonel takes great interest in his home and is continually doing something to beautify and make it more pleasant.

Winfield Courier, August 24, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

                  COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, AUGUST 22, 1882.

Council met in adjourned session, Mayor Troup in chair. Roll called: Present, Council-men Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson, and City Clerk.

Ordinance 164 levying a tax for general revenue was read and on motion of Mr. McMullen was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, and 3 were adopted on motion to adopt as a whole in its final passage. The vote stood as follows: Those voting aye were Messrs. Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson. Nays one and the ordinance was declared adopted.

On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 30, 1882.

We regret to announce that Mr. I. C. Loomis met with an accident last week while lead-ing a cow to water, that will probably be serious if not fatal in its results. The animal threw the old gentleman down inflicting a shock from which he has been more or less unconscious ever since. Mrs. J. C. Loomis is also lying very low with an attack of malarial fever.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 30, 1882.

Father Loomis was improving quite rapidly yesterday.

Winfield Courier, August 31, 1882.

                            Minutes of the Meeting of Citizens on the Glucose Works.

WINFIELD, KANSAS, AUGUST 28, 1832.

A number of the businessmen of the city convened at Doane & Kretsinger’s office Monday evening to consider the proposition of Messrs. Morse, Scott & Harris for building a glucose factory at Winfield.

On motion, Mayor M. G. Troup was called to the chair and J. W. Curns elected secretary.

Mr. M. L. Robinson being called upon stated that the object of the meeting was to consider the matter of building said factory and discussing the propriety of giving aid by subscription to the institution and taking stock in return.


Messrs. Harris and Kirby, representing the company, were present, and were called upon to state to the meeting their proposition and plans for carrying into effect the construction of said factory. Mr. Harris then submitted his proposition, in substance as follows.

That the citizens of Winfield raise the sum of $30,000 and they put in $50,000, and capi-talize the institution so as to have a capital stock of $150,000. The factory to have a capacity of using 2,000 bushels of corn per day, and probable cost of the building and works would be from $60,000 to $75,000; that the institution would employ at least 5 skilled workmen at from $100 to $125 per month, and 45 laborers, and 2 of the officers of the company should be in Winfield. In return for the $30,000 put in by citizens they would get $50,000 in stock, and Messrs. Morse, Scott & Harris were to have $100,000 of stock.

Messrs. Harris and Kirby then retired for a few minutes to give the meeting time to discuss the proposition and arrive at some definite conclusion. After mature deliberation the following conclusion was unanimously adopted.

It is the sense of this meeting that we, the citizens of Winfield, will undertake to raise the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars toward the erection of glucose works at Winfield, Kansas; Messrs Morse, Scott & Harris shall furnish fifty thousand dollars and an expert under contract for five years to manage the manufactories of the institution out of this $75,000. The said Morse, Scott & Harris shall purchase the grounds suitable for said manu-factory, and erect same according to specifications, fully equipped for business, with capacity of consuming two thousand bushels of corn per day of twenty-four hours, and converting same into syrup and sugar; said grounds, buildings, and equipments when completed shall ordinarily be considered of the value of $65,000, and furnish out of this amount $10,000 temporary working capital; said property shall be capitalized in the sum of $150,000, non-assessable stock.

The Citizens of Winfield to be entitled to Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) of the said stock and said Harris, Morse & Scott to have One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000) of stock. The Citizens of Winfield to be entitled to 3 directors and the other parties 4 directors and the Citizens of Winfield to have the secretary, treasurer, and vice-president of the organization.

After Messrs. Harris & Kerby returned, the above proposition was read to them and after considerable discussion they accepted the proposition. On motion a committee of five consisting of M. L. Robinson, J. B. Lynn, J. C. McMullen, A. T. Spotswood, and J. P. Short was appointed for the purpose of raising the ($25,000) and putting the matter in shape.

On motion G. S. Manser, M. G. Troup, and D. L. Kretsinger were appointed a committee to draw up articles of incorporation and file with Secretary of State and procure a charter and M. G. Troup, J. P. Short, J. W. McDonald, and J. W. Curns were appointed a committee to make contract for the carrying into effect the proposition.

On motion adjourned. M. G. TROUP, President.

J. W. CURNS, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, August 31, 1882.

                                                       GLUCOSE WORKS.

                 The Largest Glucose Manufactory in the West to be Located at Winfield.

                  Seventy-Five Thousand Dollars to be Expended at Once in its Erection.

                                                   Winfield “Takes the Cake.”


A meeting was held on Monday evening at A. H. Doane & Co.’s office for the purpose of considering a proposition for erecting a glucose factory in this city. About thirty of our leading businessmen were present. M. G. Troup was made chairman and J. W. Curns Secre-tary. M. L. Robinson stated the object of the meeting, setting forth clearly and concisely the advantages to be derived from the establishment.

Mr. Harris, representing eastern capitalists, was present, and made a proposition. Another proposition was made by citizens, to organize a joint stock corporation and erect a building and works to cost $75,000, of which $25,000 should be furnished by citizens and $50,000 by the eastern capitalists; the building to be 175 by 225 feet, four stories high, with a capac-ity for using 2,000 bushels of corn per day; and to be called the Winfield Syrup and Sugar Refinery. The proposition was accepted.

Committees were appointed as follows.

On soliciting subscription to the capital stock: M. L. Robinson, J. C. McMullen, A. T. Spotswood, J. B. Lynn, J. P. Short.

On incorporation: G. S. Manser, M. G. Troup, D. L. Kretsinger.

On contract: M. G. Troup, J. P. Short, J. Wade McDonald, J. W. Curns.

We regard the success of this enterprise as of the most vital importance to the interests of this city and county. We believe in home manufactures, which will make a market for home productions. A factory in this county which would make a market for 2,000 bushels of corn a day, 700,000 bushels a year, would be of immense value to the farming community. Besides it would furnish employment for a large number of workmen and operatives and add very largely to the general prosperity and wealth. At the same time, the stock would doubt-less be a splendid investment for capital, paying large dividends.

We hope our enterprising citizens will come forward with their subscriptions at once, and have the building under process of erection as soon as possible.          

When completed the Glucose Works will furnish a cash market for all the surplus corn raised in the county. Not a bushel of it will have to be shipped out of the county except in the way of syrup. It will, in reality, make a Kansas City market at home for our corn.

The Glucose Works will be one of the largest buildings in the state. It will have a frontage but little less than one of our blocks and will cover just half a square, being a story higher than the Brettun House.

Wichita will feel sore over the loss of her Glucose Works. We would like to sympathize with her if we didn’t have a finger in the pie ourselves. It’s unfortunate for Wichita that it is located so near Winfield.

[Note: Winfield never did get Glucose Factory. MAW]

Winfield Courier, September 7, 1882.

Messrs. Carpenter and Penny have opened a rink for roller skating in the McMullen building, opposite the Brettun. The room was full of young people Tuesday evening, and the exercise is exhilarating.

Winfield Courier, September 21, 1882.


Henthorn & Bro., sold one of the best stock farms in Cowley County this week, J. C. McMullen of Winfield being the purchaser. It is composed of an even section of land, and includes the Daggett farm of 160 acres on Timber Creek, and 480 acres of grazing land on the prairie adjoining on the north. Col. McMullen will enclose the three quarters of grazing land with a wire fence. He has 125 acres of choice, first bottom land, on which to raise his grain, which always yields large returns. The Col. has one of the finest stock farms in this country, and got it at a bargain. Burden Enterprise.

Winfield Courier, September 21, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, SEPTEMBER 18, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup, presiding. Present: Councilmen Gary, McMullen, and Wilson, City Attorney and Clerk.

The reading of the minutes of previous meeting was postponed until next meeting.

Petition of W. C. Robinson and 73 others, asking that the sum of $25 per month be appropriated for the support of a free Reading Room, was read and on motion was laid over until the next meeting.

The City Attorney stated that ordinances already in force provided for the appointment of an assistant Marshal at a salary of $1.25 per day. By consent the matter of the appointment of an assistant Marshal was referred to the Mayor with authority to make such appointment whenever in his judgment such an officer shall be needed.

Reports of Police Judge for August, and of City Treasurer for months ending July 15th, August 15th, and September 15th, and of City Clerk for quarter ending September 15th, 1882, were read and referred to Finance Committee.

Bill of Wm. Warren for street crossing and culverts, $14.60, was allowed and ordered paid.

On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, September 28, 1882.

Col. J. C. McMullen accompanied his mother to Kansas City Monday, where she will visit with her daughter, Mrs. E. P. Kinne. The Colonel will take in the fair during his stay.

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, OCT. 2, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup presiding. Present: Councilmen Gary, Wilson, McMullen, and City Attorney Seward. In the absence of City Clerk, D. C. Beach, on motion of Gary, O. M. Seward was appointed City Clerk pro tem. Minutes of meetings of Sept. 4th and 18th, 1882, read and approved.

Petition of W. C. Robinson, E. P. Hickok, and others asking for an appropriation of $25 a month for a public reading room, was postponed until the next regular meeting of the Council.

Reports of the City Treasurer for the months ending July, August, and September 15th, 1882. Approved.

The following accounts were presented and referred to the County Commissioners.

Johnson & Hill for 2 coffins and box: $22.50.

J. A. Earnest, groceries for poor: $12.00.

Harter Bros., Medicines for poor: $19.35.


Dr. Emerson for professional services: $22.00.

Dr. Davis for professional services: $89.00.

The following accounts were allowed and warrants ordered drawn on Citty Treasurer.

City Officers: $67.90.

B. McFadden, special police: $2.50.

Sandy Burge, special police: $1.25.

Jackman, special police: $.37

John Bates, special police: $.25

The bill of Wm. Warren for $28.50 for street crossings was referred to the Finance Committee.

On motion Council adjourned to next regular meeting. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

O. M. SEWARD, City Clerk pro tem.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 11, 1882.

Dr. J. A. Loomis is down with an attack of fever and exhaus­tion, caused by his unremit-ting attention at the bedside of his father.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 11, 1882.

FUNERAL OF I. C. LOOMIS. The funeral of I. C. Loomis, father of Dr. J. A. Loomis, will be held at 10 o’clock this (Wednesday) morning at his farm, two miles northwest of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 11, 1882.

                                                                 Obituary.

DIED. At his farm two miles northwest of this city, on Monday last, Oct. 9th, 1882, I. C. Loomis, in the 83rd year of his age. The funeral took place on the following Wednesday. The deceased had been a resident of this vicinity for many years and was universally re-spected by all with whom he came in contact. He sank to sleep in the fullness of years and in the full hope of a joyful resurrection.

Winfield Courier, October 12, 1882.

DIED. Mr. I. C. Loomis died at his residence in Arkansas City on Monday evening, October 9, 1882, at 10 o’clock, aged 81 years. He is the father of Mrs. J. C. McMullen, of this city. He has been a remarkable man in his day and has a history which we will try to give in brief next week.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 25, 1882.

We are pleased to see Dr. Loomis once more on our streets.

Winfield Courier, October 26, 1882.

Col. McMullen returned from a visit to Kansas City Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, October 26, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, OCTOBER 16, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor Troup in chair. Roll called. Present: Councilmen McMullen, Gary, and Wilson, City Attorney and Clerk.

Minutes of last meeting read and approved.

Petition of G. B. Stiles for authority to number the buildings in the city was read and referred to the Committee on streets and alleys.


Petition of H. D. Gans and 11 others for sidewalk on the east side of Block 145 was read and on motion of Mr. Gary, the prayer of the petition was granted and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance in accordance therewith.

Petition of C. N. Harter and 13 others for sidewalk on north side of Blocks 87 and 107 was read and on motion of Mr. McMullen, the prayer of the petition was granted and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an ordinance accordingly.

Petition of W. C. Robinson, J. W. Curns, and 125 others asking an appropriation for City Library was again presented. On motion of Mr. McMullen, action on same was postponed until next regular meeting.

Report of Finance Committee on Police Judge’s report for August, that they found the same correct, was adopted. The Committee were given further time in all other matters in their hands.

Bill of C. H. Wooden, removing nuisances, $3.75, and of Wm. Warren, street crossings, etc., $28.50, were allowed and ordered paid.

Bill of A. T. Shenneman for board of city prisoners from January 1st to Sept. 16, $42.25, and bill of Winfield COURIER, printing and job work, $51.00, were referred to the Finance Committee.

It was moved that the time allowed under the deed from the city to the County Com-missioners for constructing a fence around the Courthouse grounds be extended to the 1st day of January 1883. Carried.

On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, November 2, 1882.

Ad. A girl to do general house work wanted at J. F. McMullen’s. Inquire at house on Southeast corner of Stewart St. & 9th Ave., or at Law office on 9th Ave. between Millington & Loomis St.

Winfield Courier, November 16, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, NOVEMBER 6, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup in chair. Roll called. Present, Councilmen Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson; City Attorney and Clerk.

Minutes of last meeting read and approved.

Petition of A. B. Graham and 10 others for sidewalk on west side of block 187 and on south side of block 186, was read. On motion of Mr. Gary, that part of the petition relating to sidewalk on west side of block 187 was granted and the Attorney was instructed to prepare an Ordinance in accordance therewith.

Ordinance No. 165 providing for the construction of sidewalks on the west side of block 187; on the north side of blocks 87 and 107; and on the east side of block No. 145, was read and on motion of Mr. Read was taken up for consideration by sections. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 were adopted. On motion to adopt as a whole on its final passage, the vote stood as follows: Those voting aye, were Councilmen Read, McMullen, Gary, and Wilson; nays none, and the Ordinance was declared adopted.


Communication from S. L. Gilbert declining to remain on the bond of T. H. Soward as Police Judge, and asking to be released therefrom, was read. On motion of Mr. Gary, the communication was placed on file and the clerk was instructed to notify the Police Judge that he must file a new bond by the next meeting of the Council.

David C. Beach again tendered his resignation as City Clerk, which was accepted. The Mayor appointed Lovell H. Webb to the position of City Clerk for the remainder of the term, he to file his bond for approval at the next regular meeting. On motion, the appointment of the Mayor was confirmed by the council.

The Finance Committee reported favorably on bills:

Winfield COURIER, Printing, etc.: $57.00.

A. T. Shenneman, Board Prisoners: $42.00

Reports adopted and warrants ordered for the amounts of same.

The Finance Committee reported on Clerk’s quarterly statement for Sept. 15th that they had examined the same and found it correct. Reports adopted. On Police Judges report for June the Committee reported that they found it correct. Report adopted.

The following bills were presented, allowed, and ordered paid.

H. L. Thomas, street crossings and culverts: $44.24.

City officers salaries, Oct.: $67.90.

Dr. Geo. Emerson, medical attendance: $5.00.

Bill of A. B. Arment for coffin for City poor, $7.50, was approved and recommended to the County Commissioners for payment.

E. H. Lintrell and W. B. McConnels made a statement concerning the fines assessed against them in Police Court for violation of the Ordinance relating to licenses. The Mayor for the reason that the violations were technical and unintentional, remitted their fines. The action of the Mayor was on motion approved by the Council, and the City Clerk was instructed to inform the Police Judge of the same.

On motion the City Clerk was instructed to notify the Police Judge to make his reports for months of Sept. and Oct.

Council then adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

Winfield Courier, December 14, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, DEC. 4, 1882.

Council met in regular session, Mayor M. G. Troup presiding.

Roll called: Present, Councilmen Read, McMullen and Gary; City Attorney and Clerk.

Minutes of last regular session read and approved.

The Police Judge’s reports for the months of September and October were read and referred to Committee on Finance.

The following bills were presented, allowed, and ordered paid:

L. C. Fleming, Repairs City tools: $1.50.

S. C. Smith, services City Eng.: $12.50.

G. B. Rowland, street and alley crossings: $19.20.

City Officers, salaries Nov.: $67.90.

David C. Beach, services Reg. Books: $15.00.


The following bills were approved and recommended to the County Commissioners for payment:

Wallis & Wallis, goods for City poor: $30.00.

J. A. Earnest: $5.00.

Bill of Horning & Whitney for scythe, nails, and scythe stone, $1.15, was referred to the Finance Committee.

The council were addressed by a committee of ladies in the question of an appropriation to the City Library.

It was moved by Col. McMullen that the City Council appropriate the sum of $25.00 per month for a City Library in accordance with the petition filed in this case. Motion lost.

Bond of L. H. Webb as City Clerk, with W. C. Robinson, J. Wade McDonald, W. S. Mendenhall, and J. S. Mann, as sureties, was read and approved by the Council.

The following resolution was adopted: Resolved, That the Mayor and Council hereby tender their thanks to David C. Beach for the faithful and efficient manner in which he has performed the duties of the office of City Clerk.

On motion Council adjourned. M. G. TROUP, Mayor.

Attest: DAVID C. BEACH, City Clerk.

[Note: First time Beach failed to show who voted Aye and who voted Nay on the City Library Request of $25.00 per month. City did not have much money at that time. MAW]

Winfield Courier, December 21, 1882.

Council Proceedings.

COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY OF WINFIELD, DECEMBER 18, 1882.