FAIRCLO BROTHERS.

Note: It appears from newspaper items that there were possibly four Fairclo Brothers: Theodore, Arial, Marshall, and Lyman Fairclo. The two most prominent brothers were Theodore and Arial. MAW

Jay Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1880.

The following Report of the Public Schools of the city for the school month ending February 6th.

                                                          INTERMEDIATE.

Frank Shearer, Jay Fairclo, Maggie Ford, Hattie Hand, Perley McCutere, Wyatt Hutchison, Perry Fullerlove, Schuyler Hand.

Fairclo Brothers...

Arkansas City Traveler, March 30, 1881.

In the last three weeks some ten men have left our city for Texas, with a view to purchasing cattle: James Henderson, A. M. Smythia, Jack Gilbert, Harry Guenther, Lincoln Small, the Fairclo brothers, Bill Henderson, and Messrs. Tyner and Pond.

Lyman & Arial Fairclo...

                                       LOCAL REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 25, 1881.

B. Stimson & Wife to Lyman & Arial Fairclo, part lots 1, 2, & 3, block 81, Arkansas City.

Arial Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 1, 1881.

The Parlor Livery is under the management of Mr. A. Fairclo.

Fairclo Brothers...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 15, 1881.

The Fairclo Brothers returned from Texas this week, where they have been purchasing stock.

Arial Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 15, 1881.

A horse race came off last Saturday between a black pony, belonging to A. Fairclo, and a bay pony, owned by Jas. Riely. The distance was about 400 yards, and was well contested. The black pony got away with the “stakes.”

Arial Fairclo marries Ida Krets of Bolton Township...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

MARRIED. Mr. A. Fairclo, of this city, and Miss Ida Krets, Bolton Township, were united in the bonds of matrimony last week. We wish them joy.

Fairclo boys and Charles H. Holloway...

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

Arkansas City has almost taken the “hub” for the past week. Many of her citizens are here attending the Armstrong murder case. Among these we notice Charlie Holloway, Mayor Kellogg, Cal. Swarts, Joe Houston, the Fairclo boys, liveryman McIntire, Solicitor Holland, and Mr. Adams, supported by a number of other prominent citizens.


Charles H. Holloway, formerly clerk for murdered druggist, James Riely...

Arkansas City Traveler, November 9, 1881.

Mr. C. H. Holloway has opened up the drug store owned by the late James Riely, and will conduct the same in the future. Success to you, Charles.

[Note: “Two Fairclo boys” and Marshall Fairclo mentioned in the following excerpts from Armstrong murder trial relative to James Riely, murdered druggist.]

Winfield Courier, November 24, 1881.

It is the evening of the day of the eventful race. Riely, the two Fairclo boys, Capt. Rarick, D. A. McIntire, and Charley Holloway, Riely’s clerk, are gathered in the low one-story frame store, talking over the incidents of the day.

Armstrong and Adams come in. Adams is still drunk, although able to navigate. Armstrong is happy and doesn’t care one cent whether the white-winged angel of peace is within one mile or fifty of the spot. He would like to see Riely squirm on general principles; and he proceeds to gratify this desire in the most subtle manner. He goes to the cigar case, calls out cigars for himself and Adams, and then turns to Riely with the query: “Riely, won’t you smoke with me?” You who have studied human nature can analyze the feelings of these two men as they stood there eyeing each other over the cigar case: the victor, self-important at the other’s expense, and spending with a lavish hand the money he had won.

Armstrong and Adams are among the last to go out. Adams is drunk and moves slowly: he gets almost to the door and Riely gives him a push and sends him out. He turns around and tries to come in again and Riely gives him another push and he falls over at full length on the sidewalk. Riely steps up and makes a side kick at him. During this time Armstrong has gone out and is standing near the south awning post in front of the building. He sees Adams come reeling out of the door and fall on the sidewalk, and Riely follow him up and kick at him.

Armstrong starts forward exclaiming, “Hold on, Riely: I can’t stand that!” Riely takes a step forward, but before they come together, Marsh Fairclo seizes Armstrong and hurls him off the sidewalk down eighteen inches into the street, where Armstrong falls on his hands and knees.

Charles H. Holloway...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 14, 1881.

Charley Holloway has been granted a druggist’s permit for the sale of wines and liquors for medicinal uses.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 14, 1881.

                                                                I. O. O. F.

The officers elected, for the coming year, by the I. O. O. F. Lodge of this city were as follows: N. G., G. W. Ford; V. G., W. Griffith; Treas., T. Fairclo; Per. Sec., Geo. Russell; Rec. Sec., J. B. Walker.

Arial Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.


The Stanton Bros. sold out their Livery business to A. Fairclo, and gave possession to the purchaser on Saturday night last. We understand that the Stantons intend to return shortly to their former home at Oskaloosa, Iowa.

Theodore Fairclo and Charles H. Holloway...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 10, 1882.

The City Drug Store is now owned by Messrs. Holloway & Fairclo. See their “ad.”

AD:                                           HOLLOWAY & FAIRCLO.

                                                                  AT THE

                                                       CITY DRUG STORE.

                                   Is the place to buy Reliable Goods at Low Prices.

                                         DRUGS AND PATENT MEDICINES,

                                         Window Glass, Paints, and Paint Brushes,

                                 Toilet Articles, and Druggists’ Sundries of all Kinds.

                                                       Pure Wines & Liquors

                              Sold for Medicinal, Mechanical, and Scientific Purposes,

                                                         West Summit Street,

                                               ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 10, 1882.

Mr. Theodore Fairclo is putting up a neat residence on East Central Avenue. The main portion will be 14 x 24 feet with an ell 12 x 14 feet. It will be embellished with a couple of porches and be otherwise finished in good style.

Theodore Fairclo...

[COUNTY CONVENTION.]

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

On motion convention adjourned, to 1:30 p.m. On reassembling committee on credentials reported as follows.

MR. CHAIRMAN: We, your committee on credentials, report the following delegates and alternates from the various townships as entitled to seats in this convention.

Creswell Township, Delegates: G. S. Rorick, W. M. Sleeth, Theo. Fairclo, R. H. Reed, Uriah Spray, W. H. Speers, S. Matlack. Alternates: A. Dunn, O. J. Pickering, J. Barnett, R. J. Maxwell, Chas. France, J. L. Huey, John Williams.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 24, 1882.

                                                       Several Lies Nailed.

                                    CRESWELL TOWNSHIP, May 20th, 1882.

Ed. Traveler:

Permit me space in your paper to reply to an article which appeared in last week’s Democrat. It is so evidently the work of spleen, and comes so near to downright intentional lying that I do not feel it right to let it pass. The article referred to is headed “A Pretty Kettle of Fish,” but it is too wordy for repro­duction here.

In the first place the issue was not Hackney, or anti-Hackney, but Whiskey, or anti-Whiskey—such issue being made secretly by a few persons; and some good temperance men put on the ticket to give it tone, and the Democrat know such to be the case.


Secondly—Creswell Township was represented in the Conven­tion by the ticket elected with the exceptions shown below, the reason of which exceptions will be seen by the following extracts from the report of the Committee on Credentials.

Creswell Township: Delegates—G. S. Rarick, W. M. Sleeth, T. Fairclo, R. H. Reed, U. Spray, W. H. Speers, S. Matlack. Alternates—A. Dunn, A. J. Pickering, I. Barnett, R. J. Maxwell, Chas. France, J. L. Huey, John Williams.

We further recommend that J. B. Nipp cast the vote for R. H. Reed, that C. M. Scott cast the vote for U. Spray, and Calvin Swarts cast the vote for W. H. Speers for Creswell Township in this convention, those delegates and their alternates being absent.

Why the Democrat is so worked up on a Republican issue, and goes for Mr. Bonsall by name, is more than we can tell, unless it is on account of its editor being so badly scooped by the people when he ran against Bonsall for Police Judge a few weeks since.

                                                     ONE OF THE PEOPLE.

Theodore Fairclo & Holloway...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 31, 1882.

Among the many improvements being made in the appearance of our business houses our attention was specially attracted by the Drug House of Messrs. Fairclo & Holloway, who have repainted, refitted, and rearranged their establishment until it presents a most neat and tasty appearance, which speaks well for the busi­ness prosperity of the firm.

Arial Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 20, 1882.

A lively race for life and property took place on Summit St. last Thursday, that created considerable amusement among specta­tors. A team with the running gear of a wagon attached, tore down Summit street, ran close to the sidewalk near Shepard & Maxwell’s drug store; there struck a large stone which overturned the wagon, and continued but a few feet when one hind wheel came off, and the team came to a halt. In the meantime Mr. Fairclo was exercising his team, and had to lay on the whip and run at a lively gait to keep the runaways from catching him. Hardly had the excitement incident to the above subsided when a terrible racket was heard coming from the west part of town and a pair of mulish runaways with Burroughs’ dray loaded with water loomed into sight near Matlack’s store; whether in consequence of the size of the load or the mules having had enough of running, they were easily captured before doing any damage.

Carry Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, November 1, 1882.

The following pupils were neither absent nor tardy during the last school month: Willie Davis, Lorenzo Gilbert, Purley Clifton, Arthur Ware, Nettie Jordan, Carry Fairclo, Ida Beecham, Allie Davis, Eddie Mott, Byron Hubbard, Cliff Hardy, Cora McIntire, Maggie Sleeth, Willie Barnett. SUSIE L. HUNT, Teacher.

Altie Fairclo, Carry Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 6, 1882.

The following pupils were neither absent nor tardy, without an excuse, during the last school month: Willie Davis, Robbie Gaskill, Purley Clifton, Charlie Smith, Cliff Hardy, Lenna Taylor, Altie Fairclo, Ida Beecham, Jamie Fleming, Allie Davis, Eddie Mott, Lee Crebbs, Arthur Ware, Nettie Jordon, Carry Fairclo, Maggie Sleeth, Johnnie Young, Curtis Cooper. SUSIE L. HUNT, Teacher.


Carrie [instead of Carry] Fairclo, Altie Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 3, 1883.

The following pupils were neither absent nor tardy, without an excuse, during the last school month. Willie Davis, Allie Davis, Robbie Gaskill, Lorenzo Gilbert, Eddie Mott, Perley Clifton, Cliff Hardy, Willie Barnett, Carrie Fairclo, Altie Fairclo, Ida Gamel, Florence Warren, Lee Crebbs. SUSIE L. HUNT, Teacher.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 10, 1883.

                                                                I. O. O. F.

At the last regular meeting of the Arkansas City Lodge, No. 160, I. O. O. F., the following officers were installed for the ensuing year: George Russell, N. G.; J. W. Feagins, V. G.; Theodore Fairclo, Treas.; I. N. Adams, P. S.; C. H. Hollaway, R. S.; J. W. Gamel, W.; F. M. Reek [?], C.; J. E. Cox, R. S. to N. G.; G. H. McIntire, L. S. to V. G.; Con Calvin [?], O. G.; J. W. Griffith, S. P. G.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 17, 1883.

                                       Arkansas City Council M.—National Union.

This lodge was organized with 22 members, last Monday night, by Dr. W. G. Graham and C. H. Wilson, of Winfield. This lodge is very similar to the Knights of Honor and A. O. U. W., save that they have a different and, it is claimed, much superior plan of insurance. The officers elected for the ensuing year are as follows: N. T. Snyder, P; W. V. McConn, F. S.; Maude E. McConn, S; Sarah E. Kellogg, T.; O. S. Rarick, V. P.; T. V. McConn, S. P.; H. D. Kellogg, E. P.; E. A. Barron, C.; Theo Fairclo, U.; W. E. Moore, S (al) A.; A. H. Fitch, D. K.; H. D. Kellogg, Med. Examiner; R. C. Lent, T. V. McConn, O. S. Rarick, Trustees.

Theodore Fairclo & Holloway, City Drug Store...

Arkansas City Traveler, February 7, 1883.

HOLLOWAY & FAIRCLO. AT THE CITY DRUG STORE, is the place to buy Reliable Goods at Low Prices. Drugs and Patent Medicines. Window Glass, Paints, and Paint Brushes, Toilet Articles, and Druggists’ Sundries of all kinds. Pure Wines & Liquors Sold for Medicinal, Mechanical, and Scientific Purposes. West Summit Street, Arkansas City, Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 21, 1883.

Among the many improvements that every day witnessed at some of our business houses, the City Drug Store takes the lead. It has been refitted and repainted throughout, and now is the very picture of elegance and neatness. The proprietors, Messrs. Holloway & Fairclo, are doing a thriving business, which we are truly glad to see.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 25, 1883.

Messrs. Holloway & Fairclo’s drug store has just escaped from the hands of Allen & Braggins and looks as elegant and tony as it is possible for artists’ brush to make it.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 9, 1883.


Messrs. Allen & Braggins are the most busy men around town just now. They are now painting residences or stores for the following gentlemen: Messrs. Barrett, Pearson, Rarick, Holloway & Fairclo, Grady, Canfield, J. Hill, Lugin, Stanton, Barron, T. J. Gilbert, and H. Godehard, to say nothing of lots of paperhanging, kalsomining, etc.

Arial Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, July 4, 1883.

At the “colt show” last Saturday at Fairclo’s stable, for the best colt from “Cleveland Boy,” the premium was awarded to Jim Parr’s colt.

Theodore Fairclo & Holloway...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 29, 1883.

Holloway & Fairclo, the enterprising South Summit Street drug firm, last week received a large invoice of new goods of every description, and we advise all needing anything in their line to call and inspect their stock.

Theodore Fairclo...

[REPUBLICAN CONVENTION.]

Winfield Courier, September 6, 1883.

The chair appointed J. A. Cochran of Liberty, I. H. Bonsall of Creswell, and R. S. Strother of Omnia, a committee of credentials.

Committee on credentials reported the following named delegates and alternates for their respective townships.

CRESWELL: O. S. Rarick, C. G. Furry, C. L. Swarts, G. W. Ramage, Theo. Fairclo, F. M. Vaughn, I. H. Bonsall, A. B. Sankey, A. A. Wiley, James Ridenour.

Alternates: L. McLaughlin, John Smalley, Frank Schiffbauer, Dave Lewis, Frank Hess, C. W. Burt, R. J. Maxwell, R. L. Marshall, N. T. Snider, S. J. Rice.

Patterson & Hoffman take over old Arial Fairclo building...

Arkansas City Traveler, October 3, 1883.

Messrs. Patterson & Hoffman have opened out a new livery stable on West Fifth Avenue in the old Fairclo building, which they have fixed up in good shape and stocked with first class turnouts. We bespeak for the firm a share of our people’s patronage.

Theodore Fairclo and C. H. Holloway fined...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 5, 1883.

The fine and costs in the case of Mr. W. T. Kitchen amounted to about $110, and in that of Holloway & Fairclo to nearly $1,100. Pretty dear business.

Winfield Courier, December 6, 1883.

                                                   The School Fund Booming.

Last week Fairclo & Holloway, druggists at Arkansas City, were arrested on eight counts for violation of the prohibitory law. The defendants came up, plead guilty, and paid eight hundred dollars, fines and costs, which amounted to three hundred more. This makes a total of eleven hundred dollars which went into the school fund of the county last week. If the thing keeps up at this rate for a short time, the expenses of the public schools of the county will be very light. In the old license days the towns in the county got all the revenue from whiskey selling, “while the country furnished its proportion of the whiskey drinkers. The present arrangement is much more equitable as the lines are divided up among all the people.

(?) Fairclo house rented by Major Woodin...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 9, 1884.


Major Woodin has rented the Fairclo house on Sixth street, and his family are now occupying the same. The Major will make his home in the city as soon as the new agent takes control of the agency business.

Theodore Fairclo, [Holloway & Fairclo], livery of Fairclo Bros....

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 16, 1884.

                                                           DRUG STORES.

We have four first-class drug stores. . . .

Holloway & Fairclo have fresh drugs, brushes, paints, chemicals, and sundries amid their large stock of goods.

William G. Miller (blacksmith) occupies his new building, near the livery of Fairclo Bros.

Arkansas City Republican, February 16, 1884.

                                      HOLLOWAY & FAIRCLO, DRUGGISTS.

Toilet Soap, Perfumery, Shoulder Braces, Trusses, and all kinds of DRUGGISTS’ SUNDRIES usually kept in a first-class drug store. Physicians prescriptions carefully compounded and orders answered with care and dispatch. The public will find our stock of medicines complete, warranted genuine, and of the best quality.

                                                       CITY DRUG STORE.

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

The Hasie Bros., as soon as the weather will permit, will commence the erection of their new building. It will be situated nearly opposite Holloway & Fairclo’s drug store, and will have a frontage of 50 feet, a depth of 132 feet, and be a height of three stories.

Jay Holloway...

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

                                                   JUNIOR DEPARTMENT.

The following is a list of people of Miss Hunt’s department that received 100 percent: Ida Lane, Mary Dunn, Cora Taylor, Anna Wagstaff, Mervin Miller, Harry Gilstrap, Jimmie Kirkpatrick, Willie Wilson, Mattie Patterson, Elsa Darrough, Sarah Hill, Maggie Ford, Emma Wilson, Wyatt Hutchinson.

Those who were imperfect in the same department are: Larkin Endicott, James Williams, Eddie Endicott, Charley Taylor, Jay Fairclo, Amy Landes, Flora Kreamer, Ella DeBruce, Mary Lewis.

Fairclo’s Livery...

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

Ferguson & Robertson have opened a paint shop on West Central Avenue, opposite Fairclo’s Livery, and are now ready to do first-class work on short notice.

Theodore Fairclo, Holloway & Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

RECAP OF JOB WORK DONE BY REPUBLICAN PLAYED UP:

                    Holloway & Fairclo, 5,000 prescription blanks and 1,000 envelopes.

Fairclo Brothers’ Livery...

Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.


As stated last week, Robertson & Ferguson have opened a paint shop on West Central Avenue, opposite Fairclo Bros.’ livery. They are now prepared to supply all wants at shortest notice.

Theodore Fairclo, city councilman...

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1884.

                                                              City Election.

The election for city officers held last Monday resulted in the election of the gentlemen named below. There were several tickets in the field, and the total number of votes polled was 490. The figures following the names below show the vote cast for each of them, which constitutes an overwhelming majority and renders it unnecessary to give the vote on the other ticket.

Following is the successful ticket.

Mayor: Frank Schiffbauer, 470.

Councilmen: C. G. Thompson, 323; Frank Leach, 421; O. S. Rarick, 416.; T. Fairclo, 314; A. A. Davis, 308.

Police Judge: W. D. Kreamer, 274.

Arkansas City Republican, April 12, 1884.

The following was the ticket chosen at the city election last Monday: Mayor, Frank P. Schiffbauer; councilmen, C. G. Thompson, F. C. Leach, O. S. Rarick, Theo. Fairclo, and A. A. Davis; police judge, W. D. Kreamer.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, April 19, 1884.

A. Jeannette arrived from Kansas City Thursday, and located yesterday at Holloway & Fairclo’s drug store, and will do watch, clock, and jewelry repairing, having had 10 years experience in Switzerland and the U. S. He will open a jewelry store in connection in about two weeks.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, April 19, 1884.

                                                     City Council Proceedings.

Council met in adjourned session at 7:30 p.m., April 14, 1884. Present: F. P. Schiffbauer, mayor; O. S. Rarick, C. G. Thompson, Theo. Fairclo, F. C. Leach, and A. A. Davis, Councilmen.

On motion F. C. Leach was chosen president of the council.

The mayor appointed the following committees.

On printing: Leach, Fairclo, and Rarick.

On ways and means: Thompson, Fairclo, and Rarick.

On ordinance: Rarick, Fairclo and Leach.

On water works: Fairclo, Davis, and Thompson.

On sanitary: Davis, Rarick, and Fairclo.

Motion made to purchase 60 stop cocks for water works.

The ordinance committee was instructed to draft an ordinance in reference to occupation tax, and present the same at next meeting for consideration.

City marshal was instructed to see that all ordinances are enforced.


Motion made to secure the room over Atwood’s store for council chamber and police court at $10 per month. W. D. Kreamer to pay $5 per month of above rent, and be allowed to use said police courtroom for justice room. Carried.

Motion made to continue G. W. White as night police without expense to the city. Carried.

Motion made to pay the city marshal $10 per month. Carried.

Motion made to require city treasurer and clerk to give bond of $2,000 each. Carried.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, May 10, 1884.

                         COUNCIL CHAMBER, ARKANSAS CITY, May 2, 1884.

Present, F. P. Schiffbauer, mayor; C. G. Thompson, F. C. Leach, T. Fairclo, A. A. Davis, and O. S. Rarick, councilmen.

Petition to prohibit the use of barb wire fence within the city limits presented. Moved that the city attorney be instructed to draft ordinance and present same to city council, prohibiting the use of barbed wire for fencing within the city limits. Carried.

Ordinance committee instructed to draft an ordinance amending ordinance No. 121, and report same at next meeting.

Theodore Fairclo and C. H. Holloway part company...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1884.

The dissolution of the drug store of Holloway & Fairclo appears in this issue. We shall be sorry to lose Mr. Holloway as a merchant, but trust he will still make his home in the city where he has many friends.

                                                   DISSOLUTION NOTICE.

Notice is hereby given that the firm of Holloway & Fairclo, heretofore doing business as the City drug store, has this day been dissolved by mutual consent, Mr. Holloway having sold his interest to Mr. Fairclo, who will continue the business at the old stand. C. H. Holloway takes all the accounts of the firm and will have the collection of the same.

                                            C. H. HOLLOWAY, T. FAIRCLO.

Arkansas City, May 17, 1884.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, June 7, 1884.

The city council met Monday night, with F. C. Leach, president pro tem, in the chair.

Present: Leach, Thompson, Rarick, Davis, and Fairclo.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1884.

Council met last Monday night.

Present: Messrs. Leach, Thompson, Rarick, Davis, and Fairclo.

Moved and carried that the treasurer, clerk, police judge, street commissioner, and water commissioner be required to make monthly statement of their receipts and expenditures, to be presented at each regular meeting of the council.

It appearing that certain parties, to avoid paying the dog tax, are keeping said dogs tied up, the city marshal was instructed to enforce the ordinance with reference to said parties.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1884.

                                                                   “Rain.”


A communication appeared in one of our city papers last week under the above caption, in which Mr. F. C. Leach, acting mayor, was severely criticized and more or less abused. Now the facts in the case are these. A man came to town, and taking out a hawker’s license, proceeded to cry out his goods, selling shirts, handkerchiefs, scissors, etc. There was nothing in his language to hurt anyone, and he clearly had a right to pursue his business according to the terms of his license. But at the instigation of some party, a man authorized to make arrests, but who draws no salary from the city therefor, ordered the vendor to ceased. An appeal being made to the acting mayor and Councilmen Thompson and Fairclo, they decided the man could proceed, which was no more than his right. The allusion to Mr. Leach’s “imbibing too freely of his favorite beverage” is purely gratuitous, as he is a known temperance man, and could not have been under the influence of anything more soul destroying than hydrant water. Again, as regards the “rat” man, there is no ordinance prohibiting a man from giving a free show or from begging—any more than you can prevent a blind organ grinder from plying his vocation. The rat man couldn’t have made a cent if there had not been suckers there to nibble at his bait. The trouble is our night policeman is growing too fast for his clothes. He ought to take more rest in the daytime and not quite so much at night. In conclusion, we will state that the general opinion is that Mr. Leach attended to the city’s interests during Mr. Schiffbauer’s absence fully as well as could any of the mice disposed to gnaw at his hands.

Related article to “city council” activities...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1884.

Our neighbors across the way are moved to tears at the spectacle of a woman selling perfumery on our street and giving the purchaser a chance to get his money back. They fear the morals of the Arkansas City youth will be corrupted by such sights. Leaving aside the susceptibility of the average Arkansas City youth from 12 to 15 years, we respectfully submit that from the crowd of men seeking perfumery it was impossible for a boy short of eight feet in stature to see the “female gambler.” It is not worthwhile for our neighbor to abuse our mayor and municipal officers for an affair like this. They but complied with the city law, and warned the woman not to violate any state statute. Her evasion of the law is a common one, and is practiced in every city in the land, but is one in which the operator generally keeps outside the pale of gambling as recognized by law. However great the evil may be, abuse of officials not responsible is no very certain corrective. Nor do we imagine that these self-elected reformers hold such a powerful grip upon the machinery of government as to intimidate anybody by their threats of “making their demands heard and felt.”

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1884.

The council held an adjourned meeting last Monday night, Mayor Schiffbauer in the chair, and Councilmen Thompson, Fairclo, and Davis present.

The report of W. L. Webb, who has been surveying the slough in the southwest part of the city, was read, as follows.

To the Arkansas City Council:

I have the honor to submit the following report of a survey for draining the slough in the southwest portion of the city.


A line was measured in a southwesterly direction along a line of natural drainage, and levels taken at each 100 feet. The distance was found to be 2,850 feet, and the elevation of the pond above the river 1.62 feet. The elevation of the ground along the line will average, for 2,000 feet next to the pond, 3 feet, and for the remaining distance 6½ feet above the water in the pond. At the deepest place, the pond is about 2½ feet deep. The water in the canal was 3.16 feet above the surface of the pond. The small difference of level between the pond and river renders drainage along this line impracticable. Several gentlemen who have given the matter some attention suggested that a line in a southeasterly direction, following natural drainage, would, by striking the river further down, take advantage of the fall of the river, which I am told is about 3½ feet per mile, and which would still be within the limit of expense desired by the city. My examination stopped here, and the matter was left for the action of the council. W. L. WEBB.

This report was laid on the table.

The resignation of Ed. Malone as water works commissioner was read and referred to the water works committee.

The mayor instructed the ordinance committee to consult the city attorney with reference to an ordinance taking action on a petition to gutter the street on blocks 80, 81, 68, and 69.

Moved and carried that the council appropriate $100 out of any money not otherwise appropriated to repair the road south of the city and north of the Arkansas River bridge.

Committee on revision of ordinances was given more time.

Theodore Fairclo, Druggist, “Center Drug Store” [name change]...

Arkansas City Republican, June 21, 1884.

                         T. FAIRCLO, DRUGGIST, ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.

                                        [SUCCESSOR TO Holloway & Fairclo.]

TOILET SOAP, PERFUMERY, SHOULDER BRACES, TRUSSES, and all kinds of DRUGGISTS’ SUNDRIES, Usually kept in a first-class drug store.

Physicians’ prescriptions carefully compounded and order answered with care and dispatch. The public will find our stock of medicines complete, warranted genuine, and of the best quality. CENTER DRUG STORE.

Fairclo Brothers’ Livery Stable...

Arkansas City Republican, July 19, 1884.

Read the advertisement of Mr. A. Harnley, who has opened a bath room opposite Fairclo Brothers’ livery stable. He is prepared to relieve the epidermis of undesirable deposits made in ancient or modern times. Give him a call.

AD. BATH ROOMS Opposite Fairclo Bros., Livery. I am now prepared to give baths, with HOT, OR COLD WATER, -EITHER- DAYTIME OR EVENING.

                                               A. HARNLEY, PROPRIETOR.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 6, 1884.

Council met in regular session last Monday, August 4. Present: F. P. Schiffbauer, mayor; C. G. Thompson, T. Fairclo, and A. A. Davis.

                                                      C. R. SIPES, Treasurer.

                                          COLLECTION OF WATER RENTS.

I herewith submit my report of the amount of water tax collected up to August 2, 1884.


Chicago Lumber Co. $5.00, George Hasie $10.00, E. D. Eddy $3.75, Fairclo Brothers $20.00, Ed. Grady $3.33, George Childers $5.00, H. Godehard $1.25, O. Stevenson $5.00, Stedman Bros. $4.40, E. F. Shindel $5.00, J. B. Nipp $5.00, L. H. Braden $20.00, William Gibby $5.00, Samuel Burress $2.20, Charles Hutchins $2.20, W. E. Gooch $5.00, H. D. Kellogg $2.15, J. A. McIntire $20.00, Pentecost & Lyman $14.00, A. W. Patterson $10.00, Stage company $5.00, F. A. Chambers $5.00, Charles Bryant $6.25, John Love $5.00, J. H. Hilliard $20.00, Hoskins & Neal $5.00, Thompson & Woodin $20.00, A. B. DeBruce $4.75, O. P. Houghton $11.00, W. G. Miller $6.75. TOTAL: $253.18

     Ten percent for collection: $25.31. BALANCE: $227.85. Paid City Treasurer: $225.85.

                                               BALANCE (ON HAND): $2.47

The police judge reports $51 as the amount of fines assessed during last month, and $46.50 as amount collected.

The special census taker, B. C. Lindsay, reports the population of Arkansas City at 3,004.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 20, 1884.

The primaries last Saturday were hotly contested throughout, and drew out more votes than at any primary election yet held in this city.

The following gentlemen were elected delegates to the county convention: F. M. Vaughn, C. L. Swarts, E. G. Gray, T. Fairclo, F. E. Pentecost, Dave Lewis, L. E. Woodin, Sr., O. S. Rarick, W. D. Mowry, Jas. Ridenour.

The delegates to the district convention in this city, to be held one week from next Saturday, are: A. E. Kirkpatrick, C. W. Burt, J. W. Warren, F. M. Vaughn, E. G. Gray, Bowen Lewis, S. C. Murphy, D. G. Lewis, J. L. Huey, T. H. McLaughlin.

Theodore Fairclo...

[REPUBLICAN COUNTY CONVENTION.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, August 27, 1884.

Entitled to seats in the convention:

Creswell: F. M. Vaughn, C. L. Swarts, E. G. Gray, T. Fairclo, F. E. Pentecost, Dave Lewis, L. E. Woodin, O. S. Rarick, W. D. Mowry, Jas. Ridenour.

Mrs. M. [Marshall] Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, August 30, 1884.

Mrs. M. Fairclo is visiting relatives in Pennsylvania.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 6, 1884.

Last Wednesday evening an organization of Improved Order of Red Men was effected in Arkansas City. There were over 20 charter members. The following persons were elected for the ensuing term: Prophet, S. C. Lindsay; Sachem, M. N. Sinnott; Senior Sagamore, W. C. Guyer; Junior Sagamore, C. F. Kneedler; Chief of Records, Frank J. Hess; Keeper of Wampum, Theo. Fairclo.

The following are the gentlemen from Girard, who assisted in the ceremonies: A. P. Riddle, H. T. Adair, Jno. Randolph, R. H. McKay, Jos. Ennis, and T. C. Mosley.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, September 13, 1884.


At the last regular council meeting, Mayor Schiffbauer, C. G. Thompson, T. Fairclo, A. A. Davis, councilmen, were present.

On motion, water commissioner was ordered to stop the water supply of T. H. & L. McLaughlin wherever used by them from the city water works, owing to their refusal to pay for same.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, October 8, 1884.

Following is a complete list of stockholders in the Arkansas City Woolen Manufacturing Company, mention of which was made last week.

T. H. McLaughlin, Arkansas City Bank, Frank J. Hess, Wm. Sleeth, H. P. Farrar, Landes, Beall & Co., Sanborn & Gordon, H. Endicott, A. Walton, J. A. McIntyre, I. D. Harkleroad, W. E. Gooch, F. W. Farrar, A. A. Wiley, R. A. Houghton, T. J. Gilbert, A. Campbell, G. W. Cunningham, Schiffbauer Bros., A. [?] Andrews [Not sure of first initial.], Fitch & Barron, S. Matlack, J. B. Nipp, A. A. Newman, James Hill, E. H. Parker, T. D. Richardson, Benedict & Owen, D. Warren, J. H. Sherburne, J. N. T. Gooch, Uriah Spray, Theo Fairclo, H. D. Kellogg, Ira Barnett, A. J. Chapel, S. F. George, G. W. Miller, P. F. Endicott, Jamison Vawter, Kimmel & Moore, N. C. Hinkley, L. McLaughlin.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, October 18, 1884.

Theo. Fairclo wants a drug clerk immediately. Apply at his store.

Theodore Fairclo...

Winfield Courier, October 23, 1884.

                                                        Probate Court Notes.

Ira L. McCommon has filed annual settlement papers in the estate of Sarah D. Johnson; Theo. Fairclo in the estate of James Riley [Riely]; and F. M. Savage in the estate of Malinda Baum.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, October 25, 1884.

                                                         A “Horrible” Deed.

Thursday morning Archie Dunn came into our office and inquired if we had seen the dead man at Fairclo’s Drug Store. We replied in the negative, and anxious to obtain a news item, plied him with questions concerning the affair. All he knew was that there was a dead man and for us to go and view him. Donning our street attire, we started. By the time we got under headway on the street there were a number going in the same direction and a large number of grinning citizens returning. We did not “catch on,” but went to see. We arrived and then found, sure enough, a dead—wooden—man, manufactured by some genius. Of course, we didn’t feel chagrined at all, but the information coming from quiet Archie Dunn threw us entirely off our guard and we were badly fooled with the rest of the curious.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, November 8, 1884.

Dr. Will Carlisle, has accepted a position in Theo. Fairclo’s drug store. He commences duty next Monday.

Theodore Fairclo...


Arkansas City Republican, November 15, 1884.

Theo. Fairclo made a wager with Joe Finkleberg should Cleveland be elected that he would wheel him around town in one of those “handsome one-wheeled chariots” for sale at the hardware stores, and on Wednesday evening paid his wager in full. Joe secured a wheelbarrow and trimmed it up in grand style with the stars and stripes. Of course, the chariot did not resemble the one that Elijah ascended up in nor did it look like Hannah Maria’s family carriage, but it amused Joe and made Theo. sweat and furnished fun for the boys and thus it was that homage was paid to Cleveland.

Fairclo Brothers’ Livery Stable...

Arkansas City Traveler, November 26, 1884.

Ivan Robinson and Mr. Holmes, of Winfield, were in our city last week looking for a location for a coal yard. After looking the field over, they left Snyder & Hutchison to secure a suitable location. These gentlemen then bought out Pitts Ellis’ scales and office with fixtures and bins and leased of Newman & McLaughlin two lots on Central Avenue, opposite Fairclo Bro.’s livery stable. Messrs. Robinson & Holmes will immediately commence the erection of sheds, and will have seven cars of coal, hard and soft, in our city this week. These gentlemen are men who will always have coal of all kinds in hand, and we need have no more fear of a coal famine as we have been having. They will keep not less than ten car loads on hand at all times. Their office will be on the corner of Summit Street and Central Avenue.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 3, 1884.

Theo. Fairclo is adding a roomy addition to his dwelling on Central Avenue.

Arkansas City Republican, December 6, 1884.

Theo. Fairclo is building an addition to his residence.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

Dr. G. H. Stewart is clerking now for Theo Fairclo.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, December 20, 1884.

The city council convened last Monday evening in the council room. The following is a report of the business transacted.

C. G. Thompson, mayor pro tem, Theo. Fairclo, and A. A. Davis were the members present. Several bills were allowed.

ORDINANCE NO. 126, Entitled an ordinance dividing the city of Arkansas City into wards, and numbering the same. Be it ordained by the mayor and councilmen of the city of Arkansas City.

SECTION FIRST. That the said city and the addition thereto shall be and is hereby divided into wards and numbered as follows, viz:

All that portion of said city and the addition thereto lying east of the central line of Summit Street and north of the central line of Central Avenue in said city, shall constitute a separate ward and shall be known and numbered as the First Ward.


All that portion of said city and the addition thereto lying east of the central line of Summit Street and south of the central line of Central Avenue in said city shall constitute a separate ward and shall be known and numbered as the Second Ward.

All that portion of said city and addition thereto lying west of the central line of Summit Street and south of the central line of Central Avenue, in said city, shall constitute a separate ward and shall be known and numbered as the Third Ward.

All that portion of said city and the addition thereto lying west of the central line of Summit Street and north of the central line of Central Avenue in said city shall constitute a separate ward and shall be known and numbered as the Fourth Ward.

Moved and carried that the salary of the city marshal be increased to $50 per month, and that the appointment of W. D. Johnson as special police be revoked. The council then adjourned.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, December 27, 1884.

The council convened Monday night with the following members present: F. P. Schiffbauer, Mayor; O. S. Rarick, T. Fairclo, C. G. Thompson, councilmen.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 7, 1885.

                                                             Our City Dads.

                                           COUNCIL ROOM, January 5, 1885.

Present: F. P. Schiffbauer, Mayor, and O. S. Rarick, T. Fairclo, A. A. Davis, councilmen.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1885.

                                                              Our Daddies.

                                       Council rooms, Feb. 2. Adjourned meeting.

Members present, F. P. Schiffbauer, Mayor; C. G. Thompson, A. A. Davis, and T. Fairclo, councilmen.

Petition of Commercial Building Association to put in large cistern and one cesspool back of Commercial Building granted.

Ivan Robinson granted permission to retain his office on Central Avenue.

Arial Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, February 21, 1885.

A. Fairclo’s team, while standing unhitched in Will Aldridge’s lumber yard Monday evening, started for home. Before they got very far, they got in a hurry and ran away. No damage done.

Arial Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, February 21, 1885.


Last Monday night Arial Fairclo attended lodge meeting, his wife remaining at home. In the neighborhood of 9 o’clock someone came up to the residence of Mr. Fairclo and demanded admittance, which Mrs. Fairclo peremptorily refused to allow. The man then said unless she let him in, he would burst the door open. Mrs. Fairclo refused to open the door and slipped out the back way of the residence while the burglar was trying the window. She went to a neighbor’s house, Mr. Davis, and informed them of the situation. Mr. Davis secured George Washington’s cherry tree killer and went over to eradicate the burglar, sending his son after the police and Mr. Fairclo. When Mr. Davis arrived on the scene, he found that the burglar had effected an entrance and was in the bedroom rummaging through things. The burglar, on Mr. Davis making his appearance, pulled a revolver and told him to “get out,” which, it is almost needless to state, Mr. Davis did. He returned home and in moments the officers arrived; but in the meantime, the bird had flown. He secured no money as that was the booty he desired. Mr. Fairclo had received a sum of money for some hogs that day and it is quite probable that the man who broke in the house was cognizant of the fact.

Marshall Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 7, 1885.

The following is a list of transfers for the months of January and February, 1885, as taken from the transfer books of Frank J. Hess, Real Estate Agent.

                                                              FEBRUARY.

                                 Marshall Fairclo to Christian Church, 1 lot: $100.00.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, March 11, 1885.

                                                             Our City Dads.

                                           COUNCIL ROOMS, March 9, 1885.

Present. Mayor, F. P. Schiffbauer; councilmen, O. S. Rarick, A. A. Davis, and T. Fairclo.

The proposition of Mr. O’Neil, in regard to the building of water and gas works in this city was laid over for two weeks.

The City Marshal was instructed to collect the regular license of Mr. Lawless.

Bill of Frank Finch, $9.40, for feeding prisoners, laid over for two weeks.

Arkansas City Coal Co.’s bill, $16.65, laid over.

C. B. Anthony, $1.25, kindling wood furnished city, allowed.

Arkansas City Coal Co.’s bill $3.25, allowed.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, April 4, 1885.

At the meeting of the second ward voters, Archie Dunn and Theo. Fairclo were nominated for councilmen. Rev. J. P. Witt and John Landes will be on the school board.

Theodore Fairclo...

                                               ARKANSAS CITY. “FRITZ.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 16, 1885.

Davis, Fairclo, and Rarick are the men who voted for the water works fraud.

The Republican is righteously indignant this week, and is not to be blamed for it. “Fritz” is not one of the men who passed the gas and water works ordinance, but pleads, as an excuse for the item referred to by the Republican, that he had been misinformed by one of the members of the council. Since then he has investigated the matter for himself, and begs to be permitted to echo the Republican “howl.”

Theodore Fairclo...

                                                    WHISKEY BUSINESS.

            The Returns From Last Month as Shown by the Probate Court Records.

                  Arkansas City Still Very Sick—Nearly Three Thousand Invalids.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885.

                                         SOME ONE SHOULD BE NIPPED.


The first full month of business under the new prohibitory law ended on May first. Owing to the enormity of the task in figuring up these returns, THE COURIER is late in presenting them. When and as presented they furnish much food for reflection on the part of persons who care to observe the effects of whiskey on prohibition or prohibition on whiskey. The first bunch of statements tackled was that filled by S. E. Steinberger. It was a very extensive job. He filed five hundred and seventy-five statements, covering 407 pints of whiskey and 159 bottles of beer. Fifty gallons of whiskey in thirty days. This is a rattling good business. Many flourishing saloons would be proud of such a trade. The Chicago market report published in our news columns quotes whiskey as “firm at $1.15.” This is about the kind of whiskey Mr. Steinberger probably sells at never less than seventy-five cents per pint or six dollars a gallon. If it costs him two dollars a gallon, he has cleared at least two hundred dollars on his whiskey and twenty-five on his beer—a nice thing. The most probable thing is that his net profit on his beer and whiskey business was over three hundred dollars for the month. Steinberger this month as last heads the list. The sales at Arkansas City are as follows.

Steinberger, 575 sales, 407 pints whiskey, 150 bottles beer.

Grimes & Son, 438 sales, 172 pints whiskey, 120 bottles beer.

Butterfield, 226 sales, 156 pints whiskey, 8 bottles beer.

Fairclo, 206 sales, 100 pints whiskey, 76 bottles beer.

Mowry & S., 241 sales, 161 pints whiskey, no beer.

Kellogg & Co., 237 sales, 245 pints whiskey, no beer.

Total sales: 2,007. Total pints whiskey: 1,315. Total bottles beer: 581.

Thus it seems to take four barrels of whiskey and nearly six hundred bottles of beer to keep the city of Canals, boomers, and ineligible councilmen in good health for thirty days. The Winfield record for the same period is as follows.

Harter, 175 sales, 175 pints whiskey, no beer.

Williams, 182 sales, 171 pints whiskey, no beer.

Brown & Son, 197 sales, 136 pints whiskey, 215 bottles beer.

Glass, 108 sales, 138 pints whiskey, 24 bottles beer.

Total sales: 662. Total pints whiskey: 618. Total bottles beer: 239.

Mr. E. W. Woolsey, of Burden, files 226 statements for 191 pints of whiskey and 43 bottles of beer. This makes the record for the whole county stand: 2,755 sales, being 2,221 pints of whiskey and 863 bottles of beer. Of the whole, Arkansas City sells over half and double that of Winfield. There is something rotten down there. An examination of the statements will convince anyone of this. Steinberger has sold three times the whiskey of any Winfield druggist, and twice as much as his competitors. If he is doing a square business, then Winfield druggists must not be making a living. It is the duty of our officers to look after Mr. Steinberger without further delay. The most salutary thing that can be done is for Judge Gans to revoke his permit. Chop his head off smack smooth, and let County Attorney Asp wrestle with him afterwards.

Excerpts: Fairclo Brothers’ Livery Stable...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 20, 1885.

                                                       Election Proclamation.

                      MAYOR’S OFFICE, CITY OF ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.


I, Franklin P. Schiffbauer, Mayor of the City of Arkansas City, county of Cowley, and state of Kansas, by virtue of the authority vested in me by law, do proclaim and make known that there will be a special election held in the said city of Arkansas City on the first day of June, A. D. 1885, for the purpose of submitting to the qualified voters of said city of Arkansas City, a proposition for said city to subscribe to the capital stock of the Kansas City and Southwestern Railroad Company to the amount of Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000).

The places for voting at such election will be:

1st ward, at the office of Will L. Aldridge, North Summit Street;

2nd ward, at the office of Thompson and Woodin, Star Livery stable, east 5th avenue;

3rd ward, at the office of J. H. Hilliard, 5th avenue livery stable, west 5th avenue;

4th ward, at the office of Fairclo Bros.’ livery stable, West Central avenue.

The polls will be opened at 9 o’clock a.m., and will be closed at 5 o’clock p.m.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 10, 1885.

Smoke the Best Five Cent Cigar -In Town- Klein Bros.’ NEW OPERA HOUSE -AT- T. FAIRCLO’S.

Theodore Fairclo...

                                               THE MEDICINE BUSINESS.

                         What It Takes to Keep Cowley’s Invalids on Their Pegs.

                                      Some Convalescing and More Liable To.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 11, 1885.

Cowley County is recovering her health—or some of her druggists are getting very bad. The batch of statements returned by the druggists of the county for the month of May show a decrease in sales that means something. From the earnest protests from some quarters against THE COURIER publishing this “legitimate” business, it would seem that caution, that better part of valor, had been punching them in the ribs. But it is rumored, as an explanation to the decrease in sales, that certain druggists are dispensing the ardent without requiring statements or prescriptions, or failing to file them when they are obtained. This matter will be thoroughly investigated, and Judge Gans has uttered his determination to chop off the head of every druggist of whom he has evidence of such proceedings, and County Attorney Asp will attend to the remains. S. F. Steinberger, the April lion, came up with a gentler batch. The first of May he filed 575 statements, covering 407 pints of whiskey and 150 bottles of beer. This month he files only 372 statements, covering 209 pints of whiskey, 11 pints of alcohol, and 10 pints of wine. He has sensibly retired from the beer business, as have most of the other druggists. The medicine business of April, as published by THE COURIER stood as follows.

                                                        ARKANSAS CITY.

Names             No. Sales.        Pints Whiskey.        Bottles Beer.

Steinberger             575                        407                        159

Grimes & Son        438                        172                        220

Butterfield               226                        156                        000

Fairclo                    206                        100                          76

Mowry & Son              241                        164                        126

Kellogg & Co.        237                        245                        000


Eddy                              84                          71                        000

Total:                    2006                      1315                        581

                                                              WINFIELD.

Names             No. Sales.        Pints Whiskey.        Bottles Beer.

Harter                          175                        173                        000

Williams                       182                        171                        000

Brown & Sons       197                        136                        215

Glass                            108                        138                          24

Total:                      662                        618                        239

E. W. Woolsey, of Burden, was the only suburban druggist with a permit in April and filed 220 statements for 191 pints of whiskey and 43 bottles of beer. Several permits were granted in May.

Thus it will be seen that, while Arkansas City is still very sick, she shows some evidences of improvement—possibly owing to the decampment of the boomers and soldiers, who breed great gobs of miasma. Steinberger must look to his laurels, or his “rep” will be gone. Grimes & Son down him this time in the aggregate, showing a blasted monopoly on the beer business. Nearly two barrels of “rot gut” isn’t so bad for A. C. It ought to either kill or cure her invalids pretty soon. Winfield shows a small decrease from April. Compared to Arkansas City, Winfield is a perfect heaven of healthfulness. Our interior department appears to be about status quo.

Theodore Fairclo...

                                                   COWLEY’S INVALIDS.

     How Much “Medicine” It Takes to Keep Their Interior Department Status Quo.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.


The month of June has gone, and with it a large quantity of “medicine.” But, as astonishing as it may seem, we are left the consolation that out of the great irregularity in our interior department, there have been very few funerals—they will come later when the drug store “physicians” begin to dance to a tune like this: “Anyone who shall violate any of the provisions of this act (the legislative medicine regulator), shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be fined in any sum not less than one hundred dollars nor more than one thousand dollars, and be imprisoned in the county jail not less than thirty days nor more than ninety days, and shall forfeit his permit issued under the provisions of this act, and for a period of five years his right to obtain a permit.” Who can afford to take such a risk as that? And yet the records indicate that a number in this county are doing it! Winfield druggists filed, the first of June, 655 statements, representing 469 pints of whiskey and 169 bottles of beer, with about 200 pints of “other drinks,” for “medical, mechanical, and scientific purposes.” The June record shows a decrease in whiskey and an increase of 153 bottles of beer. The only druggist handling beer here gives notice that he will handle no more. So our city will be beerless this month, as far as our druggists are concerned. Arkansas City’s druggists, in May, filed 1848 statements, representing 1092 pints of whiskey and 375 bottles of beer, with 250 pints of other drinks. The June record shows a decrease of 174 statements and 250 pints of whiskey. The “physicians,” on close (?) examination, recommended “more beer,” and the record shows an increase of 681 bottles over May. And the month of July, if the Fourth don’t turn up a blank, will be as big as Jumbo, and twice as liable to kick. It will be the eternal ruin of some of the vendors. Following is the June record as gleaned from the Probate Court filings.

                        [I skipped this tabulation. Hard to ascertain all the figures given.]

[Note: It showed druggists in Winfield: Williams, Glass, Harter, and Brown. It showed druggists in Arkansas City: Steinberger, Butterfield, Fairclo, Mowry & Co., Eddy, Kellogg & Co., Grimes & Son. It showed druggists in Other Towns: Avery, Grand Summit; Woolsey, Burden; Roberts, Udall; Rule, Cambridge; and Phelps, Dexter.]

Thus it will be seen that, compared to Arkansas City, Winfield enjoys the acme of health. Arkansas City is about off her pegs. And it is boldly averred, too, that not half the statements signed are ever recorded or filed. Every druggist, the first of every month, with uplifted hand and the “so help me God,” swears before the Probate Judge that his filing represents every ounce of liquors, etc., that have gone over his counter. Can he afford to run the risk of violation and perjury too? He may do this successfully for a time, but when he does run against the pricks, it means jail, disgrace, and bankruptcy. And some of them are bound to do it. Grimes & Son show a record that demands investigation, and will be investigated. Steinberger has lost his famous “rep,” but still makes a showing that ought to entitle him to diamonds—if he can evade the cold grip of the law.

Mrs. Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 11, 1885.

Mrs. Theo. Fairclo for several days past has been very sick. She is convalescing now.

Fairclo Brothers’ Livery Stable...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 11, 1885.

Mike Harkins will have an auction sale on the 16th inst. of 75 mules in this city at Fairclo’s livery stable. The mules are four years old, Missouri stock, and thoroughly acclimated to this region. They have been three years in the Territory.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 11, 1885.

                                                              City Council.

Next was the acting upon bills.

Theo Fairclo, $15.95, allowed.

Theodore Fairclo...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The case of Ellen Riley [Riely] against Fairclo & Holloway, suit to gain possession of certain A. C. property, were filed with District Clerk Pate Monday.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 8, 1885.

                                                          The Liquor Traffic.

The liquor trade of the county for July seems to have been an exceptionally good one; in fact, the best since the inauguration of free whiskey. The total number of statements filed for last month is 3,079, against 3,052 for May and 2,607 for June.


Compared with last month Arkansas City has dropped a little—very little—in number of statements while Winfield has pulled up a notch or two. The former phenomena may be accounted for by the burning out of brother Grimes, who had latterly stood well to the front in amount of whiskey disposed of.

These 3,079 statements are divided among the various towns and dealers as follows.

Winfield: Harter, 122; Glass, 132; Brown & Son, 259; Williams, 208. Total: 711.

Arkansas City: Steinberger, 536; Fairclo, 208; Eddy, 208; Mowry & Sollitt, 236; Kellogg & Coombs, 290. Total: 1,478.

Theodore Fairclo...

                                    Trial Docket Cowley County District Court,

                                  September Term, 1885, Commencing Sept. 1st.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

                                                          CIVIL DOCKET.

       2184. Ellen Riley [Riely] vs Theodore Fairclo et al. McDermott & Johnson for plaintiff.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 16, 1885.

                                                        Delegate Convention.

The primaries were held in this city and in Creswell Township on Saturday evening, notwithstanding the severe rain storm. The proceedings were orderly and the selection of delegates was gone through with as a routine matter.

In the first ward the election was held in G. B. Shaw & Co.’s office, F. M. Peak chairman and W. D. Kreamer, secretary. The following delegates were elected: Jacob High, W. D. Kreamer, F. D. Richardson, F. M. Park. Alternates: James Ridenour, A. E. Kirkpatrick, W. D. Johnson, J. M. Smiley.

The Star Stable was the election place in the second ward. I. H. Bonsall was chosen for chairman and Frederic Lockley, secretary. The delegates elected were Frank J. Hess, Edward Pentecost, Theo. Fairclo, Charles Bryant. Alternates: E. Baldwin, E. G. Gray, David Lewis, Ira Barnett.

Third Ward. The meeting in the ward was held in Hilliard’s Stable, L. E. Woodin presided, Ed. Kingsbury, secretary. Following is the list of delegates and alternates. Delegates: L. E. Woodin, T. J. Gilbert, C. S. Searing. Alternates: Ed. Kingsbury, G. W. Cunningham, N. T. Snyder. In this ward a committeeman was elected, N. T. Snyder being the member chosen.

The Fourth Ward meeting was held in Blakeney & Upp’s store, J. C. Lindsay, chairman, Alexander Wilson, secretary. The delegates elected were W. D. Mowry, D. D. Bishop, John Daniels, O. S. Rarick. Alternates: S. C. Lindsay, Alex, Wilson, J. E. Beck, Charles Parker.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 19, 1885.

                 The Delegates to the Republican Convention to be Held at Winfield Today.

Last Saturday evening the Republican primaries were held in the four wards of Arkansas City and Creswell Township. The following are the delegates chosen.


FIRST WARD. The convention was held at G. B. Shaw & Co.’s lumber yard. It was called to order at 7:30 with a good number of mugwumps, Democrats, and one or two Republicans in attendance. F. M. Peak, a life-long Democrat, with the exception of one time that he voted for Blaine and Logan, was made chairman of the meeting. W. D. Kreamer, greenbacker, filled the exalted position of secretary. A motion was made that delegates be elected by acclamation, which, on being carried resulted in the selection of the following mongrel combination of delegates.

Jacob Hight, Republican.

W. D. Kreamer, 1st ward politician and greenbacker.

T. D. Richardson, St. John; and F. M. Peak, Democrat.

The alternates were Jas. Ridenour, A. E. Kirkpatrick, W. D. Johnson, and J. M. Smiley.

The REPUBLICAN suggests that the alternates should be recognized instead of the delegates. We are glad to inform our readers that the Democrats of the First Ward were sailing under a good name for once.

SECOND WARD. In this ward, as in the 3rd and 4th, none but Republicans were chosen delegates. The convention was held at the Star livery stable. I. H. Bonsall was made chairman of the meeting and F. Lockley, Secretary. The delegates chosen were F. J. Hess, Chas. Bryant, Theo. Fairclo, and Ed. Pentecost. The alternates were E. Baldwin, E. G. Gray, David Lewis, and Ira Barnett.

THIRD WARD. The voters assembled at the REPUBLICAN office. L. E. Woodin was made chairman, E. L. Kingsbury, secretary. L. E. Woodin, T. J. Gilbert, and C. H. Searing were elected delegates while Geo. Cunningham, E. L. Kingsbury, and N. T. Snyder were designated to serve as alternates. The convention also chose N. T. Snyder as a committeeman.

FOURTH WARD. At Blakeney & Upp’s store, the fourth warder’s congregated and chose Capt. Rarick, W. D. Mowry, John Daniels, and D. D. Bishop as delegates, and J. E. Beck, S. C. Lindsay, Alex Wilson, and Chas. Parker as alternates. S. C. Lindsay was chairman of the meeting and Alex Wilson, Secretary.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 23, 1885.

                                     REPUBLICAN COUNTY CONVENTION.

                                          COUNTY CENTRAL COMMITTEE.

On motion of J. P. Strong, of Rock, Arkansas City was allowed two members on the central committee, Winfield two, and the townships one each. The committee for the ensuing year was then elected and is composed as follows.

                                       Arkansas City: Theo. Fairclo, L. E. Woodin.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 26, 1885.

                                                Republican County Convention.

The following were elected members of the County Central Committee for the ensuing year.

Windsor, S. M. Fall; Walnut, Sid Cure; Bolton, P. A. Lorry; Cedar, Alex A. Bruce; Creswell, F. M. Vaughn; Dexter, S. H. Wells; Harvey, J. S. Rash; Rock, Dr. H. T. Hornady;


Otter, J. Stockdale; Arkansas City, Theo. Fairclo and L. E. Woodin; Beaver, J. R. Sumpter;

Tisdale, Hugh McKibben; Vernon, H. O. Wooley; Liberty, Justus Fisher; Richland, L. B. Stone; Spring Creek, J. S. Gilkey; Omnia, A. Hattery; Pleasant Valley, S. S. Linn’ Maple, E. R. Morse; Sheridan, E. Shriver; Fairview, J. H. Curfman; Ninnescah, J. S. Stuard; Silver Creek, E. A. Henthorn; Silverdale, L. J. Darnell; Winfield, C. M. Leavitt and J. C. Long;.     After the election of the Central Committee, the convention adjourned, and the delegates from the 2nd district proceeded to nominate a commissioner. Louis P. King was chosen chairman, and N. T. Snyder, secretary. J. D. Guthrie of Bolton Township and William Sleeth were named for commissioners. A vote being taken resulted 42 for the former and 8 for the latter, and Mr. Guthrie was declared the nominee, which, upon motion, was made unanimous.

                                                   CENTRAL COMMITTEE.

The new central committee met at the Courier office and organized by the election of Hon. J. C. Long, chairman; E. A. Henthorn, secretary; and J. R. Sumpter, treasurer. Voted that a committee of two from each commissioner district be constituted an executive committee to be appointed by the chairman. Committee adjourned.

The convention was filled with the best of good humor, and perfect harmony prevailed throughout. Those in attendance declare it the most harmonious convention ever held in Cowley. There was no wrangling. All the delegates appeared to have but one idea—that was to nominate good, honest men—which was done.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, September 30, 1885.

                                                         Fat Men on Wheels.

The fat men’s race in the rink on Wednesday evening was provocative of much fun. Five contestants for the prize entered the lists: H. H. Perry, Capt. Maidt, Dr. Baker, Ed Grady, and Theo Fairclo. It took these heavy weights some time to get their rollers buckled on and commit themselves to the treacherous floor and the unfamiliar mode assigned them of getting over it; but they made the dash at last, and some astonishing gyratery efforts were at once indulged in. Ed Grady was the tallest man in the party, and he was the first to come to an anchor. Capt. Maidt felt his way along to the further end of the floor, then he sat down with emphasis and avoirdupois. Mine host Perry struck boldly out for the open sea, but the wheels wouldn’t revolve as he wanted them; so after some violent efforts to preserve his aplomb, he cautiously made for shore, and steadied himself with the uprights when he got into difficulty. Dr. Baker seemed to get the hang of the thing more readily; he caught a few falls, it is true, but he struck out a gait, and by the time he had made three or four rounds, his rollers and he seemed to have a fair understanding. Mr. Fairclo went in to win. His lower extremities were quite refractory, and he would come to a full stop when there was no need for a pause, but he scrambled along without paying regard to style, and during the half hour that the race lasted pursued Lincoln’s tactics in dealing with the rebellion, and kept “pegging away.” When the bell sounded an end to the arenic strife, the last named was declared the victor, having made 27 laps, and the jewel, a handsome watch-charm, was awarded him as the prize. The Border Brass band enlivened the entertainment with some excellent music, and there was a good attendance of visitors.


Theodore Fairclo [reference to County Fair]...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

B. H. Meigs, F. E. Barnett, J. C. Endicott, and Theo. Fairclo were among the Arkansas City fellows drawn Tuesday by the elephant and trapeze girl.

Lyman Fairclo...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Jacob Smith et ux to Lyman Fairclo, lots 12, 13, 14, blk 142, A C: $1,000.00

Fairclo Brothers’ Livery Barn...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 10, 1885.

Last Saturday afternoon the owners of the colts sired by Rob Roy last season held a colt show at Fairclo’s livery barn. Numerous good colts were exhibited, but it was decided that Geo. Perry, of East Creswell, had the best animal. The colt was four months old and weighed 550 pounds. W. D. Crawford, the owner of Rob Roy, and Mr. Perry brought the colt around to the REPUBLICAN office to allow the horse editor to pass his judgment on it. It was the finest colt we have seen in Southern Kansas.

Arial Fairclo...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Alfred H Dodd to Arial Fairclo, lots 9 and 10, blk 157, A. C.: $100.00

Mrs. Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, October 17, 1885.

                                                           A Surprise Party.

Last Sabbath was my 20th wedding anniversary, and on the evening of the following day a surprise party was given at my residence in honor of that event. Of course, I did not expect anything of the kind and consequently had made no arrangements to entertain company. On the evening mentioned, a rap loud enough to have aroused the soundest sleeper came at the door, and, upon opening it, to my surprise I saw a number of ladies standing on the step. They came in two by two until both rooms and the kitchen were filled. Certainly I was prepared to receive callers, for I had my best apron on. In five minutes after their arrival, you wouldn’t have known I had ever worn an apron, but the ladies can tell you where it went better I can. I guess they intend to make a crazy quilt. After wraps were cared for and all were seated, I was invited into the next room, and then I was again surprised by being presented with an elegant toilet set—twelve pieces. You can imagine how I felt, as my “better half” was gone and I had to face the music all alone. But the ladies will remember how I looked, for on every side was a smiling face watching me; some peeping from behind the chairs, some peeping over the shoulders of others to see what I would say and do. I would say to the ladies that I thank them sincerely for their kindness, and that, at some future time, I hope to return the same compliments to each and every one.

                                            Respectfully, MRS. D. BLUBAUGH.

The following is a list of the names of those who were present.


Mrs. J. Q. Ashton, Mrs. Sarah Davis, Miss Mary Duncan, Mrs. Hon, Mrs. Sinnott, Mrs. Nelson, Mrs. D. R. Cooper, Mrs. Chapman, Mrs. O. S. Rarick, Mrs. Chas. Bryant, Mrs. F. Blubaugh, Mrs. Armstrong, Mrs. Riley Blubaugh, Mrs. Sophia Davis, Mrs. Sue Mansfield, Mrs. Philip Jones, Mrs. Oliver Stevenson, Mrs. R. E. Grubbs, Mrs. J. F. Smith, Mrs. Frank Reed, Mrs. Randall, Mrs. Bishop, Mrs. Dunn, Mrs. T. D. Richardson, Mrs. E. Knidman, Mrs. Theo Fairclo.

Arial Fairclo...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 22, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Arial Fairclo et ux to George L Pratt, lot 8, blk 63, A. C.: $600.00

Mrs. Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 24, 1885.

On Saturday evening, Oct. 17th, Rev. and Mrs. J. P. Witt were completely and pleasantly surprised by some of their friends, who brought with them some very valuable and useful presents, Judge Bryant and wife constituting the van guard. Then followed Mr. and Mrs. Bailey, Mr. and Mrs. Hyatt, Mr. and Mrs. Pile, Mr. and Mrs. Craig, Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Adams, Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Alexander, Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Lewis, Mrs. Grimes, Mrs. Ed. Pentecost, Mrs. J. M. Ware, Mrs. Strong, Mrs. Theo. Fairclo, Mrs. Frank Speers, Mrs. Wm. Gray, Mrs. Franey, Mrs. Chapel, Mrs. Blubaugh, Mrs. Pickard, Mrs. Mansfield, Mrs. Murphy, Misses Sadie and Mary Thomas, Clara Bryant, Nina Pickering, Fannie Harding, Lou Murphy, Mr. E. Baldwin, Mr. Walter S. Pickering, and Mrs. C. R. Sipes. The evening was spent sociably, enlivened with vocal and instrumental music. All seemed in love with life and will long remember the very pleasant hours spent together on that occasion.

Lyman Fairclo...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Lyman Fairclo et al to Jacob Smith, lots 16, 17, 18 and 19, blk 79, A C: $2,400.00

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 31, 1885.

The following is a partial list of the improvements made in Arkansas City since March 1, 1885.

                                               Lyman Fairclo, addition: $400.00

Marshall Fairclo and wife have a child...

Arkansas City Traveler, November 11, 1885.

BIRTH. On the 1st inst., the wife of M. Fairclo presented him with a future voter.

Arial Fairclo...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 19, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

A Fairclo et ux to Samuel David, sw qr 35-30-4e, 160 acres: $1,800.00

Theodore Fairclo...

Winfield Courier, December 3, 1885.


The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Harry P Farrar et ux to Theodore Fairclo, ½ lot 19, blk 81, A. C.: $500.00

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 9, 1885.

Theo. Fairclo has been absent on an eastern trip nearly two weeks. He is expected home today.

Theodore Fairclo...

            The Grist in Waiting for the December, 1885, Term of the District Court.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, December 10, 1885.

                                            CIVIL DOCKET. SEVENTH DAY.

Ellen Riley [Riely] vs Theodore Fairclo et al, McDermott & Johnson for prosecution; Hackney & Asp for defense.

George Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, December 19, 1885.

The ladies of the Presbyterian Church gave their concert Tuesday evening in Highland Opera House. A large audience was in attendance and thus in every respect the entertainment was made a success. The performances bespeak well of the musical talent of Arkansas City. Our space this week is quite limited, therefore, we cannot mention the performers individually in detail. Little Miss Bertha Eddy and Master Geo. Fairclo rendered the song of the “Little Milkmaid” so charmingly that they captivated the audience. “Come where the Lilies Bloom,” by the quartette (Messrs. Hutchison and Meeker and Mesdames Eddy and Newman) was especially well rendered. Mrs. J. O. Campbell sang the beautiful solo, “When the Tide Comes In,” superbly and pleased the audience so well that they would not allow her to retire without favoring them with another song. The “Song of Seven” was well rendered by Misses Pearl Newman, Mary Love, Mary Theaker, Abbie Hamilton, Flora Gould, Nellie Thompson, and Belle Everett. The recitation of Miss Lillie Cunningham was pleasing and the lady was long and loudly applauded. All the performers received frequent and hearty encores.

Lyman Fairclo...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 25, 1886.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds.

Lyman Fairclo et ux to Roy Everett Graves, Minnie Alice Graves, and Sarah Margaret Graves, lots 15 & 16, blk 75, A. C.: $150.00.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, March 31, 1886.

                                                             Election Notes.

There will be two tickets run in the second ward; on the regular ticket, Col. Ingersoll is put forth for the council and John Landes for school trustee. The opposition ticket bears the name of Theo. Fairclo for the council, and Dr. Fowler for trustee.

Arkansas City Republican, April 3, 1886.


O. Ingersoll has been nominated for the councilmanship of the second ward; John Landes for the school directorship. The opposition have put up Theo. Fairclo for councilman and Dr. Fowler for school director.

Arkansas City Republican, April 10, 1886.

The Election was hotly contested Tuesday. The People’s Ticket had a walk over the Citizens’ Ticket. The result was as follows.

                                                         SECOND WARD.

Councilman: Ingersoll 106, Fairclo 80.

School Board: Landes 110, Fowler 72.

Lyman Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, May 15, 1886.

                                                  The Land Slides of the Week.

Monday morning Lyman Fairclo sold his house and three lots in the 4th ward to John Carder for $1,000.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, June 12, 1886.

                                                        Council Proceedings.

The council met in regular session Monday evening. Present: Mayor Schiffbauer, Councilmen Prescott, Hight, Thompson, and Thurston. The following bills were allowed.

                                            Bill of T. Fairclo, $4.50, oil; allowed.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, June 26, 1886.

The Canal City Gun Club has just been organized with a membership of fourteen as follows: Chas. Wells, Wm. Prettyman, W. B. Thomas, Theo Fairclo, Geo. Wright, C. C. Sollitt, W. S. Cox, Dr. J. A. Mitchell, Jas. Parks, DeWitt McDowell, A. V. Alexander, Chas. Chapel, and L. N. Coburn. The first eleven named persons held a practice contest Saturday, which resulted as follows: 

Wells hit four Peoria black birds out of twelve; Prettyman nine out of twelve; Thomas, six; Fairclo five; Wright three; Sollitt four; Cox six; Mitchell three; Parks three; and McDowell six.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 3, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

The following is the score of the Canal City Gun Club at their contest Tuesday afternoon. Wright six Peoria black birds out of ten; Cox, three; Thomas, four; Parks, three; Fairclo, four; Sollitt, four; Prettyman, five. Three members of the club—McDowell, Mitchell, and Wells—did not shoot at the birds. After the shooting at birds came a test of their skill at glass balls with the following result: Wright broke three balls out of ten; Cox two; Thomas seven; Parks three; Fairclo four; Sollitt nine; Prettyman five; McDowell three; Mitchell four; Wells three.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 3, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

Albert Bates and Theo. Fairclo go to Geuda tomorrow to participate in the Fourth of July celebration.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 10, 1886. From Tuesday’s Daily.


One night last week someone entered Theo. Fairclo’s barn and took his horse out and rode it until their desire for riding was satisfied. Upon returning the animal to his stall, Mr. Fairclo’s dog sat upon the unwelcome visitor, who after dispatching the canine, made good his escape.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 31, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

Yesterday afternoon the Canal City Gun Club held their weekly shoot. Four members of Queen City Club—Messrs. McIntire, McClung, McLain, and Handy—were in the city and participated. The shooting was at black birds; and the following hits were made in 15 shots.

McIntire, 13; Handy, 12; McClung, 12; McLean, 11; Sollitt, 11; Cox, 11; Thomas, 12; Prettyman, 6; Hess, 2; Wright, 10; Park, 6; and Fairclo, 8. The Winfield parties made the best scores.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 7, 1886. From Tuesday’s Daily.

                                                        Council Proceedings.

The council met last evening. Present: Mayor Schiffbauer; Councilmen A. D. Prescott, C. Dean, O. Ingersoll, A. A. Davis, C. G. Thompson, Jas. Hill, C. T. Thurston.

                                               Bill of T. Fairclo, oil, $5; referred.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 7, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

Yesterday afternoon the Canal City Gun Club held its weekly shoot. The shooting was at Peoria blackbirds and resulted as follows: Prettyman hit 9 out of 15; Wright, 8; Sollitt, 4; Cox, 9; Fairclo, 7; Thomas, 7; Park, 8; Wells, 9; and Hess, 4.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 11, 1886.

                                                           Artillery Practice.

The Canal City Gun Club had its weekly shoot yesterday afternoon, a large crowd being out to witness the exercise.

The following is the score: Prettyman, 13; Fairclo, 10; Cox, 7; Sollitt, 6; E. J. Hess, 6.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 11, 1886.

                                                                 Removal.

T. R. Houghton & Co., move into their new quarters today. They have increased space for showing their stock of harness and superior faculties for manufacturing. The old Occidental kitchen in the rear has been sold to Theo. Fairclo, who will remove it, and a brick workshop erected this fall, with benches for a score of workmen. The manufacturing industry of this town is rapidly growing.

Mrs. Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 14, 1886. From Thursday’s Daily.

Mrs. Theo Fairclo and Mrs. Ed. Chamberlain left this afternoon for Chicago, where they go on a short visit.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 21, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.


Yesterday afternoon the Canal City Gun Club indulged in their weekly shoot. The following is the score: Hess hit 7 Peoria blackbirds out of 15; Wright 11; Fairclo 8; Cox 10; Prettyman 7; Sollitt 7; and Mitchell 6.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 27, 1886. From Saturday’s Daily.

                                                   County Central Committee.

The Republican Central Committee of Cowley County met this afternoon in the city building, there being present Theo. Fairclo, L. E. Woodin, J. R. Sumpter, P. A. Lorry, F. M. Vaughn, S. H. Wells, J. H. Curfman, J. S. Rash, Justis Fisher, E. R. Morse, J. L. Stewart, A. Hattery, J. Stockdale, S. S. Linn, L. B. Stone, Dr. H. F. Hornaday, E. A. Henthorn, J. S. Gilkey, Hugh McKibben, H. O. Wooley, Sid Cure, S. M. Fall, and C. M. Levitt.

The meeting was called to order by Secretary E. A. Henthorn, in the absence of the Chairman, Senator Long; and Mr. Henthorn was made chairman and Dr. H. F. Hornaday, Secretary. The delegate representation to the county nominating convention was fixed the same as last year, and the date of the convention was made Saturday, October 2nd. One delegate was placed from Tisdale to Richland, owing to the recent division of the townships. The primaries were recommended for Thursday, September 30. The Secretary was instructed to furnish each Republican paper of the county a copy of the convention call. It was recommended that the townships, at the primaries, elect members of the Central Committee.

Courier.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 11, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

The Canal City Gun Club held its weekly shoot yesterday afternoon. The following is the score: Fairclo hit 7 Peoria blackbirds out of a possible 15; Prettyman, 5; Wells, 10; Cox, 9; Wright, 7; and Sollitt, 6.

Jay Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 11, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

Hose Company No. 2. organized last evening with twenty-two members, viz: T. C. Gage, Will J. Kimmel, F. E. Barnett, Joseph Bell, F. M. Hollenbeck, Will B. Edwards, Jay Fairclo, John D. Mott, James Williams, Geo. Farrar, Fred Bell, Wm. Baxter, P. W. Myers, Jay Deming, Andy Delzell, E. J. Hoyt, Geo. B. Love, Julius Behrend, E. O. Stevenson, Al. Heitkam, Guy Sparks, R. Hurbet.

The following officers were elected by ballot: President, Julius Behrend; Treasurer, Geo. Farrar; Secretary, T. C. Gage; Foreman, Geo. B. Love; Assistant Foreman, P. W. Myers.

Fairclo property...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 18, 1886. From Tuesday’s Daily.

T. D. Richardson cannot withstand the pressure. Arkansas City is too good a town to remain from. He has concluded to remain with us and will once more engage in sinking holes into the earth. T. D. and family will reside in the Fairclo property on Summit Street.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 25, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

Tuesday afternoon the Canal City Gun Club had its shoot. Wells hit 12 birds out of a possible 15; Park, 7; Prettyman, 11; Fairclo, 8; Cox, 11; and Wright, 11.

Theodore Fairclo...


Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 2, 1886.

                                                             City Primaries.

Last evening at the appointed hour, the Republican voters of the city convened in their respective wards and elected delegates and alternates to the county convention to be held in Winfield Saturday, and the Representative convention to be held in this city Oct. 4, in Highland Opera House.

In the first ward the meeting was called to order and Judge Kreamer elected chairman, and R. C. Howard, secretary. The election of the following delegates and alternates to the county convention then occurred.

DELEGATES: W. D. Kreamer, Jas. Ridenour, C. P. Jeffries, Chas. Bryant.

ALTERNATES: W. S. Thompson, A. D. Hawk, J. S. Lewis, E. Baldwin.

On motion the delegates were instructed for Tansey, Swarts, and Overman.

Delegates and alternates were elected to the Representative convention as follows.

DELEGATES: G. L. Sudborough, A. E. Kirkpatrick, R. C. Howard, W. S. Thompson.

ALTERNATES: Frederic Lockley, C. P. Jeffries, Chas. Bryant, E. Baldwin.

No instruction and the convention adjourned.

In the second ward F. J. Hess was elected chairman and I. H. Bonsall, secretary. The following were the delegates and alternates elected to the county convention.

DELEGATES: F. J. Hess, Z. Carlisle, W. E. Moore, T. Fairclo.

ALTERNATES: I. H. Bonsall, U. Spray, G. Mott, Geo. Druitt.

To Representative convention:

DELEGATES: T. Fairclo, W. E. Moore, U. Spray, G. Mott.

ALTERNATES: I. H. Bonsall, Ira Barnett, C. Dean, D. W. Stevens.

No instructions voted.

The third ward meeting was called to order and Judge Sumner chosen chairman, and John Mott, secretary. The following delegates were elected to the county convention:

L. E. Woodin, H. T. Sumner, and S. P. Burress.

They were instructed for Tansey, Swarts, and Overman.

The following delegates were chosen to attend the Representative convention:

Dr. Loomis, A. Bates, and John Mott.

In the fourth ward G. W. Herbert was made chairman of the meeting and W. D. Mowry, secretary. Following are the delegates and alternates elected.

DELEGATES: O. S. Rarick, W. D. Mowry, D. L. Weir, S. C. Lindsay.

ALTERNATES: G. W. Herbert, D. L. Means, W. A. Nix, T. Fairclo.

They were instructed for Tansey and Swarts.

Delegates and alternates to the representative convention were selected as follows.

DELEGATES: C. T. Atkinson, Thos. Watts, J. Taylor, M. L. Williams.

ALTERNATES: G. W. Herbert, W. A. Nix, D. D. Bishop, D. L. Means.

Mrs. Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 2, 1886. From Saturday’s Daily.

Mrs. Theo. Fairclo has returned from her eastern trip.

Marshall Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, October 6, 1886.


Russell Baird has sold his property in the 4th ward, just east of the stone schoolhouse, to Marsh Fairclo. Consideration, $1,200.

Fairclo residence opposite city building...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 9, 1886. From Monday’s Daily.

J. W. Heck and family have removed to the Fairclo residence, opposite the city building.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 9, 1886. From Tuesday’s Daily.

                                             THE DISTRICT CONVENTION.

Yesterday afternoon the Republican Representative convention of the 60th district was held. Major L. E. Woodin called the delegates to order at 2 o’clock in Highland Opera House and on motion S. G. Castor, of Liberty Township, was made chairman of the convention and R. C. Howard of this city, secretary.

On motion the chair appointed five persons each on three committees as follows.

Credentials: M. H. Markum, J. R. Sumpter, T. Fairclo, A. H. Miller, M. S. Truxall.

Permanent organization: M. S. Teeter, U. Spray, J. W. Jones, N. Parisho, S. Johnson.

Resolutions: C. T. Atkinson, D. P. Marshall, A. E. Kirkpatrick, Jas. Gilkey, C. Roseberry.

Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Traveler, October 27, 1886.

Theo Fairclo has been seriously ill for twelve days, and there is no improvement in his condition yet. It is a severe case of typhoid.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 30, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

Theo. Fairclo is still very sick. His recovery is somewhat doubtful.

Arial Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 30, 1886. From Wednesday’s Daily.

A. Fairclo came in today from Bentonville, Arkansas, called here by the serious illness of his brother, Theodore.

Death of Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 30, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

DIED. Died last night, at about 12 o’clock, at his home in this city, Theodore Fairclo. The deceased has been sick with an attack of typhoid fever for several days and his demise was not unexpected. It was given out a couple of days ago that he could not get well. The deceased was a respectable citizen and had been engaged in the drug business in this city since 1881, having removed here that year. He was born in 1848. The remains were interred this afternoon at 2 o’clock in Riverview Cemetery. Rev. Witt pronounced the funeral sermon. The deceased leaves a wife and one child to mourn his demise.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 3, 1886.

DIED. The long and dangerous sickness of Theo Fairclo terminated fatally on Friday, and the remains were buried the following day in Riverside Cemetery. The drug store has been closed since, and we are not informed what disposition will be made of the estate.

Mrs. Theodore Fairclo...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 6, 1886. From Friday’s Daily.

Mrs. Theo Fairclo is very sick with an attack of fever.


Theodore Fairclo estate...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 13, 1886. From Monday’s Daily.

Rev. J. P. Witt has been appointed administrator of the estate of Theo. Fairclo, deceased. Today the drug stock is being invoiced, preparatory to Mr. Witt entering upon his duties.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 24, 1886.

The drug store vacated by the death of Theo Fairclo has been leased by M. H. Snyder and Col. Neff, who are now busy going through their stock with a view to filling it up to completeness. They retain Al. Worden as prescriptionist, who has long been identified with the business. This new drug firm is popular and will commend a good business.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 27, 1886. From Monday’s Daily.

Col. E. Neff and M. H. Snyder have purchased the drug stock of Theo. Fairclo, deceased, and have opened up for business. Messrs. Neff & Snyder are both genial gentlemen, have a large acquaintance, and consequently will command a good patronage from the first.

Mr. (?) Fairclo [Arial or Lyman or Marshall]...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 12, 1887. From Friday’s Daily.

A. Beard, Jas. Gamile, and Mr. Fairclo were called to Oswego yesterday as witnesses in the trial of State vs. True. True was here some months ago taking orders for tombstones. He boarded with Mr. Beard and left his bill unsettled. He employed Mr. Gamile to cut bases for his tombstones and treated him in the same manner. He sold tombstones to Mr. Fairclo and others, obtaining a small advance payment, and then skipped out without delivering goods. He was arrested at Chetopa and taken to Oswego for trial. True deserves to have the full penalty of the law.