COWLEY COUNTY SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, AND DISTRICTS.

                                                       PART FOUR: 1885.

                                                         TRIAL DOCKET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 1, 1885.

The following is a list of names set for trial at the January, 1885, term of the District Court of Cowley County, commencing January 6th, 1885.

                                               CIVIL DOCKET. THIRD DAY.

                               29. School District No. 13 v. School District No. 133.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 1, 1885.

A meeting of the Pleasant Valley Stock Protective Union will be held at Odessa schoolhouse Tuesday night, January the 6th, 1885. D. B. McCollum, Capt.

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                                                COWLEY COUNTY CHIPS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 1, 1885.

                                              Number of organized schools, 143.

                Total indebtedness, including school districts, township, etc., $277,000.10.

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[ITEMS FROM SOUTHEAST COWLEY. “OLD FOGY.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 1, 1885.

Literary at the Cedar Creek schoolhouse every Saturday night. Rob Nelson, Chairman.

No school for two weeks at Cedar Creek for the teacher, Miss Robbins, is spending the holidays with friends in Winfield.

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[PLEASANT VALLEY. “COUNTRY JAKE.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 1, 1885.

The Christmas tree at the Victor schoolhouse was a success, considering the cold weather. There was a very good turnout and some good presents given and a good many sells distributed. Mr. Sheridan Teter received the most valuable present—a fine silver watch.

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[BEAVER CENTER. “YOUNG NASBY.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 1, 1885.

Sunday school has froze out at the Victor schoolhouse.

Mr. Boon Newell and sister Jennie made a flying trip to this neighborhood on Wednesday of last week. They attended the Christmas tree at the Victor schoolhouse, which was in every respect a grand success. They remained overnight with their uncle, Mr. E. L. Williams, and started for their home near Rock P. Office on Christmas morning.

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[NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 1, 1885.

Vacation during holidays at Old and New Salem schools. Pupils are having a regular picnic. Mr. Burrell made all his pupils happy by pretty mementoes, in the form of Christmas and New Year cards.

Arkansas City Republican, January 3, 1885.


The public schools commence Monday.

[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, January 3, 1885.

Miss Edith Holland turned her obstreperous school urchins loose in the eastern part of the county and spent Christmas and New Years at home.

The elocution and presentation exhibition at No. 10 schoolhouse by a traveling humbug last Friday night was a successful fizzle.

The Christmas trees at the M. E. Church, Mrs. Lewis Brown’s residence, and Victor schoolhouse were interesting entertainments. Everybody seemed to receive a token of remembrance, the old as well as the young. The pastor, Rev. Lundy, was the recipient of a dray-load of substantial presents in the shape of flour, canned fruits, and vegetables.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 7, 1885.

Miss Anna Ferris, who has just completed the excellent kindergarten course under the management of Miss Kuhlman, has gone to Arkansas City, where she expects to open a school of this character. Emporia News.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

The Kansas State Teachers Association convened at Topeka, December 29th, 1884. The opening meeting was a convention of principals and city superintendents of the state. About one hundred were present and many subjects of interest were discussed. Supt. Gridley, of this city, was elected president of the Association for the ensuing year. Prof. Taylor, of Emporia, President of the State Teachers’ Association, delivered a scholarly and practical lecture on the evening of the 9th. During the two days following many papers of primary importance in the management of schools were presented by educators thoroughly competent to lead in such matters. Dr. Harris, of Nashville, Tenn., delivered a lecture on Art Culture which was a strong plea for placing art by the side of science in our public school work. Prof. J. C. Weir, of Arkansas City, was elected secretary of the Association for the coming year.

                                                           Communication.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

A communication came to us this week with this appendix: “I send you a few items from this neighborhood. Hope they will not find the wastebasket, for I am only a school girl. It is my first attempt.” The letter is newsy and well written and of course appears with the rest. There are no persons the COURIER so delights in encouraging as our bright school girls and boys. They are our future kings and queens. Young correspondents who endeavor to say something and say it in as brief space as possible can always find a place in the COURIER.

                                            Another Monument to Enterprise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

Mr. John Coffey showed us the plans Monday of the beautiful Methodist church at New Salem which has just been completed and will be dedicated next Sunday by Rev. C. A. King, of Augusta. It has a seating capacity of nearly three hundred, contains a roomy lecture room and vestibule, and a good belfry and spire and in every way does great credit to that enterprising neighborhood. It is of frame and cost about two thousand dollars. Nothing could speak louder for the energy, character, and intelligence of our New Salem friends than their splendid church and school buildings.


                                                                 Schools.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

The new third ward school building will not be ready for occupancy before Feb. 1st.

                                           Four Wards and Eight Councilmen.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

At a special session of the city council Tuesday evening, an ordinance was passed dividing the city into four wards. The division was made from Main Street and Tenth Avenue. The ward east of Main and north of 10th Avenue is the first ward. That south of 10th and east of Main Street, the second ward. That west of Main and south of 10th, the third ward. That north of 10th and west of Main, the fourth ward. This will necessitate the election, in the spring, of four additional councilmen and the same number of additional school board members. This will give us a city government commensurate with our proportions. It will also do away with the present liability of a lack of a quorum at council meetings. With our present number of councilmen, it has periodically occurred that business had to be postponed from time to time owing to the absence from the city of two of our councilmen. We think the division has been equitably made and will result in general satisfaction.

Excerpts...

[BEAVER CENTER. “YOUNG NASBY.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

After two weeks vacation Miss Beach wields the rod at the Centennial schoolhouse.

A spelling school was held at the Victor schoolhouse last Friday night. Miss Jennie Watt proved herself to be the champion speller and Miss Lola Victor the champion arithmetician. A good and profitable time was reported by all, and we have the promise of another spelling school at the above named schoolhouse in the future.

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[OTTER ITEMS. “OTTERITE.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

Two new school districts are being organized, one north and one west of district 63. Old districts are too large.

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[LIBERTY’S PRAIRIE RIDGE. “JAY HAWKER.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

The Literary has gone where the woodbine twineth, since cold weather.

The spelling school fever seems to be contagious, for it is all the rage here at present.

School at Prairie Ridge is progressing finely under the management of Miss Lizzie Lawson.

Not many weeks ago a young man from Winfield, who is very intimate with our school “mam,” stayed rather late (we didn’t say where he stayed) and being rather sleepy got lost and when he found himself, his horses were eating hay from a neighbor’s hay stack. Then he tried it again, and found himself at Mr. Halls, who told him to take the road just north for the peach orchard, but he went to the apple orchard instead, in fact, I don’t believe he knew either one from a corn field. Come “set ’em up,” and we will not give you away, it makes us shiver to think what a cold night it was.


Excerpt...

[UDALL. “O”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

Webb Thompson and his sister, Clara, returned to Emporia to school on the 3d inst.

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[HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 8, 1885.

After two weeks recreation, Miss Clara Beach will take up the spankers and start the “Centennial wax works” in Dist. No. 4, Monday.

Spelling school on last Friday night at Victor schoolhouse. “Young Nasby” was the last one chosen as usual. The teacher spelled and did not “go down” on the first word, which is an exception to the general rule. Jennie Watt and Hon. Harbaugh were the champions. Ed. Garret played dictator.

What a blessing it would be to suffering humanity if the cost craze would strike the grocery fellows and coal dealers, our opulent millers, sleek butchers and hotel nabobs. Especially do we wish that the coal men had gone to school long enough to learn that it takes twenty hundred pounds to make a ton.

As an extra pressure of business prevented me from reporting the Christmas festivities that transpired in this community last week, it may not yet be too late to briefly state that the trees at the Victor schoolhouse, Mrs. Davis Brown’s residence, and M. E. Church were all a decided success. The performances of Santa Claus at the church were particularly attractive and interesting. The spacious building was densely packed with anxious humanity. Many persons were present from a radius of several miles. The exercises were opened with prayer by Rev. Lundy, presiding pastor, followed with a brief but entertaining talk on a subject in harmony with the occasion. The months were represented and their several advantages strongly advocated by twelve charming young damsels. Old Santa amused the little ones by his unique costume, comicalities and eccentricities. The tree was placed on the rostrum and its resplendent beauty was advantageously displayed. It was a large and handsome evergreen especially ordered for the occasion from a nursery in the northern part of the state. Its graceful boughs were profusely and artistically ornamented with all imaginable kinds of articles to the number of three hundred. Many articles, too heavy for suspension, were placed beneath the tree. Everyone present seemed to receive a token of remembrance. Quite a few costly presents were distributed. C. W. Roseberry, superintendent of the Sabbath School, was presented with a silver chalice by his scholars. Rev. Lundy was the recipient of a dray load of the substantial necessities of life in the shape of flour, canned fruit, meat, and potatoes. The exercises were interspersed with appropriate and choice selections of vocal and instrumental music. The best of decorum was preserved throughout the performance and all dispersed for their homes well pleased with their reception of Santa Claus.

Arkansas City Republican, January 10, 1885.

Miss Grace Powers, who is teaching a successful school near Silverdale, was in Arkansas City Saturday.

Arkansas City Republican, January 10, 1885.


Miss Elsie Oberchain, of Parsons, succeeds Miss Lizzie Holbrooke in our public schools as instructress. Miss Florence Patterson, of Emporia, Miss Abbie Lewis, and Miss Belle Everett, of Garfield, Kansas, Miss ____Bissel.

Arkansas City Republican, January 10, 1885.

Horace Vaughn is a graduate of the Arkansas City Schools of 1884. As soon as possible he obtained a school and commenced teaching. Every morning this winter Horace has traveled from his father’s residence to his school, a distance of six miles, and is always on time. Horace has pluck and the REPUBLICAN is glad to number him among its friends.

Arkansas City Republican, January 10, 1885.

Prof. J. C. Weir and his corps of assistants are succeeding nicely in our public schools. Someone remarked that Prof. Weir was too strict, and we inquired in what way. Instead of having a recess of 15 minutes twice a day, he allows the students a five minute rest at the end of every hour. Pupils are at liberty to walk about the building and out in the yard. The damaging of furniture and the tearing of the clothing of the pupils are thus prevented. Children go to be educated and not to play. Every hour the pupil’s mind is relieved and refreshed. Pupils are benefitted more by their five minutes rest distributed all through the day than by having it all come in a “bunch.”

[TOPEKA COMMONWEALTH CORRESPONDENT.]

                                                        ARKANSAS CITY.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, January 14, 1885.

Many large business houses have been erected during the year—notably the Cowley County Bank building, the Commercial block, the Central school building, and a number of fine churches.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 14, 1885.

                                                       Cowley County Chips.

                                              Number of organized schools, 143.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 14, 1885.

We all remember when the block on which the Central School is now, used to be considered out of town. When a man lived further out than that, the delivery men objected to delivering goods free. Now this is the center of town. For half a mile beyond this residences are closely built up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

Said one of the patrons of a school not long since, when applying for a teacher: “I wish we could get such a teacher as we had last year; he taught the children hundreds of things they never thought of before, and my boy has pestered me with questions ever since; he will scarcely give me any rest; he tells me everything he has ever heard there, and relates to me all the stories in his reading book, and comments upon everything.” He could not have paid a higher compliment to the former teacher. The teacher had succeeded in awakening in the pupil’s mind a desire to know. Curiosity, the great incentive to the acquisition of knowledge, was fully aroused.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

The Republicans of Liberty township will meet at the Rose Valley schoolhouse on Saturday, January 24th, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of selecting candidates for the various township offices. J. A. COCHRAN, Chairman Township Committee.


Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

Miss Susie De Lamater, of this city, has reopened her Kindergarten School at Wellington.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

A correspondent of the Burden Eagle gives a little sketch of Miss Hattie Horner, who has obtained enviable notoriety in Kansas as the author of “Ad Astra,” and “Per Aspera,” two charming poems on Kansas, and other writings. The poems were first produced at the State Normal school on a “Kansas Day.” “I notice in the Arkansas City Republican two well written poems on Kansas by Miss Hattie Horner, who, the same paper states, is now principal of the Arkansas City schools. The paragraph and poems call to the mind of the writer a little bright-looking, black-haired, bright-eyed girl of some eleven or twelve summers, who, some eight years ago, could be seen daily mounted on an Indian pony, carrying her books and umbrella, and assisted by her faithful Shepherd dog, driving her father’s flock to graze on the Butler County prairies, and while the dog watched the flock, sitting on the grass and from the book before her, laying the foundation for future success in life.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

Last week’s Cambridge News: “A protracted meeting is being held at the schoolhouse in our town, with H. D. Gans, of Winfield, as preacher. The house is crowded nearly every night, and the sermons of Rev. Gans are excellent.”

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[NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

The Misses Etna and Mary Dalgarn, entertained a few friends for New Years dinner. A good and merry time reported by the “School marm.”

The young people of church were happily surprised by seeing the smiling faces of Dr. Downs and his good little wife in the audience on Sabbath morning. We are glad to hear they are back to stay. The Doctor has finished his college course and will devote his time and talent to mending the shattered constitutions of his neighbors and friends. May success and happiness attend this young couple on the voyage of life.

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[TORRANCE TROUBLES. “JAY-EYE-SEE.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

School will be out soon. What shall we have for the last day’s exercises? Some one come to the front and suggest.

Rev. Warren filled his appointment at the schoolhouse on last Sunday at 11 o’clock. He had a large audience and a very attentive one. In the afternoon the Sunday School was largely attended and the school is progressing finely.

Bro. Shanghai, of the Cambridge News, has got worse in the last few days. He thinks he will make himself famous or infamous by writing poetry (?). This time he seems to have chosen the same subject as on former occasions and written two little, blank verses about our school teacher. (I suppose they are blank for I fail to see anything in them.) Come, now, Brother Shanghai, give us a rest.

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[TISDALE. “GROWLER.”]


Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

We notice that Ben Franklin is around again with a patched face, the result of a row at Silver Creek schoolhouse.

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[AKRON ITEMS. “PET.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

Akron school has resumed work again after the holidays.

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[BEAVER CENTER. “YOUNG NASBY.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

Mark speaks of Young Nasby as being the last one chosen at a spelling school recently held at the Victor schoolhouse, which is one among his few mistakes. Were the statement true, we are living in an enlightened day and age of the world, and wise people always save the best until the last.

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[BURDEN DOINGS. “KROOM.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

Our public schools opened again after the holiday vacation with a very full attendance. The schools are in good condition and making fine progress.

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[SOUTH BEND. “WART.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

Our school recommenced Monday week, after a two week’s vacation. Mr. Akers, the teacher, well deserves the praise given him by the district.

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[NORTH RICHLAND. “BOB.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

The Baptists are holding a protracted meeting at the Richland schoolhouse. It is conducted by Elder Hopkins, of Douglass.

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[LIBERTY’S PRAIRIE RIDGE. “JAY HAWKER.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

School was poorly attended last week on account of high water in the streams, which have now run down.

The school was visited last week by Mr. Ballard, assistant superintendent, and from all reports he likes the way the school is progressing.

The spelling school Friday night was not as good as usual on account of some bad boys, who behaved very badly; which we all hope will not happen again. Miss Nellie Cochran was the champion of the evening. She spelled the school down.

Arkansas City Republican, January 17, 1885.

A school of Penmanship, Bookkeeping, and Shorthand will be opened Monday eve, Jan. 19th, at east school building, conducted by J. B. Garvin.

Arkansas City Republican, January 17, 1885.


The following item is taken from an “Upper Timber Creek” correspondence in the Burden Eagle. The writing is a reflection of Henthorn, the editor of the Eagle, but as it is a country communication, it cannot be Henthorn. Whoever the correspondent may be, he had paid Miss Horner a handsome compliment. Appended is the tribute.

“I notice in the Arkansas City Republican two well written poems on Kansas by Miss Hattie Horner, who, the same paper states, is now principal of the Arkansas City schools. The paragraph and poems calls to the mind of the writer a little bright-looking, black-haired, black-eyed girl of some eleven or twelve summers, who, some eight years ago, could be seen daily mounted on an Indian pony, carrying her books and umbrella, and assisted by her faithful Shepherd dog, driving her father’s flock to graze on the Butler County prairies, and while the dog watched the flock, sitting on the grass and from the book before her laying the foundation for much success in life.

“A few years after, I saw the same little girl, a trifle larger, teaching her neighbor’s children and assisting to pay her father’s expenses at Cincinnati to attend medical lectures. Since which time I have occasionally heard of her teaching to defray the expenses of her education; in attendance at normal, as a regular contributor to, first, the Walnut Valley Times, and subsequently, to some of the magazines, and now as principal of public schools in a wide awake and growing Kansas city.

“I write this with pleasure as a pointer for many of both sexes who aspire to a liberal education and a position in the world, as it is the outline of the actual experience of one whom I have known familiarly, and of whose success I am happy to hear. STRAWS.”

Poems referred to were printed in the January 3, 1885, issue of the Arkansas City Republican, and in very tiny print! Not certain I can copy accurately, but will try!

                                                       1874 - PER ASPERA.

Cheerless prairie stretching southward,

Barren prairie stretching _______

Not a green herb ______________ [WORDS OBSCURED]

From the hard earth springing forth,

Every tree bereft of foliage,

Every shrub devoid of life,

And the two great ills seemed blighting

All things in their _______ life.

 

As the human heart, in anguish,

Sinks beneath the stroke of fate,

So at last, despairing, weary,

[HAD TO GIVE UP! JUST CANNOT READ IT PROPERLY!]

                                          SECOND POEM: 1884 - AD ASTRA.

Verdant wheat fields stretching southward,

Fruitful orchards east and west;

Not a spot in all the prairie

That the springtime has not blessed;

Every field a smiling promise,


Every home an Eden fair,

And the angels—Peace and Plenty—

Strewing blessings everywhere.

[ABOVE WAS THE FIRST PART OF SECOND POEM BY HATTIE HORNER.]

WHAT IS PUZZLING TO ME IS THE REFERENCE TO HER BEING PRINCIPAL OF ARKANSAS CITY SCHOOLS...NOTHING WAS SAID IN REPUBLICAN JANUARY 3RD ISSUE AS TO HER STATUS WITH SCHOOLS....WEIR WAS PRINCIPAL...SO I DO NOT UNDERSTAND!

PERHAPS SOMEWHERE THE COMPLETE POEMS CAN BE FOUND: LIKE I SAID, I JUST COULD NOT READ THE SMALL PRINT ESPECIALLY WHEN THE OPPOSITE SIDE OF NEWSPAPER BLED THROUGH!

[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, January 17, 1885.

The Centennial School, in District No. 4, froze out Thursday on account of the coal supply being exhausted.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 21, 1885.

We printed bills for Prof. J. B. Garvin, who will conduct a class in penmanship and bookkeeping at the first ward schoolhouse. Prof. Garvin is an elegant penman and has been connected with various institutions in this country.

                                                   CORPULENT KANSAS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 22, 1885.

The total receipts of the Kansas State treasury for the last six months foot up $742,301.54 with $313,564.65 still on hand January 1st, 1885. What a commonwealth we have grown to be. The permanent school fund now amounts to $3,051,601,000. Unless a change in that respect should be made in the constitution, the time will come, it would seem, when the interest on the permanent school fund will support the common schools of the state or at least leave but a trifle for each man to pay annually. Wichita Eagle.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 22, 1885.

E. P. Greer, the present member of the House from Winfield, Cowley County, is a son of S. W. Greer, the first territorial superintendent of common schools in 1859. Representative Greer is the youngest member of the Legislature and as bright as any member in it. Capital.

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[TORRANCE TROUBLES. “JAY-EYE-SEE.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 22, 1885.

Viola McKee was compelled to stay home from school two days last week because of the toothache.

There was preaching at the schoolhouse on last Sunday by Rev. Tull, our former preacher. He shows himself to be awake to his duty, as he delivered quite an able sermon.

T. P. Vaughn, of Tisdale, the teacher of that place, visited the school at this place on Monday of this week. He was also looking for a school for the summer. Have not heard what success he met with at this place.

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[AKRON ITEMS. “PET.”]


Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 22, 1885.

Mr. Ballard, representing Superintendent Limerick, visited our school last week. Wonder what he thought of our old windowless schoolhouse? It isn’t much credit to our school board to leave the house in such a condition this cold weather.

Arkansas City Republican, January 24, 1885.

The third session of the Cowley County Teachers Association will be held at Winfield today.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 24, 1885.

The county board at its last session appointed Miss Nellie Aldrich and W. C. Barnes, both of this city, as examiners of teachers of the county for the next year. They are both competent persons, and, with Superintendent Limerick, will constitute a first-class examining board. Miss Aldrich succeeds herself, and Mr. Barnes succeeds C. T. Atkinson, of Arkansas City. Winfield Tribune.

Arkansas City Republican, January 24, 1885.

Republicans of East and West Bolton will meet at the Bland Schoolhouse Saturday, January 31st, at one o’clock sharp to nominate a ticket for township board.

                           By order of Committee. J. D. GUTHRIE, R. L. BALYEAT.

Arkansas City Republican, January 24, 1885.

For six weeks past T. S. Moorhead has been engaged in preparing a map of Arkansas City. It shows all the additions to the city, all the streets, of which we have about 35 miles, and the different residences on each lot. It is the best map of Arkansas City we have seen. The canal mills, the railroad, and the schoolhouses are all located on the map. Anyone’s abode is easily recognized at a glance. The map at present has 750 residences marked, and taking the average number of inmates to a house—five—and we find that Arkansas City contains 3,750 people. Mr. Moorhead has walked some 40 miles in obtaining his information. J. G. Danks, our new machinist, assisted Mr. Moorhead and the map is a production of which anyone would be proud to own.

[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, January 24, 1885.

Mrs. Lizzie Wilsch [?] is in charge of the Holland school this winter. She is an efficient teacher and is giving entire satisfaction. Below we give the report as given by her.

[LORD! WAS THIS EVER HARD TO READ THROUGH HERE. WILL TRY TO GIVE SOME OF THE NAMES I COULD READ...AM SKIPPING DEPORTMENT FIGURES.]

Nellie [?] Anderson, Frankie Anderson, Mabel Cronk, Mollie Constant, Elliott Constant, Montie [?] Constant, Thomas Constant, Frank Constant, Offie [?] Constant, John Constant, Mattie Chapin, Laricle [?] Chapin, Arthur Hancher, Thomas Haggard, Lealle [?] Haggard, Ethey [?] Hon, Will. Hon, [NEXT 6 - CANNOT READ], Connie Muret.

No. of scholars enrolled, 24.

Average daily attendance, 18.

Frankie Anderson has been neither tardy nor absent during this term. GRAPHITE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.


A young man named Joe Friend, residing near Sedgwick, rode a mule to a spelling school. On his way home the animal slipped and fell, throwing the rider and breaking his left leg above the ankle. This, we believe, is the first instance on record of a mule inflicting injuries upon a person by falling, when it could have accomplished the same result equally well with its hind legs.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

The State Teachers Association at its recent meeting resolved “that as county superintendents have no voice or jurisdiction in educational matters within the corporate limits of cities of the first-class and second-class, their election should be determined entirely by the electors of the county residing outside said corporate limits, and the tax creating their salaries should follow the same rule.”

                                              TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

A few of the Cowley County teachers met in Winfield on Saturday and enjoyed a very interesting meeting. The subjects under consideration were thoroughly discussed. These meetings are beneficial to those interested in their work and make an effort to attend them. It is impossible for the teachers of any city or county to come together for a day and not be benefitted. If there is a class of teachers of which this is not true, they should be ashamed to own it. The next meeting will be held at New Salem. Efforts will be made to make it one of the best associations of the year. It is hoped the teachers will be there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

Constable H. H. Siverd “took in” a number of boys last Thursday who were charged with breaking the tranquility of the lyceum at Sheridan schoolhouse, in Sheridan township, by boisterous and uncomely demeanor. Their trial is set for the first week in February, before Justice Buckman.

                                             A NOVEL ENTERTAINMENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

The Philomathian Society of the High School will give an entertainment at the Opera House on Tuesday evening, Feb. 3rd. This entertainment will be somewhat novel in character as the members of the society have chosen for their theme Dickens’ most famous work, David Copperfield. His best character will be portrayed by sketches giving their connection with the plot and the whole will be enlivened by various tableaux and scenes representing the striking events of the work. The price of admission will be 25 cents and the proceeds are to be devoted to the purchase of a school library, which is much needed. Let all friends of education come and by your patronage encourage the society in this, its first public appearance, and help in a grand cause. If you have read David Copperfield, come and review again the scenes therein presented. If you have not read it, come and get an insight into the plot of one of Dickens’ most delightful works. A cordial welcome is extended to all. Come yourself and bring your friends.

                                                          SHORT HAND.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

M. P. McCoy, a graduate in short hand writing, will organize a class at the East Ward school building Monday evening, Feb. 2nd. A new system that can be learned at odd moments in two to three months. Terms $10.00 in advance.


                                                                  School.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

School will open in the new third ward schoolhouse next Monday.

Excerpt...

[TISDALE: “GROWLER.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

Our school closes this week. We understand that Mr. Vaughn has applied for the Torrance school; if they secure him, they will be fortunate. He has but few equals as a teacher.

Excerpt...

[SOUTHEAST PLEASANT VALLEY. “D. B.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

We obtained the following report from our teacher for the month ending Jan. 23rd: No. pupils enrolled, 43; average daily attendance, 28; No. visitors, 8. The extreme cold weather makes it impossible for many of the little folks to attend.

Excerpts...

[NORTH RICHLAND: “BOB.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

District 22 is in good condition financially, and pays its teachers at the end of each month if they say so.

Miss Jennie Brengle is teaching in District 22 and is conducting the school in a style that suits the citizens of the District.

The weather has been so bad that the Protracted meeting at the Richland schoolhouse, has not been as much of a success as we would like to have seen.

The Temperance meeting at the Summit schoolhouse last Sunday was well attended. The exercises consisted of: 1st, Prayer; 3rd, song; 4th, select reading, by N. J. Larkin, one of Rev. Talmage’s sermons, “The Monopoly of the Abomination,” which was good; then a song and dismissal.

                              [Note: If there was a “2nd” in list, it was not given.]

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[BURDEN DOINGS. “BROOM.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

The High School here, under the supervision of the teacher, is preparing to give a public entertainment in the near future. The proceeds are to be used in purchasing an organ, if enough to warrant it.

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[AKRON ITEMS. “PET.”]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

We were pleased to see so many visitors in our school last Friday. We hope they will come again.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 29, 1885.

There will be a Republican Caucus held at Little Dutch Schoolhouse Jan. 29th, 1885, at 7 o’clock P. M. for the purpose of nominating a township ticket. R. B. Corson, Chairman.


The Republicans of Vernon will hold a primary for the nomination of township officers on Saturday evening, the 31st inst., at the Werden schoolhouse, at 7 o’clock.

                                                   Thos. Thompson, Chairman.

The Republicans of Beaver township will meet at the Tannehill schoolhouse on Saturday, January 31st, at 2 p.m., for the purpose of selecting candidates for the various township offices. J. R. Sumpter, Chairman Com.

The Republican primary for the nomination of township officers for Fairview will be held at the Akron schoolhouse on Saturday at 2 o’clock p.m., the 31st inst.

                                       By order of Chairman Township Committee.

The Republicans of Liberty township will meet at the Rose Valley schoolhouse on Saturday, January 24th, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of selecting candidates for the various township offices. J. A. COCHRAN, Chairman Township Committee.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 31, 1885.

January 29th was Kansas Day. That was the great Republic’s birthday. She was 24 years old that day as a state. Our public schools observed that day in the east school building. Appropriate exercises were given by the pupils. Miss Emma Campbell recited the poems of Miss Hattie Horner on Kansas—Ad Astra and Per Aspera. Other recitations were rendered. Several visitors were present. On the blackboard was a drawing of the state of Kansas with the grasshopper going from the state at one side and a train of immigrants coming in at the opposite. It was the work of Frank Barnett and Miss Constance Woodin.

Arkansas City Republican, January 31, 1885.

Last Saturday at Winfield the Cowley County teachers held their meeting. They had a very enjoyable time. The next meeting will be held at New Salem.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1885.

Some of our school children, in order to pass away the tedious time, indulged in a “kid game” of poker during noon and recess intermissions. An apology and “promise to do so no more” wiped “all guilty stains away.”

[SOUTH BEND CORRESPONDENT: “X. Y.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1885.

A series of meetings are being held at our schoolhouse by the Rev. G. Crawford, of Winfield.

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Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

             THE PROCEEDINGS IN DETAIL OF THE FARMERS’ INSTITUTE

                                     HELD IN WINFIELD ON JAN. 29 & 30.

At the afternoon session there was a very good attendance. We were glad to notice a number of ladies, and some farmers from distant parts of the county. Profs. Shelton and Fallyer and Supt. Thompson of the agricultural college were on hand—also Mr. Heath of the Kansas Farmer. The exercises were opened by President Martin in a paper on forestry, which excited a good deal of interest and discussion. In the discussion Mr. Adams favored the improvement of school grounds by the planting of trees—suggesting that each child plant a tree.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.


School opened Monday last in the new Third Ward school building, with Miss Campbell, principal; Miss Iva Crane, intermediate departments; Miss Kate Rogers, second primary; and Miss Jessie Stretch, first primary. Miss Davenport takes Miss Stretch’s place in the primary department of the First Ward.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

Cowley’s quarterly school fund apportionment is now being disbursed by County Treasurer Nipp, and the teachers of the county, some of whom haven’t had a nickle yet for their winter’s labor, excepting on discounted script, are rejoicing. The apportionment for Winfield City is $4,619.

                                         Down With the Jack and Cotton-Tail.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

The citizens of Richland township made up five premiums aggregating $15 to be given to the hunters that would kill the most rabbits on Friday, January 30th. A. O. Welfelt was chosen as north captain and W. H. Lewis as south captain. Sixteen hunters on a side were chosen, and at 1 o’clock Friday morning the hunt began, and an uproar of guns was heard during the day, and at 6 o’clock in the evening the hunters met at Summit schoolhouse for a count of game and to partake of an oyster supper. The following parties won premiums: Loyd Coe, first, $5; W. H. Lewis, second, $4; Jack Shrubshell, third $1; Jack Randall, fourth, $2; and Bed Lewis, C. Groom, and Joe Calvin, fifth, $1. Total number of rabbits killed during the day were 889. Now can anyone say we have not accomplished anything? If other townships would do likewise, our county would be free of these pests.

                                                  E. M. McPherson, Secretary.

                                         To the Patrons of Our Public Schools.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

By order of the Board of Education, all children under seven years of age will be excluded from our schools for the present. It was supposed that with our new school building, all the children of the city could be accommodated, but the rooms are crowded to that extent that the above action has been deemed necessary. The school population during the year has increased 460, and the additional building will provide for only 200, hence the imperative need of more school room. Steps should be taken, at once, to make preparation for the erection of a new building, to be completed by September of his year.

                                       A. GRIDLEY, JR., Superintendent Schools.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

The Dickens entertainment by the Philomathian society of our High School at the Opera House Tuesday eve passed off very creditably. The sketches on the prominent characters of Dickens’ famous work, David Copperfield, showed much thought and capability. The entertainment deserved a much larger audience than it got, especially when the proceeds go to the purchase of a school library. However, a good excuse is offered in the terrible condition of the streets.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

Constable Siverd brought Milton Johnson from Omnia township before Justice Snow last Friday. He plead guilty to “licking the wadding” out of a school mate and the fine and costs aggregated thirty-two dollars. He was sixteen years old.


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                                     NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

The old Salem school had a spelling one night last week; invited Moscow school to spell with them. The contest, we hear, was not very long, and alas! For the glory of Salem, they let Moscow carry off the laurels. Only members of Salem’s day school spelled, while Moscow had outside assistance and also some excellent spellers from their school. It will help them to have such contests often. Success to the spellers.

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                                                   AKRON ITEMS. “PET.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

Last Wednesday some of our scholars went to visit another school. They came home not much wiser but a great deal hungrier.

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                                          DEXTER NEWS. “MOSS BACK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

Charlie and Mattie Linsdale have gone to Lawrence, Kansas, to attend school. They are greatly missed in society here.

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                                                 WILMOT ITEMS. “SUB.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

Miss Nett Heizer is teaching at Summit. She has made us a good teacher.

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                                                    SOUTH BEND. “O. V.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

Ed. Watt, of Hackney, visited this locality last week. He is rusticating since his attendance at the Winfield school.

A protracted meeting is in progress at our schoolhouse. Notwithstanding the unfavorable tendencies of the weather, the attendance has been large. Revs. Crawford and Stansberry very ably preside.

[HIGH SCHOOL CORRESPONDENT: “HATTIE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 7, 1885.

                                                              Kansas Day.

Of the many pleasant afternoons we have spent in the High School, Thursday, the 29th of January, was certainly the most pleasant.

School was in regular session in the morning, but a few of our young artists were busy decorating the boards in honor of Kansas.

On the east board, just beneath the picture of the Three Graces, appeared in ornamental capitals the motto, “Ad Astra, Per Aspera,” the work of Mervin Miller.


On the south board, in colored crayon, could be read “Westward the Star of Empire takes its way.” In the center of the inscription was a large white star. Below was a sheaf of wheat and above a gigantic sunflower. This was the work of Frank Barnett and Emma Campbell. The opposite board showed a well executed map of Kansas, with a moving wagon coming into it from the east while a grasshopper was crossing its western boundary. Much credit is due to the artist, Miss Constance Woodin.

The bell tapped promptly at 1:30 and not only were all the pupils in their seats, but some ten or twelve visitors were also present.

The choir opened with America, which was followed by the reading of Watson’s touching poem, “Wounded,” by Mettie Martin.

Maggie Gueyer next recited “Our Kansas School Girls,” and was appropriately followed by Walter Pickering with his well written essay, “The Boys of Kansas.” He gave their occupations, amusements, and characteristics and said their chief ambition is to excel other boys, and it was his opinion that they do. He closed with:

                 “May peace, good will, and good luck ever be with the boys of Kansas.”

Edward Marshall read his paper on the productions of Kansas, in which he drew a vivid comparison between Kansas as a state and Kansas as a territory.

Taylor’s stirring poem, “The Bison Track” was then read by Jacob Endicott. The reading evinced careful preparation.

Ollie Kirkpatrick told us “What Eastern People think of us,” giving many absurd theories entertained by eastern people concerning Kansas.

A brief biography of John Brown was read by Frank Armstrong, in which were set forth the principal facts of an eventful career.

After a short rest, the choir reopened with the “Call to Kansas,” and Flora Gould recited Whittier’s “John Brown of Osawatomie.” Miss Gould is taking pains with her rhetorical work and the students are learning to expect something good whenever she appears.

Howard Maxwell then took the rostrum and delivered Beeche’s “Tribute to Kansas,” which is certainly a handsome one.

Mr. Maxwell gave place to Effie Gilstrap, who read an excellent paper on our “State Institutions.” She conducted us through the most important of these, giving a condensed history of each. In conclusion she quoted:

“The rudiments of Empire here

Are plastic yet and warm,

The chaos of the mighty world

Are rounding into form.

And westward still; the star which leads

The new world in its train

Has tipped with fire the spears

Of many a mountain chain.”

Tina Hollis next read Percival’s “To an eagle.” She has a fine, clear voice and will make a good speaker.


Owing to the limit placed upon the time of each reader and speaker, justice was hardly done the “Literature of Kansas.” However, Miss Hoffman gave us an idea of progress of the state’s literature by commencing with the first issue of the Leavenworth Herald, printed under the elm tree in 1854. She gave account of the State Editorial Association, mentioned in brief the prominent writers of the state, and spoke of our leading magazines, “The Educationalist,” Dr. Hass, editor; the Kansas Review, published by State University; and the Kansas Vanguard, published at Burlington, by Messrs. Hendee and Richmond.

Jennie Snyder read the sad story of “La Marais du Cygne” in Whittier’s beautiful language.

Lloyd Ruby followed with his humorous composition on the “Grasshopper.” His subject, he said, needed no definition—to those especially who had lived in the state for ten years. He quoted the saying that nothing was created in vain, but he seriously questioned the good intentions of the grasshopper. He did not know what other trials were in store for Kansas, but taking a hopeful view of the future, he trusted all her plagues (if any awaited her) might pass as  quickly and stay away as long as the grasshopper.

After another intermission, which was enjoyable from its very brevity [unlike this article], the programme was again resumed by the choir’s rendering the “Song of the Kansas emigrant.”

Birdie Martin’s graceful essay, “Ad Astra Per Aspera,” was then listened to with the closest attention. Her opening sentence, “Sunny Kansas will not suffer by comparison with any other state, for she is bound to fulfill the destiny expressed in her motto,” was indicative of the thought and care spent upon the entire paper.

Frank Wright next held our attention with the very interesting history of the state seal, and was followed by Alice Lane, who read her essay on the “Schools of Kansas.” She gave us some interesting figures, called the schools Kansas’ foundation stones and ended with:

“For the structure that we raise,

Time is with material filled;

Our todays and yesterdays

Are the blocks with which we build.

Read’s “Song of the Emigrant” was read by Lillie Fuller. The song is a smooth one and was well rendered.

Frank Barnett next read his essay on the Sunflower. After treating his subject from a botanical standpoint, he made the application. He held that the term “Sunflower State,” tho’ probably at first jestingly applied, was one of which Kansas should not be ashamed; and went on to say that no more fitting emblem than the flower, which constantly leaning toward the source of light, could have been selected for a state whose object is to follow as closely as possible the sun of truth and justice.

Lastly came Emma Campbell with her excellent rendition of “Kansas.” Miss Campbell is one of our best speakers, and was rewarded with the applause she so well deserved.

Prof. Weir then spoke of the early struggle attending the admission of Kansas and in response to repeated requests, Rev. Campbell came forward. He said he disliked to speak on such an occasion impromptu, but supposed the subject should inspire any true Kansan with sufficient eloquence. His remarks were mainly upon Kansas as an agricultural state, and ere he closed, proved himself to be a true Kansan.

The exercises closed with the singing of the “Red, White, and Blue,” by the whole school.

Several well written essays, among which were “Evils of Kansas,” Harry Hill, and the “Geography of Kansas,” Wilford Edward, were of necessity omitted from the programme.


We trust that our manner of celebrating Kansas’ twenty-fourth birthday may leave the desired impression on the minds and hearts of our young folks and create in them a love for the state of whose record they may well be proud. I cannot refrain from closing with Forney’s oft quoted words:

“If I had been commanded to choose one spot on the globe upon which to illustrate human development under absolute liberty, I could have chosen no part of God’s foot stool so interesting as Kansas, yesterday an infant, today a giant, tomorrow—Who can tell?”

                                                                 HATTIE.

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Arkansas City Republican, February 7, 1885.

                                                                KANSAS.

Kansas spent last year $3,318,904.65 for her public schools. There are in the state 6,480 school districts, 8,155 school teachers, and 390,416 pupils. Eighty-two counties are organized.

Arkansas City Republican, February 7, 1885.

We must not forget to choose a new school board. At present our schools are second to none in the state. We understand two of our present board will retire at the expiration of their term and the REPUBLICAN desires to see their places filled by as equally well qualified members.

Arkansas City Republican, February 7, 1885.

S. E. Pollock finished his winter term of school at the Parker schoolhouse Tuesday. He gave good satisfaction as a teacher.

Arkansas City Republican, February 7, 1885.

Miss Eva Collins, one of our teachers, has been quite ill this week. Miss Hattie Glotfelter teaches during Miss Collins’ absence.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1885.

Clyde Beck, for whom the TRAVELER advertised some time ago, has returned to Arkansas City. He was hunting a place to board and go to school. He gave as a reason for leaving home that there were too many children there. His folks have been notified.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1885.

Miss Lida Strong spent Sunday in our city visiting with her sister, Mrs. Ed. Pentecost. The young lady is teaching school at Udall whither she returned on the morning train Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1885.

Fred McLaughlin, who graduated from our public schools last year, re-entered this week to review. Fred wishes to have perfect everything he has at all.

Excerpt...

                                             IMPORTANT SUGGESTIONS.

                         Many Points of Value to Cowley’s Wide-Awake Farmers.

                    Paper Read Before the Farmers’ Institute at the Opera House

   On January 29 and 30 by Prof. Geo. F. Thompson of the State Agricultural College.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 12, 1885.

                                                EDUCATION OF FARMERS.


We all believe that the farmers should be educated. We are glad that the nation has acknowledged the importance of our educating them in the creation and endowment of agricultural colleges. The rapid progress in farming brought about by the few has made the education of the many absolutely necessary. Classical institutions are not adapted to the wants of the farmer; they did not educate many men for the farm, and many farmers looked upon them as being the enemy of their industry. The agricultural colleges of the country have been established especially for the benefit of the farmers, and the courses of study are arranged with that object in view. I am glad to say that wherever these colleges have been tried longest, there they have succeeded best.

There are some people who claim that ignorant men often make as good farmers as educated ones. It is true they may be illiterate, yet they are not ignorant; they are shrewd, observing men, and have accumulated a vast amount of information by experience, that most expensive of all schools. Such men will agree with me, I think, that a course of study adapted to their calling together with the reading of farm literature would have placed them far beyond their present condition. Experience may be convincing, but it is better when possible to let some other person have it, and let us profit by their mistakes. It is a part of the business of a man in any calling to profit by the mistakes of others. No farmer can afford to neglect his education; time and wealth can be saved by preparing for our work.

As farmers constitute a majority in this western country, they ought to educate their children with the idea of farming in view. I do not believe that everybody should learn a trade; it is possible to have too many artisans. An overproduction of mechanics means lower wages for them, and as an outgrowth of this, poorer work by them. Our country is too new, and our farms too large to even consider the overproduction of farms. The children of our district schools ought not to have it instilled into their minds that farming is a business that men engage in because they are not capable of entering the professions. This is often done. Too many of them get the idea that to be successful or great, one must either be a lawyer, a politician, or a merchant. They are told how our presidents entered the professions and toiled earnestly for fame; but it is studiously kept from their young minds that the majority of these presidents retire from the chair to the seclusion of a farm for pleasure and contentment. Let the education of the future farmer begin in the common schools, and it will be quite certain to end in the proper school. Take from before the boy the gilded glory in the professions, for this glory is like the will-o’-the-wisp. Show him the beauty of that industry which is all important, and by which the whole human family and its humbler auxiliaries are fed. Children are too often impressed with the idea that farmers are ignored because they are farmers. This is a mistake. That man who thinks farming beneath his station will find on trial that it is above him. In this country people do not care what profession a man follows as long as it is an honorable one. We take the fittest men for our rulers, let them come from whatever walk in life they may. We take the rail-splitter from the backwoods, the tanner from the tannery; and the mule-driver from the canal, and make them presidents. It is intelligence that commands respect in this country, not position. Farming as a profession is honored or dishonored as its followers are intelligent or ignorant. It is what a man does that makes him what he is: brown hands and face are no disgrace, for they were made so by the same sun that causes vegetation to spring into life and mature, and without which nothing could exist.


My second suggestion to farmers, then, would be that they pay more attention to the proper education of their children than they do to the dollars and cents which might be immediately available by their labor. It will pay in the end, and will be fulfilling a duty all parents owe to their children.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 12, 1885.

The school population in the United States is 16,000,000, of whom 10,000,000 are enrolled in the public schools. The number of teachers employed in public schools is 200,000, and the annual expense of the schools is about $91,000,000. If education can save a people, this nation is quite secure from serious harm.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 12, 1885.

Allen B. Lemmon was in Winfield last Saturday to Monday, wearing a hat which did not fit him, and supposed to be a minister’s hat. He has been appointed a Regent of the State Agricultural College to succeed Rev. Philip Krohn, so we suppose the doctor’s hat instead of his mantle has fallen upon A. B.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 12, 1885.

Program of the evening session of the Cowley County Teachers Association to be held at New Salem, February 20th, 1885: Music. Address of welcome, Rev. Irwin; response. R. B. Moore; music. Paper, relation of teacher and pupil, Fannie Stretch; talk, Prof. A. Gridley; music. Recitation, Jessie Stretch. Paper, W. C. Barnes; Exercise by New Salem school; roll-call of teachers with five minute responses.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 12, 1885.

School district No. 13 wants a good teacher for a four months school. Address A. A. Jackson, director, Seeley, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 12, 1885.

Miss Julia Deming, of Carthage, Mo., and Mr. and Mrs. Smyth and Mr. Rube Israel, of Wichita, spent several days of this week with Mr. and Mrs. Ray Oliver. Miss Deming will be remembered as one of Winfield’s school misses of an early day.

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                                      BEAVER CENTER. “YOUNG NASBY.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 12, 1885.

Beaver township was well represented at the lyceum at the Oldham schoolhouse last Friday night.

Not a thousand miles from Beaver Center there is a so-called bread and butter school, where the scholars cast their bread upon the plaster and gather it many days hence.

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                                  TORRANCE TROUBLES. “JAY-EYE-SEE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 12, 1885.

A. H. Limerick, our county superintendent of schools, was in our town one day last week visiting the schools. He says we have a fine school.

Our school will close on Friday of next week with appropriate exercises and a grand dinner, in which all three of the schools will take part. They are anticipating a fine time.

Miss Emma McKee, the teacher of the primary department of our schools, was in the metropolis on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week. Miss Eva Reynolds, one of the upstairs scholars, took charge of her school during her absence.


Excerpt...

                                                    SOUTH BEND. “G. V.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 12, 1885.

A gentleman whose name I have not learned speaks of starting a writing school at our schoolhouse.

Arkansas City Republican, February 14, 1885.

The Southwestern Kansas Teachers Association will convene March 27 at El Dorado and continue over the 29th. Prof. J. C. Weir received notification Tuesday that he was placed on the programme to prepare a paper on “No Recess.”

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 14, 1885.

The Literary Association of Silverdale schoolhouse is going to debate the Tariff and Free Trade question next Wednesday night. A good attendance requested.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 14, 1885.

The members of the Lyceum at Mowry’s schoolhouse are having excellent debates and splendid entertainments. The Lyceum is thriving. Chas. Wing is president. They meet on Thursday evening of each week. At the meeting of last week Tariff and Free Trade was ably discussed. Last Thursday evening Woman’s Suffrage was presented pro and con. In our local last week concerning the Tariff debate, we said Al. Mowry resided in West Bolton. We meant Bolton. Al. says he is not the Conkling of that district; and that Pat Summer carries the honors we tried to thrust on Al. [DO THEY MEAN PAT SOMERS?]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 14, 1885.

The following is the programme of Cowley County Teachers Association, which will convene at New Salem, Friday evening, Feb. 20th, 1885.

                                                           PROGRAMME.

MUSIC.

Address of Welcome ......... Rev. Irwin.

Response ................... Mr. R. B. Moore.

MUSIC.

Paper, Relation of Teachers and pupil: Fannie Stretch.

Talk: Prof. A. Gridley.

MUSIC.

Recitation ................. Jessie Stretch.

Paper ...................... Mr. N. Barnes.

Exercise by New Salem School.

Roll Call of Teachers with five minutes Response.

Saturday:

1. Methods of teaching primary reading.

2. The course of study—its use in school.

3. How to organize and how to use school libraries.

4. To what extent should you teach biographies of noted personages?

5. Miscellaneous business.

Arkansas City Republican, February 14, 1885.


The little son of Chas. Bryant, on the way home from school one evening last week, called a boy with auburn locks, “reddy.” The latter considered this an infringement on nature and retaliated by flinging a stone at Bryant, who caught it on his head. A severe scalp wound was the result.

[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, February 14, 1885.

Two tramps paid their respects to our school ma’am, in district 4, last Friday evening, after school hours in way that was not appreciated by her. She will not remain after school to sweep the room. Said tramps returned and took possession of the schoolhouse Saturday and nearly exhausted the supply of coal before they were forcibly ejected by a member of the school board Sunday and roughly escorted out of the neighborhood.

Arkansas City Republican, February 14, 1885.

                                                             School Report.

EDITORS REPUBLICAN: The following are the names of the pupils who have won honors in 6th and 7th grades of the west school for the month ending Feb. 6th, 1885. Meta Hall stands alone on the roll of honor, having been the only one perfect in attendance, perfect in deportment, and above 90 in scholarship. She is also rank one in the 7th Grade, having a total average of 98. Lizzie Shindel stands second with a total average of 96. In the 6th grade, Lizzie Watts ranks first with a total average of 93. Maggie Strode and Luna Ware are each rank two, average 91. LENA GAUSE, Teacher.

The following pupils were 100 in attendance and deportment, with an average of 90 and upward in scholarship: 1. Jno. Warren. 2. Jacob Ochs. 3. Edith Ochs. 4. Edward Green. 5. George Lindsay. 6. George Armstrong. 7. Aola Krebs.

                                        Respectfully, FLORENCE PATTERSON.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 18, 1885.

Mrs. E. D. Power, of our city, whose daughter has been here attending school this winter, is visiting the family of T. H. McLaughlin.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 18, 1885.

The scholars of the 8th grade will give an entertainment at the brick schoolhouse next Saturday evening. The admission will be only 10 cents, and will be well worth it.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 18, 1885.

All interested in the Prairie View Cemetery are requested to meet at the Parker Schoolhouse Thursday, March 5, for the purpose of electing officers, and transacting such business as may come before the meeting. BY ORDER OF COMMITTEE.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 18, 1885.

Miss Fannie Peterson, of Oswego, Kansas, who graduated in music last fall at Emporia, arrived in the city Friday last. She intends teaching music to such as may wish instruction, and can be found at the residence of P. Pearson.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 19, 1885.

The recent arrest and conviction of Milton Johnson, of Polo, this county, aged sixteen, fined thirty-two dollars for fighting at school, will be a warning to many who are in for “lickin’ the stuffin’” out of school mates. School boys are just as liable, in the eyes of the law, for squabbles as anybody.

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                                JOTTINGS FROM DEXTER. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 19, 1885.

School closed last Friday at the Plumb Creek schoolhouse, with quite an interesting entertainment given by the teacher and pupils. Miss Howland leaves here for her home with the best wishes of her scholars and friends.

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                                          SOUTH FAIRVIEW. “EVERETT.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 19, 1885.

Dr. Smith has returned from college. We presume he will soon begin his practice.

H. S. Wallace is holding “The Fort” at Fairview, “Teaching the young ideas how to shoot.”

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                                      BEAVER CENTER. “YOUNG NASBY.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 19, 1885.

Miss Kuhn closed her school at the Tannehill schoolhouse last Friday.

The youths’ of this vicinity gave the Davis brothers a surprise party on Monday night.

Mrs. Snyder closed her successful school at the Victor schoolhouse on Wednesday with an evening entertainment.

Charley Grimes, of Arkansas City, was the guest of his sister, Mrs. S. A. Beach, part of last week. I am afraid Charley is after our school miss.

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                                     NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 19, 1885.

There will be a Teachers’ Institute held at the Salem Hall on the 20th. Hope the friends of education will turn out strong.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 21, 1885.

The boys of the 8th grade of the east school building have arranged to give an entertainment this evening at their school building. An admission fee of 10 cents will be charged. The money will be expended on a school library.

Arkansas City Republican, February 21, 1885.

H. G. Vaughn’s school in Silverdale Township closed yesterday.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 25, 1885.

The entertainment given at the High School building Saturday evening by the scholars of the eighth grade was well attended, the room being crowded. They realized about $8.00 towards buying a library.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 25, 1885.

School will commence in District 32 just east of the Walnut, Monday, March 2nd, with Horace Vaughn as teacher.

[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: NAME NOT GIVEN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 25, 1885.

                                                          Bolton District 98.

This is our first attempt to write up news of our vicinity, but we will do the best we can.


Last Saturday evening, Feb. 14th, some of the boys met at Mowry’s, or “Jack Knife” schoolhouse, to practice for debate. The following recitation was chosen: “Resolved, That the dog has done more for man than the gun.” The question was ably debated on both sides, and was decided in favor of the gun.

The Lyceum met Thursday evening. The question was, “Which has caused the most distress, whiskey or war?” Whiskey gained. This was followed by a comic Negro debate on the question, “Which has caused most wonder, the land or water?”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

To the members of the Oklahoma Colony: You are hereby notified that your presence is required at the colony meeting at Torrance schoolhouse, Feb. 28th, 1885, at 7 o’clock p.m. Business of importance to transact. Shelton Morris, Capt.; W. H. McPherson, Sec.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

The Alpha society will present a very entertaining program at the opera hall Friday evening. The proceeds will be used for the benefit of the high school library. All should feel interested in encouraging this laudable enterprise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

Cowley’s State school fund apportionment, $3,378.20, thirty-five cents per capita, has been received and is being distributed to the different districts of the county.

                                         WASHINGTON’S ANNIVERSARY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

Sunday last was the anniversary of the birth of the Father of His Country and on Monday the pupils of Miss Fannie Stretch’s department in the third ward celebrated the day most appropriately. The writer had the pleasure of witnessing the performances and they were such as will be lasting upon the minds of the pupils. Incidents and peculiarities in the life of Washington, from birth to death, were related in turn, and recitations and essays which were highly creditable to the teacher and pupils were given. These anniversaries of the birth of America’s great men are very instructive to pupils and should be more widely celebrated. Then they break the dull monotony of every-day school work. Miss Stretch is one of our most accomplished teachers, and we were pleased to note the interest and advancement exhibited in her school.

                                    Meeting of Cowley’s Teaching Association.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

On Friday evening in company with a number of teachers from Winfield and surrounding country, we started for New Salem for the purpose of attending the Association.

Arriving at New Salem, Mr. Lucas met the teachers at the train and sent them to houses where they were served to a bountiful repast; after which they went to the school building, which they found full to overflowing at an early hour.

An address of welcome was given to the teachers by Col. Jackson. Mr. Moore not being present, the response was delivered by Mr. B. T. Davis.

The New Salem school entertained the audience with recitations and songs for a short time, after which Dr. Downs delivered an oration.

The program of the evening was conducted by the teachers. Prof. Gridley read a paper on reading; Jessie Stretch gave a recitation, “Monia’s Waters.”


The day session was one of the most pleasant and instructive meetings we have had. A majority of the teachers seemed anxious to have a part in making the meeting a success by giving of what they had.

An observer in the discussion could not help seeing a defect in the architecture of many who are rearing intellectual structures: they are much concerned about the finishing of the building to the neglect of the foundation, but we would add, look well to the foundation, first.

Besides our program for the day, we enjoyed some hash prepared by Miss Fannie Stretch and Mr. W. C. Barnes.

The next meeting will be held in Winfield. We hope our citizens will meet with us and at least consider the teacher as a piece of humanity. We believe if the teachers will take the trouble to prepare the work, they will be able to make the meeting such a meeting that all will feel “it was good to be there.” That the citizens of Winfield will be willing to help all they can.

The teachers not being able to return to Winfield until the night passenger, it was decided to hold a social in the evening. It consisted of promenading, recitations, music, and minute speeches.

To the people of New Salem, the teachers gave a vote of thanks for the hospitable entertainment they received, for the interest they manifested in the profession, and for the kind and cordial invitation to return to their village again.

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                                                NORTH RICHLAND. BOB.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

Prof. John Davis and Miss Clark gave an entertainment at the Richland Schoolhouse recently. Johnny is the funny man, sure enough.

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                                                            UDALL. “O.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

Our public schools close on the 28th. A public exhibition will be given at the Hall on the eve of the 28th.

Miss Clara Berman opens a writing school for evenings at the schoolhouse. Miss Berman is an accomplished writer and no doubt will meet with success.

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                                            BURDEN DOINGS. “KROOM.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

Professors A. H. Limerick and H. T. Davis were in town a few minutes Friday.

A petition is being circulated, asking the Board of Education to set a day to vote bonds for the erection of an addition to our schoolhouse—$200 will be voted on. This is a step in the right direction, and there seems to be little doubt but what the bonds will be voted.

The entertainment given by the high school at the rink last Saturday night was a decided success. A large and intelligent audience greeted the performers, and gave them hearty encouragement all the way through. The exercises were of a high order of merit throughout, and showed careful drill and practice. Where all did so well, it would be impossible to mention any unless all were named, and that would be a big job, considering the number that took part.


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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

The ex-pedagogue of district 75 has “Mark’s” profound sympathy. Rum, ruin, and rebellion is an alliteration peculiarly applicable to that particular section. The youngsters know how to shoot anything but ideas. Instead of sending missionaries to foreign heathens, a wide field of work can be found for them at home.

Last Wednesday evening, the 18th inst., the people of this community were highly entertained by a literary exhibition at the Victor schoolhouse, in district 115. The exercises were the consummation of Mrs. Delia R. Snyder’s efforts as school ma’am in the district for a term of five months. The patrons of the school speak in commendable terms of her efficiency as a teacher, and seemed well pleased with the result of her labors. The following interesting program was presented.

Song by the school, organ accompaniment.

Recitation, “My old hat,” Charlie Albert.

Recitation, “The baby,” Charlie Harbaugh.

Recitation, “Bobby Shafts,” Mary Ging.

Song, “Are all your matches sold yet.”

Recitation, “My kitty,” Robbie Richardson.

Recitation, “His proposition,” Charlie Watt.

Recitation, “Little Sillie,” Sillie Victor.

Recitation, My little dog,” Geo. Richardson.

Recitation, “Found,” Vic. Victor.

“Grandmother’s last balance,” Carolina Richardson and Allie Albert.

Dialogue, “Little wise heads,” Allie Albert, Carrie Teeter, and Vic. Victor.

Charade, “Manage,” three scenes: Allie Harbaugh, Lois Victor, Stella Harbaugh, Ed. Garrett, and Henry Garrett.

Song by quartette.

Dialogue, “Double cure,” Jennie Watt, Allie Harbaugh, Lois Victor, Carolina Richardson, Ed. Garrett, and Henry Garrett.

Dialogue, “Widow Bedotte,” Henry Garrett, Stella Harbaugh, and Lois Victor.

Charade, “Madcap,” three scenes: Lottie Albert, Lois Victor, Carolina Richardson, Jennie Watt, Ed. Garrett, Henry Garrett, and Ed. Watt.

The exercises closed with instrumental music by the organ with violin accompaniment. The young folks acquitted themselves on the stage as well as could have been expected of amateurs—having rehearsed but twice. If “Mark” was to make a criticism (which of course he won’t), it would be of the nature that sentimentalism was made too prominent a feature in the selection of charades and dialogues.

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                                                  TISDALE. “GROWLER.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

Our school is again in full blast with a full complement of little ones. Miss Ollie Stubblefield wields the birch.


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                                        CAMBRIDGE CRUMBS. “CLYTIE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

Miss Hattie Utley’s school closed last Saturday. Quite a number were there, and the day passed pleasantly.

J. F. Rowe attended the Institute at New Salem last Saturday in company with Miss Ida Straughan and Miss Bedell.

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                                              SEELEY SCRAPS. “TRUTH.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 26, 1885.

Miss Mattie Linn’s school closes next Friday.

The lyceum here will close next Friday after a long and successful term.

Mrs. Gammon resigned her position as teacher of our school last week. This is the second year she has taught with success and we are sorry to lose her. Miss Pixley, of Winfield, is our new teacher.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 28, 1885.

School will commence in district No. 32, just east of the Walnut, on Monday, March 2nd, 1885.

Arkansas City Republican, February 28, 1885.

The entertainment given by the boys of the eighth grade last Saturday evening speaks well for the application and perseverance of the boys. At the opening of the exercises Frank Gamel, the president of the club, made a neat little speech stating the object of the entertainment. The exercises consisted of declamations, recitations, and dialogues which were well rendered. The participants were Harry Gilstrap, Frank Gamel, James Kirkpatrick, Horace Prescott, Mervin Miller, Elmer Lane, and Samuel Beall. There was a good audience and the boys received about $8. Excellent instrumental music was furnished by Miss Constance Woodin and Al. Keller. The proceeds of the entertainment go to the club’s library. The boys intend giving another entertainment shortly and the friends of school should encourage them by attending. They desire a club’s library and are willing to work to get the necessary means to obtain one.

Arkansas City Republican, February 28, 1885.

S. E. Pollock was, we believe, the only teacher in attendance from this vicinity on the Cowley County Teachers Association at New Salem, Friday and Saturday of last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 4, 1885.

World’s Fair will open at Silverdale Schoolhouse, Wednesday night, March 11, 1885. Prof. Will Waugh at the grandstand, assisted by Montford Scott.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 4, 1885.

EDITOR TRAVELER:

Instead of the usual Friday afternoon literary exercises, the pupils of the Intermediate Department celebrated the anniversary of the birth of our great poet, H. W. Longfellow.

The school sang the Psalm of Life, after which each pupil recited a short selection from his writing.


Edith Ochs and George Lindsay, each read an essay consisting of a brief sketch of his life.

Grace Love and Estelle Kellogg sang “The Bridge.”

Lillie Rarick, Annie Dodson, Ella Robertson, Grace Love, Estelle Kellogg, and Annie Spiers sang an amusing parody on Excelsior, entitled Upsides, at the close of which the pupils were dismissed, felling well pleased with the change from the usual routine of school work.

Both teacher and pupils regretted that more friends of the school were not present.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 4, 1885.

                                                The Traveler Would Like to See

                            More of the children attend school in our fine schoolhouse.

[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: “PETER SPRIGGINS.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 4, 1885.

                                                             Bolton No. 89.

School has again commenced, in the new district, in Mr. Buzzi’s house. Miss Minnie Turner, teacher.

Miss Battie Parvin, of Maple City, is visiting friends in Bolton. Battie used to be one of our school girls, and we are glad to see her smiling face once more among us.

Lyceum No. 89, “jack knife” schoolhouse, met as usual last Thursday evening, and gave to the assembly a new and lengthy program, consisting of numerous declamations, select readings, and music by the string band. A few minutes of recess was enjoyed by the assembly, in making up the program for next meeting, after which followed the debate, on the question: “Resolved That the bachelors should be taxed and the tax paid as a dower to the marriageable ladies.” Al. Mowry (solemn eloquence), chief of affirmative; and Geo. Stevens, of negative. Decided in favor of affirmative. W. O. Beason read his lengthy side-splitting, pointy paper, and we adjourned to meet again in one week. PETER SPRIGGINS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

There will be an examination of applicants for teachers’ certificates in the East Ward School building on the 14th inst., commencing at 10 o’clock a.m.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

Some teachers of penmanship now teach their pupils to write with both hands. The method of instruction is to make the pupil write his name in pencil and then go over it with a pen held in left hand. Constant practice gives proficiency.

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                                         SOUTH FAIRVIEW. “EVERETTE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.


H. S. Wallace closed his school on last Wednesday. After the bitter task was through then came the sweet in the way of a treat to the scholars with a feast of candy. In the evening Mr. Wallace had his scholars give an exhibition. The following is the program: Salutatory, Isaac Curfman; Harry and the Guide Post, Minnie Ehret; For a boy and girl, Eddie and Jennie Baird; Don’t give up, George Christolear; Dialogue, Albert Curfman and Hattie Orr; Speech of a daisy, Eddie Baird; A Sonnet, Ida Orr; Some leading questions, John and Chas. Baird; Sucking Cider, Maggie Orr; Temperance address, Frank Curfman; Tick Tock, Eddie Orr; Oration, Isaac Curfman; The Wonderful Sack, Jennie Baird; Johnnie Rich, Ambrose Caufman; What I Learned at Home, Eddie Orr; Pride, Hattie Orr and Jennie Baird; A Poor Old Maid, several girls; A Guardian Angel, Clara Caufman; The two Teachers, Minnie and Carrie; Playing Doctor, A. Caufman, Oscar and Jennie; Hoe your own row, George Ott; The Miser, Joshua Wallace; Song, Mr. and Mrs. Christolear; Give the little boys a chance, Four small boys; Warreous [?] address, Charlie Wallace; Old Heads on Young Shoulders, M. Curfman, Mary Orr, Jennie Craine, A. Caufman, and H. S. Wallace; The Evergreen Mountain, Minnie Larimer; Valedictory, Eddie Baird. The exhibition closed and all went home feeling it was good to be there.

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                                            BURDEN DOINGS. “EROOM.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

Miss Mary Berkey and Miss Rose Pierce are talking of teaching a summer term of school here.

Mrs. Berkey, of Winfield, was in town Friday visiting her daughter, Mary, who is teaching the primary department in the schools.

The second entertainment of the Lyceum was given last Friday night and was well attended. The singing was the feature of the evening. The drama was short but good.

The senior class in the high school numbers three members: Miss Effie Young, Miss Lulu Burden, and Arthur Brooks. The graduating exercises will be held in about four weeks in the evening of the last day of school, and will be the first ever held here. This is a long step toward the advancement of our schools and will be of more benefit than any other thing. Next year with more rooms and more pupils a still more thorough course of grading should be insisted on and carried out.

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                                     NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

School at the old Salem district closed on Friday. The exercises were good, and the teacher in his glory led his happy students in some of the exercises. Plenty of visitors to fill the house. Mr. Carroll has given excellent satisfaction and will remain a welcome Salemite until the close of the next term, commencing March 15th. He will be sadly missed when he leaves for new fields of labor.


You all know the Cowley County Teachers’ Institute was recently held at Salem and there were teachers there from different places and on Friday evening an entertainment was given and oh, such a crowd. I for one felt nervous about the safety of the floor, for the hall was fairly packed. The program was excellent, but on account of the crowded house and tiresome positions of some of the audience, it was not fully carried out that evening. The recitation, “Monas Waters,” by Miss Stretch, was splendid. Prof. Gridley read an excellent paper he had prepared, on “reading.” The American “snap” is in his manly composition and flashes from his eyes. Prof. Davis favored us with an excellent little speech. Short but good. Members of the Salem school, under the careful training of their excellent teacher, Mr. W. H. Lucas, were on hand with songs, declamations, and dialogues, and all are deserving of praise. Will not try to mention all their names. Doctor Downs also held the audience with his good oration, the subject “Thought.” “The old folks at home,” was represented by the Misses Gilmore and Crow and Gilmore Brothers. Handsome darkey ladies and gentlemen they made. How I wished for a pencil and paper to take notes that none might be slighted, but alas for the glory of some good little Salemite, for I cannot remember everything—yet know all pleased me. On Saturday the teachers with their energetic Superintendent (to whom we had listened so attentively on Friday evening) met again to give and receive instruction. Morning, afternoon, and evening sessions were well attended and it was truly good to be there. All of the good things in this life cannot be fully enjoyed and when I returned to my quiet home on Saturday evening, although I became very ill, yet I did not regret attending, for I learned many things and perhaps would not have suffered less had I remained at home. The evening session I hear was even better than that of Friday evening, and those present more comfortably seated and a “delightful time” is the verdict of those present. Mr. Rowe, of Cambridge, was present with three of his lady pupils under his wing. Where the teachers from abroad were entertained, I cannot tell. Come again teachers and Superintendent.

                             RESOLUTIONS OF TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

The following resolutions were adopted by the Teachers’ Association at New Salem.

Resolved, That we encourage the use of the course of study prepared by the State Superintendent of public instructions, by adopting it in our schools and conforming to all of its requirements.

Resolved, That we recognize the need of a good school library in each district in the County, and that we assist in the organization of the same in our respective districts.

Resolved, That we recognize the efforts of our County Superintendent in the work of the Association, as well as his faithful discharge of all his other official duties.

Resolved, That we extend our thanks to the patrons of the New Salem school and their teacher, Mr. Lucas, for the cordial welcome they gave us and their hearty cooperation in our work.

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                                                   AKRON ITEMS. “PET.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

The Pleasant Valley school closed last Friday. They celebrated the day with a dinner and recitations in the afternoon.

The Cedar Creek lyceum is grappling with such questions as “Art and nature,” “Female suffrage,” and next Saturday evening it will decide the loan agent’s fate by discussing whether or not he is a benefit to the State of Kansas and to the people in general to borrow money, giving mortgage security, etc.

Since our voting precinct cast the largest percent of Republican votes cast for J. G. Blaine and the whole ticket last fall, I think we should at least command decent respect. Our county officers never visit our fair valley either in the performance of their official duties nor in their more trying days, viz: When they are making the canvass of the county asking for votes. We have been trying for six months to get Prof. Limerick to come over and settle a school division trouble, and we have always failed. We will vote other than for the Republican ticket if this thing is not remedied in the future.

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                                         CAMBRIDGE AND VICINITY “H.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

Miss Allie Harden came over from Burden Friday evening and remained over Sunday. Miss Allie is one of Cowley’s best teachers and is getting in good work at Burden.

The Christian denomination organized a class at the schoolhouse Sunday. They believe in taking a little wine for the stomach’s sake, so the preacher said when he was making known the acquirements an elder of their church should have.

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                                   TANNEHILL ITEMS. “A KANSAS GIRL.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

Our schoolhouse has received a general renovation, which improves its appearance very much.

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                                                NORTH RICHLAND. BOB.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

The new schoolhouse which is now being built at Polo adds much to the looks of that city.

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                                      BEAVER CENTER. “YOUNG NASBY.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 5, 1885.

Miss Cora Beach closed her school at the Centennial schoolhouse on Friday last, with a bountiful repast and an exhibition at night, which was largely attended. As we loaned a helping hand in the exercises, we will allow the audience to express their opinion as to how they were entertained.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 7, 1885.

One morning this week in the primary department of the east school building, 100 names were enrolled. This is too many pupils for one teacher and more school room will soon have to be made.

Arkansas City Republican, March 7, 1885.

The fifth session of the Cowley County Teachers Association will be held at Winfield March 21, 1885.

                                                              PROGRAM.

1. Which is of the most importance, the industrial or political history of a people?

2. When should the General Exercise be given?

3. With how much of the school law should the teacher be conversant?

4. What questions should be settled between the school board and teacher aside from those embodied in the contract?

5. Miscellaneous Business.

Arkansas City Republican, March 7, 1885.


Thursday evening of last week at schoolhouse No. 89 in Bolton, the literary society held another debate. This time the question was: “Resolved that old bachelors should be taxed to endower marriageable ladies.” Al. Mowry espoused the affirmative and Geo. Stevens the negative. Mr. Mowry presented his arguments so clearly that the judges decided in his favor. Next day Al was very much surprised at having four Pawnee squaws come up to his house and demand their dowry.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 11, 1885.

Miss Nellie E. Thompson, the new music teacher, whose card will be found on this page, is now staying at the residence of Mrs. J. P. Johnson. She has rented music rooms in the Commercial Block, which she will occupy as soon as her piano arrives. The graceful and accomplished lady is welcomed to our midst and recommended to our patrons.

CARD. Miss Nellie E. Thompson. Teacher of music, painting, and embroidery. Orders filled for china painting, hand painted dresses, bonnet crowns, and fancy work. Sheet music supplied. Call at Mrs. J. P. Johnson’s.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 11, 1885.

                                                          S. P. U., Attention.

There will be a meeting of the Stock Protective Union at the Mercer Schoolhouse in Bolton Township, on the fourth Friday evening of March, at 7 o’clock sharp, for the election of officers, and to attend to such other business as may come up. Your presence requested.

                                                     W. S. VORIS, Secretary.

[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: “PETER SPRIGGINS.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 11, 1885.

                                                            Bolton, No. 89.

The stone schoolhouse in the new district is progressing nicely. Some of the neighbors in that locality suggest that it be called Pole Cat College, as it is situated in what is known as pole cat hollow.

Clyde Beck, the boy who has been missing so long, is now staying at Mr. Chambers in East Bolton.

If those naughty boys who tap on the windows at the Lyceum do not stop, they will get in a bad box and don’t you forget it. We do not bother you boys, and you must leave us alone. If you do not wish to hear our entertainment, you do not need to come. We give you fair warning.

The Lyceum goes off nice, a good programme each evening and a full house. Our Lyceum will hold about three or four nights longer, and will close with a comic negro performance.

                                             NOTES FROM MANHATTAN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

A Cowley County student of the State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, sends us the following college notes.

The cooking class furnishes a lunch Fridays to all those so disposed, for the little sum of ten cents.

A few of the professors are wont to be absent occasionally, for this is the time of farmers’ clubs and institutes.

Prof. Snow, of the State University, gave a lecture here in the Chapel February 20. His subject was “Pre-historic Man,” of which he gave us the scientific side in a straight forward style.


There evidently is one good act of the Regents, and that is the matting of the halls, so now the tramp of three hundred and thirty pairs of feet through the main hall is greatly modified by a strip of carpet 240 feet long.

Mrs. Kedzie gave the Chapel lecture on Friday last. Of all the students besides many visitors, none could have imagined a more correct and complete idea of the sights in New Orleans during Christmas vacation except by being there themselves, besides a very graphic account of the history and manner of living of the old French Creoles of that “quaint old city,” as she calls it.

On Saturday evening, February 28th, the College social of this term was held. The entertainment consisted of music by the orchestra and singing class and a concert, after which the time was occupied until 10 o’clock by social greetings and parades up and down the halls, providing somebody didn’t get ahead of you which was the case with your honorable correspondent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

Another famous legend has struck a snag. It is now asserted that when Rome burned fiddles had not been invented, and consequently Nero could not have indulged in the musical past-time attributed to him. Alas! With the disappearance of the Captain John Smith Pocahontas, the Toll-apple, and other allegories, what will the school children of the future do for pretty fables?

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

Mr. Greer, of Winfield, this morning succeeded in capturing the Imbecile and Idiotic youth, and two years from now the school for this purpose will be removed from Lawrence to Winfield, and will serve all purposes as a high school for that beautiful little city.

Kansas City Journal.

There can be no doubt but that its removal to Winfield will elevate the tone of the institution, to such a degree, we hope, that its alumni will no longer consent to serve as Topeka correspondents for Kansas City papers.

[Note: About this time, the future “Southwestern College” activity started. I am skipping that in “schools” file. It will be handled separately. MAW]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

Mrs. Hartwell and Miss Books, accomplished teachers, who have recently arrived from the east, will open a preparatory school in the Farringer building, south Main street, Tuesday next.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

There will be an examination of applicants for teachers’ certificates in the East Ward School building on the 14th inst., commencing at 10 o’clock a.m.

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                                                    SOUTH BEND. “G. V.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

Miss Mollie Holcomb has returned from Topeka where she has been visiting relatives and attending school. She arrived at the “mushroom city,” Hackney, and took her trunk to Teter’s Hotel on Timme street, between the depot and north hedge row.


Last Friday night our teacher gave a spelling match and entertainment. The spelling lasted until recess and Al Bookwalter and Mr. Tousley were pronounced champions. After recess the pupils entertained the audience with the following program: Select Reading, Will Welman; Recitation, Rosa Wilson; Recitation, Emma Welman; Laughing Hyena, Harry Shaw; Likee Melican Man, Dick Chrisman; Little Horner, Mr. Stephenson. The program concluded with “The Neighbor’s Cat,” by the leading stars, and “Old Maids,” by Misses Welman and Sitter.

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                                     GLEN GROUSE AND VICINITY. “J. P.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

The Armstrong school closed Friday evening the 6th, with an exhibition. Mr. Ramage has taught a good school and gave splendid satisfaction.

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                                           DEXTER NEWS. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

School is progressing finely and the term has been extended one month.

School closed in District No. 7 last week with an entertainment at night. Quite an interesting time was reported. J. R. Smith, Jr., conducted the school there this winter. The school at Fairview, Crab Creek, also closed last Wednesday evening with an entertainment, assisted by the literary society and Dexter band.

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                                             EXCELSIOR ITEMS. “HUGH.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

The Excelsior schoolhouse was painted and plastered last fall. It is now the neatest school room that we have seen in Kansas.

There have been so many changes in this district during the past year that many are strangers to their near neighbors. The splendid gathering at Excelsior last Friday gave an opportunity to get acquainted. We should have more such occasions.

Last Friday was a pleasant day for the scholars and patrons of Excelsior school. The occasion was the close of the winter term of Miss Wolf. Before noon the parents and friends of the school began to gather and by noon there were as many as the house would hold. The morning session was dismissed and the scholars and men repaired to the yard; the pupils spending the time at play and the men in conversation while the ladies took possession of the house. Soon they called and when we entered the room, we beheld two tables the length of the room filled with as nice and good a dinner as was ever set in Cowley County. So great was the variety that one could not taste but a small part of any one thing. After dinner the time was spent in songs, select readings, essays, dialogues, and declamations, of which there was variety enough to keep up the interest until the close. This, we believe, is Miss Wolf’s first term in Kansas. The school has made rapid progress under her direction. The next term begins the 23rd of March.

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                                                   AKRON ITEMS. “PET.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

The Holiness meeting that is in progress at Valley Center schoolhouse is succeeding very slowly.


The school is progressing at Akron quite successfully under the able management of Prof. R. B. Corson.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

Mrs. Della Snyder, after a very short vacation, has begun her second term of school at the Victor schoolhouse in No. 115. This is a just recognition of her services in the quite recent past.

Since his last contribution, “Mark” enjoyed a week’s recreation at the State Capital and Manhattan, returning by way of Kansas City. Were he to give a description of the sights, scenes, and pleasures incident to his trip, the columns of the COURIER would be too much crowded. During his sojourn at Topeka he was the recipient of many valuable favors and appreciated courtesies from Representatives Greer and King and Senator Jennings, for which they have his hearty thanks. Having spent much time in the House part of the Legislature, he was pleased to notice the active part Hon. Greer took in the debates of that August assembly. Hons. King and Maurer, although more conservative, appeared none the less interested and solicitous concerning the disposition of bills. Senator Jennings seemed to have but few, if any, superiors in the Senate, and was quite fortunate in accomplishing what he undertook. “Our boys,” with possibly one single exception, made as clean and clear a record as legislators as any county delegation in the State. The fact that they finally secured the Imbecile Institution after a close and sharp contest, entitles them to the just recognition of our people in the future. The “boys” are now acquainted and could exert a more powerful influence in the next Legislature. At Manhattan, “Mark” enjoyed a “feast of reason and a flow of soul,” as the guest of Prof. Thompson, of the State College. Prof. Shelton, of the Farm Department, kindly placed himself at ye scribe’s service and a rich treat was enjoyed in the agricultural line, which space forbids describing. Many valuable improvements have been made in and to the College and farm since “Mark” was an honored student three years ago. The only regret that his visit occasioned was the fact that he is not now numbered among the four hundred students who are daily enjoying its delightful comforts and advantages. This institution is rapidly becoming, and deservedly too, the most popular school in the State. It is now more thoroughly equipped than ever before, with comfortable buildings well lighted and heated, neatly carpeted and artistically decorated. A corps of able instructors who have no superiors in their special fields, in or out of the State, and all necessary apparatus for the education of mechanical and scientific subjects. The Industrial Department of the College is a grand success. Every student is not only taught theory, but practice is compelled in some one of the several useful trades taught and fostered by the institution, thus laying the ground work of an honorable and useful career of its alumni.

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                                        CAMBRIDGE AND VICINITY. “H.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

Preaching at the schoolhouse next Sunday at 11 a.m., by Elder Dwyer and in the evening at half past seven by Rev. Jas. Tull.


A juvenile singing class was organized at the schoolhouse yesterday, under the leadership of N. S. Crawford. The motive Mr. Crawford has in view is to teach the Sunday school children, especially, how to sing, and in the near future give a Sunday school concert. Mr. Crawford is well versed in music and he cannot be complimented too highly for his enthusiasm in this matter.

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                                          TORRANCE ETCHINGS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

Miss Eva Reynolds was in Burden Tuesday visiting Miss Harden’s school.

Miss Laura Elliott, the instructor of the young minds at Dexter, Sundayed at home.

Miss Eva Reynolds spent the latter part of last week down the creek in getting up a school. She will commence teaching Monday week.

Miss Mattie Rittenhouse opened a select school yesterday morning. As she is a favorite among the children, I feel confidence she will be successful.

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                                                            UDALL. “G.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 12, 1885.

Our efficient County Attorney made this city a visit on the 3rd, and enriched the State School fund to the extent of $100, at the expense of Charles Martin.

[STATE NEWS.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 14, 1885.

There are 411,000 children of school age in Kansas, and the state school fund to be apportioned is $143,920, which will allow 35 cents per capita.

Arkansas City Republican, March 14, 1885.

Editors Republican: We attended a meeting of the Farmers last evening at a schoolhouse 4 miles south of this city called to consider their interests in the Farmers Co-operative Mill and had the pleasure of seeing and talking with a large representation of the tillers of the soil. At the close of the exercise Mr. Snyder (the director in that locality) waited on the audience with his Stock Book and received a liberal subscription to the capital stock from all but two. They promised to subscribe but were not decided as to the amount; some that had subscribed a small amount increased the same four fold. And thus the good work goes bravely on.

                                               T. W. GANT, General Manager.

Arkansas City Republican, March 14, 1885.

                                                             School Report.

Report of the 6th and 7th grades, West School, for months ending March 6th, 1885.

In 7th grade, Muta Ball is rank 1 with a total average of 98 percent. Lizzie Shindel and Ida Lane are each rank 2 with a total average of 96 percent.

In 4th grade, Gracie Houghton and Joseph Gilmer are each rank 1 with a total average of 93 percent; Lura Ware, rank 2, an average 92 percent.

Muta Ball has been 100 in attendance, and deportment, and above 90 in scholarship.

The total average, from which the rank in class is determined, is an average of attendance, deportment, and scholarship.

We would urge the parents and friends of pupils in our charge to visit our school and observe for yourselves the work done. Respectfully, LENA GAUSE, Teacher.


Report on the 4th and 5th grades. Pupils 100 in attendance and deportment with an average in scholarship of 90 percent and upward: Cletes Binbaugh, Ella Patterson, Bertha Stafford, Aola Krebs, and Grace Love. FLORENCE PATTERSON.

[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, March 14, 1885.

Mrs. Della Snyder has begun her second term of school in district 112.

It is to be hoped that the school board of District No. 4 will use greater wisdom in their selection of the next school ma’am. The school the past winter was a farce in the strongest sense of the word. The district pays the highest wages and should secure talented teachers who have a disposition to return an equivalent for a generous salary. Not every girl who receives a certificate is capable of teaching school.

Arkansas City Republican, March 14, 1885.

Nellie E. Thompson, teacher of music, painting, and embroidery. Orders filled for china painting, hand-painted dresses, bonnet crowns, and fancy work. Sheet music supplied. Call at Mrs. J. P. Johnson’s.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 19, 1885. Front Page.

                                                                 AN ACT

To authorize school districts and boards of education in any county in the State to adopt a uniform series of text-books, and to repeal section 1, chapter 157, laws of 1879.

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Kansas:

SECTION 1. School districts may, at their annual meetings for the election of school officers, indicate by a majority of all the votes cast at such meeting their desire for a county uniformity of text books, which vote shall be transmitted to the county superintendent of public instruction by the clerk of the aforesaid school district, within ten days from the time of such vote.

SEC. 2. Whenever a majority of all the districts of a county in any one year shall indicate as in section one their desire for a county uniformity of text-books, the county superintendent of public instruction shall notify the districts of such vote, and at the same time call for one delegate from each municipal township and city of the third class in the county, to be elected at a meeting of the school board of such township, on a day and at a place and hour specified in said call: Provided, That if, by virtue of section 8 of this act, any city of the first or second class shall decide to adopt the provisions of this act in the matter of county uniformity, then the city so adopting shall send the superintendent of the city schools, and one other person to be elected by the board of education, to be the representatives of such city on the county text-book board.

SEC. 3. District boards shall vote in the county and township in which their schoolhouses are located.

SEC. 4. The delegates so elected shall constitute a county text-book board, whose duty it shall be to select and prescribe the text-books to be used in each branch of study required by law to be taught in the public schools.


SEC. 5. No text-book shall be prescribed in pursuance of the provisions of this act unless the publishers thereof shall have first filed with the county superintendent of public instruction a guarantee of its price, quality and the permanence of supply for five years, together with a good and sufficient bond for the faithful compliance with said guarantee, conditioned in such sum as the county text-book board may determine and approve.

SEC. 6. The county superintendent of public instruction shall be ex officio chairman of said county text-book board and shall furnish each school district a list of the text-books selected and prescribe in pursuance of the provisions of this act, which list shall be posted by the district clerks in their respective schoolhouses, and said list shall comprise the only legal text-books for the schools of said county, and it is hereby required of the school board to conform to the said lists in the text-books prescribed for use in their schools.

SEC. 7. A county text-book board may be elected once in every five years in each county, in the manner prescribed in this act, whose powers and duties shall be the same as those herein before enumerated.

SEC. 8. Any cities of first and second class are hereby exempted from the provisions of this act, except that any such city may, by a vote of its board of education, decided to join in a uniformity of text-books with the county in which each city is situate, and so deciding such city shall be represented on the county text-book board, as provided in section 2 of this act.

SEC. 9. When a uniformity of text-books shall be adopted in any county in pursuance of the provisions of this act no change shall be made in such county for a period of five years from the date of said adoption of any particular series of text-books; but no member of any board of education, school board or text-book board, and no teacher, while employed in teaching, shall act as agent for any author, publisher or book seller; nor shall any member of said boards, or any of them, or any employed teacher, directly or indirectly receive any gift, emolument or reward for his or her influence in recommending or introducing any book, school apparatus or furniture of any kind whatever; and any member of either of said boards and any teacher who shall violate any of the provisions of this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction shall be punished as provided in section 2 of chapter 157 of the laws of 1879.

SEC. 10. Section 1 of chapter 157 of the laws of 1879 is hereby repealed.

SEC. 11. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the official State paper.

Approved March 5, 1885.

I do hereby certify that the forgoing is a true and correct copy of the original enrolled bill now on file in my office.

Subscribed my name and affixed my official seal.

                   [SEAL.] Done at Topeka, Kansas, this 5th day of March, A. D. 1885.

                                              E. B. ALLEN, Secretary of State.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 19, 1885.

Kansas has the most perfect common school system in America, not excepting Massachusetts. We have six thousand schoolhouses, costing $60,000,000. We have better schoolhouses, better equipments, and better instructors than any other state. That accounts for the high grade of intelligence and civilization among our youth.

                                           ARBOR DAY PROCLAMATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 19, 1885.


“Jock, when ye hae naething else to do, ye may be sticking in a tree; it will be growing, Jock, when ye’re sleeping.” Sir Walter Scott.

The custom of appointing an Arbor Day now prevails in eight States of the Union, and it is believed that it will soon be honored in all the States and Territories, the East and West following the head of the Central States of the Missouri Valley. The people of Kansas went to planting trees as soon as they began to plow, and increasing millions of shade, fruit, and forest trees are planted every year. The love of Kansas for trees has shown itself on every farm and village lot; in city parks and the grounds of the church and the school, and the God’s Acre where our beloved ones sleep their last sleep. This feeling is equally strong in the mind of the old and young—in women not less than men; it leads to practical results in increasing the value of land, and in ameliorating the asperities of our climate—that there has been an increase in the rainfall in Kansas is fully proved by the statistics of our oldest meteorologist—and it leads to uses of beauty in adorning our homes, and making them scenes of loveliness, the remembrance of which will follow our children to the last days of their old age. The State which the pioneers found treeless and a desert now bears upon its fertile bosom more than twenty millions of fruit trees, and more than two hundred thousand acres of forest trees, all planted by our own people.

In view of these facts, and in obedience to the popular will, I, John A. Martin, Governor of Kansas, hereby set apart Thursday, April 2, 1885, as Arbor Day, and respectfully ask that it be made a general holiday. School officers and teachers can greatly aid in carrying out the purpose of the day by giving their pupils a holiday, and by devoting special attention to the adornment of school grounds and parks.

Done at Topeka, this 16th day of March, A. D., 1885, and of the State the twenty-fifth year.

                                                  [L. S.]   JOHN A. MARTIN.

                                                           By the Governor.

                                              E. B. ALLEN, Secretary of State.

                               KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 26, 1885.

The fourth biennial report of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture for the years 1883 and 1884 has just been issued and delivered to the public. It is a volume of 713 pages, and embraces many topics of interest concerning population, wealth, agriculture, manufactures, mineral resources, churches, schools, etc., that will be of value both to the citizens of Kansas and those persons in the East that intend to become residents. A bird’s-eye view of the State Agricultural College and experimental farm in Manhattan is the appropriate subject for the frontispiece, and is an artistic piece of engraving and tint work.

The secretary, in his introduction to the volume, speaking of the progress in wealth and agriculture during the last biennial period, says:


“The population increased during the two years 172,665. By reference to the diagram of centers of population, on page 458 of this volume, it will be observed that the great proportion of this increase was in the eastern half of the State, the point of equal population moving eastward during four years about thirty miles. * * * * During the biennial period just passed nearly 2,000,000 additional acres have been put in cultivation. The principal field (crops, corn, wheat, oats, and grass), have received each a proportionate amount of this increase in acreage, the most notable addition being to the winter wheat area, which increased from 1,465,745 acres in 1882, to 2,151,868 acres in 1884. * * * * * The area of grass, made up of the tame grasses and prairie meadow under fence, increased in the two years nearly 1,000,000 acres. The westward march of the tame grasses may be said to have commenced within the period covered by this volume. Fields of timothy, clover, orchard grass, blue-grass, and many other kinds, are now to be found in the central counties, and even beyond, where such fields were rarely met with two years ago. Experience as to the kinds best adapted to the various portions of the State are being prosecuted with vigor and intelligence, and the question may reach solution within a very few seasons.

“The results of farming operations in Kansas for the past two years, as will be learned by consulting the pages of this report, have definitely settled any doubt as to the entire fitness of the eastern half of the State to the successful prosecution of agriculture in all its branches. The debatable ground of ten years ago is now producing crops that have placed Kansas among the first three great agricultural States of the Union, and the soil that ten years ago was believed to the satisfaction of many to be unfit for diversified farming is now producing average yields that largely exceed the yields of any other portion of this country.

“The numbers of the various kinds of livestock have increased largely during the biennial period, the interest keeping abreast with the advancement made in agriculture. The adaptability of Kansas to the successful prosecution of stock raising has been amply demonstrated, and the many millions of dollars embarked in the business in this State indicates the faith of our people in the safety and profitableness of the investment. The percent of mortality from diseases for both years was slight, and compares favorably with other sections of the country.”

After stating the contents of the volume, the secretary then acknowledges his obligations to government, state, and county officers, legal and volunteer correspondents, and to a large number of citizens, for their valuable aid in securing the information contained in the report.


Pages 9 to 454, inclusive, are devoted to “Population, Production, Industries, Resources,” etc., of the ninety-five counties of the State. Each county is treated separately in alphabetical order, a sectional map in colors accompanying each county sketch. These maps are corrected to December 31, 1884, and show municipal, township boundaries, location of schoolhouses and postoffices, streams, and railway lines. For the first time since sectional county maps have become a feature of the biennial reports, the railroad lines are correctly located, the engineer of each road furnishing the correct location for the map. The points treated of in each county are: Geographical Location; Area; Population to the Square Mile, both as to the whole number of inhabitants and rural population; the Rank of the County in Population; the Name of the County Seat and its Location in the County; the Leading Cities, with their Populations and their Rank among the Cities of the State having more than 1,000 People; the Population of each Township and City for 1883 and 1884; the Railway System, giving Number of Miles of Main Track in Operation; Surface Features; Proportion of Native Timber; Per Cent of Bottom Lands; Names of Streams, their Location and Direction; Manufactories, with Capital Employed, Value of Annual Product, Average Number of Hands Employed and Wages Paid; Mineral Resources, such as Coal, Ore, Building Stone, etc.; Banks; Assessed Valuation by Townships and Cities; Postoffices, Alphabetically Arranged; Names and Postoffice Addresses of County Officers; Agricultural Statistics for 1883 and 1884, Giving Area of Each Crop, with Product and Value; Rank of County in the Area of Wheat, Corn, and Total Cultivated Acreage, and in the Numbers of the Various Kinds of Farm Animals for 1883 and 1884, the Number of Livestock for Both Years, with Increase and Decrease; Statistics Relating to Horticulture, Apiculture, etc.; Churches, Schools; Vacant Public Lands, and a List of Newspapers, with Names of Editors, Proprietors and Publishers.

Following the matter relating to counties is a sketch of the progress and development of the State since its organization, in population, wealth, and agriculture, illustrated with colored diagrams. This is a very interesting and instructive chapter of twenty-six pages, containing sixteen colored diagrams, accompanied by explanatory letter press. While diagrams have been used in previous reports of the board in illustrating the growth of wealth and agriculture, there has never been so complete a treatment of the subject as is found in this portion of the volume. The wonderful story of Kansas, its rapid strides towards prominence among the States, is better told in these object lessons, occupying a few pages, than if hundreds of pages were covered with statistical tables and letter press. This department of the report will be highly prized by the citizens of Kansas, and by all those persons seeking for information as to the resources and capabilities of the State.

A brief synopsis of the journal of the proceedings of the board at its annual and special meetings occupies the next twelve pages, the principal feature of this portion of the volume being the constitution and by-laws of the board, as amended at recent meetings.

Following the Journal, the State is treated after the plan of the county sketches, giving geographical location, population, railroad systems, surface features, water system, mineral resources, agricultural, livestock and miscellaneous statistics, and a synopsis of the laws relating to the requirement of government and school lands, with statements concerning the number of acres of government, school and railroad lands still vacant, and subject to entry and sale.

Full statistics by counties, concerning population, agriculture, livestock, horticulture, and miscellaneous subjects cover the following sixty-six pages, being the compilation of the returns of township and city assessors for the years 1883 and 1884.

Four of the officers of the board, by appointment, made reports for this volume: Prof. O. St. John, the geologist, furnishing a paper on artesian wells, a subject much agitated in Kansas at present; Prof. F. H. Snow, entomologist, an illustrated paper on “Insects Injurious to Wheat,” remarks and observations concerning the Hessian fly occupying the most prominent place in the paper; Prof. J. T. Lovewell, meteorologist, on the “Meteorology of Kansas,” being a record of rainfall and barometer readings for the past two years at various stations in the State; and Hon. E. B. Cowgill, Sorghum Commissioner, on “The Sorghum Industry of Kansas in 1884.” This paper is founded upon recent investigations as to the manufacture of sugar from the Northern cane, and at this time is of peculiar interest to Kansas farmers.


Following the reports of officers by appointment are papers from Dr. A. A. Holcombe, the State Veterinary Surgeon; Hon. W. S. Gile, State Fish Commissioner; Hon. F. P. Baker, Special Agent Division of Forestry, United States Department of Agriculture, and Prof. E. M. Shelton, Professor of Agriculture at the State Agricultural College. These papers were read by their authors at the annual meeting of the board, held in January last, and are well worth preservation in this report of the board.

The “Schools of Kansas” are next treated of, and a very full and complete statement is made concerning the public school system in the State, the examination of teachers and branches taught. In this chapter the three State institutions, the State Agricultural College, the State University, and the State Normal School are also fully described and their objects set forth.

Financial statements of district and county agricultural societies of the State for the years 1883 and 1884, and a roster of the State Government, closes the volume.

The report is by far the most complete and valuable ever issued by the State Board of Agriculture, and will be much sought after by citizens of the State as a reference book. The Legislature, before its adjournment, ordered an extra edition of 10,000 volumes, and Maj. Sims, the Secretary, will take pleasure in forwarding copies as long as the edition holds out.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, March 21, 1885.

                                                   The Arkansas City Schools.

It was our privilege to pay the schools of Arkansas City a visit last week. Meeting our old friend, Mr. Pollock, one of Cowley’s best teachers, we went in company to the high school rooms, where we found Miss Hattie Horner in charge. Miss Horner is a lady of fine talents and good experience as a teacher. She graduated at the state normal some years ago and was one of our pupils. She was one of those from whom the school expected much and they have not been disappointed in this instance as she is teaching an excellent school. She seems to command the respect and love of her pupils and everything seems to move like clockwork. Her assistant seems to be a very pleasant and efficient lady.

After the close of school we had the pleasure of meeting Prof. Weir, the superintendent. He stands high in the state as an educator, and is making the schools of Arkansas City among the very best. We speak thus positively because we took an opportunity upon the following day to visit several departments and found them all doing excellent work and the evidences of good grading, perfect system, and thorough work were numerous. Among those, upon whom we called, were our old pupils from Emporia, Myrtle Jones, Eva Collins, Lena Gause, and Miss Obenchain.

With so many teachers from the state normal, it is no wonder the schools of Arkansas City are excellent, and are fast attaining a state reputation. Although our stay in each department which we visited was short, we were permitted to witness some exercises in each department that gave evidence of good work, but must speak of the excellent exercise in calisthenics presented by Miss Jones, just before recess, and the beautifully decorated blackboards and general appearance of neatness in the rooms of Miss Gause and Collins. There are new rooms, which were so nicely kept as to impress us as being the most attractive schoolrooms we ever visited. One other thing made a deep impression upon us and that was the orderly and perfect plan of conducting recess. We cannot close this review without speaking of the very neat course of study, rules and regulations which have been issued by these schools. Should anyone desire to know more of the details of the workings of the Arkansas City public schools, they should secure one of these pamphlets. Winfield Tribune.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 26, 1885.


The Cowley County Teachers’ Association meets Saturday next in the high school building, this city, where a program of great interest to educators will be carried out.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 26, 1885.

Miss Kate Paulin, one of Burden’s charming young ladies, accompanied Miss Mary Berkey home and spent Saturday and Sunday. Miss Berkey’s school at Burden closes this week.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 26, 1885.

Prof. R. B. Moore, superintendent of the Burden Schools, was in the metropolis Saturday. The Professor is one of Cowley’s most accomplished educators, and his popularity and success in Burden is well merited.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 26, 1885.

A little determination, elbow grease, and good taste should be put forth all over Cowley County on next Thursday, “Arbor Day.” Many a schoolhouse over the County unprotected by shade or shelter, can be vastly improved in appearance and comfort by a little extra effort. Let us see that this day so wisely set apart by Governor Martin is energetically celebrated.

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                                          TORRANCE ETCHINGS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 26, 1885.

There was a magic lantern show at the South Torrance schoolhouse Saturday evening. As I was not there and have not seen anyone who was, I can’t say how good it was.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 26, 1885.

County Superintendent Limerick dropped in on our school ma’am, in No. 115, last Friday afternoon, for a short but pleasant visit. He imported a portion of his enthusiasm to the scholars in an interesting talk on the value of an education. The Professor is daily winning laurels because of the energetic manner in which he performs the duties of his position. If third-termism is not a crime and a violation of the constitution, Prof. Limerick’s continuance in this office should be insisted upon.

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                                                    SOUTH BEND. “G. V.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 26, 1885.

Our school closed last Saturday. As a pedagogues, Mr. Akers has given entire satisfaction. Master Jimmie Broadwell’s report showed a full-time attendance, which evinces his desire to climb the ladder of knowledge.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 1, 1885.

A. H. Limerick and wife, Misses Cora Reynolds, Lois Williams, Fannie Stretch, Mattie Gibson, Mary Hamill, Mary Bryant, Flo Campbell, Kate Rodgers, Jessie Stretch, Allie Dickle, Sada Davis, Retta Gridley, Davenport, Mrs. C. M. Leavitt, Mr. C. W. Barnes, and A. Gridley and wife, prominent teachers of Winfield, were in the city last Wednesday for the purpose of visiting our excellent schools. Unfortunately, our schools had dismissed in order to allow our teachers to attend a meeting at El Dorado. Failing in this, they visited the Chilocco schools.


Arkansas City Traveler, April 1, 1885.

                                                        Fifth Grade Exercise.

We are indebted to Miss Florence Patterson, teacher, for the following exercises from Monday of last week’s lesson. The work required was a description of a picture—Mt. Aetna.

                                    AN IMAGINARY STORY OF MT. AETNA.

Mt. Aetna is situated on Sicily, an island in the Mediterranean sea. It is two miles high and ninety miles in circumference. From what I have heard, I suppose there are several buried under it. I don’t see why people want to live near that mountain. I don’t believe I would want to. Sometimes it is not in action and then it will start up in a single night and throw up balls of fire, rock, ashes, and lava. The people in that country build very low houses on account of earthquakes. They had a high wall built around a city once. It was built to keep the lava and rocks from burning it, but an explosion occurred and the lava went over the walls and buried the city. Once there was a town at the foot of this mountain. One morning the people were busy, some selling, and doing one thing and another. All at once lava came from the mountain. Some people ran into the street, but only to be killed, for the stones and lava were coming down everywhere. The people were running here and there, some crying for their children, others trying to get out of town; but it was of no use, for all at once the mountain exploded and the lava covered the town in a little while.

                                                        EDWARD GREEN.

                                    AN IMAGINARY STORY OF MT. AETNA.

On the island of Sicily, which is in the Mediterranean sea, is a volcanic mountain called Mt. Aetna. Many beautiful cities have been destroyed by it. Once a city was built on the banks of the Mediterranean sea, near this mountain, which is a beautiful place, looking so peaceful, like nothing could disturb it. But one day the people were startled by a quantity of stone, sparks, etc., coming down upon them. They guessed what it was and gathering their children, money, and other things they valued, flew for their lives. But alas! They were too late; the fire and stones had overwhelmed them; the city was in ruins; the people killed and completely covered up. All this was a great many years ago, and it is said that men have dug [TWO LINES ZAPPED OUT] as they were, trying to rescue their children, or get their money; and even found bread in the oven where they had put it to bake. The jewelry which many people had are also found, and other things too numerous to name.

                                                        MATTIE KIRTLEY.

[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: “PETER SPRIGGINS.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 1, 1885.

                                                             Bolton No. 69.

School closed at the Bland, last Saturday. Quite a number of the neighbors came out bringing with them their baskets filled with many kinds of cake and pie and other delicious eatables. After having a general neighborhood visit, we left, all happy that we came out, and sorry that school closed.


School has closed for the year in the new district on account of a little trouble concerning bonds. It is said, and is a fact, that some of the school patrons voted for the house, and now as the house is built, vote against it. Such people we term cranks, or idiots, in short, any man that will vote against the education of the rising generation, don’t know enough to cast his vote for dog shelter; and, furthermore, if all the property that these cranks have was to be taxed twenty-five percent, their tax which would go for school purposes would not exceed seventeen cents per year. That shows the interest some people have in the rising generation. We only hope that these aforesaid persons could realize the harm that they have done to the neighborhood by casting their vote as they did.

Our henpecked husband who lives in a stone house in the neighborhood of the Stony Lonesome schoolhouse, called us a conceited ass, and he himself, claims to be ten times smarter than that sandy complexioned crank which is about to leave Bolton. Perhaps he is, but he will go and partially dictate, and the two together will get up a happy production concerning somebody’s conceited ass, (meaning, of course, a mule.)  I would not write at all if I could not write of something worse, of which I am endeavoring to describe in this article.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

Charley Dever has been honored with the position of clerk of the city school board, Lou Zenor having resigned. Charley is one of our brightest, most reliable young men, and will fill the position to the satisfaction of all.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

Dr. F. A. Howland, son of our A. A. Howland, and well known to our people, has returned from Chicago and settled, for the practice of his profession, in Cambridge. He took a thorough course in the Homeopathic school. He is a young man of splendid ability and ambition, and will make a mark in his profession.

                             COWLEY COUNTY TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

The Cowley County Teachers’ Association met in regular monthly session in this city Friday and Saturday last. Over sixty of the wide-awake teachers of the county were present. The meetings of the association have always been interesting and profitable, but this one was by far the most enthusiastic and beneficial. Among the prominent features was a lecture by Rev. Reider, on “The Teacher’s Unconscious Tuition,” at the Methodist church Friday evening. The various topics discussed by the Association were pointed and pithy—topics of much importance to school work in Cowley County. These meetings of teachers mean much for educational matters. Ideas are interchanged, modes of instruction compared, and conclusions arrived at that do much in putting the schools of our county in the foremost ranks. We are indeed glad to note the zeal and enterprise exhibited by our teachers in elevating and perfecting their vocation. Education is the bulwark of the Republic—the backbone of everything that enhances its facilities should receive the warmest encouragement from all. This is the last meeting of the Association until the fall schools open.

                                                      BURDEN’S EPOCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.


The writer had the pleasure of attending the first annual commencement exercises of the Burden High School Tuesday evening. Cowley County has always been foremost in educational matters, but the last few years have been marked by unusual strides. But a few years ago a little frame schoolhouse, twenty by thirty, was the seat of learning for our sister city. It was enlarged, additional buildings rented, etc., until demand and enterprise erected a handsome stone building, containing four departments, and being one of the most substantial and convenient schoolhouses in the county. Now they have outgrown this, and will add two more rooms. The past winter saw Burden’s first graded school. Under the superintendency of Prof. R. B. Moore, one of the foremost educators of the State, ably assisted by Misses Mary Berkey, Alice Hardin, Ella Kempton, and Lizzie Burden, the different departments bore gratifying fruits. The first graduates from the Burden High School who “commenced,” Tuesday evening, were Misses Effie C. Young and Lain Burden and Mr. Arthur W. Brooks, all of whom acquitted themselves nobly on this occasion. The entire exercises were very interesting and creditable. Burden has great reason to congratulate herself in her varied advancement—her public and private improvements and general air of thrift and enterprise. No town of her size in the West can exhibit a better growth, more public spirit, or more energy in everything that makes true citizenship.

                                          THE TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

The Southwestern Kansas Teachers’ Association began a two days’ session in El Dorado, March 27, there being about one hundred teachers present. The first session was held in the afternoon. The discussions proved interesting and instructive. Professor Canfield, of the State University, was there and addressed the association.

                         The Experience of Three Teachers with a District Board.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

[To Miss Florence M. Campbell, one of our city teachers, was assigned the topic: “What questions should be settled between the district board and the teacher, not included in the contract,” for delineation at the Teachers’ Association in this city last Saturday. She handled the subject handsomely in the following practical poem.]

                               [Note: I skipped the poem, which was quite long.]

                     SOUTHWESTERN KANSAS TEACHERS ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

The second annual meeting of the Southwestern Kansas Teachers Association convened in El Dorado on the 27th ult. The largest delegations came from Wellington, Harper, and Arkansas City. The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: President, Superintendent Jay, of Wellington; Secretary, Superintendent Weir, of Arkansas City; vice-presidents, County Superintendent Hammond, of Wichita, and Prof. Olin, of El Dorado. For executive committee, Prof. Knowles, of Peabody; Raney, of Anthony; and Hubble, of Sterling.

Wichita was chosen as the permanent place of meeting. The papers and discussions were eminently practical and beneficial. Among the noted instructors and visitors in attendance were Prof. Canfield, of the State University; Prof. Saddler, of the State Normal school; and Prof. Sanders, President of the Fort Scott Normal school. Prof. Canfield’s lecture was a rare intellectual treat.

Excerpt...

                                       BREVITIES FROM OTTER. “QUIZ.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.


Our term of spring school will begin on April 20th, Provided, First, the school board can hire a No. 1 pedagogue. Our district has now five students in attendance at Ft. Scott. If any district as small as this can show more intellectual power, please inform the whole world, (the valley of Otter), in case some Hawaiian heathen may want to know where to send for material for teachers.

Excerpts...

                                               ARKANSAS CITY. “FRITZ.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

The gentleman who was chairman of the secret caucus held in the fourth ward recently, and who distinguished himself at the last county convention, is making for himself quite a reputation as a ward politician. It is quite evident from his efforts to “pack” the school board, that he aspires to the position of principal of the city schools. May the good Lord deliver us!

Superintendent A. H. Limerick and wife, Professor Gridley and sixteen of the teachers in the Winfield schools, visited this city last Thursday for the purpose of visiting our schools. Unfortunately, the schools here were closed to allow the teachers to attend a meeting of the Teachers’ Association at El Dorado. In the afternoon, accompanied by several of our teachers, the party paid a visit to the Chilocco Industrial school.

Excerpt...

                                            AKRON ITEMS. “DREAMER.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

I dreamed that R. B. Corson’s school was out last Friday. R. B. taught a good school. It might be said of him: “Well done, good and faithful servant; go in peace until another term of school.”

                            A FEW WOMANLY POINTS AND ARGUMENTS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

In view of the coming municipal election, at which time the voters of this city are to use the responsible privilege of choosing officers to govern our city, schools, etc., it being of importance to have men elected who will be on duty when our persons or property are in danger, a number of the ladies of the W. C. T. U., who help to sustain the treasury of our city and county by taxation (without representation), think it a duty we owe ourselves and those mutually interested, to use the only privilege given us, free speech, in defense of our homes and firesides.

We have been drawn into a discussion of the proper enforcement of the laws of chastity and temperance, not from any seeking of our own, but incidentally, and we believe providentially. Not wishing to injure anyone, but believing the transactions of all good men and women will bear investigation, we go to the public record and find the expense of the grand jury for November, 1884, to be $918. We do not object to the calling of the grand jury under existing circumstances; but we do object to the necessity of calling it, and are sure, if the city officers had done their duty, that much of the expense might have been saved.


We also learn in the investigation the astonishing fact that the salary of the mayor is one dollar per annum, making his services, of course, gratuitous. “The laborer is worthy of his hire.” Much cannot be expected of any man performing his duty without remuneration. Pay the mayor an honest compensation for his labor that citizens may feel free to call upon him to enforce laws, and he to spend the time necessary to attend to the sanitary and moral condition of the city. Also, we would suggest a more critical watch over the city officers, with a proper remuneration for the services of all, and that when they have done their duty in arresting offenders and placing them in the hands of the court, that the law be strictly enforced, with due regard for penalties, that the law may become a terror to evil doers and the majesty of our court sustained.

This brings us to a disagreeable subject, but one which we think needs to be noticed, because of many false rumors connected with it. Our city has always, we believe, and nobly, too, refused to license houses of ill fame; nevertheless, they have been allowed to flourish in our midst, with frequent arrests for drunkenness and other intolerable misdemeanors. The offenders have been thrown into jail; fined ten dollars and costs, and turned loose to fester anew, until arrested and the same farce gone through with again. Thus it was at our last term of court with one Mollie Burke, who, according to the record, was brought before the court on the 20th day of January, 1885; the defendant was placed before the bar, was asked if she had any council, and answered in the negative. She was asked if she desired any council, she answered she did not; thereupon she was required to plead to the indictment of the grand jury, to which said defendant plead guilty. Her plea was, therefore, considered, ordered, and adjudged by the court that she pay the fine of ten dollars, the costs of the prosecution, taxed at $21.45, and that she stand committed to the county jail until such fine and costs are paid; and it is further adjudged by the court that the said Mollie Burke executed to the State of Kansas a good and sufficient bond with sufficient sureties in the sum of three hundred dollars, conditioned that she keep the peace for the term of two years from this date, and that she stand committed until such securities be given. On January 20th she was again brought before the court with council, when a motion was made for a modification of the foregoing penalties. Hearing an affidavit on the motion, the court sustained it, and she was relieved from giving bond for good behavior, to keep the peace, etc. She was therefore ordered to be discharged. With these facts before us, we beg leave to ask what has been accomplished for morality, good order, and the general well being of society by the large outlay of money by the county, as above mentioned? The prisoner found herself in the same position after all this as before, and with very little expense and trouble to herself.

Another question we would like right here to ask: by what course of reasoning was the account of the W. C. T. U. for seven dollars and twenty-one cents expended for Lida Vandermark refused by the council on the ground she was not a pauper, when we see one week later an account of seven and a half dollars allowed for the same person as a pauper? O, consistency, thou art a jewel!

Again we ask, what incentive can we have to labor for the advancement of morality, when such hindrances are continually thrown in our way by officials of the law elected by yourselves? And we ask all thoughtful, candid, law-abiding citizens to think well on these things. It is true we have no place to put these persons, either to punish or reform. Let us build a reformatory for women, enlarge the jail for men, and then mete out justice equally to all; and, with the blessing of God, we will begin the work of reform in earnest, and try to teach that virtue is as honorable in men of all ages as it is lovely in women.


Some time ago, when the engine was located for our water-works, one place was condemned because it was near pig-pens and a slaughter-house; nevertheless the water riffled by them as clear on the surface as at other places; but these wise men knew it was not healthy, notwithstanding its apparent purity and placidity. So with our city beautiful for situation, with every God-given advantage, and with, we believe, when troubled, “it casteth up mire and dirt,” but like the chain pump in our cisterns, we believe agitation will purify, and with the disinfectants of honest officers and an equal enforcement of the law, the moral condition will be improved.

We find there are in the City of Winfield 1,488 children of school age and that the enrollment for the year is 1,150, which leaves 138 children out of school. We are told almost daily, in newspapers, from platform and pulpit, that education is the bulwark of our free government; that every child should be taught the genius of our institutions that he may compare with others and learn to appreciate the blessings he enjoys. We have also the figures of $9,000 as about the cost of the new east ward schoolhouse. So the cost of one grand jury is about one ninth that of a good school building needed to meet a crying demand for another to accommodate the 300 and more children, who are loafing around our streets learning wickedness. Now we ask a redress for these ills and believe there is no better remedy than to make our laws a terror to evil doers, which will produce economy in the outlay for criminals, and enable us to make a more liberal expenditure for education, with wiser laws to compel attendance at school, during the whole school year.

                                                               W. C. T. U.

                                                                A CARD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 2, 1885.

To the W. C. T. U.:

From your article published April 1st, in regard to the administration of the city government in relation to the immoralities practiced in Winfield, I am irresistibly led to the conclusion that you are grossly ignorant of the facts or else maliciously intended to misrepresent. Now, if you desire light rather than darkness, and mean business rather than gush or twaddle, call at my office and I will give you such an explanation as will enable you to talk with some degree of intelligence on the Vandermark matter. GEORGE EMERSON.

Arkansas City Republican, Wednesday, April 4, 1885.

                                                            “HOT TIMES.”

                                            The Squirt-Gun Ordinance the Cause.

Thursday the businessmen and taxpayers held a meeting to place in nomination a ticket for the city officers to be filled next Tuesday. The following was the result.

FOR MAYOR: A. J. PYBURN.

FOR POLICE JUDGE: CHARLES BRYANT.

FOR CITY TREASURER: CHARLES R. SIPES.

FOR TREASURER OF SCHOOL BOARD: JAMES L. HUEY.

FOR JUSTICE OF THE PEACE: S. C. LINDSAY.

FOR CONSTABLES: FRANK THOMPSON, J. J. BREENE.

                                                            FIRST WARD:

Councilmen: Jacob Hight; A. C. Gould.

School Board: S. B. Adams; T. D. Richardson.

                                                         SECOND WARD:

Councilmen: Archie Dunn; Calvin Dean.


School Board: J. P. Witt; John Landes.

                                                            THIRD WARD:

Councilmen: J. P. Johnson; M. C. Copple.

School Board: A. D. Prescott; L. E. Woodin.

                                                          FOURTH WARD:

Councilmen: John M. Ware; W. P. Wolf.

School Board: A. P. Hutchinson; T. R. Houghton.

Arkansas City Republican, Wednesday, April 4, 1885.

                                                       From the County Seat.

                                                               TRIBUNE.

Our school board has purchased five hundred Maples, which will be set out in the schoolyard on Arbor Day. The water company gives the privilege of using water necessary to keep the trees in good flourishing condition. The pupils should take a pride in ornamenting the school grounds, that they may appear inviting and beautiful. With proper care, the trees planted this season will make good shade in five or six years.

Arkansas City Republican, April 4, 1885.

Arbor Day was observed in our public schools. A large number of trees were planted; the next thing will be caring for them.

Arkansas City Republican, April 4, 1885.

At the meeting of the second ward voters, Archie Dunn and Theo. Fairclo were nominated for councilmen. Rev. J. P. Witt and John Landes will be on the school board.

Arkansas City Republican, April 4, 1885.

                                                          Notice Stockmen.

S. P. U., of West Bolton, will meet at the Mercer schoolhouse, Friday evening, April 10th, to transact business of importance. All turn out.

                                  By order of, P. H. SOMERS, Capt. Commanding.

Arkansas City Republican, April 4, 1885.

The sixth monthly session of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association convened in Winfield Friday, March 27, at 3 o’clock p.m., with about thirty teachers in attendance. Pres. Limerick called the meeting to order, and, after discussing the relative value of Industrial and Political history, committees on finance and publication were appointed, and the meeting adjourned to meet at 8 o’clock p.m., at the M. E. Church. The inclement weather prevented a large crowd at the church; but quite a number of teachers and citizens of Winfield were in attendance. The programme was well rendered, and the lecture by Rev. Reider, entitled “The teacher’s unconscious tuition,” was worthy the consideration of all and especially the teachers. The Association met in the high school building, at 9 a.m. The attendance was more than twice that of the previous day. The session was an interesting one; papers were read by Misses Raynolds, Campbell, and Dickie. The afternoon session convened at 2 o’clock. Mrs. Greer, representing the W. C. T. U., met with them and gave an interesting talk on the study of Physiology and Hygiene, with regard to the use of stimulants and narcotics. After disposing of the query box, the usual resolutions were adopted and the Association adjourned.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 8, 1885.


                                                         School Examination.

The public schools of our city were engaged last week in a term examination. The questions submitted to the pupils embraced the work performed during the term, and were designed to test their thoroughness in the studies they had pursued. These examination questions are prepared by the teachers of the respective classes, it being the belief of School Principal Weir that they are best informed on the standing of their children, and are best adapted to draw out what the latter know. In this he may be correct; although some school authorities contend that an examination should put to the test the efficiency of the teacher as well as the knowledge of the pupil, and hence the examination should be conducted by the principal, who is not likely to show tenderness for any weak spots that may be latent. It will be satisfactory to parents and the friends of our public school system to be informed that the young folks acquitted themselves creditably; their correct answers and intelligent statements of fact giving evidence to tedious work on the part of the teachers and commendable diligence used by the scholars. Each study comprised in the curriculum was carefully analyzed by the questions propounded, and a comparison of the examination papers furnished by each school shows a satisfactory average of merit. . . .

[SILVERDALE CORRESPONDENT: “P. Q.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 8, 1885.

Our spring school is progressing finely under the supervision of C. T. Perkins.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, April 11, 1885.

Kendall F. Smith, of Ponca Agency, Indian Territory, is building a residence on lots on Central Avenue, just east of the hotel. His family will remove here in about four weeks and make Arkansas City their home, in order to give the children the benefit of Arkansas City’s superior schooling advantages. Mr. Smith formerly resided here before going to Ponca. Robt. Baird has the contract for the building.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 9, 1885.

The County Treasurer of Ellis County had been advertising 20,000 acres of school lands for sale to the highest bidder, but the Attorney General has warned him to stop the sale—that the land must be sold to “actual settlers.” This is right. There has been too much school land forced on the market, at $3 per acre, when if they had been held, they would have appreciated in value.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 9, 1885.

A complete system of scales, weights, and measures have been added to the object lesson apparatus in Miss Jessie Stretch’s department of the city schools, the second ward primary. The attendance in this department was remarkably good last month, forty-eight being neither tardy nor absent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 9, 1885.

Miss Hattie Andrews has returned from a winter’s course in the State Normal School.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 9, 1885.

Supt. Limerick created School District No. 144 this week. Cowley believes in schools. Let them grow.

                                             THE TREE PROCLAMATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 9, 1885.


No violent or alarming exercise was exhibited here in celebration of Arbor Day. Gov. Martin failed to interview the weather manager, and therefore made a mistake of one day in naming the date. Gossamers and umbrellas were in much greater demand on Thursday than trees and shrubbery. But the beautiful days which immediately followed have been energetically utilized. All over the city can be seen the effect of the tree planter’s labor. The city school board set out over three hundred maples on our several school grounds, and the number of private improvements in this line augur much for our future title of the “Forest City”—a cognomen we can already gracefully bear. Our people are firm believers in the adornment of home, as is evidenced in beauty all around.

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                                   CULLINGS FROM OTTER. “OTTERITE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 9, 1885.

George Hosmer has returned from Manhattan school, and will again take up his usual profession.

This week will end our school until fall. Miss Robins, our teacher, is generally liked by all and especially by the old baches.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 9, 1885.

Miss Ella King will commence a spring term of school in District 4 Monday.

Ex-pedagogue Myron Cronk, having accumulated some capital the past winter from shooting ideas, is now investing the same in young cattle. He will soon be a bloated and polluted stockman.

There was a kissing and hugging exhibition last Monday night at the Holland schoolhouse, ostensibly in the celebration of the close of the school, but more particularly for the benefit of the bachelettes and bachelors of district No. 10, and some imported young bloods.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, April 11, 1885.

                                                           The City Election.

Tuesday the city election occurred. There were only two tickets in the field—the Citizen’s ticket and the Reform ticket, but the supporters of each worked hard for victory. F. P. Schiffbauer was elected mayor by 117 votes.

The councilmen chosen in the first ward were Jacob Hight, long term; James Hill, short term. School board: S. J. Rice and J. W. Ruby.

In the second ward, the race of councilmen was very close. It resulted in the election of Archie Dunn, long term; and Calvin Dean, short term. J. P. Witt and John Landes were put in the school board.

In the third ward Capt. Rarick and C. G. Thompson were elected councilmen; the school board is John Love and Dr. H. D. Kellogg.

In the fourth ward A. A. Davis and George Bailey were made councilmen; J. C. Duncan and Alex. Wilson were elected to serve on the school board.

[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, April 11, 1885.


School began Monday in Dist. 4 under the supervision of Miss Ella King.

Miss Wilson’s school in District No. 10, will close this coming Friday, with the usual exhibition.

[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: NAME NOT GIVEN.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, April 11, 1885.

The new schoolhouse district is just now in a bad pickle. In November of 1884 they voted bonds to the amount of $800 [? NOT SURE OF FIGURE...DISTORTED...COULD BE $500] for the purpose of building a new schoolhouse, the bonds were sent to the state Superintendent and accepted, but could not accommodate them with any money until February 1885. And in order that they might have school this year, Mr. Buzzi agreed to build the house, and complete it at once; which he did, about the time at which they were looking for their money. The new State Superintendent overhauled the papers which were turned over to him by the old Superintendent; and in examining these bonds, he discovered that the majority of voters in the District had not voted for the bonds, although the votes cast were in favor of the bonds. The board was at once petitioned to call an election for the purpose of voting new bonds. And the result of the election was, the bonds were defeated. The board was again petitioned to call another election, which will be next week. Certain parties are working day and night to defeat them again.

Some time between Friday evening of last week and Monday morning of this week, some sneak stole the water pail from the schoolhouse in District 80. It might be made very unpleasant for anyone found disturbing school property.

The band met at the Mowry schoolhouse for practice last Saturday night. We hope the boys may not weary in well doing.

Arkansas City Republican, April 11, 1885.

Since the beautifying of the school grounds on Arbor Day, Prof. Weir and the other teachers are making arrangements to have a plat of the ground and trees planted, and the improvements made. Wm. Gall will do the drawing.

Arkansas City Republican, April 11, 1885.

The election in Winfield was very quiet and resulted as follows: W. G. Graham, Mayor; W. H. Turner, Police Judge; Jno. D. Pryor, City Treasurer; Geo. W. Robinson, Treasurer, School Board; H. H. Siverd and T. H. Harrod, Constables; Councilmen, First Ward, Jas. W. Connor and W. R. McDonald; Second Ward, A. H. Jennings and T. B. Myers; Third Ward, W. J. Hodges and G. H. Crippen; Fourth Ward, J. P. Baden and J. N. Harter. Members Board of Education: A. G. Wilson, W. O. Johnson, J. S. Mann, Geo. Ordway, W. C. Robinson,

Jas. H. Bullene, B. F. Wood, and W. H. Smith.

Arkansas City Republican, April 11, 1885.

The members of the Bolton Stock Protection Union are requested to meet at the Bland Schoolhouse, Saturday evening, April 18th, promptly at 7 o’clock, to elect officers and transact other important business. By order of the company. R. N. TURNER, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 15, 1885.

                                                      Stock Raisers’ Meeting.


The members of the Bolton Stock Protective Union are requested to meet at the Bland Schoolhouse, Saturday evening, April 18th, promptly at seven o’clock, to elect officers and transact other important business. By order of the company. R. M. TURNER, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 16, 1885.

Mr. Harvey Campbell, of Door Creek, Wis., came in Saturday, and will spend a week with Earnest Reynolds. He is the father of Miss Floe M. Campbell, one of our teachers. He is wonderfully taken with Winfield, and we may get him as a permanent resident. Hope so.

                                            OF INTEREST TO TEACHERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 16, 1885.

Teachers examination under the new law will take place in this city on the 25th inst. The examinations now are only quarterly, and the questions come from the State Board of Education. County Superintendent Limerick thinks the new law a big improvement. A first grade certificate will be good any place in the State when endorsed by the County Superintendent of the county in which it is used. Certificates granted in the past are yet good until the time expires for which they were granted. The law requiring all teachers to pass an examination in psychology and hygiene does not go into effect till January next.

                                       MANHATTAN NOTES. “STUDENT.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 16, 1885.

A new term of college opened up last Monday. The students are earnest and industrious in pursuing their studies.

Mrs. Kedzie, Supt. of sewing and cooking, started for Topeka this afternoon for a few days’ visit.

The winter term closed last Friday, with a well delivered and instructive lecture by Geo. F. Thompson, Supt. of the printing department. His subject was “Some elements of success.”

Mrs. Winchip, assistant to Mrs. Kedzie, was the happy recipient of a handsome work box Friday last, as a present from her class in sewing.

Last Saturday evening the Webster Literary Society held their third annual exhibition. The exercises were highly entertaining to the large audience present.

Thursday one week ago, Mrs. Kedzie received a handsome silver cake basket from her 1885 class in cooking, as a token of friendship.

The party given by Prof. Shelton and Mrs. Kedzie to their class in household economy and agriculture was a highly enjoyable affair. The luscious repast that was served spoke volumes for the culinary abilities of our girls.

Excerpt...

                                   PLEASANT VALLEY. “COUNTRY JAKE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 16, 1885.

The school closed at the Holland schoolhouse last Friday. The school gave an exhibition Monday night.

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                                        CAMBRIDGE AND VICINITY. “H.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 16, 1885.

Miss Allie Harden’s school has closed, and she is now at home resting up for the World’s Fair, which she expects to visit in about two weeks.

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                                           DEXTER NEWS. “MOSS ROSE.”


Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 16, 1885.

Miss Lucy Hite is teaching the Crab Creek school this summer. We wish her success.

Our school closed last Friday. Our teachers, Misses Vaught and Elliott, have given good satisfaction.

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                                          TORRANCE ETCHINGS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 16, 1885.

Miss Laura Elliott’s school at Dexter closed last Friday. She is now at home for the rest of the summer.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, April 18, 1885.

                                                             School Report.

Following is the report of the 6th and 7th grades for month commencing March 9th and ending April 2nd.

In the 7th grade, Meta Ball in rank 1; total average, 98; Mary Logan, rank 2, average, 96; Lizzie Shindell, rank 3, average, 95.

In the 6th grade Gracie Houghton is rank 1, average 93; Willie Crew, rank 2, average 90; Eddie Scott and Luna Ware, rank 3, average 88. LENA GAUSE, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 22, 1885.

                                                      Stock Raisers’ Meeting.

The Stock Protective Union of Bolton Township will meet at the Bland Schoolhouse, Monday evening, at 8 o’clock, April 27th. All members not present at that time will be dropped from the roll. We mean business. By order of the captain. J. R. RAMSEY.

Unrelated to schools, but a very provoking comment...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.

It was Napoleon Bonaparte who said, when the conquest of the Chinese was proposed to him, “No, there are too many of them. Once teach them the art of modern warfare and they will overrun Europe and crush out our civilization.”

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.

                                             THE COUNTY PARLIAMENT.

In answer to a majority petition from Winfield township a committee was appointed to appraise school lands embraced in the southwest quarter and south half and northwest quarter of southeast quarter and northeast quarter of northeast quarter of section 36, township 31, range 7.

                                                LINCOLN ANNIVERSARY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.


Several departments of the city schools celebrated appropriately yesterday afternoon the twentieth anniversary of the death of Abraham Lincoln. The exercises were too late in the day to catch the evening COURIER before press hour. Nothing could possibly be more beneficial to pupils than a yearly recognition of the Country’s honored Statesmen, and authors, as well as the anniversaries of the leading epochs in our history. It instills a love of country and greatness in the mind of youth that can never be accompanied otherwise. The life of Abraham Lincoln furnishes many points upon which to expatiate, and the essays, declamations, and historical readings given in our city schools did the great hero full credit, and shows commendable enterprise on the part of the teachers and pupils.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.

The Cemetery Association has purchased one hundred cedar trees and many other evergreens to set out on the grounds. They will make an effort toward improving and beautifying the grounds this spring and summer. In this they will have the heartiest well wishes of every citizen. Next to the schoolhouse grounds, the cemetery needs attention most.

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                                           MAPLE GROVE. “OBSERVER.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.

Two tramps entered the schoolhouse on the night of the 10th, tore up things generally, carried off one gossamer coat, which had been forgotten on Friday, one pair of gloves belonging to S. W. Norton, three erasers, one new book on literature, three new histories, and one large unabridged dictionary, and cut off the broom-handle and skipped out east. This is an outrage, and the offenders should be brought to justice.

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                                         STAR VALLEY. “BOBBY DUFFY.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.

Robert Hammond’s school at Darien will close Friday. Rob is a good teacher and has given entire satisfaction.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.

The school ma’am and large scholars of district 115 gave the schoolhouse a general scouring last Friday afternoon.

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                                              NORTH RICHLAND. “BOB.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.

The temperance meeting which was held at the Summit schoolhouse the second Sunday of this month was well attended. The programme consisted of songs, speeches, and an essay by Mrs. John Groom, which was good.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.

                                                        GEUDA SPRINGS

                                                      NORMAL SCHOOL.

                                            Geuda Springs, Sumner Co., Kansas.

                    RATES OF TUITION, $2.00 PER MONTH FOR ALL GRADES.

Charges are made only for time pupils are in actual attendance.

First term opens April 20th and continues ten weeks.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 29, 1885.

                                                     OUR CITY SCHOOLS.

                                How the Young Idea is Being Taught How To Shoot.


Our reporter visited the West Ward school on Monday, and found teachers and scholars in the agony of a monthly examination. The studies that have been gone over during the past month are carefully reviewed, and a resume of the lesson is given in written exercises. In Miss Collins’ room our reporter found sixty scholars present, comprising the second and third reader grades. Excellent order prevailed, and a glance over the work of the scholars showed they were setting down what they knew about language. As text books are not used, the teachers impart instruction by oral lessons and blackboard examples; and the scholars in stating what they know are thrown largely on their own resources. The work in this room is merely elementary. The employment of capitals, the use of the particles “a” and “an,” rules for punctuating, and such minor details mark the progress made by these juvenile students. An examination day is not a favorable time for a visitor to discover the merits of a school, our itemizer made but a brief stay.

In Miss Patterson’s room he found 41 scholars present, out of 58 belonging to the school. The average attendance is 47. A few of the more dilatory are apt to stay away during examination, from the fear of exposing their weakness. The fourth and fifth readers are used in this room, and the exercises of the scholars show corresponding advancement. Miss Patterson exhibited with becoming pride some of her pupils’ feats in drawing, and as she herself possesses superior skill in this graceful accomplishment, it may be supposed she teaches the art with some success. The lady desires the publication of the following monthly report of her school.

The following pupils were 100 in attendance and deportment during the month of March: John Cue, Maud Adams, Estelle Kellogg, Grace Love, John Warren, George Armstrong, Dick Mitts, Pearly Lane, and Aola Krebs.

Their average scholarship was also 90 and upward. Aola Krebs passed the best term examination, having an average of ninety-eight. FLORENCE PATTERSON.

Miss Lena Gause teaches grades 6 and 7; there were but 19 percent in her room, out of an enrollment of 30. The scholars were busy writing brief memoirs of Professor Wilson, Longfellow, and other authors; their memory serving them for facts and the narrative their own composition. This was creditably done. The story was told with directness, the style (as a rule) was correct and natural, and the facts were grouped together without labor or distortion.

A few moments were devoted to Miss Ida Springer’s school, who had an attendance of 90 little folks, with 96 belonging. This is an immense task to impose on any fellow mortal, and if our school teachers after a few years of actual service give up, the victims of insomnia and nervous prostration, the evil is due to the overwork imposed on them by cruel task masters. Miss Springer conducts her school with admirable method. There is perfect order, the children are interested in their studies, and in their early attempts at writing, quite a number give promise of excellence.


The following general remarks may be made on this school. The building is new and pleasantly situated. The rooms are commodious, well lighted, and ventilated, and the single-seated desks provided for the scholars are a blessing to any community. (The most fertile cause of disorder in a school is sitting two scholars together, one of whom is unruly and who pesters his unhappy schoolmate with his exuberance.)  The halls are built on a liberal measurement, which admits of the classes entering and leaving the building without crowding or confusion. The dismissal of the two upstairs rooms was the perfection of school discipline and harmonious movement. On Arbor day Prof. Weir quite liberally set out the ground with saplings, and now if the school board would put up a fence around it, this very pleasing public building would assume a more finished appearance.

Prof. Weir speaks in terms of warm approval of the efficiency and esprit de corps of his teachers. The four ladies above named are certainly competent and painstaking. Well equipped for their duties, advanced in their methods, and devoted to their work, their attainments and fidelity should advance our schools to the foremost rank. And yet, we regret to state the fact, a careful observation of the result of their labors is somewhat disappointing. The average calligraphic skill of the pupils cannot be rated highly, and the spelling in all the rooms is certainly defective. One cause for the poor writing might perhaps be found in the scholars writing with pen and ink on a single sheet on the bare desk; and some of them using ink-bottles instead of ink wells, by which means they get their hands saturated with the discoloring fluid. It would be well also for the teachers to confine their scholars to black ink; carmine and purple tints look tawdry and where the writing is defective, they intensify its bad qualities. But the ladder of learning is not climbed in a day, and with the agencies now at work, we may look to see any ground that has been lost successfully made up.

                                                     IN THE FIRST WARD.

In Miss Peterson’s school, our reporter found thirty-eight scholars present, out of an enrollment of seventy names. The teacher accounted for the light attendance on the ground that scarlet rash was prevalent among her pupils. The second and third readers are used in this school, and arithmetic is taught as far as short division. Grammar is merely introduced by the scholars being taught to designate nouns as “name words,” verbs as “action words,” conjunctions as “connecting words,” and so on. One young grammarian in his haste to describe the word “and,” inadvertently called it a “Connection word.” To a teacher who, like Miss Peterson, has been accustomed to more advanced grades, it is a difficult matter after bringing her scholars to the portals of grammar, to suppress herself and proceed no farther. Naturally she desires to tell the more apt of her scholars about the intricacies of person, number, and case. During our reporter’s stay in this school, the B class read from a supplement, and both A and B classes wrote dictation lessons. This exercise is useful in testing the scholar’s proficiency in spelling, and it accustoms the memory to carry a sentence. In such sentences as, “animals and plants grow,” “John writes well, but George writes more rapidly,” the scholars are requested to underline the nouns, or some words. In the B class (18 scholars present), six erred in spelling.

There are a number of excellent writers in this school, and some of these were prompt to show their work to the newspaper man. Others betrayed evident carelessness, and assigned as a reason that their pencils were too short to write with, exhibiting morsels half an inch long in some cases. It would be wise for the school board to provide pencils, and place them in the care of the teacher.


Text books are not much used in the lower grades, the teacher being required to pump up knowledge from her own well of wisdom. This avoids the formalism of mere rote work, and develops the reason of the young folks more than a mere exercise of the memory. With such a mode of instruction, the A class wrote down about two score geographical terms, such as inlet, Isthmus, peninsula, promontory, with commendable exactitude. A map of Missouri was drawn on the blackboard by several scholars, the outlines and prominent features of the state being correctly given. A water piece, “Row, Boatman, Row,” etched in crayon by the teacher, shows her possessed of considerable skill as a draftsman. (This is no bull; commissions are made out to women as postmasters.)

When the studies were over and the books laid away, the scholars rehearsed short passages from the standard poets and also repeated a number of maxims. The emulation shown by the school to earn a favorable mention from the reporter showed a perfect support existing between teacher and scholar.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 30, 1885.

Some of our school girls are learning the “manly art.” Two of them, whose names we don’t have to tell, had a serious tussle one day recently. The trouble in this case, we believe, was about as follows. One of the boys had written his girl a note and it fell into the hands of a “Miss” for whom it was not intended. She refused to give it over when the girl to whom it was addressed demanded it, and then the war commenced. The list of the killed and wounded we failed to obtain. The auburn haired fiend of the Wellingtonian will please take note of the muscular ability of our girls, and forever lay his libelous pen on the shelf.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 30, 1885.

County Superintendent Limerick has just finished and sent out to the different townsite trustees plats of every school district in the county, in pursuance of a law passed by the late legislature. These plats will be a great convenience to teachers, school officers, and township boards.

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                                                         ROCK. “ROXY.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 30, 1885.

Miss Cora Robins visited her sister, Emma, Rock’s school teacher, last week.

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                                          TORRANCE ETCHINGS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 30, 1885.

Miss Eva Reynolds expects to have a May party at her school next Friday.

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                                            PLEASANT VALLEY. “CORA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 30, 1885.

The Sabbath school at the Victor schoolhouse is progressing finely.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 6, 1885.

The city schools were dismissed on Friday that the teachers and scholars might enjoy May day. They took a picnic on the banks of the Walnut, and had a happy time.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 6, 1885.


MARRIED. Wedding Bells. If there is no failure to connect, our debonair Presbyterian friend, Rev. J. O. Campbell will be married today. The bride is Miss Grace E. Medbury, formerly a teacher in our public schools, a lady of accomplishment and sterling worth. The practice so common among western celibates of going East for their brides is heartily condemned by the fair ones who gild home life with their presence; but when an enamored bachelor travels a thousand miles to recover a pearl that has got loose from our midst, such devotion is creditable and we award him praise. The happy couple are expected to arrive here by the end of the month, and then will be a good time to extend congratulations.

                                                         GIVE US LIGHT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 7, 1885.

The advanced position the young State of Kansas is taking in matters pertaining to the education of her people, the excellent school system—the immoralities filtrated from the commonwealth by the inauguration of an advanced political system are just occasions for pride and emulation. It is wise and commendable to look well to the qualification of those who are to occupy the position of teachers and instructors of the young. It is not only important but it is essential to success, in training and disciplining the intellect and morals of the young of our country, that the standard of qualification be high and exacting. While this is commendable, wise, and just, the applicant for the high position of teacher should have a just and fair opportunity to vindicate his capability and fitness for the high position in the examination by which his qualification is tested. The answers returned to the several questions, in the various branches to be taught, are to decide his fitness. That being so, it is but just to the applicant that the question propounded should be pertinent, clearly stated, and free from ambiguity so there can be no misapprehension of its intent and boundary. The questions should admit of an answer, positive, and unequivocal. If the question is itself, an absurdity, the applicant should not be held responsible for an absurd answer. Looking over the questions submitted by the State Superintendent, correct answers to which is the test of fitness, we find the following.

                                             PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE.

“Name, locate and give function of each of the five principal cavities of the body.” This question does not admit of an intelligent or rational answer. It is itself an absurdity too preposterous to be seriously propounded with any view to answer. A cavity is not a thing per se, but the absence of anything, a space enclosed by a wall or structure, which exists only relatively. It is a state or condition, not a thing. Since nothingness so far as we know can express no activity, so nothingness can have no function. The function of an organ is the work it does—the action it performs. An answer to this question would be in parallelism to the answer of an Indian when asked how guns were made. He said the white man took a hole and ran iron around it. A hole could as easily be taken and utilized for constructing gun barrels as to perform functions in the body. The organs enclosing cavities may perform functions, but cavities as yet have shown no inclination to function. How must the applicant answer this question to win, and how must he answer to lose? When this question has served its purpose and performed its function upon the pedagogue, and he writhes only in remembrance of it and his destiny by virtue of the answer he returned, will the State Superintendent please perform the trick publicly that we all may know how and with what cavities perform functions.


Question 4th: “Trace a particle of sugar from the mouth to the left hand, naming the various divisions of the digestive and circulatory tracts through which it passes.” Like the old philosopher when asked to explain why dropping bullets into a cup brim full of water did not run the water over, he is said to have answered because it does. So this question wants to be answered. You cannot trace a particle of sugar from the mouth to the left hand because it takes no such course. Sugar taken into the mouth, thence to the stomach, never enters the system as sugar at all. It is decomposed and loses all traces of sugar long before it enters the circulation. What sugar the blood contains is secreted by the liver, and it secretes sugar irrespective of any saccharine food taken into the stomach. How the applicant is to answer this question to win and how to lose, we hope our Superintendent will answer after it has served the purpose upon the pedagogue. We are pleased to see most of the questions are pertinent and to the point, and on the whole are well taken.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 7, 1885.

Madam Rumor says Miss Edith Holland contemplates attending some university next fall.

School was suspended in District 115 last Thursday and Friday because of the indisposition of the school marm.

New hitching facilities have been added to the Victor school grounds for the convenience of teams this week by the enterprising citizens adjoining.

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                                                OTTER VALLEY. “JESSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 7, 1885.

Miss Hattie Utley is teaching school in the east part of the county. May success attend her; also J. F. Rowe began his spring term of school at Windsor last Monday.

                                       MANHATTAN NOTES. “STUDENT.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 7, 1885.

Members of the entomology class are now capturing all the insects they can find and liberally treating them to cyanide of potassium.

Two weeks last Friday afternoon the students enjoyed a rhetorical feast prepared by a division of the third year class. The exercises were interesting and instructive.

Only seven more weeks of this term. Then the tired and book-worn students will be permitted to return to their happy homes and loving parents.

The class in botany are very busy gathering and analyzing flowers and plants. Each student is required to present at the close of the term forty or more different specimens. They must be pressed, mounted, and classified.

Last Friday, Miss Katie Markum was honored with the editorship of the Gleaner, the journal of the Alpha Beta Literary Society. An excellent number of the paper is reported to have been presented. Miss Markum is one of Cowley’s progressive students.

Thursday evening last the Board of Regents and Faculty, accompanied by their wives, were the guests of Mrs. Kedzie, superintendent of the culinary department. A sumptuous repast was served after which the gentlemen delivered brief but appreciative speeches. Ex-State Superintendent, A. B. Lemmon, was present with his lady.

Last Friday night the college was highly entertained with a lecture by Hon. Noble L. Prentis, under the auspices of the Alpha Beta Literary Society. Topic: “The temptation of Smith.” The large audience expressed their appreciation by frequent and hearty applause. The lecture was replete with wit, humor, and sparkling gems of thought.


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                                 FROM SOUTHEAST COWLEY. “PHINEAS.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 7, 1885.

What has become of our school district notices. They were posted in February, stating that if no appeal was taken, notices of the organization would be sent in, within the specified time. We have not heard from our worthy superintendent, who, since he has held the office, has been in the banner Republican precinct about ten minutes.

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                                            PLEASANT VALLEY. “CORA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 7, 1885.

Sunday school was organized at the Excelsior schoolhouse last Sabbath.

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                                                 DEXTER. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 7, 1885.

A Mr. Dover is teaching a subscription school in Dexter this summer. We wish him success.

We learn that Miss Minnie Secrist has returned from Kansas City, where she has been attending school.

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                                          TORRANCE ETCHINGS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 7, 1885.

Miss Mattie Rittenhouse closed her school Monday.

The May party given by Miss Eva and her school last Friday was quite a success. They ate dinner at the schoolhouse, and just had everything good to eat. After dinner Mr. I H. Phenis took them all down to the creek, where they spent the afternoon fishing. Miss Eva was presented with a nice cake by the school.

                                GIVE US AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885. Front Page.



The writer located in Winfield some few months past, and has come to stay. There is no subject before the public mind dealing with the future of this city which more deeply impresses nor should receive the serious attention of the people so much as the matter of establishing an Educational Institution in our midst at this time. While it is true that most of the citizens of this country have not located here for their health entirely, but have come for the purpose of satisfying their natural and legitimate desires for wealth and competence, yet the man who lives for the mere accumulation of “precious bane,” or the community which irrationally worships at the shrine of gold, will ultimately suffer the moral doom of the most despicable thing on earth—the miser. Our object in writing this article is to fan and encourage the idea of planting a college here which we think will prove of more permanent value to our county, which will shed more lustre over our community and enwreathe it with brighter laurels than all the railroads or spasmodic and financial schemes the most sagacious speculator can set forth; schemes which by reason of their uncertainty and the necessary evils they carry with them make their event doubtful, and sometimes very undesirable. A college in the city of Winfield, well endowed, sustained by a healthy growth, and as our wealthy men grow more wealthy, supported by their liberal contributions, would be a memorial worthy of this generation aside from the constant financial benefit which would accrue to our merchants, tailors, liverymen, grocers, and those engaged in all other lines of business. We want a college for the object of a college, viz: to develop the brain of this county and to keep apace with the spirit of the age, not to be dragged by it, but to guide. The object of education is the full and symmetrical development of all our faculties. That is the best education which approaches the nearest to this. The college course gives this training. It not only furnishes knowledge but it does something better: it brings out, it develops, it trains, it educates the man himself. It not only gives facts but shows how to reason upon these facts, and how to use them. A man’s mind, it has been well said, is a logic-engine. Education teaches how to run this engine—knowledge furnishes the material. The great aim of mechanics is to obtain the greatest power with the least expenditure of force, and so the aim of education is to do the hardest and best thinking with the least exertion. A college course affords this training, therefore we want the college. A second reason why we desire such an institution is because it gives culture. A college is not the place to get a merely practical education—a bread and butter education. He who estimates the value of his college course by the number of dollars and cents he makes from it had better stay at home. Education is culture. It recognizes a higher aim than money. If money is all that is desired, the common school is the best possible. The three “R’s” are of more importance to the businessman than the whole Latin or Greek language or all the scientific principles known. The studies of a college course are chiefly of two kinds, classical and scientific, and the particular advantage which these afford in the matter of culture cannot be overlooked by a discreet people. In this age and country there is a good deal of human nature in the rough. Classical studies refine and polish. They inspire a love for literature and that which is best among men, exhibiting incomparable models of style and at the same time calling into play and improvement memory, judgment, reflection, patience, taste, and imagination. The analytic and synthetic faculties, too, are constantly exercised and strengthened by the studies of the ancient languages. Scientific education is also one of great value. The scientist of today is one of the great benefactors of the human race. Our knowledge is so intimately connected with the universe that knowledge of the latter implies happiness in the former. A knowledge of natural forces is the foundation of invention, and the inventor is the true benefactor. A thousand years ago Latin was the language of business and science, but now men no longer dive for knowledge in the misty records of the past. They shy into the future. The old motto, “Recovery,” has been replaced by the “Discovery.” Therefore give us a college. If we are to have an imbecile asylum, for the sake of humanity give us something to counteract and parry off its grosh upon any of our citizens. Unite the two courses of training and the deficiencies of the one, which some men complain of and object to, will be supplied by the excellences of the other, and then we shall have greater strength, more refinement, broader comprehension in the intellectual faculties, and as a people prudent and powerful in all the relations and offices of life. Upon the education of your youth depends much. Let it be hoped that our citizens will work upon the true principle that they will plant and foster an institution of learning which, though it may not prove a successful financial speculation, will yet redound to the honor of this city. Give your children something which will nourish their youth, delight their old age, adorn their fortunes, and elevate their society; and you will do an act which will fall in blessings from the lips of a high-hearted and generous people and bloom in the memory of your children for many years. P. S. H.

                      [Note: Article had the word “grosh.” There is no such word.]

                                                   A BULLET SERENADE.

                 Our Officials Beard the Party Burglars in Their Den and Converse

                                                 Through the Pistol Medium.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885.

Winfield has been infested for some time past with some lazy whelps who make their living by nocturnal visits to residences and business houses, without invitation, appropriating anything they could get. Our officials have tried every way to locate them, but failed until last night. Marshal McFadden had been shadowing two heavily built, burly and poorly dressed individuals for several days as they perambulated our famous sidewalks with an I-wonder-who-we’ll-tackle-next expression, and determined that they had taken rooms for the night in the First Ward school building, the lock of one window of which was broken. Sheriff McIntire and Marshal McFadden therefore shortened the idea castle about nine o’clock. The Sheriff entered the hall while the Marshal watched the eight windows of the north wing. But the Sheriff had no light and a “grope in the dark” was not very rapid. The festive burglars tried to exit through a window, but the Marshal stood them off with his gun. Dr. Park happened along, and, taking him to be one of the gang, the Marshal pulled down on him. The Doctor at once confessed his identity and was dispatched to the jail to get a little light to throw on the subject. The flash of a lantern in the building made the burglars desperate, and, watching an opportunity, piled headlong out of a window in the darkness. The Marshal immediately opened fire on them. The first shot brought one of the fellows to the earth, but he got to his feet and then ensued a race for life. The Marshal emptied his “gun”—six shots—but the darkness was too much of a shield, and the fleet burglar got away. Tom Harrod was all this time following up the other disciple of the jimmy. Starting a considerable distance behind, his two shots were ineffective. One of them went so “wild” as to go through the wall of Alex. Graham’s house, corner of Eighth avenue and Platter street, passed within a foot of Alex.’s head, and lodged in the stove. The chase had to be given up fruitlessly. But a very bloody trace was found this morning near M. L. Robinson’s residence, proving that some of Marshal McFadden’s shots hit the mark. The sidewalk was sprinkled with blood all along, and our officials are certain of yet running in the victims.

                          COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT LIMERICK’S GRIST.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885.

Burden voted $2,000 last Thursday for additions to their already commodious school buildings.

Normal opens this year on the first Monday in July, the 6th, Prof. Wilkinson, of the State Normal, conducting.

District 80, “Springside,” in Bolton township, have voted bonds for a new and substantial schoolhouse; also district 97, “Crooked Elm,” Tisdale township.


At the last Teachers’ Examination, the first under the new law formulating the questions in the State Board of Education, out of the seventeen applicants, eight failed. At the last county examination, out of twenty-two, but four succeeded. It is not as easy to get a certificate as in days of yore. As our State and county grow older, we must have better educators. While the questions of the State Board are rigid, they are entirely within the bounds of reason and will have a strong tendency to raise our educational standard. County Superintendent Limerick is in receipt of many inquiries regarding the new mode of examination, some of which, when occasion requires, he will publicly answer through THE COURIER. The criticism made on the questions of the State Board in THE COURIER a week ago, will be answered by the State Superintendent in the Western School Journal, official organ of the State.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885.

Rev. J. H. Snyder preached the funeral of Mrs. Ed. A. Allen Sunday p.m. at schoolhouse 106, from the text, “Now they desire a better country.” Heb. 11:16. A large congregation was present, some being unable to get in the house.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885.

Miss Belle Page goes to “Darien,” Rock township, Thursday, for a two months’ summer school.

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                                           GRAND SUMMIT. “AMERICA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885.

The spelling school last Tuesday night was a failure on account of its raining.

Our school is being conducted by Miss Allie Wheeler, one of Cowley’s prominent young teachers.

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                                        CAMBRIDGE AND VICINITY. “M.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885.

A series of meetings will begin at the schoolhouse next Saturday evening, conducted under the auspices of the Christian denomination. We trust that this will be as great an outpouring of the Holy Spirit as there has been of rain during the past week.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885.

Prof. Craddock closed a successful term of school at Tannehill last Friday. “Mark” happened to be sauntering by and dropped in just in time to witness the closing exercise and catch on to the candy treat. The professor had provided a generous supply of stick candy and the scholars, patrons, and spectators enjoyed a toothsome feast. Prof. Craddock is an intelligent young man. He has made teaching his life work and will open a normal school at Geuda Springs shortly.

      Arkansas City Traveler, May 20, 1885.

                                                     Cheese Paring Economy.


Yesterday the school trustees sent the clerk of the board to the various printing offices in town to procure bids on a $5 job. The TRAVELER declined to enter into the competition. The trustees were prompted to this, most likely, by a proper regard for economy, but they have taken the wrong way to promote the public interest. Competition in this city is keen enough among printers to ensure a narrow margin of profit; and when a small job is to be done for the public, their scale of charges will not be found excessive. But if open bids are to be received on a trifling order, without specifications as to the quality of material used or class of work done, the tendency is to degrade the professional standing of the contestants, and force them into a cheap John business. The TRAVELER office prefers to stand aloof from such a contest.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 20, 1885.

                                                            A Blighted Bud.

DIED. We regret to announce the death of the oldest daughter of Major and Mrs. Sleeth, on Saturday evening, notice of which is given in another column. Maggie was a bright child, the pet of the household, and a favorite among her schoolmates. But fell disease had seized hold upon her, and during the last few months had blighted her young life. The funeral took place Monday forenoon at the residence of the bereaved parents, and many friends of the family were present to hear testimony to their grief.

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                                                           LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 21, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds yesterday.

The State to John Newman, w ½ of se ¼ of 36-34-s-4e, school land patent: $240

The State to Mary Newman, ne ½ of sw ¼ of 36-34-s-4e, school land patent: $240

Allen Mowery to School District 89, portion of se ¼ 12-33-s-3e: $70.00

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 21, 1885.

Prof. Gridley desires us to state for parental information that the city schools do not close on Thursday, as is supposed by some. They close Friday afternoon. The commencement exercises take place at the Opera House in the evening. A class of six birls and one boy will “commence.” How lonely the young gentleman must feel! But t’was ever thus—the young ladies are always excelling.

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                                                CAMBRIDGE NEWS. “H.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 21, 1885.

School closed Friday. Mr. Alberts has given general satisfaction the past term.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 27, 1885.

School examination has been in progress during the week, but we defer any report of the work until the next issue when the results will have been arrived at.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 27, 1885.

                                                            Funeral Notice.

DIED. The funeral of the late Wm. A. Badley will be preached in the Coburn School-house, on Grouse, next Sunday, May 31, 1885, by Rev. Kitch. Friends and neighbors of the family are invited to attend.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 27, 1885.


Several lovers of music in this city propose to form a class to be held in the brick schoolhouse and last through June. Prof. J. Warren Duncan, of this city, will conduct the class, with Miss Mary B. Bradley as assistant. Application for membership can be made to Will Blakeney. Prof. H. S. Perkins, of Chicago, has consented to close the term.

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Arkansas City Traveler, May 27, 1885.

                                                           Ordinance No. 6.

SECTION 5. That it shall be unlawful for any person to picket out any horse or cow or any other domestic animal within reach of any street, alley, or sidewalk within the city, or upon any school grounds.

Approved May 18th, 1885.

                                                F. P. SCHIFFBAUER, Mayor.

Attest, JAS. BENEDICT, Clerk.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 28, 1885.

The Catholic school closed last Friday. The teacher, Miss Bransfield, leaves for Leavenworth this week. Miss Bransfield has given entire satisfaction. Under her efficient management the school has been a success.

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                                                  TISDALE. “GROWLER.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 28, 1885.

Miss Dillon’s select school is simply immense.

Mrs. McLean has been in our city the last week teaching dress-making.

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                                                OTTER VALLEY. “JESSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 4, 1885.

Rev. Elliott, from Nevada, Mo., has been holding a series of meetings at the South Prairie schoolhouse the past week.

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                                                 STAR VALLEY. “DUFFY.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 4, 1885.

Miss Fanny McKinley, the last winter’s school ma’am of Star, was visiting friends here last week. Come again, Miss Fanny; the latch string always hangs out.

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                                                 DEXTER. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 4, 1885.

Mr. Dover, our worthy school teacher, has given good satisfaction so far.

Miss Lou Jarvis spent Sunday with Mr. Henry Branson’s family. Lou is teaching quite an interesting school southeast of Dexter. We wish her much success.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 4, 1885.

“Mark” is in receipt of “Farm Experiments,” a valuable pamphlet of fifty pages, by Prof. E. M. Shelton of the State Agricultural College at Manhattan. This little book is chock full of instructive information to farmers and may be secured by addressing the Professor as above.


Arkansas City Traveler, June 10, 1885.

                                                          Christian Services.

Rev. J. P. Witt will preach at the Baldwin Schoolhouse five miles east of this city on Sunday next at half after three o’clock p.m. All are cordially invited to attend.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 10, 1885.

The Sunday School social, to be given in the Parker schoolhouse this evening, will be a pleasant affair, and the object to be accomplished by the festivity recommends it to the good will of all.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 10, 1885.

                                                      Sunday School Festival.

A Sunday School festival will be given in the Parker Schoolhouse (two miles east of town) this (Wednesday) evening to raise funds to procure a library for the use of the scholars. Supper with ice cream will be provided, and music and singing will be given. A pleasant time will be enjoyed and all are invited.

                                                 QUARTERLY MEETING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 11, 1885.

The second quarterly meeting of Sheridan Circuit, Arkansas Valley Conference, U. B. church, will be held Saturday and Sabbath, June 13th and 14th, 1885, at Liberty schoolhouse, in Liberty township. Everybody is invited. Elder Parks will officiate. Rev. T. W. Williams, Pastor.

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                                         GRAND SUMMIT. “UNCLE JOE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 11, 1885.

Our school closes in two weeks with a picnic.

Mr. Dwire [?] preached a good sermon at the schoolhouse last Sunday.

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                                                    UDALL. “HAWKEYE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 11, 1885.

This school district has voted to issue bonds to the amount of $1,000 for the purpose of enlarging the schoolhouse. Great many children this year.

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                                     NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 11, 1885.

School in the village is out and Miss Aldrich has gone to her city home, to the regret of her little charges.

Mr. Lucas can see and be seen by most of his pupils, as they have him in their midst, even though school is closed.

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                                              TORRANCE ITEMS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 11, 1885.

Miss Eva Reynolds’ school closed last Saturday. She was presented with a nice quilt from her school. Eva was proud of her scholars and it seems they were proud of her.


Rev. Brady delivered a very interesting lecture at the schoolhouse last Tuesday evening, on “Heads.” Everybody seemed to enjoy it hugely. Rev. Kelly, of Winfield, made a few remarks, which were highly appreciated.

Our little town was pretty badly shaken up by the storm Monday. The tin roof on Mr. Higbee’s store was taken off and carried away. Part of the roof was taken off the schoolhouse. The roof on the livery stable was also blown away. The blacksmith shop and the barn at the Hotel were blown to the ground. Mr. McPherson was blown out of the shop onto a barb wire fence, cutting him up pretty badly. Several men and boys who were trying to get in from work were knocked down and some were carried quite a distance. Mr. Rockwell’s house was torn up badly. Mr. and Mrs. Higbee were obliged to move out of their house. It seems as though wind storms have a spite at Mr. Higbee, as this is the second time he has been visited by one inside of a year.

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                                       AKRON TINKLINGS. “DREAMER.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 11, 1885.

The first quarterly meeting for this conference year on the New Salem charge will be held at the Valley Center schoolhouse, next Saturday and Sunday. Preaching Saturday afternoon at two o’clock and in the evening at lamp light. Love feast Sunday morning at 10 o’clock; communion services at eleven o’clock, at which time further announcements will be made.

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                                           BETHEL ITEMS. “BLUE BELL.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 11, 1885.

The names of the visitors that were present the last day of school were as follows: Alec Shelton, Mrs. Maggie Weakley, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Buckner, Mrs. Mantz, Mrs. Fred Arnold, Mrs. L. B. Hotchkin, Anna Mantz, and Eva Anderson. There would have been a larger attendance of the patrons, but the men could not stop their plowing, even for an hour or two. What industrious creatures.

The Bethel school closed Friday. The names of the pupils who obtained the prizes were as follows: Jimmie Buckner, two; Orie Buckner, three. Ethel Shelton, Lena Buckner, Daisy Hassell, Henry Wilson, and Will Weakley all obtained a prize for not being tardy or absent. The patrons prepared a dinner for the teacher and scholars. All were well pleased with the teacher. A paper was read by Lena Buckner.

Arkansas City Republican, June 13, 1885.

The Sunday school festival will occur at the Parker Schoolhouse next Wednesday evening, June 17. The Traveler was mistaken in saying it came off Wednesday evening of this week. Remember, it is June 17. Quite a number will go out from here if the weather remains good. The proceeds are for a good cause and all who can should attend. The school is desirous of putting in a library and it takes this means to advance their cause.

Arkansas City Republican, June 13, 1885.

The Sunday school festival comes off out at Parker Schoolhouse next Wednesday night, June 17.

Arkansas City Republican, June 13, 1885.


Frank Hutchison went to Winfield Friday to accompany one of our accomplished school marms that far on her way home. While waiting for the return train, he concluded to visit a young lady residing in the vicinity of the Brettun House to while away tedious time. The consequence was Frank whiled away too much time. The train came and departed and still Frank lingered near, fascinated by the bewitching beauty of his lady friend. When the cocks began to crow for early dawn, Frank was still there waiting for that train. About noon Saturday Frank wended his way to the Santa Fe depot, wondering how the boys were getting along down at the store without him. ’Tis a bad plan, Frank, to have your love out of town especially when there is only one night train.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 18, 1885.

Tracy Elder, son of the Doctor, who has been attending the deaf and mute school at Council Bluffs, Iowa, came in Saturday. He has been setting type on the mute school paper during the past year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 18, 1885.

Since the carrying of the railroad bonds in Cowley County, and the location of the M. E. College at Winfield, that town has taken quite a boom. We do not get jealous at the success of our neighbors, but rather desire to see them prosper. We were quite anxious to see the college located either at Wellington or Winfield, and since Winfield is the lucky one, we give our hearty congratulations and best wishes for success. It is a matter of no small importance to the city that was lucky enough to get it. We want Winfield to go to work now, and get a railroad over here so our children can attend school. Geuda Springs Herald.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 18, 1885.

Mr. Hop Shivvers and Miss Lizzie Lawson were united in wedlock Monday afternoon by Rev. H. D. Gans, at the home of Miss Lawson’s parents in Tisdale township. They form a very happily mated couple. Hop is one of Winfield’s most sterling young men, thorough in business, of undoubted integrity, and an ambition that will shape a bright future. Miss Lawson graduated from our high school last year, with much credit, is accomplished, winsome, independent, and energetic—just such a young lady as always scores success in the battle of life. The earnest wish of THE DAILY COURIER is that Mr. and Mrs. Hop Shivvers may, in the words of the late lamented Rip Van Winkle, “leef long and been happy.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 18, 1885.

Miss Cora Robbins, who recently closed her school at Rock, will spend the summer in this city with Mrs. N. W. Dressie.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 18, 1885.

Mrs. N. J. Lundy and Miss Ella Kelly dropped in on THE COURIER Tuesday. Miss Kelly has recently returned from the State Normal School, where she graduated with much credit. Though having taken the course in a remarkably short time, with very hard study, she looks well. She is one of our most independent, ambitious, and capable young ladies, and we are glad to see her advancing in educational circles.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 20, 1885.


Thursday night of last week as a couple of young ladies were returning home from prayer meeting, upon arriving at a somewhat obscure place on the way, were confronted by two men, who grabbed at them. One of the girls jumped and screamed, the other was not so fortunate, for one of the villains caught her and slipped his arm around her waist. Fortunately for the young ladies, a house was not far distant and the screams which were emitted by them brought a gentleman to their rescue. But a few evenings previous to this two of our lady school teachers were treated in an almost like manner. They escaped by running into a house nearby. We withhold the names of all the ladies on account of the high social positions which they occupy. Should the brutes be discovered who thus openly insulted our girls, the citizens of Arkansas City should teach them a lesson they would never forget.

Arkansas City Republican, June 20, 1885.

Miss Theresa Halsel, a bright and handsome young lady who has been attending our schools here for some time, left last Monday for her home at Decatur, Texas. She was accompanied by her brother.

Arkansas City Republican, June 20, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Huey, Fred Farrar, Rev. Fleming and wife, Rev. Walker and wife, Misses Nellie Johnson and Hattie Corey, and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hess attended the festival at the Parker Schoolhouse Wednesday evening. They were well entertained.

Arkansas City Republican, June 20, 1885.

The following names compose a list of the teachers who will be employed in the Arkansas City schools next year.

J. C. Weir, Superintendent.

Miss Bell Everets

Miss Florence Patterson

Miss Jennie Peterson

Miss Nellie Nash

Miss Etta Farris

______ Walton

Nellie Cunningham

Miss Corea Crutcher

Miss Eva Collins

Miss Lizzie Wilson

Mrs. L. Theaker

Mr. Joseph Bryon [? Wonder if this should be Bryan?]

                                                  MORE SCHOOL ROOM.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 25, 1885.


The city School Board have decided to call an election to vote $4,000 in bonds for additional school buildings. This matter seems to be a necessity. Last winter, with our three schoolhouses, all children under seven years had to be excluded—about 250, for want of room. Our city is increasing in population and the Board thinks if more room is not provided, four hundred children will have to be excluded next winter. The population of northeast Winfield is not yet sufficient to demand a school building—a more commodious building is needed centrally located. The idea of the Board is to build a similar addition on the north end of the first ward building to that built on the south end. It would give plenty of room for some time to come and be a matter of economy. The heating apparatus can be run from the basement of the one building, and a saving made in several ways. The Board have a special meeting tomorrow evening at W. J. Wilson’s office, over the post office, where they would like to have as many of our representative citizens as possible meet with them. If anyone has anything to say, this will be the time to say it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 25, 1885.

The School Board at their meeting at Will Wilson’s office Saturday morning passed resolutions to vote bonds to the extent of $8,000 to build an addition to the Central School building. We need more school room, and must have it.

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                                                OTTER VALLEY. “JESSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 25, 1885.

Miss Hattie Utley’s school closed last Friday.

J. F. Rowe’s school closed at Windsor last Friday week.

Rev. Webb, of East Otter, preached at Highland schoolhouse last Sunday.

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                                        OTTER TOWNSHIP. “CLIPPINGS.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 25, 1885.

Supt. Limerick made us a flying visit last week in connection with dividing district No. 63, but have not heard how he divided it.

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                                                 DEXTER. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 25, 1885.

Our Sabbath school is progressing nicely. Dexter school closed last Friday week.

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                                              AKRON TINKLINGS. “PET.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 25, 1885.

Quarterly meeting was held at the schoolhouse last Saturday and Sunday. There was a large attendance and interesting services.

Arkansas City Republican, June 27, 1885.

DIED. Tuesday, Lillie M., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Braden, died from a severe attack of typhoid fever. Three weeks ago she was taken sick and has lingered between life and death until the latter claimed her as its victim. Her funeral was preached at the residence by Rev. N. S. Buckner and her remains were interred in the Parker Schoolhouse Cemetery Wednesday. The deceased was 13 years of age and the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Braden.

Arkansas City Republican, June 27, 1885.

The Sabbath school of the Parker Schoolhouse wish to tender their thanks through your paper to the merchants of the city for the handsome way in which they responded to the call of the soliciting committee of the festival given for the benefit of the school. COMMITTEE.

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[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: “LAPSUS LINGUAE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, June 27, 1885.


“The Hero of Tannehill” exists in the person of a young gent of bombastic style, who lately pranced the streets of Winfield and frothing of the mouth, hurled his anathemas upon our worthy superintendent of public instruction. Why? Because “the Hero” was examined and failed to get a certificate to teach. Now, honest thinking people, those who think the “Hero” was unfairly treated, if any there be, in the name of common sense, go and examine his papers, which are in the hands of the superintendent, A. H. Limerick; then we kindly ask you to credit A. H. Limerick with the honesty which he deserves.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Rev. Wm. Parker came in from Oak Valley Tuesday, on his way to Clearwater, and tells us of a serious episode of two fast young men who came to Oak Valley with a fine livery rig. They got full, in some mysterious way, started home, and ran pell mell through two wire fences. The horses were cut to pieces and died in two hours, amid groans and horrible agony. The young men were put in a schoolhouse to sober off and the next morning viewed the three hundred dollar wreck and were taken down with the “blues.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Prof. W. E. Merriman is delighted with the prospects opening up before him in our city. Prof. Merriman, as a music teacher, has been remarkably successful and will no doubt receive more work here than he can attend to himself.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Miss Lina Conrad, one of Winfield’s most accomplished young Misses, will leave her many friends on Tuesday evening for Toronto, Canada, where she will enter the Ontario College of Music, conducted by Prof. Farringer, formerly of Winfield. Miss Lina has been a successful teacher of piano music for some time past, but not being satisfied with her present attainments, is ambitious to succeed to the highest accomplishments in the musical world. With such energy and pluck, we predict for her a bright and prosperous future. She will spend at least one year in the Ontario College of Music, when she will return to her parents and many friends who will welcome her home. Lina, you have the best wishes or all your friends and associates.

                                    MORE SCHOOL ROOM A NECESSITY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.


The action of the School Board in providing more school room for immediate use is certainly a wise and timely move, and adding to the Central school building is the most economic and desirable. It saves, at this time, the purchase of additional grounds, and it saves, also, largely in the cost of the building, as the north wall of the present building can be utilized, and the cost of an entire basement saved. This, also, puts the room where it is easily accessible from all parts of the town. With the proposed addition, it will add much to the appearance of our Central school building, and make it an ornament, a finished and complete structure. It is impossible to accommodate our schools with our present room; we must have accommodations for at least 250 additional sittings, to, in any way, make our schools efficient. Our schools are overcrowded, our teachers are overworked, more room and more teachers are absolutely imperative. The School Board in February last were compelled to exclude from our schools all children under the age of seven, and even then, with our new East Ward school added, every room was overcrowded. It is our duty to provide for at least 250 more pupils than our largest enrollment of last year. The School Board expect, and should have, the hearty cooperation of every citizen interested in our schools. If this matter is now hastened, the additional room can be ready for occupancy October 1st, and our schools can then commence with plenty of room and plenty of teachers, and our people can then demand from teachers first-class work in every way. Let every voter go to the polls on the 8th of July, vote for the bonds and thus aid in this enterprise of most vital importance to our people and to our city. CITIZEN.

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                                                OTTER ITEMS. “NETTIE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Preaching every 3rd Sunday at the Otter Creek schoolhouse by Rev. York, at 11 a.m.

Notwithstanding the hot weather the Otter Creek school is doing excellent work under their wide-awake teacher, Mr. Hardin. It will close in two weeks.

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                                                 THE COUNTY FATHERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

E. J. Johnson, J. Hurt, and Wm. Reynolds were appointed to appraise s hf se qr and e hf sw qr and nw qr 36-33-6 school land.

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                                     NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Misses Mary Dalgarn and Ola Crow will be city ladies for a few weeks, as they are attending Normal. Our best wishes go with the girls and we wish them the reward due good, studious school ma’ams. Good bye, girls, we shall miss your friendly greeting at Sunday School and elsewhere.

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[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: “LAPSUS LINGUAE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 11, 1885.

The directors of school dist. 4 have requested L. P. King to teach their winter term of school.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 11, 1885.

Notice. Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Clerk of the board of education of the City of Arkansas City, Kansas, until six o’clock p.m. on the 3rd day of August, 1885, for one janitor for the West School Building; bids to be so much per month for the term. None but an honest, responsible bid will be accepted, and the Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD.

July 5, 1885. Alex Wilson, Clerk.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 11, 1885.

                                                            German School.

On next Monday afternoon the undersigned will open a German School in the brick schoolhouse and continue six weeks. Lessons will be given from 4 to 5 p.m. and from 7 to 9 a.m. Thorough instructions will be given to all pupils and satisfaction guaranteed if attendance is regular. Respectfully, MRS. MOLLIE BISH.

                                                       NORMAL SOCIAL.

                         The Pretty School Ma’ams Congregate for a Good Time.

                                           Beauty, Gallantry, and Intelligence.


Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The members of the Normal Institute held a social in McDougal’s Hall Thursday, for genial commingling with each other and our citizens. Depositing his heart in the safe, under a time lock, our elongated reporter hied himself to the scene, and a happy, good-looking and entertaining lot of folks he found—among the ladies. The gentlemen, as usual at every gathering, were horribly ugly, in comparison. As our reporter stood awkwardly in the corner, with no place to put his big hands and no room for his huge pedal extremities, his eyes took in several things. County Superintendent Limerick was master of ceremonies. Elder Myers, of the Christian church, gave a sparkling welcome address, responded to very happily by Prof. Wilkinson, conductor of the Institute. Mrs. O. McGuire read a pithy essay on the educational profession, and Prof. Davis gave an applicable and mirthful little talk. Then a novel scheme was carried out, that of finding from what states the teachers present had come from to Kansas. Pennsylvania had two represented in a neat little speech by Mr. Littell, who mentioned that he was delighted with Kansas, but his heart was way back east—a sad blow to the girls. West Virginia also had two, one of whom, Mr. McClellan, told of its glories and sorrows, as compared to the Garden of Eden. North Carolina stood with the preceding ones, two, with the wittiest oration of all from Bob Holland. Kentucky had three, and Elder Myers and Prof. Craddock discussed its virtues and failings. George W. Bain, who is attending the Normal, wasn’t present. Wisconsin had two to unfurl her banner, which was done very nicely by Mr. Arnett. Michigan had two, without any speechifier. Ohio had six representatives and one orator, Will C. Barnes, who thought the Sunflower state at the head of the procession. Hoosierdom came up with a boom, sixteen. The orators of the occasion were divided as to the merits of her school system. Mr. H. A. Owens thought it far inferior to that of Sunny Kansas, while Miss Fannie Stretch and Mrs. O. McGuire touched the ire of the native Kansan by going back on the Sunflower State—placing the Hoosier school system above ours. Illinois carried off the golden belt in numbers, twenty-one. Mr. S. F. Owens, H. S. Wallace, and Miss C. E. Plunket discoursed on its merits, while Mrs. Limerick was proud to have come from the state that gave us Lincoln and Grant and that had old John Brown. Iowa showed fourteen. Mr. F. E. Haughey spoke splendidly of her grand prohibition record and commended Kansas for her proud advance. The Empire State was represented by but one, Miss Celina Bliss. “Arkansaw’s” spokesman was absent. But Kansas came up smiling with thirty-three, who had first taken up the pointer within her borders. Prof. Gridley, who was one of the first graduates of the State Normal, was chosen orator. He was proud to belong to the State of baked beans, grasshoppers, and chiggers, ending with a mention of her grand record. Prof. Limerick announced three lectures during the session of the Normal: Dr. Kirkwood, “Obedience to Law as Related to the Teacher,” Prof. Jay, principal of the Wellington schools, “Our Boys,” and Prof. Cowbric, principal of the Harper schools, “The Teacher’s Place in the Nation.” During the evening the musical talent was let loose, conducted by Prof. Merriman, closing with “America.” It was a very pleasant occasion throughout. There should be more such socials during the Normal.

                                                 THE COUNTY NORMAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.


The County Normal Institute is moving along finely. Our modest reporter dropped down among those in attendance and is prepared to say that it is the best looking of any Normal Cowley has ever had. In appearance, interest, and zealous intelligence, it shows a splendid advance. Educational matters, as our county grows older, are enhancing. It isn’t everyone who can get a certificate now. Better teachers and better wages are becoming the motto of all people truly interested in education—the foundation of all that is substantial and ennobling. The attendance has now reached nearly a hundred and fifty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Some little rapscallions have been committing depredations on the several school grounds of the city, breaking down trees, knocking out window lights, and like vandalism. The School Board offers a reward of ten dollars for any one of the little rascals. They mean to make it sultry for them.

                                          THE SCHOOL BOND ELECTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The election yesterday to vote $8,000 bonds for additions to the Central school building resulted in a majority of 109 for. The following is the vote.

First Ward.       For: 102.    Against: 54.

Second Ward.        For:   56.    Against: 12.

Third Ward.           For:   68.    Against: 17.

Fourth Ward.         For:     8.    Against: 42.

The vote of the 4th ward is a sad revelation. It seems to prove the inhabitants to all be Democrats, and of course opposed to education. Only eight voters who can read and write! Heavens, what a commentary!! And in Winfield—the banner city of the banner county of the banner State of the Union. We write this without the least trepidation knowing that none of those 42 fourth warders can read it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The school Board, at its last meeting, voted to offer a reward of $10 to anyone giving information of anyone committing depredations upon the school premises. This is business. Let no guilty one escape.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Normal, this session, is the largest and most successful ever held in the county. A number of live teachers from other counties and States are in attendance, and the regular recitations give both faculty and students an opportunity to be present and participate in the exercises. The large audience room of the Christian church was well filled yesterday, with an attentive and appreciative audience. The attention and general good conduct of the students is exceedingly creditable to themselves and to the Institution. There is a great deal going on that we have not the pleasure of hearing, as we are only a visitor and do not wish to intrude; but we think if more parents would visit the schools and see the good that is being done for their children, there would be less fault finding, for the instructors are doing their duty nobly. Now, good friends, let us do ours. Let each parent turn out and see what is being done. O. M.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.


Nearly every town in southwestern Kansas is building new schoolhouses this summer. This speaks well for the growth of the country. This city will require several more teachers the coming year than were employed last term.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The writer trusts that “Peddle,” of your e. c., will be able to make the riffle this time and once more plant his avoirdupois in some backwoods school room arm chair, as a target for paper wads and wry faces.

This locality is well represented at the Normal—so far as attendance is concerned—in the persons of Myron Cronk, Mrs. Amy Chapin, Mr. E. M. and Miss Nettie Anderson, Miss Edith and Bob Holland, and Miss Carrie Roseberry.

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                                               ARKANSAS CITY. “FRITZ.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The ex-school master and noted politician of the fourth ward seems to be about as anxious to get rid of some of our city officers as he was to secure their election, if we may judge from the meeting he called for Friday evening. In this desire he is not alone, although there are some doubts as to the propriety of his giving the ball the first kick, and yet if the learned professor desires to leave the mug-wump ranks and identify himself with the interests of the city, it would be a shame to discourage him. And then he may want to become City Attorney, who knows? But let it begin when it may, there is the most urgent need of reform in our city government. There is hardly a day passes that some of our city ordinances are not openly and shamefully violated, and if perchance the offender is brought before the bar of justice (?) it is very often only to find that through the ignorance of our officers the ordinance is worthless.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 18, 1885.

Notice. Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Clerk of the board of education of the City of Arkansas City, Kansas, until six o’clock p.m. on the 3rd day of August, 1885, for one janitor for the West School Building; one janitor for the East School Building; bids to be so much per month for the term. None but the lowest, responsible bid will be accepted and the Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

                                                BY ORDER OF THE BOARD.

July 14, 1885. Alex Wilson, Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.

The schoolhouse in district No. 89, East Bolton, known as the Dickenson and Mowry school, has had its names changed, and is now called the I X L school.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.

                                                      Cheeseparing Economy.


The school board of Arkansas City desire to engage a janitor for the fourth ward schoolhouse for the ensuing year. When a private employer wishes to engage a hand, he makes his want known, and takes the most suitable man from the applicants for the place on his agreeing to serve for the price named. But our school trustees resort to a different method. They advertise in a city paper for sealed proposals from those seeking the office, each eager applicant to name his price, and the award to be given to the lowest responsible bidder, the board reserving the right “to reject any and all bids.” We condemn this proceeding as wrong in principle. It is setting one needy man to bid against a host of others, and results in grinding the face of the poor. The service is worth so much, and the trustees, eight in number, as businessmen, know what it would be fair to the taxpayers to pay for such an office. They mistake their duty to the public if they suppose it behooves them to run the wages of their employees down to starvation point, and pauperize those whom they have dealings with. Let them bear in mind the old scriptural precept, “the laborer is worthy of his hire.”

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.

We acknowledge the receipt of the 19th annual report of the officers and students of the University of Kansas for the collegiate year just closed. The compiler of the report furnishes this gratifying summary: “The University shows many signs of substantial progress, leaving to the high and grammar schools and academies of the state the preparatory work which properly belongs to them. It is growing stronger and more efficient in all collegiate and professional lines.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Father J. F. Kelly and sister, Miss Sarah, leave this week to reside at Wellington. This will be regretted by all. During Father Kelly’s pastorate of our Catholic church, he has made a host of warm friends, while Miss Sarah is highly esteemed by our young folks. Wellington is fortunate. Father Kelly goes to Wellington because of its better facilities for a good Catholic school. An accomplished teacher of Leavenworth has been secured, and a better school is promised than was maintained here. Father Dougan, who was with our Catholic church for a time several years ago, will take Father Kelly’s place here.

                                                              AN OASIS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

There are oasis in the desert of even the knights of the faber. Mr. G. W. Robertson laid upon our table Saturday morning as beautiful a cake as was ever turned from the gentle hand of woman. It was a remembrance from the ladies of Excelsior, two and a half miles south, who gave one of their enjoyable and always successful Sunday School socials the other evening. The writer shot almost his first ideas and paper wads within the walls of Excelsior schoolhouse, and any token from that district always gets his warmest appreciation.

                                          THE NEW SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The School Board, at its last meeting discussed the feasibility of tearing away the old stone building just north of the new wing of the Central schoolhouse, to join the new building, for which $8,000 has just been voted, to the south wing. That old building is a perfect shell. By putting this new wing on its site, a fine tower can be built in the center and a bell put in, which the city needs badly. Then some style could be given the structure, with four additional rooms.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.


The Cambridge News thinks “a man who won’t fall in love with a charming school-dame is a fit subject for transportation to the cholera -infected districts of Spain,” and declares our Normal Institute capable of laying successful siege to every young masculine heart in Winfield. Correct, Brother Wilkinson. And they have done it. But the coquettish damsels only do it to go back to their more substantial gallants, the country young men, leaving the city dudes to commit suicide, or throw themselves in the path of the howling Cheyennes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

M. C. Klingman sends us the Meriden Report, Jefferson County, a paper he has just started with the appendage “please ex.” You bet we will. “Mac” is one of the old COURIER boys, one of Cowley’s pioneers—one who grew up and got his “larning” on her soil, and we are glad to note his advance. Mac and the writer shot ideas and paper wads together at the first term taught in the first country schoolhouse built in this county, Excelsior, whose first school was held in 1870.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A basket meeting will be held at the Prairie Ridge schoolhouse, 6 miles west of Dexter, on Sunday, August 2nd. Services will be conducted by Rev. T. W. Woodrow, Universalist minister, of Hutchinson.

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                                          SILVERDALE, NO. 28. “GOSSIP.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Preaching at the schoolhouse Tuesday night by Rev. Mr. Walker, of Arkansas City. We understand that Mr. Harris will address the people at this place next Sunday.

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                                          TORRANCE ETCHINGS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The ladies missionary society of this place will give an ice cream social at the Torrance schoolhouse on Wednesday night, July 29th. Everybody is invited.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 25, 1885.

                                                    “Cheeseparing Economy.”

The Traveler has produced its second article on “Cheeseparing Economy.” Like the former it lacks consistency as well as common sense. In speaking of the school board advertising for bids for the janitorship of the city schools, it says:

“When a private employer wishes to engage a hand, he makes his want known, and takes the best suitable man from the applicants for the place on his agreeing to serve for the price named. But our school trustees resort to a different method. They advertise in a city paper for sealed proposals from those seeking the office, with the eager applicant to name his price, and the award to be given to the lowest responsible bidder, the board reserving the right to reject any and all bids. We condemn this proceeding as wrong in principle. It is setting one needy man to bid against a host of others, and results in grinding the face of the poor. The service is worth so much, and the trustees, eight in number, as businessmen know what it would be worth to the taxpayers to pay for such an office. They mistake their duty to the public if they suppose it behooves them to run the wages of their employees down to starvation point, and pauperize those whom they have dealings with.”


The writer of the above tries to manufacture a mountain out of a molehill. The criticism is unjust. A school board is justified in advertising for bids for the letting of any city work. The school trustees of last year advertised for bids for a similar purpose. They also advertised for bids for the building of the Central School House. According to the Traveler’s theory, this was all wrong. They were grinding the face of the poor. They should have themselves, being businessmen, made an estimate of the cost and awarded the contract to some individual without regard to competition. Each man who bids for the janitorship of the school buildings well knows what he values his own services at, and he makes out his bid accordingly. The board looks over the several bids received and from them it makes a selection. In this manner they get the work done at a reasonable figure. ‘Tis not the grinding of the poor, but it is a discretion the board should use to keep extortionate wages from being charged. It is just to advertise for bids to erect a schoolhouse, it is also just to advertise for bids to take care of them. It is evident that the editor of the Traveler is deficient in business tact, when he tries to knock competition out of business circles in this western country and especially our own bright sunny state. That is impossible. The motto of the state is competition.

Arkansas City has had a little experience in the non-bidding plan. We refer to the action of last year’s defunct city council on the water works question. O’Neil came along and told that body he would put in works and they accepted his proposal without a competitive bid or investigation. It was the people’s money that had to pay for it and the city dads could afford to spend it freely. If bids had been asked for it would have been “grinding the face of the poor,” you know. Poor O’Neil!

It appears that the editor of the Traveler has been receiving instructions from certain members of that dead body or he is not aware of the meaning of the subject on which he writes. The REPUBLICAN illustrates its idea of “cheeseparing economy” with the following example.

We will suppose that a man is publishing a nine column newspaper; business gets dull and the publisher immediately reduces his sheet to an eight column until business revives. By this “cheeseparing economy” for a few weeks the subscribers of the paper are cheated out of four columns of reading matter, each week, and the publisher violates his contract.

When the council let the city printing a short time ago, they asked for bids from the three printing offices. The Traveler never made mention of this “grinding of the poor” printers; “of this setting up one needy man against a host of others.” It did not dare for fear of decapitation. If the Traveler should happen to open its tiny mouth and whisper “cheeseparing economy” in regard to that matter, it would offend its “bosses.” But we wonder if that sheet won’t advocate the awarding of the janitorship to the 5 percent less man. We believe Bro. Lockley needs company.

In the REPUBLICAN’s advocacy of the removal of the ex-city attorney for incompetency, the Traveler for a time did all in its power to thwart our purpose. Upon discovering that it had pursued the wrong course in regard to the matter some weeks ago, it did not have the courage to come out and say that it was in the wrong; that the editor’s credulity had been imposed upon by scheming persons. To be cognizant of a wrong and unwilling to confess it makes a double wrong. The animus of the Traveler is apparent. If it had been selected by the school board to do its advertising, all would have been lovely. As it was not, hence the howl.

Arkansas City Republican, July 25, 1885.


CITY BOOK STORE, Has on hand WORKS OF FICTION, HISTORIES, SCHOOL BOOKS, NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES, ETC. The Only Complete Stationery Furnishers IN ARKANSAS CITY. S. P. GOULD, Proprietor.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 29, 1885.

                                                      That School Janitorship.

The Republican makes a rambling arraignment of an article published in our columns last week, condemning the method adopted by our school trustees in hiring a janitor. They advertise for bids, thus setting one needy person to jostle against another, the result of which will be starvation wages for the man employed. This we called grinding the face of the poor. Our jejune contemporary says if this plan is wrong, so is advertising for bids to build a schoolhouse wrong. How many of his readers agree with this dictum? The public interest must be guarded where the expenditure of a large sum of money is involved, and an employer of labor is supposed to be able to take care of himself. If a contractor through defective calculation undertakes a job at less than actual cost, it will serve as a lesson to greater caution in the future. But the case is different when needy laborers are in issue. They should be protected from the dilemma our school trustees would lead them into. The poor we have always with us, and the christian duty enjoined on us all is not to increase their burden. Simple humanity teaches that a public board, in hiring a laborer, should pay him such wages as his duties fairly performed are worth, the taxpayers for whom they act being desirous that justice should be done. The Republican, conscious of a weak cause, has devoted upwards of a column to prove an absurdity; but we are safe in saying that not a fair minded person in this school district but condemns the oppression to which we have called attention.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

A basket meeting will be held at the Prairie Ridge schoolhouse, 6 miles west of Dexter, on Sunday, August 2nd. Services will be conducted by Rev. T. W. Woodrow, Universalist minister, of Hutchinson. All are invited.

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                                           BETHEL ITEMS. “BLUE BELL.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

H. D. Hanna and sons and daughters went to church up at Valley Center schoolhouse Sunday. They report a good meeting.

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                                                      COUNTY AUDITOR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The following claims were allowed in July.

Postage and express, A. H. Limerick, $7.85

School exam, C. T. Atkinson, $3.00

School exam, Nellie Aldrich, $12.00

School exam, W. C. Barnes, $12.00

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Cowley’s third quarterly teacher’s examination commences next Monday. The Normal Institute closes Friday.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 5, 1885.

                                                     Degrading Honest Labor.


On Monday evening the school board opened the bids put in by the various eager aspirants after the lucrative position of janitor in the first and fourth ward schools. The very reasonable objection of the TRAVELER to this method of degrading and impoverishing honest labor was cited by some of those present and the belief expressed that the taxpayers of the city did not want any of their public servants reduced to starvation wages. But this irreverence provoked the ire of our educational guardians, and after indulging in some disparaging remarks on the license of a Philistine press, these disciples of a cast-iron economy comforted themselves with the mutual assurance that they understood their own business. The award of the first ward janitorship was made at $23 a month, and that of the fourth ward at $16 a month. The pay of the first ward janitor was pronounced the most shamefully inadequate because he has the frame schoolhouses also to attend to, and has to sub-hire the help of a stout lad. We trust our school trustees are now serene with the consciousness of a work well done.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 5, 1885.

Wm. R. Smith was appointed by the school board at its last meeting as professor of penmanship in our public schools for the ensuing term. This is a step in the right direction on the part of the board, and it is worthy the commendation of the parents for the action taken. As to the selection made, no one can doubt of the fitness of Mr. Smith, as he is a graduate from under the personal instruction of Prof. Henry C. Spencer.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The regular quarterly meeting of the Free Baptists will convene at Liberty schoolhouse in Liberty township, on Friday, the 7th of August, holding over Sunday. The place is 11 miles Southeast of Winfield and one mile east of the Magnolia farm. There will be a basket dinner on Sunday. A cordial invitation is extended for everybody to attend.

                                                        CITY TEACHERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The school board has employed the full corps of city teachers, excepting those for the new Central school building, which will not be finished before September 18th, as follows: A. Gridley, Principal, $125 per month; Prof. W. N. Rice, High School, $60; Miss Louise S. Gregg, $50; Miss Lois Williams, $45; Miss Sada Davis, $45; Miss Maude M. Pearson, $40; Miss Iva Crane, $40; Miss Lucretia Davis, $40; Miss Mary Berkey, $40; Miss Alice E. Dickie, $50; Miss Mattie Gibson, $45; Miss Mary E. Hamill, $45; Miss Mary Bryant, $50; Miss Florence Campbell, $50; Miss Clara Davenport, $40; Miss Jessie Stretch, $50; Miss Fannie Stretch, $45.

                                 ANOTHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.


Prof. J. A. Wood, brother of our B. F., will open on September 7th, a Normal and Commercial College in the McDougal Hall and rooms adjacent. He will be assisted by Prof. I. N. Inskeep, just retired from the principalship of the Titusville, Pennsylvania, commercial college. Prof. Wood was for eight years just past superintendent of the Salem, Indiana, public schools, and is an educator of large ability and experience. He starts this college as a permanency. A corps of first-class assistants have been procured and the institution will be an honor to the city. Prof. Inskeep is at the head of the profession in penmanship, bookkeeping, and drawing. Everything pertaining to a thorough normal and commercial education will be taught, and the tuition will come within the reach of all. A night school will accommodate all unable to attend during the day, and will likely be attended by many of our ambitious young men.

                                                SCHOOL MA’AM SOCIAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The pretty school ma’ams held another of their lively socials in the McDougal hall Thursday. They were out in full force, with many of our citizens, arrayed in their brightest smiles and jolliest spirits. Besides the excellent music, led by Prof. Merriman, some appropriate toasts were given. “Our State Educational Institutions—Their Place and Power,” was responded to by Prof. Wilkinson in a very neat speech. The Professor has taken part in Kansas educational matters for some time, and is thoroughly conversant with them and their great civilizing power, as his talk on this occasion evidenced. The pithy toast, “Our State Normal School—Its Attractions, Its Usefulness, and Its Successful Graduates,” was thrown at Prof. Gridley. It was one nearest the Professor’s heart, and he did it full justice. He is one of the first graduates of the State Normal School, has attended nearly all of its alumni meetings, and his speech was very happy and profitable. Alfred Wing, of Arkansas City, responded to “Our Common Schools, the Headlight of the Nation”—a subject as truthful, deep, and broad as the nation itself. Mr. Craddock, of Tannehill, did justice to “The Recruits of our Educational Army.” These applicable toasts gave spice and instruction to the occasion and were happily received.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Judge Gans filed his appointment at the schoolhouse last Sunday, morning and evening. The house was crowded to its utmost capacity, and some went home who could not conveniently get in. His sermon was full of straight forward, practical truths, and held the closest attention of the large audience. He will preach here again on the fourth Sunday in August. Burden Enterprise.

                                           THE NEW SCHOOL BUILDING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.


Our school board has been busy at their regular and adjourned meetings for the past few months, endeavoring to select or contrive a plan for the proposed addition of four school rooms to the Central school building, that will meet the wants in regard to capacity necessary, and at the same time make a building that will be in good style and proportion. Sketches were submitted to them at their meeting two weeks ago, which provided for the addition of two rooms on each floor, adjoining the building on the north, and was thought first to be the correct idea, but upon close study and examination it was readily seen that it would make an inconvenient plan, because of having two separate halls and stairs, with no communication with each other except by passing through one of the school rooms, and would also make as ugly and unsightly a building as the old barracks building or some old-styled asylum. At this meeting Architect Willis Ritchie, who came here from Ohio to do the work on Mr. Eaton’s residence and bank building, was called in to see if he could suggest to them some plan which would fill the bill. Ritchie’s first suggestion, which, though it would make the best appearing and most convenient building, was decided as impracticable because it would give only two additional rooms and would not accommodate the number of pupils we have. He then gave them the idea which they have adopted and are having plans prepared for. This plan will build the new addition on the south end of the building, which will be the same size of the new part of the present building, with the main entrance, with tower for bell above, fronting south on 9th Avenue. The building will be built after the same design as the present one up to the top of the stone walls of building; there a stone cornice about four feet high will be built on, and a modern Gothic roof put on the entire new parts of the building. This will make the finest looking school building in this part of the state out of what is now one of the most ordinary looking buildings, and will not only be a credit to our city, but will make one public building that our citizens can take some pride in pointing out to strangers. Mr. Ritchie will also prepare a set of elevations for the same floor plans, which will provide for no change in the roof of the present new part of the building, and for a roof of same style on the proposed building. They will receive bids on both propositions, and the board can then let the contract for the latter building in case the proposed plan is too costly for the fund appropriated.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Father J. F. Kelly and sister, Miss Sarah, got off Friday for a permanent residence in Wellington. This is a loss keenly felt by their many friends here, and Wellington can certainly congratulate herself on her good luck. As we have said before, Father Kelly goes to Wellington because of the better advantages offered for a good Catholic school, for which an experienced educator from Leavenworth has been secured. Father Duggan, who takes Father Kelly’s place here, has arrived. He was in charge of the church here for a time before, is a zealous and influential priest, and will doubtless soon win the good graces of our people.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The different school boards of the county will bear in mind that at the annual school meetings, August 13th, a vote will be taken on a uniformity text book. Copies of the 1885 school laws can be obtained by calling on County Superintendent Limerick.

Arkansas City Republican, August 8, 1885.

The school board met last Monday evening and levied a tax of 4 mills to pay bonds and the interests thereon, and 8 mills for school and incidental purposes. W. R. Smith was given permission to give instructions in penmanship.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The pretty school ma’ams, after a months’ sunshine, have forsaken the city, and the hearts of our young men have all shriveled up. Nothing so captivates the palpitating motor of a young man as a rosy-cheeked, vivacious country school ma’am. She crushes every time, and she know it. They are the bulwark of the Republic, and of course their influence is always felt.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The building committee of the School Board awarded the contract of the excavation for the Central school building addition to Jim Connor, and work was begun Thursday. By this means, everything will be ready for the contractor who gets the building to begin the stone work on Monday, August 17th, as soon as his contract and bond are signed.

                                                     MUSICAL CULTURE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.


Professor Merriman gave an invitation to the patrons of his class in vocal music and to all interested in voice culture to be present at the closing exercises of his first term of twelve lessons at the Christian church Friday. There were a goodly number present and all seemed deeply interested, and expressed themselves well pleased with the advancement of the Professor’s pupils. His classes are composed of near forty pupils: primary, intermediate, and adults. Thos in the primary and intermediate classes are from six to ten years old and in this one term have learned to read music nicely and sing beautifully. In the adult class many of them have considerable knowledge of music and express themselves well pleased with his manner and method of teaching. We would be glad to have Professor Merriman return to Winfield and believe that with perseverance he will succeed. We were somewhat surprised and sorry to see so few boys in the classes. If Shakespeare’s sentiments be true, the boys need it. The man that has not music in his heart and is not charmed by concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treason, stratagem, and spoils. Let no such man be trusted. The scarcity of boys as well as the scarcity of numbers in the classes showed the necessity of having vocal music taught in our schools, and if the Professor returns, we hope the board will reconsider the matter and conclude to introduce this branch. It is not a good policy to sacrifice the present, where such a refinement and moral benefit is to be attained.

                                                EDUCATIONAL COLUMN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

[This column is edited under management of the Cowley County Teacher’s Association. Fannie Stretch, Alfred W. Wing, and R. B. Moore, editorial committee.]

                             INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE OF STUDY.

The order of instruction in the different subjects is fixed by the nature of each subject, and by the law of the mind in receiving knowledge.

There is therefore an established mode of procedure in teaching any branch.

Every subject is made up of parts, such that, in the order of learning them, some must precede others. Each step furnishes a necessary condition for taking the next.

The pupil must pass from a known fixed point in a subject to the following unknown. He must, also, take that phase of the subject adapted to his mental development. What is true of the parts of the subjects is true of the subjects themselves. Some necessarily precede others; first, because some furnish a necessary condition for the study of others; second, because some are adapted to an earlier stage of mental development than others.

These two facts, namely, the necessary relation of the parts of the subject and of the different subjects, and the law of the mind requiring it to receive different kinds of knowledge at different stages of development require school work to be graded or stepped.

If these steps in the branches be set forth in the order of dependence, and in the order they may be received by the mind, there will be formed a graded course of study. A line of progress (pro and gradi, to step forward.) If a school be properly organized with such a course, as a basis, it will be a graded school.

This course of study has been arranged to make our school work definite, organic, and progressive.

The aim has been to set forth the steps so that each teacher will know just what to do. Each part of the work will then fit in as an organic part of the whole.


To impress the fact that subjects and not text books are to be studied, the parts of the subjects have been stated instead of referring to the pages of the book.

This course answers for both teacher and pupil the following questions.

a.       What is a good common school training in orthography?

b.      What is a common school education in reading?

c.       What shall be taught in English grammar?

d.      What is geography as attempted in the common schools?

e.       What constitutes common school training in arithmetic?

f.        What is to be attempted and mastered in writing?

g.       What instruction shall be given in United States history?

h.       What is the purpose of teaching hygiene, physiology, and the effects of narcotics?

In addition to these it names as optional branches: United States constitution, philosophy, elements of bookkeeping, and drawing.

The Cowley County Reading Circle was organized to help on the good work of popular education, by arranging such course for home reading as would unite instruction and pleasure, cultivate a taste for the best literature, and secure regularity, breadth, and progress in reading.

In order to meet the expense of correspondence, printing, etc., a small fee of 50 cents is charged each member. This fee is the only charge for the year.

                                                  EDUCATIONAL NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

At a meeting of the Cowley County Teacher’s Association, held the last week of the Institute, an arrangement was agreed upon for carrying out the work of the State course of study in the schools of the county. A committee of teachers will arrange the work for each month, and give, through the county papers, such outlines and suggestions as will enable the teachers of the county to follow a uniform system of instruction. Examinations will be held at intervals during the school year on questions proposed to cover the work as it progresses. From these examinations each teacher will be enabled to measure his school with those of his fellow teachers, and determine its standing.

The advantages of a carefully arranged plan by which all the schools of our county can move in one unbroken phalanx, with one common end in view, can hardly be estimated. Among them we might name the following.

1st. The assistance that can be given to each school in the arrangement of its study through the suggestions of a committee that will give the matter careful thought and study.

2nd. The stimulus that will be given by concert of action.

3rd. The emulation arising from the knowledge that others are doing the same work as ourselves.

4th. The discussions of subjects and plan of study at Teachers’ Associations, and

5th. The one “Projective Point” at which all are aiming.

Now, will not our school officers and patrons join in this movement and aid in putting our schools on the high road to success?

The efforts of the best teacher, directed by the most careful management, without the sympathy and cooperation of parents and officers, must be, at best, but partially successful.


Let us each, then, with our co-equal interests in our schools, do our part in this great drama, and we shall see this year mark a new epoch in our educational growth.

                                                          A. H. LIMERICK.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The festival given at the Victor schoolhouse last Friday evening was largely attended. A hundred gallons of ice cream and as much lemonade failed to quench the thirst and lower the temperature of the perspiring crowd. The proceeds were for the benefit of the Sabbath school.

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                                                  TISDALE. “GROWLER.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Our people should not forget the school meeting on the 13th. Matters of importance will be considered.

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                                                UDALL SENTINEL CLIPS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Chas. A. Roberts, of Winfield, a brother of Al. Roberts, our new butcher, is here this week helping Al. to get settled. Chas. is a cornetist and music teacher by profession, and his performance on the cornet is highly applauded by those who hear him. He may possibly locate here. If he does, the band boys may consider themselves fortunate in having among them such an excellent musician and teacher.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 15, 1885.

Notice. A meeting of the Hope Cemetery Association of Bolton Township will be held at the Bland schoolhouse, Tuesday, August 18, at 2 o’clock, p.m., for the purpose of electing officers and attending to other important business. A. T. COOPER, Secretary.

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[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: “LAPSUS LINGUAE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 15, 1885.

R. N. Clark thinks that District No. 65 has a very poor school board, and that the pupils would have been better off if they had been kept at home last winter. We sympathize with the “board,” for we have tried, upon several occasions, to please all the people in a school district, but we have failed in some particular.

The ice cream supper held at the Victor schoolhouse, in the interest of their Sunday school, was a grand success. We think M. S. Teter was the happiest fellow there. He was selling peanuts and made a success of it. Probably he will quit farming now and set up a peanut stand.

Arkansas City Republican, August 15, 1885.

On next Tuesday evening, Aug. 18th, at 8 o’clock, a meeting will be held at the Christian Church for the purpose of discussing the propriety of establishing a commercial college and academy in Arkansas City. The meeting will be addressed by Judge S. Ballard, Superintendent Limerick, and gentlemen from the city. If the citizens desire such school and will support the enterprise, it will be established immediately.


Arkansas City Republican, August 15, 1885.

The Ladies of the Pleasant Valley Baptist Church of Bolton Township, Cowley County, will give a Grand Farmer’s supper at the Mercer schoolhouse grounds, Dist. No. 53, on the eve of August 20th, 1885, the proceeds to be appropriated to the building of the foundation of a church house in said township. Ample accommodations and provision for all. Music vocal and instrumental will be given. MRS. S. H. DEWEESE, Chairman Com.

Arkansas City Republican, August 15, 1885.

There was no council meeting last Monday evening as there was not a quorum present of that August body. Wednesday evening a call meeting was held. The most important business attended to was the tax levy. It was decided to levy 2 mills for a sinking fund, 5 mills to pay interest on bonds, and 8 mills for general purposes, making a total of 15 mills to be levied. The council approved the levy of the school board, which is 4 mills, to pay interests upon bonds and 8 mills for school and incidental purposes. The tax levy for the city is 27 mills on a dollar.    

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Arkansas City Traveler, August 19, 1885.

                                                      COUNCIL MEETING.

Rev. Witt and Alex. Wilson notified the council that the board of education of this city, at a recent meeting, had levied a tax of two mills, making the total tax for general school purposes ten mills, which was approved.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

                                 NORMAL AND COMMERCIAL COLLEGE.

                                                     WINFIELD, KANSAS.

                                                           First Term opens

                                                  Monday, September 7, 1885.

           Prepares Ladies and Gentlemen for Teaching, for Business, and for College.

                                         For further information address or call on

                               I. A. WOOD, A.M., Principal of Normal Department.

                                                  OR PROF. I. N. INSKEEP.

                                            Principal of Commercial Department.

                                                  EDUCATIONAL NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

At a meeting of the Cowley County Teacher’s Association, held the last week of the Institute, an arrangement was agreed upon for carrying out the work of the State course of study in the schools of the county. A committee of teachers will arrange the work for each month, and give, through the county papers, such outlines and suggestions as will enable the teachers of the county to follow a uniform system of instruction. Examinations will be held at intervals during the school year on questions proposed to cover the work as it progresses. From these examinations each teacher will be enabled to measure his school with those of his fellow teachers, and determine its standing.

The advantages of a carefully arranged plan by which all the schools of our county can move in one unbroken phalanx, with one common end in view, can hardly be estimated. Among them we might name the following.


1st. The assistance that can be given to each school in the arrangement of its study through the suggestions of a committee that will give the matter careful thought and study.

2nd. The stimulus that will be given by concert of action.

3rd. The emulation arising from the knowledge that others are doing the same work as ourselves.

4th. The discussions of subjects and plan of study at Teachers’ Associations, and

5th. The one “Projective Point” at which all are aiming.

Now, will not our school officers and patrons join in this movement and aid in putting our schools on the high road to success?

The efforts of the best teacher, directed by the most careful management, without the sympathy and cooperation of parents and officers, must be, at best, but partially successful.

Let us each, then, with our co-equal interests in our schools, do our part in this great drama, and we shall see this year mark a new epoch in our educational growth.

                                                          A. H. LIMERICK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A delegation of leading men were before County Superintendent Limerick Saturday regarding the redistricting of Beaver township. The Superintendent decided it inexpedient to make the division now, the tax levy and new school boards for the coming year having been made.

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                                                  BURDEN EAGLE CLIPS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

In a recent serenade given the Eagle office by the S. K. band, we noticed Prof. Page, of Winfield. The boys have greatly improved, and on this occasion with the addition of Mr. Geo. Kimball, cornetist, and Prof. Page, the band excelled any music ever played in this city.

Prof. R. B. Moore came in Wednesday evening to pass a few days with friends in this city. He is sun browned, and shows the unmistakable marks of a son of out door toil. Since closing the schools at this place, the Professor has visited the “wild and wooly,” taken, improved, and is now the owner of a farm in Clark County, this State. It has been the best paying vacation he could have taken, and though his trials have been many, he will return to the superintendency of our schools the happy possessor of a good farm and some city property the result of industry.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Miss Alice Dickey went over to Grenola Wednesday, to remain till our city schools open.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

W. C. Barnes, formerly teacher in the city schools, will become ye local of the Tribune. We gladly welcome him into the circle.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Rev. Ferguson will hold a basket meeting at Sheridan schoolhouse Sunday, August 30th. A general turnout is expected.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Republicans of Liberty township will meet in caucus at Rose Valley schoolhouse on Saturday, September 12th, at 2 o’clock. J. A. COCHRAN, Chairman.


Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A fine portrait plan of the new central school building adorns the postoffice front. This plan, prepared by Architect Ritchie, will give us as handsome a school building as the west affords. The contract for its construction will be let by the school board tonight.

                                                EDUCATIONAL COLUMN.

[This column is edited under management of the Cowley County Teacher’s Association. Fannie Stretch; Alfred W. Wing; and R. B. Moore, editorial committee.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Teachers’ Reading Circle inaugurated at the State Teachers’ Association on the Chautauqua plan, if properly conducted, must result in great good.

Indiana and Ohio started in a very similar work last September, and report good progress with bright prospects.

The committee having the whole affair in charge is certainly a good one, and will soon have all ready.

The plan of organization and course of study were laid before the teachers of the State through the Western School Journal, (a paper which every teacher in the State, those of Cowley not excepted; should take and thoroughly read), and by circulars sent out by the educational department of the State.

We urge upon every teacher the necessity of sending name and membership fee to W. C. Barnes, Winfield, immediately, in order that he may be able to report at the September association.

No teacher in the county should allow this opportunity of better preparing himself for the great work that he has undertaken to pass by unheeded.

Should it be asked what are the advantages offered to the readers of the course, it may be replied they are three-fold.

1. The work of the course has been carefully arranged. The need of both general and professional culture has been kept in view. To have carefully followed the course is of no slight value. The personal benefit will be incalculable. Teachers of the state reading and thinking along uniform lines of the best progress in thought, must dignify their work. The first advantage then is a professional and moral one.

2. The honors to be conferred upon members who complete the course are not empty, meaningless, or to be cheaply esteemed. Certificates are to be issued only upon satisfactory completion of the work. No complimentary certificates will be given. Examinations while free from catch questions and obstructions, will be made fair and sufficient tests of the work done.

3. Finally there is a practical advantage that will commend itself to every teacher, and which will be of itself worth all the needed study and expense.

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                                           DEXTER DOTS. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Rev. E. C. Ferguson of Wellington, Kansas, will preach at the Sheridan schoolhouse the fifth Sabbath in this month (August), and plenty of good shade will be erected and a basket dinner will be on the programme, so all come with your baskets filled and hear a sermon.


Excerpt...

                                                 DEXTER. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Rev. E. C. Ferguson, of Wellington, C. P. minister, will preach at the Sheridan schoolhouse the fifth Sunday in this month. Good shade will be prepared.

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                                        CAMBRIDGE AND VICINITY. “H.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Prof. A. H. Limerick and other speakers, of Winfield, will be out Friday evening, August 14, and have a meeting at the schoolhouse for the purpose of organizing a Temperance Union. These gentlemen are working in the interests of the State Temperance Union, and are speaking and organizing all over the county. They are able men for the work and we bespeak for them a good audience.

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                                     NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. Nelson’s team ran off last Thursday with Mrs. Vance’s youngest child in the wagon. They ran from Mr. J. W. Hoyland’s house to Mr. McMillen’s, where they were stopped by the men just out from school meeting. There were some white faces and wildly throbbing hearts anticipating the final of the run-away, fearing a little mangled form would meet their gaze. Little Dallas had run out and climbed into the wagon and seizing the whip, gave the horses a sharp cut, when they broke loose and away they went. He came off well, only receiving a cut on his chin.

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                                           BETHEL ITEMS. “BLUE BELL.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Miss Lida Howard has secured the school at No. 37. This is her second term. Success to her.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Excelsior district No. 9, two and a half miles south, at its school election on the 13th, was a tie on uniformity on text books. E. C. Smith was elected clerk. Eight months school was determined on for the coming year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Sheridan township basket meeting for next Sunday will be held at Dunning’s grove instead of Sheridan schoolhouse as at first announced.

 

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Republicans of Fairview township will meet at the Akron schoolhouse Saturday, September 12th, at 2 o’clock p.m. J. L. Foster, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Rev. Reider will preach at Valley View schoolhouse, district No. 12, next Sabbath afternoon, at 3 p.m.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.


Judge Soward delivered a temperance address at Silver Creek schoolhouse, near Burden, Sunday. The attendance was large and the interest warm. The Judge’s niece, Miss Mattie Marshal, accompanied him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mrs. E. D. Garlick opens her Kindergarten school again the first Monday in September. Her school has always been popular and will have as large attendance as ever. There is no better education for the young up to the seventh year.

                                           THE NEW SCHOOL BUILDING.

                 Shall We Have a Building a Credit to the City or a Duplicate of the

                                                         Present Rookery.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The School Board met in regular session Monday for the purpose of letting the contract for the completion of the addition to the Central school building. The bids were received for two propositions as follows.

First. For the erection and completion of the building according to the plans and specifications, as prepared by Architect Ritchie. This contemplates the removing of the roof of the new part of the present building. (This is now dangerous, and is liable to cause a serious accident at any time because of the poor construction of the roof, which is spreading, so that the plastering is cracking and falling off the upper ceilings. It is only a question of a short time until the ceiling will fall in, causing, no one can tell how much damage, if not attended to now, while it can be helped.) This roof would be removed entirely. A new roof and cornice would be built (including the top ceiling of the rooms), which will correspond with that of the new part of the building. This will make a building, an accurate prospective drawing of which Mr. Ritchie has completed and had framed. It is now hanging at the postoffice door.

Second. The second proposition that the bids were received for contemplated no change or work on the roof of the new part of the present building.

This must be done though by a separate contract before school can be held in this building, or we will at some near future time, be called upon to chronicle the injury, and perhaps the death, of many of our school children, caused by a falling ceiling and roof of the building.

The contemplated roof on the new building will correspond in style and beauty with that on the building as it now stands.

                                                            Bids Received.

The bids on the first proposition were $12,794, which would complete the building as the drawing shows.

The bids on the second proposition were $9,655, which would give us a building of the same style as the present one with the tower as shown on the drawing.

Neither of the above bids include the seating or furnace.

                                    Bid for Building Awarded to Connor & Son.


The contract for the completion of the building, up to the height of the stone walls on the present building, including the top joist, plastering, etc., was awarded to Connor & Son, of Winfield, their bid being the lowest, and work will be pushed rapidly so as to lose no time in getting the building completed.

                                                          Special Election.

The school board reserved the right to accept either plan the citizens decide upon, and have another contract entered into on the first day of September. To this end the special election was called for Monday, the 31st day of August, and thus let the taxpayers and citizens of Winfield decide as to whether we shall have one public school building that our citizens need not be ashamed of, and can point at with some pride as a sample of the good taste and style of our flourishing little city; or whether we shall continue to sink our money into such looking, botched, and patched up concerns as we have the honor of calling our public school buildings, and which have gained for Winfield the notoriety of having the worst looking public buildings in the State. Consider this matter thoroughly and examine the drawing of the proposed building (which is as correct as a photograph of the completed building could be), which will hang at the postoffice door until after the first day of September, thus giving our citizens an opportunity of knowing what they are going to get for the additional $6,000 worth of bonds, which will be necessary to complete the building. And remember that besides the style and appearance of the building, we will get four rooms on the third floor which can be fitted up and used as class rooms or school rooms when an emergency (such as the present one), should arise and we should need more school room.

When the seating and furnace is put in and all completed after the cheapest plan of roof has been put on, the cost will be about $11,000, ($3,000 more than was voted for the building purpose) while to finish the building according to the plans and specifications will require only $6,000 more than was voted for that purpose.

Now the question is: Can the city of Winfield afford to cut off the four rooms on the third floor and lose the only possible chance it has of having one public building that we may be proud of for the small difference in the two propositions?

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                                                           CITY RULERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

W. J. Wilson, clerk of the school board, presented the tax levy made by the board for school purposes, as follows: For general school purposes, 10 mills; for bond fund, and to pay interest on one bond, 4½ mills, which levy was approved by the council.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 22, 1885.

The following is a statement of the enumeration of the school children between the ages of 5 and 21 years in the corporate limits of Arkansas City for the school year of 1885-1886.

          MALE     FEMALE                TOTAL

FIRST WARD             140                  141        281

SECOND WARD                     84              113                         197

THIRD WARD                          87                96                         183

FOURTH WARD                    181              176                         357

        TOTALS:             494                  526             1,020

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[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 22, 1885.


An ice cream festival at Victor Schoolhouse last week on Thursday evening netted the Sabbath school twenty-five dollars.

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[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: “LAPSUS LINGUAE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, August 22, 1885.

                                                           Tannehill Tidings.

Great excitement prevailed in this vicinity during the last ten days with reference to the proposed change of school district boundaries, reaching from Kellogg, in Vernon Township, to the center of Beaver Township. The object was to form a new district for the city of Kellogg, which would entirely destroy district 75. The opposition was so obstinate that our worthy county superintendent was compelled to give his decision in favor of the remonstrators.

The school board of district 65 have hired Miss Cogshall to teach their winter term of school. She lately came from Illinois, where she held a state certificate, and she is highly recommended as a teacher. They pay her fifty dollars a month.

John C. Snyder of Hackney has made application for the winter term of school in district 4. He offers his service for fifty dollars a month.

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Arkansas City Republican, August 22, 1885.

                                                        Council Proceedings.

Last Monday night was the regular meeting of the city council. Present: Mayor Schiffbauer and Councilmen Davis, Hight, Thompson, Dean, and Bailey.

The board of education asked that a further levy of two mills for school and incidental purposes be allowed and it was granted.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Republicans of Vernon township will meet at Vernon schoolhouse on Saturday, September 12th, at 7 o’clock p.m. T. Thompson, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Southern Kansas Normal School and Business Institute will open Sept. 7th, 1885. The first term, which closes Oct. 30th, especially adapted to prepare teachers for the quarterly examination. J. A. Wood and Prof. I. N. Inskeep, principals.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The furniture for the Southern Kansas Normal School and Business Institute has been ordered from St. Louis and is expected here this week.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Republicans of Fairview township will meet at the Akron schoolhouse Saturday, September 12th, at 2 o’clock p.m. J. L. Foster, Chairman.

                                           AN EXCELLENT SUGGESTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.


EDITORS COURIER: As your interest in the prosperity of our inhabitants is not confined to the city, would you bring before the School Commissioners a question that affects many who live outside of Winfield. Many farmers of this county have families who have got beyond the three R’s of our country school. They long for something beyond, but prosperity has brought increased taxes, and education in our county towns becomes an additional tax which is doubled or trebled, and the poor farmer is unfortunate enough to be well supplied with ambitious children. Why could not the tax for one insure an education for more if desired, and not make him feel that the size of his family is a misfortune instead of a blessing? Now give the boys a chance who have struggled side by side of their father in toils and hardships of pioneer life, and may their intelligence and culture contribute as much as their industry in making Cowley County the banner county in mere virtues than one.

                                                   COURIER SUBSCRIBER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Republicans of Otter township, Cowley County, Kansas, are hereby requested to meet in caucus at the Otter Schoolhouse on Saturday, September 12th, 1885, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of selecting delegates to the county Convention, to be held September 19th, 1885, at Winfield, and to elect a township committee. By order Committee.

                                                   H. B. GRAVES, Chairman.

                                    Trial Docket Cowley County District Court,

                                  September Term, 1885, Commencing Sept. 1st.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

1929. School Dist. No. 13 vs School Dist. No. 133. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

                                                  COWLEY’S TEACHERS.

                    Who Will Shoot the County’s Young Ideas the Coming Winter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Cowley’s first extensive examination under the new law formulating the questions in the State Board of Education, shows 105 certificates out of 155 applicants—5 in the first grade, 41 in the second grade, and 50 in the third grade, as follows.

                                                           FIRST GRADE.

Albert, H. F.; Norton, S. W.; Norton, H. G.; Overman, S. F.; McClelland, A. J.

                                                         SECOND GRADE.

Alderson, P. S.; Akers, Martin; Andrews, Hattie; Angerman, W. E.; Beach, Cora B.; Bliss, Celina; Bradshaw, J. C.; Bringle, Jennie; Chapin, Amy; Clover, William T.; Craven, Mrs. F. E.; Dalgarn, Mollie; Finfrock, P. H.; Fuller, O. P.; Green, Clara; Haughey, F. E.; Hutchinson, Libbie; Marble, A. D.; Martindale, J. C.; McClelland, Frank; McKinley, Fannie; Overman, R. B.; Olmstead, Bertha; Pierson, Maude M.; Owen, H. A.; Phelps, Laura; Pickering, Sadie; Strong, Lida; Robbins, Emma; Trezise, H. A.; Stiverson, E. E.; Utley, Hattie; Turner, M. F.; Wallace, H. S.; Walch, C. I.; Weigh, W. F.; Wallis, Bertha; Wing, C. J.; Wheeler, Allie; Wilson, Lizzie; Williams, W. F.

                                                           THIRD GRADE.


Anderson, E. M.; Arnett, M. R.; Baker, Thornton J.; Baker, Annie; Bertram, Belle; Brown, Hattie; Bryan, Harry; Bush, Belle; Coonrod, Mollie; Coombs, Villa; Cronk, M. R.; Craddock, W. F.; Darnell, Hattie; Earhart, Henry; Ewing, E. W.; Garrett, E. M.; Garrett, W. H.; Gillett, S. E.; Hite, Lucy; Holland, W. B.; Hosmer, George E.; Howard, Lida; Jacobus, W. P.; Johnston, Ella B.; Kerr, Joseph P.; Kinney, Maggie; Krow, V.; Littell, W. B.; Manser, Mary; Mark, Anna; Merydith, Mettie; Miller, Mary E.; McKee, Emma L.; Miller, Alice B.; Nelson, Stirling; O’Neil, Lizzie; Perkins, Cyrus F.; Powell, C. W.; Preston, E. B.; Powell, H. F.; Plunket, Carrie; Page, Belle; Ramage, D. W.; Randall, Mary; Robertson, Anna; Rowell, Cora; Smith, J. R.; Snyder, John C.; Stevenson, Etta; Sumpter, Flora; Taplin, Linnie; Taplin, Hattie; Taylor, Lida; Walton, Lillie; Taylor, M. A.; Warren, J. W.; Wilkins, Alonzo; Wing, A. W.; Wilkins, Lottie.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Lincoln Shaffer, formerly one of Cowley’s best teachers, but who has resided at Wichita for the past year, has returned and will follow his old avocation. He says Cowley is good enough for him.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 29, 1885.

                                                 The Councilman and His Cow.

In that beautiful city known as Arkansas City, there once lived a councilman who owned a cow. She was a fine, large cow, of a red and white color. Near the residence of the councilman there was a lofty edifice of learning situated in the center of a grassy, unfenced plot of ground. Now, it was the daily business of this councilman to lariat his cow in the pasture surrounding the schoolhouse. Every morning, ere the sun had risen, he would arise from his “virtuous couch” and go forth to lariat his cow. And there throughout the long, hot summer days that cow grazed, and grew fat and sleek and shapely, from the nutritive grasses on which she fed. Now, this councilman had a neighbor who also owned a cow, and he thought his cow was just as good as that owned by the councilman. So he, too, lariated his cow upon the school ground. In vain the councilman remonstrated against such a proceeding, and told his neighbor that he would enforce the law prohibiting the lariating of any stock upon the school ground. Of course, the councilman had helped to make this law or ordinance and knew how valid and binding it was, like every other ordinance which was passed in that mighty city. But his neighbor heeded him not, and so these two men vied with each other in rising early, in order to see which would be the first in putting his cow out in pasture.

The question now is, “Why should a councilman’s cow have any more privilege than one owned by any other citizen?”

Arkansas City Republican, August 29, 1885.

According to previous appointment members of the Christian Church from the city with their minister, J. P. Witt, repaired to Grouse Creek or Gilstrap Schoolhouse, some 12 miles east, last Lord’s Day, where they were met by brethren and friends from the surrounding country with baskets well filled with provisions to refresh the inner man. All enjoyed an old-fashioned basket meeting. Sermon at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. They of the city very highly appreciated this opportunity of mingling with their country friends and were delighted with the manner in which they do things. Not by halves, but fully and heartily. May they live to have many such meetings, and when life’s struggles are o’er meet beneath the boughs of Jeremiah’s bloom, beyond the dark river, to part no more. ONE OF THE COMPANY.

Arkansas City Republican, August 29, 1885.

The school year of 1885-1886 will most likely consist of only seven months. The school will not commence until about October 1 and in all probability close a month earlier than usual. The cause of this is a lack of money.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, September 2, 1885.


                                                  PUBLIC SCHOOL FUND.

The school treasurer reports an exhausted exchequer, and a considerable floating indebtedness besides. This deficiency was largely caused by the building of the fourth ward schoolhouse, the total cost of which, including purchase of ground, furniture, heating apparatus, etc., amounted (in round numbers) to $14,500. The bonds issued to meet this expense were for $10,000. One bond of $1,000 has been paid, leaving the bonded indebtedness of the district, $9,000.

                   SKIPPED SCHOOL TREASURER’S REPORT BY JAS. L. HUEY.

This statement of orders outstanding is taken from the treasurer’s register of orders presented for payment and not paid for want of funds, and includes no orders that may be outstanding and not presented for payment.

The following figures show how the school fund is expended:

Salary of superintendent: $1,100.00

Amount paid teachers:     $4,400.00

Incidental expenses,  including fuel, janitors, insurance, etc.: $1,843.93

                                                         TOTAL: $6,943.93

The records of the clerk to the school board show that the average monthly pay of the teachers is $45.45; the average amount earned by the teacher during the school year, $363.65. Eleven teachers were employed last year, exclusive of the superintendent, and 32 weeks (or 160 days) comprised the school year. The enrollment shows 404 males and 385 females: total 789. The average attendance was 595.

There seems to be a confusion in the school fund account, arising from the inadequacy of the means provided to pay all demands. The treasurer’s report shows a teachers’ fund, an incidental fund, and a building fund, and, of course, every order presented should be paid from the proper fund, but the cost of the new school building exceeded the amount voted by our citizens $4,500, and the most pressing orders appear to have been paid from any money available. Leaving $2,000 of the salaries due to the teachers is a gross injustice to those ladies, and it is to be hoped that speedy provision will be made to wipe out that debt. We can understand that the school trustees are surrounded with financial difficulties, the work growing rapidly on their hands and inadequate provision made to meet the requirement. It would be well to find what portion of the floating debt cannot be liquidated, and thus reduce the present interest burden.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 2, 1885.

The apportionment of the school fund of the state for the year gives Cowley $4,343.49. This money is the interest on the proceeds of the sale of school lands.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

There will be a Republican primary election held at the Dexter schoolhouse September 12th, 1885, to elect seven delegates and seven alternates to attend the Republican County Convention to be held at Winfield, September 19th, 1885.

                                   S. H. WELLS, Chairman, Township Committee.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

H. G. Norton has the principalship of the Torrance schools for this winter. He had charge of the Torrance schools last winter.


Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Jim Connor & Son are whooping the New Central school building up with a rush. Twenty men are at work now and the force increasing. The walls are Rough Ashler, like those of the old building, to make uniformity.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Miss Mamie Garlick is visiting friends in Eureka before commencing her school at Augusta, the first Monday in September. Miss Ella Garlick will also visit in Emporia and Lawrence till Wednesday next, when she will accompany the Kirkwood family to Minneapolis, to enter McAlister College.

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                                               THE BOOM COMMENCED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The addition and alteration in the Central school building will make us the most convenient and prettiest schoolhouse in Southern Kansas, provided the bonds are voted next Monday to complete the building according to the plans and drawings. The addition will contain four schoolrooms with a cloak room for each, a broad hall running through the center, connecting with the hall in the present building, with an easy stairway in the hall starting near the front entrance; a superintendent’s room on the second floor, and folding doors so arranged as to throw the two rooms on the second floor into one large hall. The appearance of the building may be better understood by looking at the drawing of the building hanging at the postoffice door than could be from any description of it. The improvements as contemplated (with fence, seating, etc.) will cost about $14,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Judge Gans filled his regular monthly appointment at the schoolhouse last Sunday, morning and evening, to large and attentive audiences. His forcible and aggressive style of preaching attracts and holds the attention of the hearer, while the logic and arguments furnish food for reflection not very likely to be wholly forgotten in a day. Burden Enterprise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Prof. A. Gridley is home from Kingman, having closed the Kingman normal, which he conducted.

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                                                    SOUTH BEND. “G. V.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

At our last annual school meeting the ladies turned out bravely and voted their own ideas to the front in a manner that would shock some of our natives.

Our School Board has secured the services of Miss Celina Bliss for a 4 months term. These gentlemen were surely wise in their selection of a teacher.

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                                              TORRANCE ITEMS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mr. H. G. Norton will teach our school again this winter.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”


Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Ed Watt will attend school at Winfield again this winter, providing his father does not part with the old homestead in the meantime.

James Albert leaves for Lecompton Monday to attend college a year. Jim is ambitious and determined to advance himself educationally. Success to him.

Mr. J. C. Snyder has contracted to teach in District 10 for seven months. There was quite a demand for J. C.’s services as a pedagogue—no less than three school boards were after him. Merit and proficiency never goes begging.

District 115 is still unsupplied with a teacher for the coming school term. However, from the numerous applications made daily, the district fathers cannot resist much longer making a choice. Sometimes it requires other influences besides that of a prospective father-in-law and an evanescent spirit of sanctimoniousness to “stand in” with the district.

Ed Garrett has secured the Centennial school in District 4. He will teach as long as he gives satisfaction: which means the whole term. The school board is too sympathetic and tender hearted to suspend a teacher, even though he accomplishes no good in the school room. We hope Ed possesses firmness of will sufficient to govern the school and crown his efforts with success. The very short time which country children can spend in the school room each year is too precious to be wasted by incompetent teachers. Better have no school at all than one which inculcates knowledge that is anything but beneficial to the pupils.

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                                                       CAMBRIDGE. “H.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

School will open here the first Monday in September. Mr. Alberts has been employed as principal, at $65 per month. The primary teacher is not employed. We will have an eight months’ term.

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                                     NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Miss Mary Dalgarn will hold the scepter in Crooked Elm district when the new schoolhouse is completed.

Mr. Haughey will teach the New Salem school while their late teacher, Mr. W. H. Lucas, will teach the Prairie Home youth.

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                                              WILMOT JOTTINGS. “JOT.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Summit Temperance Society meets the second Sunday in each month at 3 p.m., at the Summit schoolhouse. The attendance is good and a general interest is taken in the cause.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Republican voters of Beaver township will meet at Tannehill schoolhouse on Saturday, Sept. 12th, at 4 p.m., to elect 4 delegates and 4 alternates to the Republican County Convention, at Winfield, Sept. 19th, 1885. J. R. SUMPTER, Member Co. Cen. Com.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.


The Southern Kansas Normal School and Business Institute will open Sept. 7th, 1885. The first term, which closes Oct. 30th, especially adapted to prepare teachers for the quarterly examination. J. A. Wood and Prof. I. N. Inskeep, principals.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Republicans of Silverdale township will meet at Silverdale schoolhouse on Saturday, September 12th, 1885, at 4 o’clock p.m. sharp, to select five delegates to attend the County Convention to be held in Winfield, Saturday, Sept. 19th.

                                       L. J. Darnell, Chm. Tp. Central Committee.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Preaching in the Prairie Ridge schoolhouse, six miles west of Dexter, by the Rev. P. S. Nellis, a southerner, on Sunday, Sept. 20th, at 11 a.m. All are invited.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Republican caucus of Tisdale Township will be held at the schoolhouse at Tisdale on September 17th, 1885, at 3 o’clock p.m. By order of Com.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Miss Lou Varner and A. H. Snyder, who have been visiting Mrs. C. M. Leavitt, returned to Osage County Monday. Mr. Snyder will return in a few weeks to teach a winter school near Floral.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mr. C. M. Wood has been taking the school census in the city and reports 1,561 school children between the ages of 5 and 21. In going all over the city, he is surprised at the great number of good buildings and residences which are being erected all over the town. He says that the residence portion of the town is far ahead of the business portion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

We learn through Dr. Elder that the opening of the next term of school at the Kansas Institution for the education of deaf mutes of the State will be postponed on account of repairs and improvements necessary to be made. The next term will commence Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1885, instead of September, as heretofore. All pupils who desire to attend should be present Tuesday, Oct. 13th, to have their names entered on the roll. Parents should see that these unfortunate children do not lose this, their opportunity.

                                          CHRISTIAN BASKET MEETING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.


Last Sunday was pleasantly celebrated by the Christian church at Tannehill in holding their regular annual basket meeting in Mr. Smalley’s grove, on the verdant banks of Beaver creek. The indications of the thermometer were low enough to make the day comfortable and the exercises enjoyable. It being the fifth Sunday of the month, many ministers from a distance who were afforded leisure by an “off” Sabbath, were present to add to the attractions of the hour. Among the visiting ministers your reporter remembers the following names: Revs. Wright, of Douglass, Butler County; Irwin, of Floral; Broadbent, of Geuda; Hawkins, of Vernon township; and Drennen, of Ninnescah township. Rev. Hopkins, of Mulvane, was expected to deliver the annual sermon, but a business call to St. Louis prevented him being present. Rev. Frazee, the resident preacher, was chief master of ceremonies, and at his request, Rev. Wright occupied the pulpit before and after dinner. The Reverend gentlemen delivered two very interesting discourses, which were attentively listened to throughout by the large assemblage of people present. Quite a large number of persons were in attendance from Winfield, Geuda, Kellogg, Hackney, Floral, and other remote localities. The exercises of the day were pleasantly and harmoniously adjourned to the Tannehill schoolhouse. The writer did not remain for the evening services, but wearily wended his way homeward ever and anon meditating on the subject whether or not it was possible for him to read his “titles clear to mansions in the skies,” when members of different religious denominations are not quite positive that his brethren and sisters of opposite faith are presenting the proper route in their pilgrimage toward the “pearly gates.” MARK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The third quarterly meeting of Sheridan Circuit U. B. Church will be held at the Red Valley schoolhouse September 12th and 13th, 1885, beginning at 2 p.m. Saturday. The services on Saturday and Saturday night will be at the schoolhouse, and on Sunday in a tabernacle 2½ miles north and 1 mile east of the schoolhouse. Everybody invited. Bring your baskets well filled. Rev. T. W. Williams, Pastor.

                             COWLEY COUNTY TEACHERS ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The first monthly meeting of the Teachers Association will be held in Winfield September 19th. Arrangements were made at the last meeting for holding the first regular meeting September 5th, but owing to the difficulties encountered by the committee on course of study, their work could not be arranged for publication this week; hence the postponement of the first meeting. The work of this meeting will be principally given to discussion on the course of study, and arrangements for its introduction and use in the schools of the county, and it is hoped and earnestly requested that every teacher attend. Another matter that should not be overlooked is the completion of the arrangements for the Reading Circle. Those wishing books should be prepared to order them, and all wishing to become members should do so at once that the entire class may commence work together.

Arkansas City Republican, September 5, 1885.

The first monthly meeting of the Teachers Association will be held in Winfield September 19th. Arrangements were made at the last meeting for holding the first regular meeting September 5th, but owing to the difficulties encountered in making the necessary arrangements, it was postponed until the above time.

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[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: “LAPSUS LINGUAE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 5, 1885.

Ed. Garrett, of Pleasant Valley Township, has been employed to teach the school in district 4.

T. H. Shaffer, of Wichita, has secured the school in district 75, Easterly Schoolhouse.

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[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 5, 1885.

                                                          Hackney Harpings.

E. W. Evering has secured the Victor School, No. 115, and will teach the rising generation how to sprout ideas this fall and winter.


District 10 is fortunate in securing J. C. Snyder to teach for them the ensuing school year. His services were in demand by other districts.

The Centennial School will be taught by Ed Garret.

School ma’ams and candidates have kept the grass down on our country roads for two weeks past.

Bob Holland will teach his first term of school this winter in district 101.

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[BOLTON TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT. NAME UNKNOWN.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 5, 1885.

Chas. Wing took a flying trip to the north part of the county in search of a school. He made a grand success.

Arkansas City Republican, September 5, 1885.

A Mission Sunday School will be organized at the stone schoolhouse Sunday Sept. 13 at 3 p.m. It will be entirely undenominational, and the Sunday School workers of the city should come out and aid in this work.

Arkansas City Republican, September 5, 1885.

The voters of Bolton Township will hold their primary in the Bland Schoolhouse Sept. 12th. At what hour we cannot say. The REPUBLICAN would gladly publish the calls of the different townships if the committeemen would bring them in.

Arkansas City Republican, September 5, 1885.

The Republican voters of Beaver Township will meet at Tannehill Schoolhouse Saturday, Sept. 12th, at 4 p.m., to elect 44 delegates and 4 alternates to the Republican County Convention at Winfield, Sept. 19th, 1885. J. R. SUMPTER, Member County Central Committee.

Arkansas City Republican, September 5, 1885.

The Republicans of Silverdale Township will meet at Silverdale Schoolhouse on Saturday, September 12, 1885, at 4 o’clock p.m. sharp, to select five delegates to attend the County Convention to be held in Winfield, Saturday, Sept. 19.

                            L. J. DARNELL, Chairman, Township Central Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 9, 1885.

                                                                  Political.

The Republicans of East and West Bolton Townships will please meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Wednesday, September 16th, 1885, at 2:30 p.m., to elect seven delegates to the county convention, to be held at Winfield, on Saturday, Sept. 19th, 1885. Apportionment: East Bolton, 3 delegates and 3 alternates; West Bolton, 4 delegates and 4 alternates.

                                             R. L. BALYEAT, J. D. GUTHRIE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Miss Kate Rogers left on Friday to finish her course in the State Normal School. She will be absent all winter, with probably a home visit during the holidays.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.


Miss Lizzie McDonald left on Tuesday for school, at Beaver, Pennsylvania. She will be absent nine months. Miss Lizzie is one of our brightest and most attractive young ladies and will be missed from the social circle. All rejoice, however, at her opportunity to complete the accomplishments she has so successfully begun.

                             COWLEY COUNTY TEACHERS ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The first regular session of the Cowley County Teachers Association will be held at Winfield, September 19, 1885. The program will be as follows.

1st. The Teachers Association. What should it do and how can it be done?

2nd. Speer’s course of study. The difficulties in the way and how to surmount them.

3rd. How can we make the local divisions of our reading circle benefit our schools?

4th. Shall we teach the effects of stimulants and narcotics, and how?

5th. Upon what does the value of the common school depend?

6th. What in the public schools is open to the criticism of being impractical?

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

There will be an Ice Cream and Oyster festival at Olive schoolhouse, 1½ miles north of Winfield, Tuesday evening, September 15. All are invited.

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                                                      THE CITY RULERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The council recommended that the city board of education detach from the city for school purposes all the territory surrounded, or nearly surrounded by the city limits, the owners of which do not voluntarily come into the limits.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Jimmy Toole, a paddy who got too much “mechanical purposes,” and didn’t have the wealth to pay out, was put in Jim Connor’s hands Tuesday, Jim to give him work and pay his fine. Jim put him to carrying stone at the new school building. He worked an hour or so, and didn’t like it. He is a brick mason and didn’t like stone: too heavy! He was being watched, but getting a chance, he skipped off and the last seen of him he was going northeast at a rate to discount an Arabian steed. Several fellows have worked out their fines with Jim, not caring to skip.

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                                                  BETHEL ITEMS. “L. B.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

I believe Henry Weakly will do well to accept the horse his brother offers him if he will marry a certain school “marm” in Winfield.

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                                           DEXTER DOTS. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Miss Sallie Davis, of Tisdale, formerly a teacher of our school, is visiting friends in Dexter and vicinity.

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                                                       CAMBRIDGE. “H.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Miss Allie Harden has been employed by the primary department at Burden. She will enter upon her duties next Monday.


Judge Soward failed to put in an appearance at the schoolhouse Sunday, hence we had no temperance lecture; but the Band of Hope occupied the time that was to have been occupied by Judge Soward.

“Under the Laurels” was rendered in good style at the schoolhouse last Saturday evening to quite a large audience. The drama was played by home talent and should be encouraged in a rousing way. The participants are Misses Allie Harden, Maud and Minnie Leedy, and Lillie Long; Messrs. Harden, Howland, Alberts, and Allen. The play will be repeated next Friday evening.

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                                                OTTER VALLEY. “JESSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Rev. Webb preached at Highland schoolhouse last Sunday.

Mr. Utley and family moved from this neighborhood last week to take charge of the poor farm. We regret having them leave us. But Miss Hattie will remain and teach our school.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

There will be a delegate convention at the Dexter schoolhouse on Sunday, Oct. 4th, at 1 p.m., for the purpose of making a permanent organization of the Sunday Schools of the southeastern part of the county. It is desired that each school send two delegates.

                                                 E. I. Johnson, Chairman Com.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The Republican Primary for Pleasant Valley will meet at Odessa schoolhouse on Friday, September 18th, at 1 o’clock p.m. Sampson Johnson, Chairman.

Arkansas City Republican, September 12, 1885.

Republicans of East and West Bolton will please meet at the Bland Schoolhouse on Wednesday, Sept. 16th, 1885, at 2:30 p.m., to elect 7 delegates to county convention at Winfield on Saturday, Sept. 19th, 1885. Apportionment: East Bolton, 3 delegates and 3 alternates; West Bolton, 4 delegates and 4 alternates. R. L. BALYEAT. J. D. GUTHRIE.

Arkansas City Republican, September 12, 1885.

A. W. Wing will teach school over near the Sumner County line this fall and winter.

Arkansas City Republican, September 12, 1885.

Miss Ella Bishop, Wednesday, left fair southern Kansas for the arctic regions of Iowa. She is a teacher in the public schools of Des Moines.

Arkansas City Republican, September 12, 1885.

                                           Cowley County Teachers’ Association.

The first regular session of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association will be held at Winfield, Sept. 19, 1885.

                                                           PROGRAMME.

1st. The Teachers’ Association: what should it do, and how can it do it?

2nd. Speers’ Course of Study.

(A). The difficulties in the way; and

(B). How to Surmount them.

3rd. How can we make the local divisions of our Reading Circle benefit our schools?

4th. Shall we teach the effect of narcotics and stimulants? And how?


5th. On what does the value of the common schools depend?

6th. What, in the public school, is open to the criticism of being impracticable?

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Adam Walck filed an injunction Friday in the District Court stopping the removal of the schoolhouse in District 91, Maple township.

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                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

E. W. Ewing will flourish the scepter at Victor, district 115, the ensuing school year.

Score one for “Neppie” and “Peddie.” The bristling array of interrogatives at the teachers examination failed to down them. Both have secured schools at top wages, and will thus be usefully employed for the season. “Nothing succeeds like success,” and “Mark” admires genuine pluck and grit wherever found.

Prof. Ingalls, state Sunday school evangelist of the Christian denomination, who held a series of meetings last week at the Tannehill schoolhouse on analysis of the Bible, spent last Friday visiting J. C. Snyder and family. J. C. and wife were once honored students of the Professor when he was a member of the faculty of Abingdon, Illinois, college.

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                                                    OTTER. “OTTERITE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

George Hosmer is talking of giving the young idea the direction of the target at Eli this winter.

Mr. Harden, principal of the Grenola schools, has been employed to teach our school at a salary of $50 per month.

We could have more offices in our township and school district to fill, so some of our most influential men that now have only four or five offices could be accommodated.

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                                              TORRANCE ITEMS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Mattie Rittenhouse teaches the lower room here this winter. We wish her success.

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                                                       CAMBRIDGE. “H.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

“Under the Laurels” was rendered at the schoolhouse again last Friday evening to a very large audience. A German farce, which was very good, closed the exercises.

School commenced in the upper room Monday. Mr. Alberts wields the rod. The primary school will not commence until the first of November. The teacher has not been employed.

The schoolhouse has been repainted and other improvements around the building, such as hitching racks, fence, etc., add much to the appearance of the building and speak well for the community.

Miss Allie Harden went to Burden Monday to take charge of her school. We are sorry to lose her from our society circle, but Burden gains an intelligent lady by our loss. Such acquisitions to society as Miss Allie are very desirable in any community.


The funeral sermon of Joseph Wager was preached at the schoolhouse Sunday a. m. by Rev. Duer. The funeral services were conducted in Colorado before the body was shipped here for interment, but as the widowed mother was deprived of showing her love to her darling boy during his illness, or watching the life so dear to her ebb away, and could not even see the lifeless form or attending the burying, she had the last sad rites paid to his memory on Sunday by a second funeral sermon. The God of the widow and orphan will uphold her in this great grief.

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                                                 DEXTER. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Our school opened Monday with Mr. McClellen, of Winfield, and Miss Laura Phelps, as teachers.

Miss Lou Jarvis will teach the coming winter in the Shreves district.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Winfield City Schools will again open Monday, Sept. 28. At the Central building an examination will be held Sept. 21st, at 1:30 p.m., for the benefit of all pupils who desire to be promoted to advance grades. Also those who have never attended our city schools should be examined with the above, that they may know the grades to which they belong and thus avoid all confusion at the opening of school.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Ollie Stubblefield, daughter of the Captain, has entered the State Normal school at Emporia for the winter’s term. She is one of the brightest graduates of the Winfield High school, and all her acquaintances take a warm interest in her advance. Her ambition and keen intellect will soon put her to the front in the State Normal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The school board, at the last meeting, elected Carrie Crysler, of New York, and Bertha Wallis and Mary Randall, of Winfield, as teachers in the new central school building. There is yet one vacancy. Misses Crysler and Randall have not yet accepted.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Owing to the unfinished condition of the Central school building, the high school and one of the grammar schools will open in rooms in the McDougal block.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Prof. R. B. Moore came in from his Clark County claim Saturday, going to Burden. The Burden school, of which he is superintendent, opened today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Bertha Wallis has accepted the second reader room in the new Central school building. Her election to the position, by the School Board, is a meritorious compliment. She is the second graduate of Winfield’s high school who has been honored with a position as teacher in our city schools. She is ambitious and bright and will fill the position with credit and satisfaction.

                                                     TOO MUCH LIQUID.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.


Capt. H. H. Siverd was up to Udall on Monday and Tuesday, subpoenaing about twenty-five witnesses in the Edward G. Roberts whiskey case. Edward quit teaching school some time ago to go into the drug business, and has run against the cold arm of the law. Captain Siverd took an invoice of the whiskey found in the drug store, over a hundred gallons. It is a very plain case, and Edward is in a very tight place. Mr. Amon, who was on Roberts’ bond with the latter’s father, withdrew his name yesterday, and Roberts is now in the county bastille. His trial comes off before Judge Snow Thursday.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 19, 1885.

The returns of the county superintendents of Kansas show that there are 411,000 school children in the state, an increase of 28,931 over last year. The school fund arising from the sale of school lands, invested in school district bonds, yielded an income aggregating $850,040.

Arkansas City Republican, September 19, 1885.

                                                      Mission Sunday School.

                                   ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS, Sept. 17, 1885.

For the last two weeks the Misses Wilson, Duncan, and Pickering, realizing the wants of quite a large number of families in our town, and that neither they nor their children attended either church or Sabbath school, with praiseworthy zeal began visiting these families and obtained a promise from them that they would come to a mission school if such was opened in one of our school buildings. Permission was obtained from the school board for the use of the stone school building. On last Sabbath at 3:30 p.m., the first meeting was held and there were over 70 persons present—parents and children. A few remarks were made by Dr. Reed, who explained the object of the school; that it was for the especial benefit of the poor, or those who did not feel like going to the Sabbath schools connected with the different churches, because they thought their clothes were not good enough.

J. C. Armstrong was elected superintendent and Amos Spray assistant; Miss Duncan, secretary, Miss Wilson, treasurer. Superintendent then called for volunteer teachers. There was no lack of teachers. The school was divided into classes and teachers assigned and work was commenced at once. At the close of the exercises, a committee of two in each ward was appointed to visit each family to solicit funds and old clothing for the needy, that all might come. We hope each family will feel invited to come; that all will do what they can to make this mission school prove a blessing to the town—especially the poor. This school is wholly undenominational; it is a union mission. We hope the different congregations feel invited to come and work. All will be done that can be done to make it interesting. J. C. A.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 23, 1885.

The public schools of Arkansas City will open Monday, October 5, 1885.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 23, 1885.

Our public schools will open shortly, and Mowry & Sollitt call the attention of parents to their fall line of school books.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 23, 1885.

Miss Nellie Nash, having entered into a state of connubiality, her place is made vacant on the roll of teachers. We understand the position will be left unfilled on account of the shortness of school funds, and that her labors will be divided up between Professor Weir and one or two other teachers.


Arkansas City Traveler, September 23, 1885.

School district No. 2 has been incorporated with district No. 1. This will give the children of the outlying localities better school facilities, and will admit of a more economical use of the school moneys.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 23, 1885.

                                            A DEFAULTING BOOKKEEPER.

                              W. R. Smith Under Bonds For Robbing His Employers.

The defalcation of William R. Smith, late bookkeeper in the employ of A. V. Alexander & Co., is a painful instance in our social life. He came here last February from Washington, D. C., with his wife and two children, and was employed in the real estate office of Frank J. Hess. He is a young man of 28 or 30 years, genteel in appearance, popular in manner, and well fitted to win the confidence of those with whom he comes in contact. He seems to have studied law some, and had a shingle painted designating himself as attorney-at law. He is an elegant calligraphist, and was recently appointed writing master in our public schools. After a stay of about three months in Frank Hess’s office, he severed his connection there and obtained an engagement in Alexander & Co.’s lumber office. For awhile he enjoyed the entire confidences of his new employers, until doubts of his strict integrity were aroused over the paucity of the cash receipts. The result of a heavy day’s business was often disappointing in the light showing it made in the cash book. To test the accuracy of his accounts, Mr. Alexander, or Mr. Baldwin, his partner, would abstract small sums of money from the safe during the bookkeeper’s absence, and an inquiry the next morning how his cash account came out would always receive a nonchalant answer, “all right.” His method of keeping accounts was original and elastic, and would adapt itself to any circumstances.

This confirmed the suspicions of his employers of wrong doing, and one evening last week, after Smith had left the office, the two gentlemen set to work to examine his cash account of the day, and discovered a discrepancy of $20 in one of the columns. The next morning Mr. Smith declared his cash balance “all right” as usual, and then his attention was called to this error in the footing of his debit column. The error he had to admit, but could give no account of the additional $20 on hand it called for. He showed no confusion, and said that one of his employers must have used the money and failed to charge it on the blotter. This led to serious talk, and the inculpated accountant sought to relieve himself from the dilemma by producing a $20 bill from the cash drawer in the safe badly crumpled up. Mr. Alexander told him he had evidence that he had been abusing his trust, and urged him to make a clean breast of it. He denied his guilt for awhile, but the threat of exposure and prosecution forced him into the confession that he had abstracted various sums, some of which he enumerated and the uses to which they had been applied. One of his pilferings had been to pay his admission fee to freemasonry. His admissions that evening accounted for the abstraction of about $147 in all; but his employers believed that they greatly exceeded that amount.

The services of another accountant, Fred Barrett, were called in, who has been at work the past ten days on the books, and who reports his cash account within a few dollars of balancing. His investigations have not resulted in discovering any further delinquency.


Complaint was made to Judge Kreamer and a warrant issued for Smith’s arrest. On Monday he was examined, County Attorney Asp conducting the proceeding, and Judge Sumner appearing for the defense. The charge of embezzlement being proved, the defendant was bound over in the penal sum of $500 for trial in the district court. Frank Hess made no charge, his books being in such an involved condition that he can prove no defalcation.

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                                          Winfield Spreading On Every Hand.

                                                      Her Prospects Grand.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Another of our public improvements is the fine Central school building, which will be finished by November fist, making one of the city’s most creditable public edifices. Its cost, with the present additions, will reach twenty-five thousand dollars, and will exhibit forcibly the educational tendency of our people.

                                                   A DRUGGIST’S WOES.

           The Trial of E. G. Roberts, Udall’s Druggist, for Violating the Liquor Law.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The trial by jury of Ed G. Roberts, a druggist of Udall, for violating the liquor law, was commenced before Judge Snow Thursday. Roberts is a young man of about twenty-one, who quit teaching school to get wealth and fame in the drug business. The case has elicited deep interest, and a big attendance of Udallites, some thirty of whom are witnesses, this number about “’alf and ’alf” for the defense and prosecution. W. G. Webster, of Udall, and Jos. O’Hare, of this city, are attorneys for the defense, and Senator Hackney, acting County Attorney, for the prosecution. One illegal sale has already been proven and others are being crowded. The invoice of Robert’s liquors on hand showed over a hundred gallons. Five witnesses of the prosecution swore they never saw or knew of Roberts selling any liquor illegally. Hackney said they lied. He at once made out warrants and had Noah Douglass, Clarence Boots, Peter Kelly, W. A. Cox, and Peter McCush arrested for plain drunks. The first arrest was knocked by the statutory limit of thirty days in which to file complaint. M. G. Troup, attorney for the plain drunks, brought up this point. This morning Hackney re-arrested the whole five on charges of more recent date.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

“Out of every one hundred and nine female school teachers,” says an exchange, “seven marry every year.” How many times do the remaining 103 marry? Give us all the facts.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Miss Ollie Stubblefield entered the State University at Lawrence instead of the Emporia Normal school. She will take a four year’s course—complete in the classics.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Miss Louise Gregg, the teacher for the Grammar school here, from Bluffton, Indiana, where she has had charge of the High School for some time, arrived Friday, and is a guest of Rev. Reider.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Misses Mary Randall and Mary Majors came up from Ponca Thursday afternoon, after two weeks visit with the Hodges. May and Will Hodges accompanied them up. May will remain to attend our high school.


Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mr. C. A. Shaw, of this city, has been appointed by President Cleveland to the Superintendency of the Ponca Indian school, and will move his family there to reside October first. This family will be parted with regretfully. Miss Mamie is a favorite among our young folks and will be greatly missed, as will Mr. and Mrs. Shaw.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

H. E. Silliman returned from Ottawa Friday and reports a very gratifying state of affairs in the University. There is double the number enrolled this year than there was at this time last year—107 now on the roll, 32 counties of Kansas being represented, and some from without the state. One student is from Salt Lake City and was formerly a Mormon. There has been an increase in the faculty, and under the energetic management of President Ward, the Baptists of Kansas have a school of which in the near future they will be justly proud.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Owing to the unfinished condition of the Central school building, the high school and one of the grammar schools will open in rooms in the McDougal block.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

C. A. Roberts, of Winfield, was here during our colt show, and helped out the Sentinel band with his playing. Charley is an excellent musician and teacher, and will accompany the Winfield Courier Band to Topeka. Udall Sentinel.

                                              TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

On last Saturday was held the first regular monthly meeting of the Teachers’ Association. Fifty-three of the live workers of Cowley County were present, representing Winfield, Arkansas City, Burden, Cambridge, Dexter, New Salem, Udall, and Otter. In fact, every section of the county was represented, and the meeting was one of the best ever held in Cowley County. Each topic of the program, as given in the COURIER, was fully discussed. An account of the proceedings in full will be given in tomorrow’s COURIER.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 26, 1885.

A 4th ward tax-payer suggests the thought to the school trustees of putting something over the holes in the cupola of the Central school building, in order to keep the pigeons from depositing waste matter therein. It will be remembered that the windows in the cupola of the brick school building were left open for a long time and the pigeons almost filled it up with debris. A stitch in time may save nine.

Arkansas City Republican, September 26, 1885.

The public schools of Arkansas City will open Monday, Oct. 5, 1885.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, September 30, 1885.

AS USUAL E. D. EDDY Comes to the Front With the Largest Stock of School Books -AND- School Supplies South of Kansas City. Wholesale or Retail. Call and see me before buying your School Books, and save money.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 30, 1885.

                                                        From Our Exchanges.


Geuda Springs Herald: The public school opened Monday, with a good attendance of scholars. In the principal’s department, Prof. W. S. Varner, instructor, nineteen pupils were enrolled. In the Intermediate, Miss Lydia Taylor, forty pupils, and in the Primary department, Miss Eva Preston, teacher, forty-two pupils, a total of one hundred and one for the first day. The teachers are all well qualified for their positions.

Excerpt from a lengthy article...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

School opens Monday and the small boy from then on for the next eight months will suffer all the torment that confinement can inflict on the young mind. The high school and grammar department will open in the McDougal building.

                                             THE CITY SCHOOL OPENED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

The city schools opened Monday and the Superintendent, Prof. A. Gridley, has been bobbing around variously in getting the various departments started off. The high school and grammar rooms of the Central school building are dilapidated by the progressing addition and the high school and one grammar department have rooms in the McDougal building—the main hall and a room suite—until the Central building is finished. The teachers this year are: Prof. W. N. Rice, Principal of high school; Miss Lola Williams, grammar department—McDougal building.

Central building—Miss Louise Gregg, grammar room; Miss Sadie Davis, 2nd Intermediate; Miss Maude Pearson, 1st intermediate; Miss Josie Pixley, 2nd primary; Miss Mary Berkey, 1st primary.

Second ward—Miss Flo. Campbell, 2nd intermediate, Miss Fannie Stretch, 1st intermediate, Miss Clara Davenport, 2nd primary; Miss Jessie Stretch, 1st primary.

         [I question the following: Jessie Stretch (1st intermediate and 1st primary???]

Third ward—Miss Alice Dickey, 2nd intermediate; Miss Mary Hamill, 2nd primary. Miss Mattie Bryant, teacher of the 1st primary in this ward is necessarily absent in Colorado, and her department will be taught till her return by Miss Jennie Lowry.

                                              TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

The second monthly meeting of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association will be held at Arkansas City on October 17, 1885, the program to be as follows.

1st. What are the secrets of success in school government?

Paper: Prof. Gridley. Discussion: J. W. Warren and Miss Cora B. Beach.

2nd. In what respect should recitations in primary classes differ from those in advanced classes?

Paper: Prof. Weir. Discussion: Miss Jessie Stretch and F. E. Haughey.

3rd. Importance of essay writing—the means to secure it.

Paper: Miss Flo Campbell. Discussion: Florence Patterson and Laura Barnes.

4th. Should a knowledge of vocal music be a qualification of the common school teacher?

Paper: Miss C. Bliss. Discussion: E. Collins and Chas. Wing.

5th. The teachers preparation for assigning and conducting a recitation.

Paper: Miss Sadie Pickering. Discussion: Amy Chapin and L. B. Hart.

6th. The feasibility of dropping technical grammar from the course of study of the

common school.


Paper: Miss Ella L. Kelly. Discussion: Misses Lida Strong and Maud Pierson.

Excerpt...

                                              TORRANCE ITEMS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

School begins Monday.

Excerpt...

                                                OTTER VALLEY. “JESSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

Lou Wilkins will teach in the O’Connor district this winter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

The bonds voted for the erection of our new central school building have been purchased by the State school board, at par, and the $14,000 is in the treasury of our school board. These bonds draw 6 percent and are payable any time after ten years. This mode of investing the State school fund is a good one. On state and national sureties, but four percent was realized. By investing in district school bonds, the State funds realize two percent more and the districts are enabled to get money four percent less.

                                                           LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 1, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

           State of Kansas to David Gatton, nw qr 19-36-6, 160 acres, school land: $1,640

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 3, 1885.

                                                       “Let Us Have Peace.”


The above plea for mercy comes from the Traveler. After devoting about three columns of valuable space to the REPUBLICAN, it winds up with a plea for peace. Coming from the source it does, we are naturally surprised. When the present editor assumed the management of the Traveler, he was very aggressive, constantly criticizing the course of this journal. He opposed all the measures advocated by us. In our efforts to create a reform in our city government, he antagonized us. When we worked for the removal of the notorious Stafford, he upbraided us and defended him. He defended the old city water and gas works franchise. He defended the infamous skating rink, criticized a minister of the gospel because he wished to banish the evil from our midst. He has called us a Democrat. He has criticized Councilman Prescott and T. H. McLaughlin unjustly. He never found fault with them as public officers or as private citizens, but he attacked their private opinions. He has called us ill-bred, yet he offered a public insult to J. L. Huey, as chairman of a citizen’s meeting, and never apologized. He has made bad calculations in making out his city printing bills. He has made fun of our youthfulness, calling us “callow,” forgetting that ignorance in youth is excusable, but in old age, contemptible. He has charged the school treasurer with paying money out of the wrong fund and never corrected, although he has been informed that his allegation was untrue. He awaits for the REPUBLICAN to take issue upon a question and then he antagonizes. The above calendar of sins is enough to try the patience of Job. But that is not all. Our space is just too limited to produce a complete list. And yet in the face of all he has done, he hoists the white flag and sues for peace. Having begun the battle, but being worsted, he pleads for peace. Can we do aught else but grant it so long as it does not injure the welfare of the public? The vision of the white-haired newspaper veteran rises before us and as his plea for peace rings in our ears, our heart is touched. The spirit of

 “Then lay on McDuff,

                                        And damned be he who first cries enough,”

is crushed. Henceforth, we will allow the editor of the Traveler to pursue his way along the rugged path of life without fear from us, unless he again becomes too officious. The REPUBLICAN will continue to labor in the interest of Arkansas City. We will propel the rudder of this journal, allowing Mr. Lockley the privilege of editing the Traveler. We realize that the REPUBLICAN has come out victorious in the fight and that is why we can afford to be magnanimous.

Your request is granted. You shall have peace as long as you remain in your present condition. Now, kind neighbor, go home and give that “mighty” and weary brain a rest.

Arkansas City Republican, October 3, 1885.

                                                       Teachers’ Association.

The second monthly meeting of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association will be held at Arkansas City on October 17, 1885, the programme to be as follows.

1st. What are the secrets of success in school government? Paper: Prof. Gridley; discussion: J. W. Warren and Miss Cora B. Beach.

2nd. In what respect should recitations in primary classes differ from those in advanced classes? Paper: Prof. Weir; discussion: Miss Jessie Stretch and F. E. Haughey.

3rd. Importance of essay writing—the means to secure it. Paper: Miss Florence Campbell; discussion: Florence Patterson and Laura Barnes.

4th. Should a knowledge of vocal music be a qualification of the common school teacher? Paper: Miss C. Bliss; discussion: E. Collins and Chas. Wing.

5th. The teachers preparation for assigning and conducting a recitation. Paper: Miss Sadie Pickering; discussion: Amy Chapin and L. H. Hart.

6th. The feasibility of dropping technical grammar from the course of study of the common school. Paper: Miss Ella L. Kelly; discussion: Misses Lida Strong and Maud Pierson.

Arkansas City Republican, October 3, 1885.

School Books at Kingsbury & Barnett’s.

Arkansas City Republican, October 3, 1885.

School opens Monday.

Arkansas City Republican, October 3, 1885.

School will begin Monday with the following teachers.

Miss Cora Cretcher, Principal Central Building.

Miss Florence Patterson, 4th and 5th grades.

Miss Eva Collins, 2nd and 3rd grades.

Luella Ferris, 1st grade.

Miss Belle Everett, Principal, High School.

Joe Bryan, Assistant Principal, High School.

Miss Jennie Peterson, 6th and 7th grades.


Miss Nellie Cunningham, 4th and 5th grades.

Mrs. Theaker, and Miss Lizzie Wilson, 2nd and 3rd grades.

Miss Lucy Walton, 1st grade.

Arkansas City Republican, October 3, 1885.

Voters of Creswell Township will take notice that at the coming election there will be two polling places: One at the schoolhouse in district No. 30—known as the Parker Schoolhouse; the other at the schoolhouse in district No. 6—known as the Jack-oak Schoolhouse. Voters of the township will be entitled to cast their vote at either precinct.

                                            F. M. VAUGHN, Township Trustee.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 7, 1885.

Dealers in school books are doing an active business supplying the wants of scholars in our public schools.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 7, 1885.

                                                         The Public Schools.

The public schools of this city opened on Monday, and there was a large attendance of scholars. Following is the assignment of teachers.

High school: Miss Belle Everett, principal; Joseph Bryan, assistant.

On the lower floor of the same building (first ward), Miss Nellie Cunningham teaches the 4th and 5th grades; and Miss Jennie Peterson the 6th and 7th grades.

In the north school building, Mrs. Theaker and Miss Lizzie Wilson have the 2nd and 3rd grades, and in the school house south, Miss Lucy Walton teaches the first grade.

In the 4th ward school, Miss Cora Cretcher has been appointed principal. Miss Florence Patterson is placed in charge of the 4th and 5th grades; Miss Eva Collins of the 2nd and 3rd; and Miss Luella Ferris teaches the first grade.

The regular work of tuition is not yet fairly entered on.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 7, 1885.

                                       Notice to the Voters of Creswell Township.

There are two places located to receive votes in said township, one at the schoolhouse in school district (32) thirty-two, known as the Parker schoolhouse, east of the Walnut; the other at the Jack Oak schoolhouse in district (6) six. Citizens of said township can vote at either poll. E. M. VAUGHN, Township Trustee.

Excerpt...

                                              TORRANCE ITEMS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 8, 1885.

School commenced here Monday morning with H. O. Norton and Mattie Rittenhouse, teachers. We wish them success.

Excerpt...

                                           DEXTER DOTS. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 8, 1885.


There was a Sunday school convention held at the schoolhouse Sunday afternoon for the purpose of making a permanent organization of the Sunday schools of the southeastern part of the county. Mr. L. J. Johnson was elected president and Rev. N. E. Rankin vice-president. There were delegates from several Sunday Schools present, but were not all in the district represented. After making all arrangements they adjourned to meet the first Friday in November at 2 o’clock. We think this is a good plan and hope that it will be successful. Let all come out and make it interesting.

                                              RICHLAND HIGH SCHOOL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 8, 1885.

The educational enterprise of Richland township is showing itself substantially. A stock company, composed of Messrs. T. R. Carson, N. J. Larkin, S. W. Phenix, J. R. Thompson, D. C. Stevens, H. J. Sandfort, H. F. Hornaday, and others, has been formed to erect a township high school at Wilmot. The building will be 24 x 40, two stories, and cost to start on between fifteen hundred and two thousand dollars. It will be erected at once. The intention is to have a regular graded school, to commence in November. They expect to employ the best talent, and have a school in every way a credit to the public spirit, wealth, and intelligence of Richland township. This is a move most commendable, and will succeed finely. It will be run as a subscription school until the township is able to take it off the stockholders’ hands. Richland is always foremost in every move for the general upbuilding of her citizens.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 8, 1885.

A “citizen” sends us the following communication, written on a memoranda page of a patent medicine circular indicating his desperate condition. “Are the children to start to school when the bell begins to ring or when it quits? If, when it quits, there are not many hours of school. Is the janitor paid by the hour for ringing? If so, why not hire him by the day, for he rings most of the time anyway. Is there no law to prosecute a man for ringing a bell all the time?”

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 10, 1885.

The thirteenth regular yearly meeting of the library association met in the High School building, October 8, 1885. All business brought before was the election of the officers, which was as follows.

President: Alvan Sankey.

Vice President: Miss Carrie Rice.

Librarian: Prof. J. C. Weir.

Assistant Librarian: H. G. Vaughn.

Treasurer: H. S. Maxwell.

It is earnestly hoped the members will take more interest in the association, and will make their interest manifest, by favoring it with their presence at the next meeting.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 10, 1885.


Frequently, during the short time we have been a resident of Arkansas City, we had heard of the No. 89 literary society. Last winter, when the organization was in successful operation, we heard many reports of the hot debates in which Al. Mowry took such a prominent part. Although our curiosity was excited, we never had an opportunity of gratifying it and verifying these reports until last Thursday evening. A number of the “boys,” among whom was a representative of the REPUBLICAN, mounted their gallant steeds on the evening mentioned, and started off for the I. X. L. Schoolhouse. Arriving there in good time, we found a large crowd had already assembled, and, at the time the exercise commenced, every seat was occupied. It was the first time the society had met since last spring. Consequently, many were unprepared, and did not perform with as much excellence as they would have done had they been in practice. The society compares well with other like organizations which we have visited. Music was furnished by the East Bolton brass band and a violinist. The exercises consisted of declamations, select readings, and debate. The question for debate was, “Is protective tariff beneficial to our country?” It was decided in favor of the negative. We failed to hear the name of the lady who read the paper which is connected with the society and called the Bolton News. We can justly say it was well edited and well arranged; it was newsy, spicy, and witty, and was read with good effect by the editress. We anticipate that this society will, next winter, become a great center of instruction as well as amusement.

Arkansas City Republican, October 10, 1885.

To Teachers. Please notice the change of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association at Arkansas City, from October 17 to the 24th. LIZZIE WILSON, Secretary.

Arkansas City Republican, October 10, 1885.

                                           Cowley County Teachers’ Association

Will hold its Second Monthly Meeting at Arkansas City, Oct. 24, 1885. The following is the programme.

1. What are the secrets of success in school government.

Paper: Prof. Gridley; discussion: J. W. Warren and B. Beach.

2. In what respect should recitations in primary classes differ from those in advanced classes?

Paper: Prof. Weir; Discussion: Jessie Stretch and F. E. Haughey.

3. Importance of essay writing; the means to secure it.

Paper: Florence Campbell; Discussion: Florence Patterson and Laura Barnes.

4. Should a knowledge of vocal music be a qualification of the common school teacher?

Paper: Celina Bliss; Discussion: Eva Collins and Chas. Wing.

5. The teacher’s preparation for assigning and conducting a recitation.

Paper: Ella S. Kelly; Discussion: Lida Strong and Maud Pierson.

Excerpt...

[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: NAME UNKNOWN.]

Arkansas City Republican, October 10, 1885.

Some of the schools have already opened. The schools in East Bolton will be taught by the following gentlemen: No. 89, Geo. Cunningham; No. 141, R. A. Boys; and No. 80, Charles Powell. Districts 89 and 141 have each a new house, while 80 is building one at present, and when completed, will be the largest schoolhouse in the township. It is built of stone, 27 x 42 feet, with 12 foot ceiling. The contractors are Herndon and Sanburne.

Excerpts...

Arkansas City Republican, October 10, 1885.

                                              Items from School District No. 32.

We re-organized our Sabbath school last Sabbath by electing S. C. Murphy, superintendent; E. E. Stiverson, assistant, and H. G. Vaughn, secretary. Our Sabbath school has been running all summer and has proved quite a success. It is expected to be continued all winter.


School is progressing finely under the management of Prof. Stiverson.

School did not commence in the Baldwin district, as was reported. The school board and R. R. Company failed to agree on the freight of some desks; hence, the delay. It will probably commence Monday and Perkins says he wished they would hurry up.

A lyceum has been organized in this district, meeting every Friday evening. Capt. C. W. Burt, president; E. E. Stiverson, vice president; Miss Emma Campbell, secretary. A grand time is expected this winter.

Several of the country pupils are attending the city schools. They report school is progressing nicely.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 14, 1885.

The Republican offers to open a department for the benefit of teachers wherein “arithmetic, grammar, etc.,” may be discoursed, Dick Howard being kind enough to offer his own “humble efforts in aiding this enterprise.” We suggest that correct spelling be made a prominent feature of this department.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.

The new addition to the Central school building walls are ready for the cornice and exhibits to some degree the imposing appearance of the whole building as improved. Of course, the magic change will be when the old rookery roof is taken off, a neat cornice put on the old walls, and a handsome roof put on. Entirely completed it will be the handsomest school building in Southern Kansas—a beauty and a joy forever. But even these extra five rooms won’t give us room enough. Winfield’s prolificness is as remarkable in “young ’uns” as in everything else.

Schoolhouses mentioned in the following townships...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.

Meeting of the Republican County Central Committee held at the office of G. H. Buckman, Oct. 10, 1885, pursuant to a call of the secretary. Minutes of last meeting read and approved. J. C. Long, E. A. Henthorn, J. R. Sumpter, H. F. Hornaday, S. M. Fall, and L. E. Wooden were appointed as an executive committee. It was decided to hold meetings in the different townships as follows.

Sheridan: Two meetings, Sheridan schoolhouse and Shrine schoolhouse.

Walnut: Two meetings, Maple Grove schoolhouse and District No. 1.

Bolton: Two meetings, Theaker and Mowry schoolhouses.

Cedar: Two meetings, Centennial and Otto schoolhouses.

Creswell: One meeting, Lone Star schoolhouse.

Harvey: Two meetings, Hickman and Armstrong schoolhouses.

Tisdale: Two meetings, Tisdale and one schoolhouse to be selected.

Vernon: One meeting, Vernon Center schoolhouse.

Liberty: Two meetings, Rose Valley and Prairie Ridge schoolhouses.

Pleasant Valley: Two meetings, Odessa and South Bend schoolhouses.

Maple: One meeting, Centennial schoolhouse.

Fairview: One meeting, schoolhouse to be selected.

Silverdale: One meeting, Estes schoolhouse.


Time of meetings and speakers to be fixed by the Executive Committee. On motion committee adjourned. E. A. HENTHORN, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.

The new addition to the Central school building walls are ready for the cornice and exhibits to some degree the imposing appearance of the whole building as improved. Of course, the magic change will be when the old rookery roof is taken off, a neat cornice put on the old walls, and a handsome roof put on. Entirely completed it will be the handsomest school building in Southern Kansas—a beauty and a joy forever. But even these extra five rooms won’t give us room enough. Winfield’s prolificness is as remarkable in “young ’uns” as in everything else.

Excerpt...

                                      FAIRVIEW JOTTINGS. “ALL WIND.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.

School opened Monday with R. B. Corson, teacher.

Excerpt...

                                           BETHEL ITEMS. “BLUE BELL.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.

Miss Howard is the one selected to train the young minds at Bethel again, and has taught one week quite successfully this term.

Excerpts...

                                     NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. “OLIVIA.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.

Mr. A. R. Carrol is once more a Salemite—and is the Old Salem school marm. Teacher and pupils all seem happy.

Miss Mary Dalgarn is the owner of a pretty pony and it carries her from her home to and from her school in Crooked Elm District.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.

Miss Hattie Andrews was in from Darien, where she is conducting a very successful school Sunday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.

Prof. Paul Finefrock will take the principalship of the Richland High School at Wilmot, which will open November 2nd. The building is progressing rapidly. Three courses will be taught: literary, commercial, and elocutionary, including vocal music. It will thoroughly fit the pupil to enter either our State University or State Normal School without taking a  preparatory course. This High School, which is instituted by a stock company and run on subscription until the township gets able to buy it, is a masterpiece of enterprise. The building is 25 x 40, two stories, and will cost nearly $2,000.

                         [Later articles have “Finfrock” rather than “Finefrock.”]

        SOUTHERN KANSAS NORMAL SCHOOL AND BUSINESS INSTITUTE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 15, 1885.


We note with pleasure the continued progress of this institution. This is the first week of the second month, and the enrollment is more than three times what it was at the opening, and new pupils are coming in from our city, from various parts of Cowley County, and from Harper County. Others are expected soon from a distance. Classes are in successful operation in all the branches included in a first grade certificate, also in pedagogy and in Latin. Arrangements are being made to secure an additional teacher.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 17, 1885.

                                                   County Central Committee.

Meeting of the Republican County Central Committee, held at the office of G. H. Buckman, Oct. 10, 1885, pursuant to a call of the secretary. Minutes of last meeting read and approved. J. C. Long, E. A. Henthorn, J. R. Sumpter, H. F. Hornady, S. M. Fall, and L. E. Woodin were appointed as an executive committee. It was decided to hold meetings in the different townships of Southern Cowley as follows.

Bolton: Two meetings, Theaker and Mowry schoolhouses.

Cedar: Two meetings, Centennial and Otto schoolhouses.

Creswell: One meeting. Lone Star schoolhouse.

Dexter: One meeting. Dexter schoolhouse.

Otter: One meeting, place to be selected.

Arkansas City: One meeting, Arkansas City.

Beaver: One meeting. Tannehill.

Tisdale: Two meetings, Tisdale and one schoolhouse to be selected.

Liberty: Two meetings, Rose Valley and Prairie Ridge schoolhouses.

Spring Creek: One meeting. Maple City.

Pleasant Valley: Two meetings, Odessa and South Bend schoolhouses.

Silverdale: One meeting. Estes schoolhouse.

Time of meeting and speakers to be fixed by the executive committee.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 17, 1885.

                                                         High School Notes.

EDS. REPUBLICAN. Thinking a few items from our high school might interest some of your readers, we note the following.

The high school has an enrollment of 60, divided as follows: Seniors, 7; middle year, 14; juniors, 39. Two of our seniors are the graduates of the class of 1884.

The teachers in all of the grades say they are much encouraged by the enthusiasm and energy with which the students enter upon the year’s work. We think this entirely due to the discipline and training they received last year.

The pupils are delighted with the prospect or removing to the Commercial Block, and hope the school board will find no obstacles in the way.

Prof. Bryan has been very ill for the past few days and is unable to teach. Rev. J. O. Campbell has been his substitute.

Many new faces are among us and still keep coming. All are welcomed and made to feel at home.

Prof. Weir has entered upon his work this year with his usual well known energy. His heart and soul are in the work, and if any fail to be interested, the blame certainly does not rest with him.

Our Friday afternoon exercises promise to be of unusual interest this year, and, although there are always a few who try to shirk this duty, the majority of the pupils appreciate and enjoy the work. All friends of the school are cordially invited to come and listen. LUDO.


Arkansas City Republican, October 17, 1885.

About 800 pupils are enrolled in the public schools. Inside of another month there will be fully 900.

Excerpts...

[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: NAME UNKNOWN.]

Arkansas City Republican, October 17, 1885.

The stone work on the new schoolhouse in Dist. 80 is completed.

The literary in Dist. 89 is in full blast. Everybody is invited to take part in the exercises. You cannot spend your leisure time in anything that pays you better.

Rev. H. S. Lundy will preach his farewell sermon at Springside schoolhouse, Oct. 15.

[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: NAME UNKNOWN.]

Excerpts...

Arkansas City Republican, October 17, 1885.

                                                 From Another Correspondent.

John Broadbent, while playing at school, had a double dislocation of the elbow. We are glad to inform his many friends that he is getting along nicely and is able to attend school again.

Little Willie Baird struck his knee on the platform, causing a bruise which kept him from school several days.

Lyceum No. 89 has begun. The first session was last Thursday evening. The night was changed to Friday evening for convenience. Good programmes, good crowds, and a good time in general.

The singing class under Prof. Demer is progressing nicely and they have sent for new books.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 21, 1885.

The Cowley Co. Teachers’ association will meet in the brick schoolhouse on Saturday morning at 9 o’clock.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 21, 1885.

Rev. Mr. Harper, of Wichita, will lecture in the Baptist Church on Friday evening to the

 public school teachers of the city and county. The public are invited to attend.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 21, 1885.

                                                 LIST OF APPOINTMENTS.

                                              By Republican Central Committee.

Maple Township. Centennial schoolhouse, Oct. 26. W. P. Hackney and H. H. Siverd.

Rock Township. Rock schoolhouse, Oct. 22, W. E. Tansey and C. M. Leavitt.

Omnia Township. Atlanta, Oct. 21. A. Stuber, H. H. Siverd, and W. E. Tansey.

Harvey Township. Armstrong, Oct. 26; Hickmans, Oct. 27. F. S. Jennings and T. H. Soward.

Ninnescah. Udall, Oct. 29. F. S. Jennings and A. H. Limerick.

Fairview. Little Dutch, Oct. 24. A. H. Limerick and Henry E. Asp.

Richland. Floral, Oct. 31; Wilmot, Nov. 2. M. G. Troup and C. M. Leavitt.

Windsor. Cambridge, Oct. 20; Grand Summit, Oct. 19. H. D. Gans and A. H. Limerick.

Vernon. Vernon Centre, Oct. 28. W. P. Hackney and C. R. Mitchell.


Walnut. Maple schoolhouse, No. 44, Oct. 27. W. P. Hackney and E. P. Greer.

Tisdale. New Salem, Oct. 26; Tisdale, Oct. 27. H. D. Gans and Henry E. Asp.

Silver Creek. Burden, Oct. 28. T. H. Soward and Capt. Tansey.

Dexter. Oct. 29. Capt. W. E. Tansey and E. P. Greer.

Otter. Stockdale, Oct. 25. Capt. A. Stuber and Henry E. Asp.

Beaver. Tannehill, Oct. 27. H. D. Gans and Henry E. Asp.

Bolton. Theaker’s, Oct. 29; Mowry’s, Oct. 30. F. S. Jennings and C. R. Mitchell.

Pleasant Valley. South Bend, Oct. 29. T. H. Soward and H. H. Siverd; Victor, Nov. 2. C. R. Mitchell, Cal Swarts, and E. P. Greer.

Creswell. Lone Star, Oct. 29. C. L. Swarts and M. G. Troup.

Liberty. Rose Valley, Oct. 29; Prairie Ridge, Oct. 30. H. D. Gans and Henry E. Asp.

Silverdale. Estus, Oct. 26. C. R. Mitchell and E. P. Greer.

Sheridan. Sheridan schoolhouse, Oct. 20. T. H. Soward and E. P. Greer.

Spring Creek. Maple City, Oct. 28. E. P. Greer and Cal Swarts.

Cedar. Centennial, Oct. 30; Otto, Oct. 31. T. H. Soward, E. P. Greer, and Cal Swarts.

All meetings will be held at 7:30 p.m. Members of township committees will please see that the places of meeting are properly lighted and that due notice is given.

                                 By order of Republican County Central Committee.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 22, 1885.

There is a complaint that the Second ward schoolhouse is not warmed up these cold mornings and the children suffer. We mention this to call the attention of the school officers to the matter.

Excerpt...

                                                           BURDEN. “B.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 22, 1885.

The enrollment of the schools here is now 292. The teachers have adopted the plan of taking turns to stay at the schoolhouse during noon, in order to insure quiet and good behavior. Everything is moving along smoothly in the schools.

Excerpt...

                                       AKRON GLEANINGS. “DREAMER.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 22, 1885.

The Akron school is progressing finely under the management of Mr. C. S. Parsell.

Excerpts...

                                       HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. “MARK.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 22, 1885.

Miss Nellie Holtby is attending school at Arkansas City.

Schools are now in session in districts 4, 10, and 115, with a good daily attendance. The pedagogues are Messrs. Ed Garrett, J. C. Snyder, and E. H. Ewing.

An empty whiskey bottle was found near the close of the first week of school in the rear of the Centennial schoolhouse. It is presumed that the teacher was complying with the recent school laws, in practically illustrating the injurious effect of alcoholic stimulants and narcotics on the human system. The illustration must have been very impressive as it exhausted the contents of the bottle.


Bob Hunt and Miss Ella King launched their barque on the turbulent tide of matrimony this week. Bob is an exemplary young man, and by industry, economy, and frugal habits has secured a fine farm and provided a cosy home for his bride. Miss King has been one of our intelligent and energetic teachers, and will be missed from the ranks of the profession. Their many friends wish them a happy and prosperous voyage down the ceaseless stream of time.

Excerpt...

                                              TORRANCE ITEMS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 22, 1885.

There was a blind man lectured at the schoolhouse Saturday night, on “The World.” Those in attendance seemed to be highly pleased.

Excerpt...

                                             OLD SALEM. “AUNT SUSIE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 22, 1885.

There will be an oyster supper at the Torrance schoolhouse Friday, Oct. 23rd. Everybody invited.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 22, 1885.

The heavy rain of Sunday caused a considerable dampness in the central school building. The roof is off part of the old wing so the water had full access to it. School had to be dismissed in several of the rooms on account of the damp walls. This week will get the building in good shape and we will have a building to be proud of.

                                                           LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 22, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

School District No 77 to C A Briggs, tract in 19-32-5e, one acre: $8.00

State of Kansas to S A Bendine, 100 acres, school land: $720

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 24, 1885.

                                                         High School Notes.

Prof. Bryan is still sick, but, at last report, was slowly improving. He hopes to be with us again next week. It makes the burden very heavy for Prof. Weir and Miss Everett to bear.

The school board at its meeting on Friday evening decided to fit up the rooms in the Hasie block for the high school. New desks will be purchased and everything fixed comfortably and neatly.

The old high school room, around which so many memories and tender associations still cling, will be divided by a partition, thus making two commodious rooms for the use of the 7th and 8th grades.

The pupils are surprised as well as delighted with the success they have in procuring funds to buy a musical instrument. Over $90 has been donated by the generosity of the city people and more has been promised. A piano has been decided upon.

Several pupils have left school rather than comply with some of the rules enforced. Persons who take such a step injure only themselves and are no loss to our school.


A goodly number of pupils attend school from the country. We are glad to see that the country boys are beginning to appreciate the benefits of a good education as much as their city brothers.

The performance on last Friday afternoon was lamentably poor, but hope for improvement. As this was the beginning and many of the performers were strangers to the work and did not receive any drilling, we can make allowance for them.

For rhetoricals, the scholars are divided into two divisions. They alternate with each other, one division performing one Friday, the other, the next. The odd numbers are under the leadership of Alvan Sankey, the even, under Emma Campbell. LUDO.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 24, 1885.

The Republican rally which was advertised to come off at Lone Star school in Creswell Township Thursday evening, Oct. 29, will take place at the Jack oak schoolhouse instead on the same date.

Arkansas City Republican, October 24, 1885.

                                                       Teachers’ Department.

The following questions were given to us this week for publication.

                                                               HISTORY.

1. Who was in command of the American forces at the time of the battle of Lexington?

2. When and where did the first colonial congress meet?

3. State the difference between “continental” and “colonial” congress.

                                                 THEORY AND PRACTICE.

1. When should pupils in ungraded schools begin the study of grammar?

2. Should a recitation in spelling be written or oral?

3. Is the Eclectic system of penmanship superior to other systems?

4. Is a teacher made responsible for furniture injured by his pupils?

                                                            ARITHMETIC.

1. In a pair of scales, a body weighed 31¼ pounds; in one scale, and only 20 pounds in the other scale. Required its true weight.

2. A man bought two animals for $100; calves at $10 each, sheep at $3, and lambs at $0.50; how many of each did he buy?

3. If a man buys a lot whose sides measure respectively 48, 60, 96, and 108 feet, what will be the length of the longest boards which he can use to fence all the sides without cutting?

4. A man engaged to work a year for $240 and a suit of clothes. At the end of 9 months an equitable settlement was made by giving him $168 and the suit of clothes. What was the value of the clothes?

                                                              GRAMMAR.

1. What is the basis of grammar?

2. Write the possessive, singular and plural, of lady, chimney, sheep, brother-in-law, and man-servant.

                                                            GEOGRAPHY.

1. Supposing the inclination of the earth’s axis to be 25 degrees, instead of 23-1/2, what would be the width of the several zones?

The names of those who answer the above questions correctly will be published.

Arkansas City Republican, October 24, 1885.


L. F. Abernethy, of Mitchell County, this state, is in the city. Mr. Abernethy is an applicant for a position in our public schools, when the change occurs of moving the high school department into the rooms of Commercial Block. Mr. Abernethy, in order to keep up with the times, came in and subscribed for the REPUBLICAN.

Arkansas City Republican, October 24, 1885.

Eddy is receiving new school books every day.

Excerpt...

[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, October 24, 1885.

MARRIED. Bob Hunt and Miss Ella King permitted Cupid to apply the matrimonial noose last week. The teaching fraternity loses one of their worthy disciples in Miss Ella. Bob is an honorable, energetic, and enterprising young man. Their many friends wish them a happy and useful career. GRAPHITE.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 28, 1885.

AD. SELECT SCHOOL: Begins Nov. 9, 1885; Ends June 25, 1886.

One week’s vacation for Holidays.

Tuition $2.00 per month, including one hour’s exercise daily in Hoyt’s Gymnasium.

School Rooms Under Hoyt’s Hall.

                            STUDIES FROM WHICH STUDENTS MAY SELECT.

Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Penmanship, Drawing, Reading, Elocution, Physiology, Physics, History, Geography, Grammar, Composition and Rhetoric, Latin.

                                                     BUSINESS COURSES.

Book Keeping, Penmanship, Commercial Law, Counting House Arithmetic.

Instrumental and Vocal Music Extra.

For further information call on or address the Principal, L. F. ABERNETHY, B. S. Principal.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 28, 1885.

William Wilson, brother to Alexander Wilson, our efficient school clerk, is spending a few days in town. His home is in Americus, Lyon County, but he has been attracted here by the fame of our city’s growth and progress, and is now looking round with a view to purchasing land.

       [Confusion over name. Republican uses “Abernethy.” Traveler, “Abernathy.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 28, 1885.

Mr. Lincoln F. Abernathy announces his intention to open a school on Monday, Nov. 9th. He comes highly recommended from Osage City, Iowa, where he has taught school for several years, his scholastic attainments being vouched for and his merit and energy commended. In view of the crowded state of our public schools, there is certainly room for Mr. Abernathy’s useful enterprise, and if he puts proper energy into his work he can hardly fail of success.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 28, 1885.

                                                   OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

                    Additional Rooms to be Provided and Two More Teachers Engaged.


We paid a visit to some of the city schools a few days ago, to see whether the young idea is being successfully taught to shoot. The trouble that encounters the school board, and the teachers who endeavor to carry out their plans, is the lack of sufficient funds. Our city population grows more rapidly than means are provided to supply its wants. The enumeration of persons of school age this year gave 1,120 names, and when the present term opened 700 scholars enrolled their names, which has since been increased to upwards of 800. This was in excess of the facilities provided, and reduced the school board to shifts, which are not satisfactory to themselves or profitable to the scholars. Some rooms are overcrowded to such an extent that the teachers cannot do justice to their scholars; in other rooms the children are divided into relays, one-half being taught in the forenoon and the remainder in the afternoon. In view of the fact that the school session will not exceed seven months and may be reduced to six, thus overcrowding the room and giving the primary scholars only half tuition, is not considered a full award to taxpayers for their outlay, and to increase the facilities it has been deemed expedient by the trustees to hire two or three rooms in the Commercial block, and employ two additional teachers. This will increase the expense of running our schools, and may shorten their operation to six months, but it is considered only just to the supporters of our schools who demand that proper facilities be provided, and of the two evils presented the trustees to choose from this is considered the least.

The school assessment of 10 mills on the dollar will probably raise $4,500, and the allowance from the state on our increased enumeration will probably turn in $2,500 more. The state quota is more liberal than was at first estimated, and with the amount of resources thus furnished, the school trustees feel themselves justified in extending their facilities as above indicated.

[NOTE: SCHOOL TAUGHT IN COMMERCIAL BLOCK. ARTICLE DOES NOT MENTION HASIE BLOCK...WHICH IN 1885 WAS USED BY HASIE BROS. AS A GROCERY STORE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 28, 1885.

Messrs. Wood & Inskeep, proprietors of the Winfield Business Institute, attended the meeting of the Teachers’ Association on Saturday, and favored the TRAVELER with a call.

                                             DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.

J. W. Weeks, the candidate on the Democratic ticket for county surveyor, is comparatively a stranger in this country. He was imported from Missouri by a couple of Udall parties for the purpose of instructing the young ideas of Udall and vicinity how to shoot. From some cause, the school board, after seeing him, concluded his friends were a little too anxious for him and did not hire him. He then offered to teach the kindergarten department at $35 per month, five dollars less than a lady offered to teach it for. The school board couldn’t see it and did not hire him. His friends were bound to help him into something, and as the Democrats could not find anybody else, put him on the ticket. He is said to hold a third grade certificate for teaching, and has not been in the county long enough to have a vote.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.


The Teachers Association at Arkansas City last Saturday was well attended and the full program as published in THE COURIER some time ago was carried out. There were some forty or more of the teachers of this county present. Those who attended from here were Misses Fannie and Jessie Stretch,          Gregg, Mary Berkey, Josie Pixley, and Flo Campbell, Supt. A. H. Limerick, and Profs. Wood and Inskeep. They report a delightful time and say the meeting was quite interesting as well as very profitable. We did not learn where the association decided to have their next meeting.

Excerpt...

                                      FAIRVIEW JOTTINGS. “ALL WIND.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.

Preaching at Fairview schoolhouse every two weeks at 4 p.m., by Rev. Knite.

Excerpts...

                                              TORRANCE ITEMS. “DAN.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.

Mr. Yates, the blind man, delivered two very interesting lectures in our city, last week.

The oyster supper given at the schoolhouse on last Friday night by the mite society was quite a success. A number from Burden, Dexter, and Cambridge were present and all had a lively time.

The mite society met with Mattie Rittenhouse Saturday night, and owing to the rain, there were but few present. Will meet at the schoolhouse next Saturday night. Everybody come.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.

Miss Hattie Andrews is down with quinsy. Miss Minnie takes her school for a few days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.

The reporter mounting a steed sallied forth early Friday morning to take an inventory of the improvements and new buildings which have gone up since the season opened, and the ones under construction at the present time. Being rushed, we are satisfied many have been overlooked. The valuation given is below the market value rather than above. The following list we know will surprise our own citizens.

                                        Central School Building, addition: $14,000

                                                           LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

State of Kansas to A M Shurts, lots 4, 5 and 6 and sw qr se qr 16-34-3e, school land: $495

                                                              FESTIVAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.

The new stone schoolhouse in Dist. 43 is about completed and is located four miles southeast of town. In order to purchase a new bell for the school, the people of the District will hold a festival on Thursday evening, Nov. 5th. A good supper, oysters, etc., will be provided. All are invited.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 29, 1885.

Prof. R. B. Moore, principal of the Burden schools, returned from Clark County Monday after proving up his claim near Ashland. The Prof. is now one of the bloated landholders.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 31, 1885.


                                                       Teacher’s Department.

                                                              GRAMMAR.

1. Where in relation to the word which it limits, should a relative pronoun be placed? Where an adjective? Where an adverb?

2. Parse the italicized words in the following sentences.

The boy closed the shutters, which darkened the room.

I know who was elected president.

3. In the sentence, “Mary studies,” is the verb transitive or intransitive?

                                                               HISTORY.

1. What is meant by an inter-colonial war?

2. What three presidents of the United States died on the 4th of July?

3. Where were the two conventions held that nominated Lincoln?

                                                            GEOGRAPHY.

1. Tell why rain falls.

2. What is meant by the zodiac signs.

                                                            ARITHMETIC.

1. A man was offered $1,125 for a house in cash, or $1,181.80, payable in 8 months. He chose the latter; if money is worth 9 percent to him, how much did he lose?

2. What sum must I invest in U. S. Bonds, whose market value is 116, and which draw 6 percent interest, to secure an income of $18,450 in currency, if gold is worth 115?

3. A man bought a farm for $6,000 and agreed to pay principal and interest in three equal annual installments. What was the annual installment, interest being 6 percent?

Answers to questions will be published every two weeks. We have only received a few answers to the questions of last week and we would like to see more promptness on the part of those who are interested in this work.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 31, 1885.

Oh, yes, the Democrats are going to get there. No doubt about it. This is the manner in which they progress. A Democratic rally was advertised in an out township Tuesday evening, and “Hon.” E. C. Gage was to be the speaker. “Hon.” E. C. was at the schoolhouse at the appointed time, but the crowd was not. Ed came home and recited his beautiful eulogies on Capt. Thompson to father McGinnis.

Arkansas City Republican, October 31, 1885.

Miss Minnie Randall, of Peoria, Illinois, is stopping in the city. Miss Randall is a teacher of piano and organ music and has recommendations from some of the leading professors of music in the city of Peoria. She is a sister of Mrs. U. S. Upp.

Arkansas City Republican, October 31, 1885.

In another column of the REPUBLICAN appears the advertisement of L. F. Abernethy. Mr. Abernethy came here from Iowa last week and has decided to open a select school in the rooms under Hoyt’s Gymnasium. Mr. Abernethy is young, energetic, and comes very highly recommended by his former instructors and professors at the college from which he is a graduate, at Osage City, Iowa. We believe Mr. Abernethy will succeed in his undertaking and we hope all who desire to send their children to a select school will visit him. See his ad. elsewhere.


[AD: ARKANSAS CITY SELECT SCHOOL.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 31, 1885.

                                         ARKANSAS CITY SELECT SCHOOL

Begins Nov. 9, 1885; Ends June 25, 1886.

                                  ONE WEEK’S VACATION FOR HOLIDAYS.

Tuition $2.00 per Month, Including One Hour’s Exercise Daily in Hoyt’s Gymnasium.

School Rooms Under Hoyt’s Hall.

                                        STUDIES FROM WHICH TO SELECT.

Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Penmanship, Drawing, Reading, Elocution, Physiology, Physics, History, Geography, Grammar, Composition and Rhetoric, Latin.

                                                      BUSINESS COURSE:

Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Commercial Law, Counting House Arithmetic. Instrumental and Vocal Music extra.

For further information, call on or address the Principal.

                                            L. F. ABERNATHY, B. S. Principal.

Arkansas City Republican, October 31, 1885.

Cal. Swarts went over to Maple City Thursday evening and addressed a large crowd of voters at the schoolhouse in that township.

Arkansas City Republican, October 31, 1885.

Cal. Swarts and John Daniels went out and held a public meeting at Jack Oak Schoolhouse, Thursday evening. They report a big time.

Arkansas City Republican, October 31, 1885.

                                                         High School Notes.

The Cowley County Teachers Association met in the high school room on last Saturday morning with an attendance of 35. After a few remarks by Prof. Limerick, the minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved. The first subject on the programme was dispensed with on account of the absence of Prof. Gridley. The second subject was opened by Prof. Weir. He gave a very interesting address on the methods to be used with the primary classes. He was followed by Miss Jessie Stretch and others. The importance of essay writing was next discussed very ably by Rev. J. O. Campbell, Prof. Weir, and Miss Campbell. On account of the illness of the Arkansas City teachers and absence of others, the fourth, fifth, and six topics were not discussed. Business was attended to and after voting to have an afternoon session the association adjourned for dinner. As most of the teachers in attendance left on the afternoon train, the meeting after dinner was of little importance. It was voted to have the next meeting at Winfield.

Messrs. Wood and Inskeep of the Winfield Commercial College were at the meeting. The Arkansas City teachers rather give the city away by rising when called on and begged to be excused from duty on account of having the chills.

Prof. Barnes and wife attended the meeting of the association. Mr. Barnes came as a representative of the Winfield Tribune.

It was quite a disappointment to all that Rev. Harper was unable to fill his engagement for Friday evening. A severe cold prevented his coming.


The high school is still flourishing in spite of the disadvantages the teachers labor under on account of Prof. Bryan’s absence. New pupils are coming in every week.

The janitor evidently needs a few lessons in the art of heating a school room, part of the time the room is at the freezing point, and at other times is too warm to be comfortable. Several pupils have contracted severe colds from this carelessness.

The pupils desire to return their sincere thanks to the persons who have given so liberally toward an instrument; $16 is the sum now on hand.

In two weeks the high school expects to move to its new quarters. LUDO.

Arkansas City Republican, October 31, 1885.

                                                        Teachers Association.

Cowley County Teachers Association met at Arkansas City last Saturday. Opening exercises were conducted by Prof. Weir. After a few brief remarks by the president, the discussion was opened by Prof. Weir, followed by Miss Jessie Stretch.

Questions:

1. In what respect should recitations in primary classes differ from those in the advanced classes.

2. Importance of easy writing. The means to secure it.

Paper: Miss Campbell, discussion by Miss Florence Patterson, Prof. Wood, of the Winfield Normal school, Rev. Campbell, Alfred Wing, and Miss Jessie Stretch.

3. The teacher’s preparations for assigning and conducting a recitation.

Discussion by Mrs. Amy Chapin, Prof. Weir, Prof. Wood, Miss Jessie Stretch, J. W. Warren, and Miss Campbell.

After a few minutes recess the house was called to order by the president, and the business coming before the association was transacted. An adjournment was made to allow the Winfield teachers to go home on the afternoon train. But those teachers living in this vicinity reconvened at the schoolhouse where the remainder of the afternoon passed very quickly and satisfactorily to all present. The afternoon session was on a par with that of the forenoon. In the afternoon as neither president or vice president were in attendance, Alfred Wing was chosen to preside protempore. The question, what are the secrets in school government, was ably discussed by J. W. Warren followed by Mahalia Arnett, Mr. Stiverson, Alfred Wing, and Minnie Turner. The ground being almost entire covered and many new theories put forth. The association adjourned to meet at Winfield Nov. 20th at 7 p.m. and the 21st.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 4, 1885.

                                                             Dancing Club.

Miss High’s dancing club will meet tonight (Wednesday) at Highland Hall. Those wishing to join, and those who have already joined, are requested to be on hand at 8 o’clock sharp. Miss High is an excellent teacher, an acquisition we have long wanted.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 4, 1885.

                                                              Music Class.

We take pleasure in announcing to the public that we have secured an able and efficient teacher of instrumental music, Miss Minnie Randall, who will give lessons to our students at greatly reduced rates. L. F. ABERNETHY, Principal, Arkansas City Select School.


Prof. Duncan, who is so well and favorably known in this city, will favor the students of the Arkansas City Select School, by giving them lessons for a very reasonable charge.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 5, 1885.

A county superintendent in one of our neighboring counties was asked the following, and his reply was about right.

“How does it happen that there are so many old maids among the teachers?”

He replied, “Because school teachers are, as a rule, women of sense, and no sensible woman will give up a $60 position for a $40 man.”

                                                    A CARD OF THANKS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 5, 1885.

We wish to extend our sincere thanks to the kind friends for their many favors and the sympathy shown us during our sad bereavement; also to the dear teacher, Miss Stretch, and schoolmates, for floral offering. Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Frazee.

The gate stood ajar to the morning.

And an angel passed that way

And plucked the fruit’s sweet blossom,

Our darling had gone for aye.

We send these flowers in remembrance

Of our schoolmate, our little Pearl,

A soul as white as the blossoms

Had the sweet voiced, dainty girl.

                                              Pearl’s Schoolmates and Teacher.

                                                         DISTRICT NO. 4.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 5, 1885.

We noticed in the COURIER of Oct. 27, an article written by “Mark,” of Hackney, in regard to an empty whiskey bottle said by him to have been found at the rear end of our schoolhouse. We wish to inform “Mark” and others who may have read his article that the said bottle was not found on the school grounds at all, but was picked up by one of the small boys along the hedge row on the outside of the school grounds and some distance south of the schoolhouse. We think “Mark” was a little “hasty” in writing this item without making some inquiry and obtaining the facts in the case. We also think he was a little “fast” in trying to make the impression that we were responsible for the bottle being there, and also that we had drank the contents of the same. However, we hardly think he intended to do this, but merely intended it as a joke. Nevertheless, such an impression has been made, not only within the district, but with some persons living some distance away. And now we think it behooves “Mark” as a gentleman to make some explanation in regard to this matter in his next writing. The Teacher.

Excerpt...

                                                TISDALE ITEMS. “COM.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 5, 1885.

Preaching service at the new church every Saturday, by Presbyterian and M. E. alternately, preceded by a well attended and interesting Sunday school. The winter school is in progress with F. P. Vaughn as teacher, and over sixty pupils in attendance.

Excerpts...


                                           DEXTER DOTS. “MOSS ROSE.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 5, 1885.

J. R. Smith, Jr., has commenced his school in Dist. No. 7, four miles north of Dexter.

Our school is filled to overflowing. One hundred and thirty scholars are enrolled. We are to vote bonds for a large stone schoolhouse soon.

Excerpt...

                                           BETHEL ITEMS. “BLUE BELL.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 5, 1885.

Miss Ida Howard has taught one month successfully, but has some hard chaps to deal with.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 7, 1885.

                                                         High School Notes.

Prof. Bryan has returned to his work, and all moves on as before.

Prof. Marble, an old and experienced teacher, visited the school on Tuesday, and made some interesting remarks.

It is wonderful how the changes in the weather affect the pupils. On a dark, gloomy day the interest is very hard to keep up; but on a bright sunshiny day, all are wide awake and ready for lessons, no matter how difficult.

A committee of ten has been appointed for taking the final measures in purchasing our instrument. All will be much pleased when we once have it, as we have had no music this year, and all feel the need of it.

The monthly examinations have been dispensed with in the high school, but one examination will be held during the term. These examinations hung over the pupils like a dark cloud from one end of the month to the other, and we are glad to know that they will haunt us no more.

Some effort will be made soon to replenish the library. The students are proud of the library and want to make it more complete this year than ever before.

The question as to whether we shall have a literary society this winter is being discussed. Many favor the plan while others disapprove on account of the ones held heretofore not amounting to anything.

Many pupils forget George Washington’s glorious example for telling the truth, when the deportment roll is called each evening. LUDO.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 7, 1885.

                                                       Teacher’s Department.

Dora Armstrong and C. Symington furnished the answers to the questions published two weeks ago. Nearly all of their answers were correct.

                                                               HISTORY.

1. Captain Parker.

2. At New York, Oct. 7, 1765.

3. Some historians make no distinction between the two terms, calling the First and Second Continental Congresses the Second and Third Colonial Congresses. The term, “Continental Congress,” was doubtless used when all the colonies were intended to have been represented.


                                                 THEORY AND PRACTICE.

1. A child may be taught to use language correctly without learning the rules and technicalities of grammar. It takes the mature mind to comprehend fully the underlying principles of a language. Perhaps a child who is able to read in the Fourth Reader may study grammar to advantage.

2. He is not responsible, although it is one of the requisites of a good schoolteacher to see that no such injury is done.

                                                              GRAMMAR.

1. The language of our best authors and the usage established by them.

2. Sing.                                     Plur.

    lady’s                                         ladies’

    chimney’s                                   chimneys’

    sheep’s                                       sheep’s

    Brother-in-law’s                   Brothers-in-law’s

    Man-servant’s                            Men-servants’

                                                            ARITHMETIC.

1. We have not yet received an answer to this problem from any of our correspondents. One of them requested as to publish both the answer and solution to it. We confess our inability to give an arithmetical solution, and, as we have no algebraical symbols in this office, we can furnish only a very imperfect analysis by algebra. We believe the problem can be solved by arithmetic.

In Ray’s Higher Arithmetic is the following law of leverage: The power; the weight; the distance of the weight from the fulcrum; the distance of the power from the fulcrum.

From this law it is seen that the same ratio exists between the power and weight as between the two distances on each side of the fulcrum; it is also seen that, when the true weight is placed on the lesser side of the scales, it will balance a weight equal to 20 times the ratio, and, when it is placed on the greater side, it will balance a weight equal to 31-1/4 divided by the ratio. Let x = ratio. Then, 20x = 31-1/4 divided by x, from which the value of x is found to be five-fourths. Substituting this value in equation, and we find the true weight to be 25 lbs.

2. 5 calves, 1 sheep, 94 lambs.

3. 12 feet.

4. $49.

                                                            GEOGRAPHY.

Each frigid zone would be 25 degrees, each temperate, 40, and the torrid, 50.

Arkansas City Republican, November 7, 1885.

The Arkansas City Select School prepares young people for business.

Arkansas City Republican, November 7, 1885.

The dancing school was well attended on Wednesday evening in spite of the rain. The glide polka and new quadrilles were taught.

Arkansas City Republican, November 7, 1885.

If you wish to take music lessons, either vocal or instrumental, you will save money by attending the Arkansas City Select School.


Arkansas City Republican, November 7, 1885.

Prof. Duncan, who is so well and favorably known in this city, will favor the students of the Arkansas City Select School, by giving them vocal music lessons for a very reasonable charge.

Arkansas City Republican, November 7, 1885.

We take pleasure in announcing to the public that we have secured an able and efficient teacher of vocal and instrumental music. Miss Minnie Randall will give lessons to our pupils at greatly reduced rates.

Excerpts...

[EAST BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: NAME NOT GIVEN.]

Arkansas City Republican, November 7, 1885.

The new schoolhouse at Springside will be ready for occupancy the first of the coming week; C. A. Powell will be instructor.

Announcement is made to organize a Sunday school at Springside next Sunday at 11 o’clock; turn out and aid in the good work.

Excerpt...

[HACKNEY CORRESPONDENT: “GRAPHITE.”]

Arkansas City Republican, November 7, 1885.

Messrs. Cal Swarts and Wm. M. Jenkins, of Arkansas City, and Hon. H. P. Greer, of the Winfield Courier, tore off [WORD MISSING] yards of political oratory at the Victor schoolhouse, last Monday evening.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 11, 1885.

Furniture for the high school arrived yesterday, and will be set up in the rooms rented for that purpose in the Commercial block.

Excerpt...

                                           BETHEL ITEMS. “BLUE BELL.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 12, 1885.

The patrons at Bethel are generally of the opinion that Miss Howard don’t want another school there, with her stringent rules with even the small children (and where is the superintendent that he never visits Bethel?). We think it about time for him to call and see how teacher and pupils are both doing.

Excerpts...

                                                 STAR VALLEY. “DUFFY.”

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 12, 1885.

Spelling school at Star Friday night. Oh! We’re bound to boom, everybody come.

Otis Richards left last week for Winfield, where he will attend school during the winter. May peace and good luck be his consistent companions.

Star Valley has organized a literary society. This is something that has been needed here for some time. It gives the people a chance to get together once in a while. We hope everyone will come and take part, and make it a grand success.


Joseph McKibben died at his home near Darwin schoolhouse Tuesday morning of last week, after a few minutes illness. After a post mortem examination by Dr. Hornady and two others, they said the cause was congestion of the brain. Mr. McKibben leaves a wife and child to mourn his sudden death, who have the heartfelt sympathy of their many kind friends.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 12, 1885.

A Beaver correspondent writes us a long essay on a “Young Ruff,” who set fire to a children’s play house, made of cornstalks, during evening services of a protracted session in Beaver Center schoolhouse, disturbing the meeting. The correspondence boiled down is to the effect that it was a very disgraceful act. It certainly was a very rude act to treat the children and the meeting so, and we advise the complainant to catch the “young ruff,” if he can, and have him properly fined before a magistrate. As the correspondent did not give us his name, he will not be surprised that his essay does not appear.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 12, 1885.

The case of Fred Vaughn, for “licking” Mr. Boon’s boy in Tisdale township, for deviltry at school, has been set for Saturday.

Arkansas City Republican, November 14, 1885.

We take pleasure in announcing to the public that we have secured an able and efficient teacher of vocal and instrumental music, Miss Minnie Randall, who will give lessons to our pupils at greatly reduced rates. L. F. ABERNETHY.

Arkansas City Republican, November 14, 1885.

Rev. Chas. Boles of the M. E. Church South, will preach in the new schoolroom in Commercial Block, Sunday, at seven o’clock p.m. Rev. W. J. Blakey will be present also.

Arkansas City Republican, November 14, 1885.

DIED. Died in this city No. 6th, 1885, Mrs. Lewis, wife of Chas. Lewis, aged 57 years. Funeral services were held at the Christian Church, Nov. 7th, by J. P. Witt. Remains were interred in the cemetery at Parker Schoolhouse.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 18, 1885.

Prof. Abernethy started an evening school in the Hoyt building on Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 18, 1885.

The young ladies of the high school have raised $150 towards the purchase of a piano forte. They have gone in to win.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 18, 1885.

An evening school has been organized by Mr. L. F. Abernethy, in which bookkeeping, commercial arithmetic, and grammar are taught. First session, Friday night, November 27th, from 7 till 9 o’clock.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 18, 1885.

                                                       Teachers’ Association.

The third monthly session of the Cowley County Teachers’ association will be held Nov. 20 and 21, 1885, at Winfield.

PROGRAM:

1. What are the secrets of success in school government?

   Paper: Prof. Gridley. Discussion: J. W. Warren, Cora Beach.

2. Should a knowledge of vocal music be a qualification of a common school teacher?

   Paper: Celina Bliss. Discussion: E. Collins; Chas. Wing.

3. How to secure the cooperation of parents.

   Paper: Prof. Weir. Discussion: Lois Williams, Lottie Eveleigh.


4. Can a system of gradation and graduation be applied to country schools?

   Paper: Mollie Cogdall. Discussion: Frank McClellan, Fannie Stretch.

5. What preparation should the teacher have for his work?

   Paper: R. B. Moore. Discussion: J. W. Campbell, Prof. Wood.

6. Grammar in the country schools.

         Paper: Ella S. Kelley. Discussion: W. N. Rice, W. H. Lucas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 19, 1885.

Cowley County has a school “marm” who has, on a salary of from thirty-five to fifty dollars per month, saved enough to buy a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres, put part of it under cultivation, and stocked it. She is little more than twenty years old, independent, pretty, and neat, with an energy and business tact that would do credit to many a man. Going to no extravagances in dress, she is always as “neat as a new pin.” The young men who have earnestly tried to convince her that it is not well for woman to be alone—since she’s got this fine farm—are astonishing. But she sweetly smiles on them, the coquettish girl, and gently but emphatically says, “No!” Her social qualities are admirable. She is a jewel: the equal of whom you find scarcely more among a hundred.

                                                OUR NORMAL COLLEGE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 19, 1885.

The reporter dropped into our Normal and Commercial school Thursday. We found everything conducted on a high order. The attendance was much larger than we had any idea. The rooms are very pleasant and commodious, situated on south Main, over the Blue Front. The Normal department is conducted by Prof. Wood, a gentleman of high attainments as an educator, having spent many years in the school room. The Commercial department is conducted by Prof. Inskeep, who is a graduate of the best Commercial school of the country. The walls of their rooms are adorned with works of fancy penmanship, which alone show the Professor’s skill as a penman. Mrs. A. H. Limerick and H. A. Owen also assist in the lower grades, and soon, if the school increases as it has in the last few weeks, the corps of teachers will