COWLEY COUNTY SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, AND DISTRICTS.

                                       PART THREE: 1883 THROUGH 1884.

 

                                                                    1883

 

     Arkansas City Traveler, January 3, 1883.

Miss Mollie Christian is now attending school.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 3, 1883.

The following pupils were neither absent nor tardy, without an excuse, during the last school month. Willie Davis, Allie Davis, Robbie Gaskill, Lorenzo Gilbert, Eddie Mott, Perley Clifton, Cliff Hardy, Willie Barnett, Carrie Fairclo, Altie Fairclo, Ida Gamel, Florence Warren, Lee Crebbs. SUSIE L. HUNT, Teacher.

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[HARVEY TOWNSHIP  CORRESPONDENT: “JIM.”]

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

District 134 has built a fine schoolhouse, 24 x 32. It will soon be ready for us.

The school in district 113 is doing splendidly under the management of Miss E. Burden. The school in district 18, Mr. Starnes, teacher, is also doing well.

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

Miss Ella Kelly resigned her school last Monday and went to Wichita to take charge of the Grammar Department of the public schools there. Miss Kelly has given entire satisfaction here and will no doubt please in her new field.

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

A. M. Leavitt, of Rock, was in the city Saturday. He manipulates the young and growing ideas of that enterprising community at the center of intelligence—the schoolhouse—and is an adept at the business. If we were a big girl, we would walk six miles out of our way to go to school to him. He is handsome.

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

                                             To the Citizens of Walnut Township.

There will be a meeting at Olive schoolhouse on Friday, January 5th, 1883, for the purpose of organizing a temperance society, and the election of a delegate to attend the State Temperance Convention to be held at Topeka January 8, 9, and 10, 1883.

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

                                                              A Resolution.

About four weeks ago the citizens of Seeley and vicinity organized a singing class, which was conducted by Professor Hager, of Pennsylvania. They held a four day’s convention last week, closing Friday night with a concert, which was very interesting to all who attended, at the close of which the following resolution was passed: “Resolved, That we respectfully tender to Professor Hager our sincere thanks for his gentlemanly conduct toward each of us, and for his scholarly manner of conducting our singing school and convention. We also extend to him our best wishes for success and many happy years in the future.” Mrs. Hood, Mrs. Rothrock, and Messrs. Jones, Myers, and Copple, executive committee.

                                                   L. T. MADDUX, Secretary.


Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

MARRIED. Married at the residence of the bride’s father, Mr. Rowland, in Winfield, December 31, 1882, by Rev. J. Cairns, Mr. Lewis Billings, of Cherryvale, Kansas, to Miss Anna E. Rowland, of this city.

Mr. Billings is a former resident of Winfield, and was at one time agent for the lumber firm of G. B. Shaw & Co., at this place. Miss Rowland is truly a “Winfield girl,” having grown to womanhood among us, and graduated last year from the Winfield High School. Her sweet disposition and pleasant manners have won for her many friends, who will greatly miss her from the circle of “single blessedness,” but wish her all the joy imaginable in her new relation.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

Mr. Lee Brown is home on a short vacation from his labors as a teacher.

Miss Etta Johnson is with us during the intermission of Winfield school.

Mr. Will Christopher put in an appearance at some of our social gatherings lately. We miss his genial presence when he is off teaching the rising generation.

There was an oyster supper on Thursday evening. Quite a goodly number were present and some seemed to enjoy themselves wonderfully, in the old schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, January 4, 1883.

M. J. STIMSON, TEACHER of the Piano, Organ, and Voice Culture. Also Singing and Sight Reading in class. Pianos tuned and repaired. Residence, Olds House, corner Eighth Avenue and Fuller Streets.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 10, 1883.

A flourishing lyceum is carried on at the Guthrie School House. It meets on Tuesday evening of each week, and is presided over by J. D. Guthrie.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 10, 1883.

NOTICE. The next regular meeting of the Library Association will be held at the High School Room at 3 o’clock p.m. on Monday, January 15th, 1883. HARRY FINLEY, Pres.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 10, 1883.

The High School department commenced last Monday with an attendance of twenty-eight. On account of the measles among the small fry, the primary schools will not resume labor for a week longer.

Winfield Courier, January 11, 1883.

Miss Theresa Goldsmith has been transferred from the first Intermediate department of the public school in the East Ward to the same department in the West Ward, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Miss Ella Kelly. Mrs. A. P. Johnson takes the place of Miss Goldsmith in the East Ward.

Winfield Courier, January 11, 1883.


The select school of the Catholic Church of this city is an institution well worthy of patronage. It is presided over by Rev. Father Kelly and his sister, Miss L. M. Kelly. All the branches of both a high school and primary department are taught. The languages are also taught to those desiring to study them. While there is great attention paid to the religious education of the Catholic children, yet the religious convictions of non-Catholics is not in the least interfered with. The principal object of the school is to train children in morality and in all those branches which will tend afterwards to make them ornaments in society and useful men and women in business. Terms of the school are so low that they are within the reach of all; namely $1.00 a month, or, if there be two children out of the same family, $1.50 a month for both; and if three, $2.00 a month for the three. Persons desirous of further information concerning the school, can call on Rev. G. M. Kelly, Catholic Church, 8th Avenue.

Winfield Courier, January 11, 1883.

A Republican convention of Richland Township will be held at Summit schoolhouse on the 20th of January for the nomination of township officers to be voted for on the 6th day of February, 1883. N. J. LARKIN, Chairman of Township Central Committee.

[TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION.]

Winfield Courier, January 11, 1883.

The Rock division met pursuant to adjournment, Jan. 6, 1883, R. B. Corson in the chair, with a sufficient number of teachers present to ably discuss all the topics marked out for this meeting. In the absence of the secretary, J. C. Martindale was appointed secretary pro tem. The topics being satisfactorily discussed, they proceeded to miscellaneous business.

Resolved, That R. B. Corson’s name be substituted for A. H. Limerick’s on the “Committee on Examination,” and that they report at the next meeting. On motion it was agreed that the next meeting be held at Darien on the evening of 2nd of February for a literary entertainment and the 3rd for discussion of topics.

Program for the 3rd as follows.

1. Do exhibitions pay? R. B. Corson and L. T. Maddux.

2. Causes of the Rebellion: A. Brookshire, Miss Lide Strong, and J. C. Bradshaw.

3. Webster and Calhoun: Miss Green and Miss Fanny McKinley.

4. The railroad system of the U. S.: M. Akers, Lu Strong, and Miss Perrin.

5. The postal rules and regulations of the U. S.: J. C. Martindale and _. M. Leavitt.

6. Written recitations: Mrs. A. Limerick and Porter Wilson.

All patrons and teachers cordially invited to attend both sessions.

                                        J. C. MARTINDALE, Secretary pro tem.

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[AKRON CORRESPONDENT: “MAC.”]

Winfield Courier, January 11, 1883.

Mrs. Limerick is having a two weeks’ holiday vacation of her school. The other schools have all resumed business this week.

Valley Center school district is running a successful literary this winter. Prairie Grove also has a very good literary society in operation.

Professor Hittle has organized a singing school at Prairie Grove, singing two nights each week. Any commencing in want of a singing teacher could not do better than call on Prof. Hittle.

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[ORCHARD COTTAGE CORRESPONDENT AT VERNON: “M. LEWIS.”]


Winfield Courier, January 11, 1883.

Mr. Unie Millspaugh is home during vacation of the Agricultural school at Manhattan.

The Vernon Library Association is prospering this winter. The candy stand and oyster supper put $14.55 into its treasury. There is considerable money in its treasury now for the purchase of new books.

Our new citizens, Mr. Yeoman’s family, are a wide-awake people and take a lively interest in our library and literary. The latter institution is just booming. The several teachers in the township are helping it along.

A crowded house witnessed the distribution of presents from the Christmas tree and patronized the candy stand quite liberally, and with the exception of a few persons who had imbibed to the health of Gov. Glick too freely, the house was orderly enough. We think it is the first time Vernon schoolhouse was ever invaded by persons in such a condition. It should not be tolerated.

Winfield Courier, January 11, 1883.

                                                  Notice—Republican Primary.

There will be a Republican Convention at the Dexter schoolhouse on Saturday, January 20th, 1883, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of placing in nomination a township ticket.

                       By order of the Committee. J. V. HINES, Chairman, Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 17, 1883.

The S. P. U.’s, of Bolton Township, will meet on the last Saturday in January, at the Bland School House, for the election of officers. The meeting will be called to order at early candlelight. All members are requested to attend. AL. MOWRY, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 17, 1883.

NOTICE. There will be a match spelling Friday evening, Jan. 19, 1883, at the High School room. Prize, a $2.50 volume of the winner’s selection. The match will be confined to the first 45 pages of Patterson’s Speller and Analyzer. Everyone is fraternally challenged. The school has confidence—it may be conceit—that it can defeat all competitors. The spellers are expected to give capitals and apostrophes. Admission 5 cents; proceeds for Library.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 17, 1883.

M. J. STIMSON, Teacher of the PIANO ORGAN and Voice Culture, also Singing and Sight Reading. Pianos and Organs tuned and repaired. Leave Orders with Frank J. Hess, at Creswell Bank.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, January 18, 1883.

Miss May Christopher will finish her labors as teacher in the Moscow school this week.

Rev. C. P. Graham is holding a series of meetings at the Salem schoolhouse and considerable good has been accomplished, and the good work still goes on. We wish those from neighboring districts would come out and help in the good cause.

Winfield Courier, January 18, 1883.

The Republicans of Liberty Township will meet in caucus at Rose Valley schoolhouse February 3rd at 2 o’clock. J. A. Cochran, Chairman.


Winfield Courier, January 18, 1883.

The Republicans of Pleasant Valley Township will meet in caucus at Odessa schoolhouse on February 3rd, at 2 o’clock. Z. B. Myers, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, January 18, 1883.

                                                       Teachers’ Examination.

A public examination of candidates for teachers’ certificates will be held at the High School building in Winfield, on Saturday, February 3rd, commencing at 9 o’clock a.m.

                                          A. H. Limerick, County Superintendent.

Winfield Courier, January 18, 1883.

There will be a caucus of the Republicans of Vernon Township on January 25, at 7 p.m., at the Worden schoolhouse for the purpose of nominating township officers.

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[ARKANSAS CITY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 24, 1883.

Schools. In schools and school buildings she has always taken the lead, having now the finest school building in Southern Kansas, and is making preparation to erect two more, when the larger building will be a first-class graded school, giving facilities for education found in but few cities in Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 24, 1883.

Measles in Bolton Township are quite the rage. School district 96, in that township, out of a school population of thirty-five, has had twenty down sick with them, and the school has been closed for two weeks past.

[SCHOOL REPORTS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 24, 1883.

Report of the Rose Valley School. The following scholars have been neither absent nor tardy during the month ending January 12th: Perry Grey, Chas. Harrader, George Locke, Newt. Kirkpatrick, William Purdy, John Drennan, Mabel Kirkpatrick, Emma Locke, Beasie Kirkpatrick, Nannie Maxwell, Maggie Kirkpatrick, Effie Rupert, Erta Kirkpatrick, Maggie Guyer, and Lillie Purdy. GEORGE E. WRIGHT, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 24, 1883.

Another Spelling Match. A match-spelling will be held in the High School Room Friday evening, January 26th, 1883, to which all persons are cordially invited, and also fraternally challenged. A $2.50 prize will be awarded the successful contestant. The spellers will be expected to give postoffices and capitals. The match will positively take place at the above named time.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 24, 1883.

Republican Caucus. The Republicans of Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland School House at 2 o’clock p.m. on Saturday, February 3rd, for the purpose of nominating a township ticket. J. D. GUTHRIE, Chairman, Township Committee.

P. A. LORRY, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

                                                    Walnut Township Primary.


The Republicans of Walnut Township met at Olive schoolhouse January 19th at 2 p.m. They organized by electing John Mentch chairman and S. E. Burger Secretary. Frank Manny, G. Brown, and J. A. Mentch were elected judges. The following persons were nominated.

For Trustee: T. A. Blanchard.

For Treasurer: Joel Mack.

For Clerk: Frank Manny.

For Justice of the Peace: J. L. King.

For Constables: J. C. Monforte, Jr.; J. A. Mentch.

For Road overseer, District 1: F. Arnold.

For Road overseer, District 2: _ ____.

For Road overseer, District 3: J. C. Roberts.

The following resolutions were adopted.

Resolved, That we request our Senator and Representative in the Legislature to use their best endeavors to reduce passenger rates on railroads to three cents per mile and freight rates be fixed at so much per ton per mile.

Resolved, That we are opposed to the commissioner system unless backed by a specific law, the mere collection of facts to report to the next Legislature having the people at the mercy of the roads for two years more.

Resolved, That the Secretary of this meeting furnish a copy of these resolutions to our Senator and Representative at Topeka and to each of the Winfield papers for publication.

                                                  JOHN MENTCH, Chairman.

S. E. BURGER, Secretary.

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[CEDARVALE CORRESPONDENT: “OBSERVER.”]

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

Mr. J. H. Bartgis has again taken charge of the “young bloods” in school district No. 63.

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[BALTIMORE CORRESPONDENT: “DAD.”]

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

Mr. Z. W. Hoge is teaching a singing school at our schoolhouse with marked success.

Our public school is getting along finely under the leadership of Mr. R. O. Stearns.

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

“Horatius” comes to the front again this week with an interesting communication. He has been too busy teaching the young idea how to shoot to keep us posted regularly on Pleasant Valley doings.

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[PLEASANT VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: “HORATIUS.”]

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

United Brethren have protracted meetings at Victor schoolhouse.

The denizens of district No. 10 have a pow wow every Saturday night and call it a lyceum.


DIED. This week death invaded the sacred precincts of our beautiful community, by removing with his cold, icy hand, from the warm embrace of loving parents and kind friends, charming little Mertie, daughter of Jno. and Phoebe Vandever. A large concourse of relatives and friends attended the funeral services, which were conducted by Rev. Whitson at the Centennial schoolhouse. The bereaved parents have the sincere sympathy of their large circle of friends in their sad affliction. It is natural, of course, to feel sorrowful at scenes like this. The ties by which humanity are bound together are of such a peculiar character that they cannot, it seems, be severed without causing a universal throb of sympathy to vibrate throughout the human family. But there is cheering consolation to be found in those beautiful lines of Longfellow:

“There is no death,

 This life is but transition,” etc. HORATIUS.

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[AKRON CORRESPONDENT: “MAC.”]

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

The Little Dutch school is sadly afflicted with mumps at present.

Necktie festivals seem to be the popular means of raising money in this neighborhood. The Presbyterians at their festival a few nights since, cleared thirty-two dollars. Next week Prairie Grove district is to hold one for the purpose of purchasing an encyclopedia, and the week following the Methodists hold one for the benefit of their pastor. MAC.

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

Professor R. C. Story of Winfield was in the city a few days ago and made us a friendly call. Prof. Story has been the county superintendent of schools of Cowley County for the past six years, and retired a few weeks ago with the highest respect of the people of that county. Prof. Story has few equals and no superiors as an educator in this country. Wellingtonian.

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

The Republicans of Pleasant Valley Township will meet in caucus at Odessa schoolhouse on February 3rd, at 2 o’clock. A. B. MYERS, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, January 25, 1883.

                                                         Republican Caucus.

There will be a Republican convention at Akron schoolhouse in Fairview Township, February 1, 1883, at 7 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of placing in nomination a township ticket. By order of J. W. Douglass, Chairman.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 31, 1883.

MARRIED. Mr. Joseph Baldridge, a resident of Winfield two years ago and agent of W. T. Ekel’s lumberyard at that time, came up from Albuquerque, New Mexico, last week, where he has been in the lumber business since his removal from here. His mission was an important one, and in order to accomplish it, he deliberately walked up to the Probate Judge’s office and there procured the weapon with which to commit the matrimonial deed which would make Mr. Joseph C. Baldridge and Miss Clara Finley, of Arkansas City, man and wife. They were married Tuesday evening and will take up their residence in Albuquerque. Miss Finley has been one of the teachers in the public schools of Arkansas City for some time, while Mr. Baldridge is well known here and while among us took an active part in all society doings. His many friends in Winfield join with us in wishing he and his fair bride many years of happiness and prosperity. Courier.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 31, 1883.


The Spelling. The spelling match at the High School Room, last Friday evening, was well attended. The spelling began at 8 o’clock. Only twelve persons entered the lists, and in fifteen minutes, none except Alice Lane and Horace Vaughn remained. Alice Lane is a bright, dignified girl, of thirteen years of age, with well cut and clearly defined features; intelligence beams out from every linen of her expressive countenance; she is one of the best scholars in school, a member of the Junior Class, and a great favorite of her teacher. Horace G. Vaughn is a noble, manly young gentleman, of sixteen years of age, with a discerning and thoughtful countenance. He is a diligent student, and has entirely won the regard of his fellow students by his respectful and courteous demeanor. After a contest of nearly an hour, Miss Alice failed to spell “appellate” correctly, and Horace Vaughn was declared the winner. He bore his honors very modestly and said he had not expected to win the prize. The contest was witnessed by a courteous and appreciative audience. It is to be hoped that another trial will soon be announced.

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[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “CAESAR.”]

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

Prof. Harp, of Seeley, organized a class in music at the Holland schoolhouse which promises to be a decided success.

The United Brethren are holding a series of meetings at the Victor schoolhouse. Considerable interest is manifested. May much good follow their labors is the earnest prayer.

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

                                              Report of Constant Public School.

The following is a report of Constant school, Dist. No. 10, for the quarter ending Jan. 12, 1883. No. Enrolled, 47; No. Admitted this month, 3.

The following is the standing of the pupils in the studies named, in writing examination, Jan. 11-12. 100 perfect: Lucy Hon, grammar 96; Willie Hon, grammar 80, reading 81; Jas. Bott, grammar 94; Monta Constant, arithmetic 87, Geog. 90, grammar 88; Mollie Constant, Geog. 80, reading 92; Chas. Chapin, Geog. 95, grammar 100; Nettie Anderson, Geog. 89, grammar 98, arithmetic 83; Frank Eastman, arithmetic 80; West Holland, constitution 97; history 100; reading 100, phys. Geog. 89; Mary McArther, arith. 89, Geog. 80; Nettie Smith, arith. 83; Z. Midkiff, arith. 80; Fannie White, arith. 80, Geog. 80, grammar 89. Art. Hancher, Geog. 80.

The deportment of Sallie Robinson, Mollie Constant, Amie McArther, Fannie White, Mettie Anderson, Thos. Constant, Frank Eastman, and Tillie Toombs, was not below 85-100 being perfect. Nettie Anderson was neither absent nor tardy during the quarter. No. of visitors, 7. L. C. BROWN, Teacher.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

Miss Jennie Wells is boarding with Mrs. Shields and attending Prairie Home school.

The order of United Workmen hold their lodge in Pleasant Hill or New Salem schoolhouse. Have about twenty-five members and are constantly increasing in numbers. May their work be a good one.


Our teacher, Miss Merriam, has left us and will soon be en route to her home in New York. May her journey be pleasant and her home be reached in safety is the wish of her friends, and may she soon return to sunny Kansas.

School is out and a very good time was enjoyed by those who attended the last day. An excellent dinner was served on a very large table and all seemed to have good appetites and fun mingled with the sober talk made all pass off nicely.

There is Baptist service every evening in the Prairie Home schoolhouse and they are having very good meetings, interesting, etc., from all reports. An elderly lady by the name of Winters, stepped off the porch while attending the meetings, and broke her arm. It seems hard for good people to suffer. OLIVIA.

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[PLEASANT VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: “HORATIUS.”]

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

Singing-school is being conducted at Holland schoolhouse by Prof. Hagar.

Friend George F. Thompson, a Cowley County boy in days of yore, but now identified with the State Agricultural College at Manhattan, in the capacity of Superintendent of the Printing Department, sends your reporter a sample of an ingenious advertising card which he has just patented. It is in the form of portrait author cards, and the idea is a capital one for businessmen. He has already been offered a handsome sum for the exclusive right of the patent. George is a very fortunate young man in more ways than one, and richly deserves success.

Representative Bob Mitchell, in a letter just received by your humble servant from the classical halls of the State Legislature, says that he has been thoroughly examining the question in regard to the equal distribution of the railroad tax throughout the different school districts of the county, and concludes that, in his judgment and in the opinion of the wisest statesmen of that August body, that it is unconstitutional. We hope that a law against monopolies, and a little wholesome legislation on railroads may not prove likewise. It is wisdom for our Cowley County members to keep their eyes peeled on these latter subjects, for their actions are being watched with an eagle eye.

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

                                 Meeting of Richland Township Temperance League.

At a meeting of the temperance people of Richland Township at Summit schoolhouse on January 27th, for the purpose of organizing The Temperance League, D. C. Stevens was elected chairman and J. M. Bair secretary. The following committee was elected for organization: A. S. Stuber, chairman; Dan Maher, N. J. Larkin, D. C. Stevens, Thomas Carson, Willis Wilson. Resolved to meet at the call of the chairman.

                                                  D. C. STEVENS, Chairman.

J. M. BAIR, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.


The Republicans of Otter Township met at Otter Creek schoolhouse January 27th at 2 p.m. Organized by electing D. Kantz, chairman, and G. W. Bartgis, secretary. The following persons were nominated: For Trustee, C. R. Myles; for Treasurer, G. W. Bartgis; for Clerk, J. T. Aley; for Justice of the peace, W. H. H. Rathbun; for Constables, W. Nash, J. P. Hosmer. Road Overseer Dist. 1, D. Ramsey; Dist. 2, J. J. Wilson; Dist. 3, D. M. Barnes.

D. KANTZ, Chairman.

G. W. BARTGIS, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

The Republicans of Pleasant Valley Township will meet in caucus at Odessa schoolhouse on Feb. 3rd, at 2 o’clock. Z. B. Myers, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

The Horse Protective Union of Pleasant Valley Township will meet at Odessa schoolhouse on Tuesday, February 6th, at 7:30 p.m. By order of Ord. Sergeant.

Winfield Courier, February 1, 1883.

                                                           G. A. R. Supper.

The Dexter Post No. 133 G. A. R. will give an entertainment at the schoolhouse in Dexter on the evening of Feb. 17th. A general invitation is extended.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 7, 1883.

That Bubble. The Democrat, with its accustomed vindictiveness, attempts to make a point against our representative, Hon. C. R. Mitchell, in an article headed “A Bubble Bursted.”  We know Mr. Mitchell was asked to make inquiries as to the possibility and if possible to use all efforts to secure a pro rata division of the school tax paid by the railroad to the districts through which it passes amongst all the school districts of the county. Mr. Mitchell has fulfilled his promise and after consulting with prominent men, it is decided it could not be done constitutionally. This fact, however, to the Democrat is nothing, for with the usual policy of the party it would not let such a trifle as constitutionality stand in its way if it thought anything could be gained thereby. The law as it stands relating to this may not seem strictly in accordance with principles of equity, but it is undoubtedly law, and it would be a dangerous precedent even were it possible, to attempt the change desired.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 7, 1883.

It is with pleasure we note the return last week to our city, of Miss Burrows, who has been spending several weeks visiting friends in Indiana and Iowa, her former home. During her absence, we hear, she participated in two weddings, besides heaps of other social good times too numerous to mention. Miss Burrows has charge of a grade in our public schools, and we are truly glad not only to note her return, but also the fact that she resumes her duties in the school room.

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[OTTER CORRESPONDENT: “TELLER.”]

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

A petition is in circulation to divide school district 63, it being the third or fourth attempt without success.

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

                                                     Excelsior School Report.

Report of Excelsior school, District No. 9, for the month ending January 20, 1883.


No. of pupils enrolled, 31; Average daily attendance, 20. No. of visitors present during the month, 5. Names of those perfect in attendance: Metta Byers and Harry Pierce. The examination held at the close of the month resulted in the following standings, graded on a scale of 100.

Of the advanced grade, Frank Crawford 95; Dora Smith 93; Harry Pierce 94; Flora Smith 97; Anna Crawford 96; Josie Robinson 94.

Intermediate grade: Welden Crawford 94; Katie Robertson 90; Philena Copple 84; Harry McLaughlin 86; Willie Sherrod 97; Ora DeWitt 93; Willie Wright 96.

                                              SADIE E. PICKERING, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, February 8, 1883.

Skipped statement, County Treasurer, quarter ending Dec. 31, 1882, and School Funds.

[REPORT: STATE SUPT. OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 14, 1883.

Educational. The following is a brief review of the report of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction for the past two years and will be found full of interesting facts on this question.

The volume consists of the usual summary of school statistics, the reports of the officers of the several State Institutions of learning, statistics of private academies and colleges, and the suggestions of the Superintendent closing with the conclusions given in the report of two years ago, of the National Convention of Superintendents in regard to “The Best System of Schools for a State.”

The school population of the State is given at 357,020, the increase in two years being 17,573. This increase in school population shows an addition to the general population of the State of about sixty thousand in the same time.

A very gratifying increase is shown in the enrollment and average attendance of pupils, but the average annual school term has been shortened from six months in 1880 to five and five-tenths in 1881 and five and seven-tenths in 1882. There is a decrease in the wages of teachers of about a dollar a month for both sexes, and yet with a shorter annual term and but few more schools, the expenditure for the compensation of teachers is reported as considerably more than it was two years ago. Evidently somebody has made a mistake in figuring.

The State school fund apportioned has been reduced from $302,864 in 1880 to $271,542, in 1882, and the school property of the State shows a contraction in value of about a quarter of a million dollars. The permanent school fund of the State is given at $2,508,644.23, about a half million dollars of which Mr. Speer says would be uninvested the first of this year. He and other State officers urge the adoption of measures that will enable the commissioners charged with the investment of this fund to keep the same from lying idle in the State treasury.

Supt. Speer gives a very intelligent discussion of many of the weak points in our common school system, and his recommendations are substantially those of several of his predecessors. Among his more important suggestions are the following.

(1) The State should extend such aid as will enable every school district to support a public school at least some portion of the year, there being 411 districts without any public school whatever in 1882.

(2) That county treasurers be ex-officio the treasurer of the several school districts of their respective counties.


(3) The adoption of a system of free elementary normal schools for teachers.

(4) The adoption of a more simple and less expensive plan for the management and sale of the school lands of the State.

(5) A change of time of holding district annual meetings to the third Wednesday in June.

Mr. Speer closes a very successful official term with a very interesting and creditable report. His suggestions are to the point and are valuable. Most of them should be enacted as laws before the adjournment of the present legislature.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 14, 1883.

The annual meeting of those interested in the graveyard will be held at the Parker schoolhouse, Thursday, March 1, 1883, for the election of officers for the ensuing year.

[LECTURE GIVEN CONCERNING THE WEST BY MOORHEAD.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 14, 1883.

The West and the Western Man. I. N. Moorhead delivered the lecture above named at the Coburn schoolhouse, Silverdale Township, last night to a large and appreciative assemblage and for upwards of an hour and a half kept his audience spell-bound by his eloquence, as he graphically pictured the advance of civilization from the earliest times as it traveled ever westward till he brought his hearers step by step from the cradle of the human race in Palestine, to the latest territory conquered by the ever moving star of empire in what is now the garden of the world. His delineation of the western man, his many novel peculiarities and resources, born of the needs of his everyday life, his unconquerable pluck and energy, his victories over the prejudices and ideas of ye olden time were peculiarly telling and as he lifted this ideal western man up to the gaze of his hearers, he still seemed to be reaching ever westward.

[SCHOOLS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 14, 1883.

Our Schools. The following pupils of the First Intermediate Department were neither absent nor tardy, without an excuse during the past month: Dell Clifton, Howard Warren, Belle Johnson, Ella Hoyt, Ethel Clifton, Lulu Hamlin, Nettie Franey, Hattie Franey, Eddie Scott, Dean McIntire, Henry Mott, John Garris, Gertie Peterson, Rena Grubbs, Luna Ware, Helen Jordan.

The following pupils were imperfect in deportment during the past month: Charlie McConn, George McConn, Eddie Scott, Henry Mott, Porter Holloway, Perry Fullerlove, Schuyler Hand, Clara Delzell, Nettie Franey, Otis Endicott, Oscar Ball, Mary Kitch, Maud Benedict, Hattie Sipes, Rena Grubbs, Willie Kellogg, John Garris, Lulu Hamlin, George Snyder, Hattie Franey. ANNIE NORTON, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, February 15, 1883. Front Page.

Skipped long article by R. C. Story entitled “Kansas Schools.”

[ATTACHING PORTIONS OF CITY.]

Winfield Courier, February 15, 1883.

                                                        Directions to Voters.


It is directed by the Board of Education of the City of Winfield, Kansas, that the territory adjacent to the city, attached for school purposes, be attached to said city for voting purposes as follows, to-wit: That portion of such adjacent territory lying west of a line running north and south with the center of Main Street in said city be attached to the second ward of said city for voting purposes, and that portion of such territory lying east of a line running north and south with the center of Main Street be attached to the first ward of said city for voting purposes.

Excerpts...

[VALLEY VIEW CORRESPONDENT: “M.”]

Winfield Courier, February 15, 1883.

A number of young people have been giving themselves special training, and on Thursday evening (Feb. 15th) will give a public entertainment in our schoolhouse. The drama “Bread on the Waters,” with songs and other exercises will be given. To those who will be fortunate in getting into the crowded house, it will be an evening pleasantly spent.

This is a wide-awake, moral community, so much enjoyed by its people and eagerly sought by those seeking homes. The school is held eight months in the year. Mr. Wm. Staggers, late of Illinois, is the successful teacher. Then we have a Sabbath school every Sabbath afternoon that does not burn out during the summer or freeze out during the winter; besides having excellent officers and teachers and full supply of bibles and testaments. It has a good organ and scholars that know how to use it. During the winter months, one of the chief attractions and a source of much social enjoyment and mental improvement, is the lyceum which is held each Thursday evening. The aged and young together make these occasions of much interest and a source of great improvement on the part of the young. Here the young learners display their talent on the organ, the young Demosthenes in declamation; and the young men learn to preside with dignity and intelligence. The latter attainment, which is of great importance, can only be acquired by practice, and it is the opinion of the writer, that a greater number of young men are profiting by these opportunities in the rural districts than from an equal population in towns and cities. Ye farmer boys, be not discouraged. In our own country more great and good men have come from the country than cities. At the last lyceum the following question was discussed: “Is Conscience a True Guide to Conduct?” As leaders, Wm. Staggers affirmed and J. F. Martin took the negative. A number of persons participated. . . . M.

[ELECTION REQUEST: SCHOOL PURPOSES.]

Winfield Courier, February 15, 1883.

RECAP: MAYOR TROUP ISSUED PER REQUEST OF BOARD OF EDUCATION A REQUEST FOR AN ELECTION. WED., FEB. 28, FOR PROPOSITION OF ISSUING $5,000 OF THE BONDS OF SAID CITY FOR SCHOOL PURPOSES. GEO. EMERSON, PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD, L. D. ZENOR, CLERK OF BOARD.

“For the purpose of paying teachers’ wages and improving and repairing school buildings, the laying of sidewalks and improvement of school furniture. . . .”

      Election 1st ward: to be held in a building situated on Lot No. 19, in Block No. 129, in said ward. J. C. Fuller, George Emerson, and G. H. Buckman to be judges; John M. Reed and H. E. Silliman to act as clerks.

Election 2nd ward: to be held in a building situated on the rear end of Lot No. 1, in Block No. 109, in said ward. B. F. Wood, A. H. Doane, and T. H. Seward to be judges; L. D. Zenor and J. H. Vance to act as clerks.


Arkansas City Traveler, February 21, 1883.

The M. E. Church Society, of Silverdale Township, will give a church social at the Coburn Schoolhouse, on Grouse, Saturday next, Feb. 24, 1883. A cordial invitation is extended to all to assist us having a good time.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 21, 1883.

There will be a meeting of the citizens of Bolton Township at 3 o’clock on Saturday, March 3, 1883, to take into consideration a subscription for a bridge over the Arkansas River. Meeting to be held at the Theaker Schoolhouse.

Excerpts...

[ROCK TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: “JIM.”]

Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.

ROCK TOWNSHIP, Feb. 16th, 1883.

Muddy. School 2 weeks longer. Plenty of ducks on the river.

The Teachers’ Association at Darien last Saturday was a failure on account of the rainy day.

Prof. Shoemaker, principal of the Douglass schools, visited with Gene Wilbur over Sunday.

Pedagogues are gradually preparing to lay off until fall for repairs, and attend to putting their money out at interest, and collect overdue notes.

[SCHOOL BOND ELECTION.]

Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.

                                                SCHOOL BOND ELECTION.

We would call the attention of the voters of this school district to the approaching election of Wednesday the 28th inst., to vote on the proposition for issuing $5,000 bonds of this school district to pay the district indebtedness; the bonds to run two, three, four, five, and six years. There are now about $5,000 of District scrip out drawing seven percent. It can be funded at six percent, and besides, the holders of the scrip will get their money at once. This indebtedness has accrued in several years past for balance of teachers’ wages, the heating apparatus and furniture in the schoolhouses and other improvements. The board are keeping the running expenses below the eight mill tax but this old debt is a drawback. By funding the debt and paying it by a yearly tax of two mills a year, which will pay it off in five years, the difficulty will be easily settled. We advise our electors to vote for the bonds.

Excerpts...

[AKRON CORRESPONDENT: “AUDUBON.”]

Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.

Miss Green’s school at Valley Center will close next Friday Week.

Rev. Graham has been holding a series of meetings here with good success which closed last Sabbath, and he is now holding meetings at Star Valley.

Excerpt...

[DEXTER CORRESPONDENT: “X. Y. Z.”]

Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.

Owing to muddy weather and the ill health of our teacher, school was adjourned last week, and the small boys were let loose in consequence.


Excerpt...

[PLEASANT VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: “HORATIUS.”]

Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.

Prof. Hager is conducting a singing school at Centennial.

Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.

Rev. Morehead of Arkansas City is holding a protracted meeting at Enterprise school-house, in Beaver.

Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.

Some two weeks ago about forty of the citizen taxpayers of Vernon Township petitioned Senator Hackney to frame and introduce a bill allowing the township to vote not exceeding ten thousand dollars for the purpose of establishing a high school. Our Senator took the matter in hand with such vigor that it passed the Senate last week by a handsome majority.

Excerpts...

[FLORAL CORRESPONDENT: “BUCKEYE.”]

Winfield Courier, February 22, 1883.

The Floral school is in a flourishing condition. The primary department is under the excellent control of Miss Kate A. Martin of Udall. . . .

Mr. R. B. Corson is principal of the school . . . . BUCKEYE.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 28, 1883.

Winfield votes today on the proposition to issue $5,000 bonds of that school district to pay the outstanding indebtedness.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 28, 1883.

There will be an M. E. Church festival held in the schoolhouse at South Bend, on Friday next, for the purpose of raising funds to defray the church expenses for the past quarter. A cordial invitation is extended to all to be present and assist in having a good time.

Excerpts...

[ROSE VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: “JETTA JAY.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 28, 1883.

Our school expects to do some hard work on Arbor Day, March 9.

School is progressing finely under the guardianship of our efficient teacher, George Wright.

Winfield Courier, March 1, 1883.

The Valley View Dramatic Club will give an entertainment at Mt. Zion schoolhouse, Vernon Township, on Saturday evening, March 3rd. The popular Drama “Bread on the Waters,” with “We will have to Mortgage the farm,” dramatized, and excellent music will be rendered. Admission 15 cents; children 10 cents. An evening spent in listening to the performances will be both pleasant and profitable. M.

Winfield Courier, March 1, 1883.

Senator Hackney’s bill organizing Vernon Township into a high school district with powers to vote bonds and build and maintain a high school, has passed both houses and will become a law after its publication in this paper.

Winfield Courier, March 1, 1883.


The apportionment of State school fund has been made by Supt. Limerick. It amounts to 37 cents per capita. Winfield gets $333.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, March 1, 1883.

Mr. Will Christopher will be home from his labors as “school marm” the 10th of March.

When school is out and Mr. Lucas starts for home, it looks as though he was their leader in school and out, for such a gay company of merry lads and rosy lasses trots after him until he gains his own threshold and his company is claimed by his smiling wife.

Winfield Courier, March 1, 1883.

                                           Score One for Valley View Amateurs.

On the 22nd it was our pleasure to be present at an entertainment given by the above troupe, at the schoolhouse at Valley View. This combination of amateur performers are composed of the lads and lassies of the best families of Valley View, and their acting proves them people of more than ordinary talent. When we consider that for the above entertainment, they had only been in training for a few evenings, we are the more astonished at the almost perfect representation of character. . . .

Only mentions one performer for good performance: Miss Nellie Martin.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 7, 1883.

Senator Hackney’s bill organizing Vernon Township into a high school district with powers to vote bonds and build and maintain a high school has passed both houses.

Excerpts...

Arkansas City Traveler, March 7, 1883.

                                                                District 96.

Four weeks more and the winter term of our school will close.

Our Lyceum is still in full blast, and, with our corps of able debaters, consisting of Messrs. Walton, Marshall, Conaway, Sumners, Wm. Clark, Andrews, A. H. Clark, Harkins, and a host of others, we feel able to compete with any Lyceum in the county and will accept a challenge to debate from any Lyceum in the county.

            Address Pres. Lyceum, District 96, Bolton Township. J. R. C., March 3, 1883.

Winfield Courier, March 8, 1883.

                                                       Teachers’ Examination.

An examination of applicants for teachers’ certificates will be held at the high school building in Winfield and in Arkansas City on the 16th and 17th of March.

                                       A. H. LIMERICK, County Superintendent.

Excerpts...

[CORRESPONDENCE FROM SHERIDAN TOWNSHIP: NAME NOT GIVEN.]

Winfield Courier, March 8, 1883.

E. J. Johnson’s school in District 47 was closed out by the mumps three weeks ago.

J. R. Smith’s school in district No. 2 was closed out with the measles. Both diseases have subsided.

Winfield Courier, March 8, 1883.

The school bond election went off quietly, hardly a fourth of the taxpayers voting. Only six votes were cast against the bonds.


Winfield Courier, March 8, 1883.

The measles have almost wiped out the schools throughout the county. We don’t remember ever having seen this disease so epidemic as now. The measles are ably seconded by the mumps in getting away with the district schools.

Excerpt...

[OTTER CORRESPONDENT: “TELLER.”]

Winfield Courier, March 8, 1883.

Seven days more school closes the term in district 63.

Excerpt...

[BALTIMORE CORRESPONDENT: “CHAFF.”]

Winfield Courier, March 8, 1883.

Peter Loy and family, Charlie Burden, and Jake Wingert left Monday for the Pacific slope, Washington Territory being their destination. Dr. Samuel Daniels and his son, A. L., and their families will start on the same route in the near future, and Rev. R. S. Thompson and family on or about the 15th inst. The doctor and preacher will be seriously missed by the people of this section: the former for his skill in relieving the ills to which flesh is heir to, and the latter for his good social and Christian qualities. His school district in losing Mr. Thompson will lose the main wheel in their school machinery, one that never failed to revolve, and but seldom to force the rest to move. CHAFF.

[SCHOOLS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 14, 1883.

                                                            Match Spelling.

A match spelling will be held Wednesday evening, March 21st, 1883, at the Arkansas City High School room. The contest will be confined to the best fifty pages of Patterson’s Speller and Analyzer. A $5 prize will be awarded to the successful competitor. Proceeds for the benefit of the Library. Admission 10 cents. All are invited to attend and participate.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 14, 1883.

The following pupils were perfect in the High School Room, during the 6th month: Mollie Coonrod, Hannah Gilbert, Effie Gilstrap, Laura Holloway, Ida Groves, Jessie Norton, Sarah Randall, C. T. Randall, Alvan Sankey, Ellen Taylor, and Carrie Rice.

Perfection denotes abstinence from communication, by look, word, or gesture, in room, hall, or doorway, and an honorable but strict compliance with the rules of school.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 14, 1883.

                                                         Notice to Teachers.

There will be an examination for Teachers’ Certificates, held at the High School room, in Arkansas City, Friday and Saturday, March 16th and 17th, 1883. By order of County Superintendent.

Excerpts...

[ROSE VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: “JETTA JAY.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 14, 1883.

Our school yard is dotted with trees of all descriptions since arbor day.

Our Lyceum met last Friday night and elected officers for the coming month.


Young men, please don’t whoop like wild Indians around the schoolhouse, as we would like the Valley to have a good name.

Excerpt...

[TORRANCE CORRESPONDENT: “CROCKETT.”]

Winfield Courier, March 15, 1883.

Our spring term of school commenced Monday with a fair attendance.

Excerpt...

[OMNIA CORRESPONDENT: “ELIZA.”]

Winfield Courier, March 15, 1883.

Omnia school closed very quietly at the expiration of the term.

Winfield Courier, March 15, 1883.

School Orders. Holders of school orders on the Winfield City district are requested to bring them at once to the Treasurer, J. D. Pryor, for cancellation.

[VERNON TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL.]

Winfield Courier, March 15, 1883.

                                                Vernon Township High School.

A meeting was held at Vernon schoolhouse last Monday evening to consider the advisability of proceeding to the organization of a High School. Considerable enthusiasm was elicited and a committee was appointed to prepare a plan for house, estimate expense, etc. The meeting adjourned to meet in two weeks, to hear the report of committee. Let everybody interested be present Monday evening, March 26, at Vernon schoolhouse.

                                              J. W. MILLSPAUGH, Chairman.

F. WORDEN, Secretary.

Excerpt...

[ROCK TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: “JIM.”]

Winfield Courier, March 15, 1883.

MARRIED. James Walker and Miss Daniels are married. Success to them. Jim is one of our successful teachers.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 21, 1883.

The mid-term vacation of our public schools will commence on Friday, March 30th, 1883.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 21, 1883.

The match spelling advertised for this evening at the Schoolhouse, we are requested to state is postponed.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 21, 1883.

A literary entertainment will be given at the Guthrie Schoolhouse, in Bolton Township, on Tuesday eve, March 27th, 1883.

Winfield Courier, March 22, 1883.

The West Ward schoolhouse grounds have been cleaned up and put in splendid order. It improves the looks of the building wonderfully.

Winfield Courier, March 22, 1883.

The Odessa school is blooming out with a new fence around the premises and a large lot of shade trees recently set out. Our Pleasant Valley friends are wide awake and know what ought to be done.


Winfield Courier, March 22, 1883.

During the last two weeks H. G. Fuller has sold eleven thousand dollars worth of city property. Among them was the J. C. Fuller house, just east of the schoolhouse, to F. M. Dickey for $740. The J. H. Kinne house on Manning Street to Cap. Whiting for $768. The stone house near the Santa Fe depot to M. E. Page for $800. The Hackney residence to Geo. Ordway for $2,500, and numerous other improved and unimproved property.

Winfield Courier, March 22, 1883.

                                                      Stock Protective Union.

There will be a meeting of the Pleasant Valley Stock Protective Union at the Odessa schoolhouse on Tuesday evening, April 3rd at 7-1/2 o’clock. Important business requires a full attendance. A. H. BROADWELL, O. S.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, March 22, 1883.

                                                        South Fairview Items.

Our school closed last Friday; our teacher, Mr. Crotsley, is one of Cowley’s best teachers. The scholars and parents will miss him as he goes into other fields of labor, having engaged a school in Elk County. My very best wishes for success go with him.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 28, 1883.

Sunday School was re-organized at the Theaker Schoolhouse in West Bolton on the 18th inst.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 28, 1883.

Work upon the superstructure of our Highland Hall has commenced in good earnest; the castings, lumber, stone, etc., being on the ground, and the lower floor joists are being put down. Mr. Ashton, of Lawrence, who is known as the builder of our Schoolhouse, will have a hand in the stone work, etc.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 28, 1883.

The Southwest Bolton S. P. U. will meet at the Mercer Schoolhouse next Saturday evening, March 31st. All members are requested to be present as business of importance will be brought before the meeting. F. LORRY, Capt.

Excerpts...

[ROCK TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: “JIM.”]

Winfield Courier, March 29, 1883.

Miss Lou Wilbur has returned home from school in Augusta.

Miss Lou Strong has completed her school west of here. She has taught a good school.

MARRIED. Another pedagogue gone. Albert Brookshire and Lydia Martindale this time. Cigars, Albert.

The Misses McWilliams have finished their schools and now are at home. They are among our best teachers.

Excerpts...

[TISDALE CORRESPONDENT: “X.”]

Winfield Courier, March 29, 1883.

Our literary has adjourned until October next.


Our young people have about all got around almost as good as ever. School has begun again.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, March 29, 1883.

DIED. Death has again taken away a young man in the vigor of youth, from our neighborhood. A large concourse of sympathizing neighbors met at the Salem schoolhouse to pay their last respects to the remains of Mr. Robert Crane. The only members of his mother’s family that were able to be present were his sister, Miss Ida, and his brother, Edward. The poor, widowed mother (away in Kentucky) will hear the sad tidings that her “Robby” is no more. To all the sad hearted the word goes out—for there are graves in all our hearts o’er which we shed sad, bitter tears—and though a living form is sometimes buried there, the busy world goes tramping on, unmindful of tears or aching hearts; but such is life. Death will sometime come to us all. May we fall asleep and wake to happiness in eternity.

Winfield Courier, March 29, 1883.

A number of the young friends of Miss Leota Gary went out to Centennial in Beaver Township, Friday afternoon, to witness the closing exercises of her winter term of school.

Winfield Courier, March 29, 1883.

County Superintendent Limerick is now settled down to housekeeping again in Winfield, and is occupying his property on east Ninth Avenue. Mrs. Limerick has been teaching in Rock Township this winter, her school closing last week.

Winfield Courier, March 29, 1883.

Every schoolhouse in Kansas should be surrounded by a grove of trees—cottonwoods will do; elms, ash, and catalpas are better. County Superintendents should appoint a day to be devoted by the patrons and pupils to decorating and beautifying the school grounds. A handsome school building in a grove of thrifty young trees is a “thing of beauty and joy forever.” In no other way will a small amount of work and the investment of a small sum of money do so much good for the school and the town as in the planting and cultivating of trees in our school grounds.

Winfield Courier, March 29, 1883.

Many of the winter schools throughout the county have closed and the weary school ma’ams can take a short rest before commencing the summer campaign.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 4, 1883.

Miss Linnie Peed, who has just finished teaching several terms of school in the vicinity of Newton, Kansas, returned to the city on Saturday last. She remained in the city until Monday, when she and her mother took leave for Geuda Springs, where they will probably remain during the summer.

[LYCEUM: BOLTON TOWNSHIP.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 4, 1883.


Communicated. Ed. Traveler: During the past winter the enterprising citizens of Dist. 96, Bolton Township, have conducted a Lyceum, greatly to the instruction and amusement of young and old, under the leadership of J. B. Guthrie, supported by Messrs. Walton, Marshall, Conway, Andrews, and others, not to mention the Clark brothers. The object has been to cultivate a taste for refining literature, as well as to develop the forensic art; and by way of parenthesis, let me say that this is one of the most profitable ways that the denizens of the rural districts can spend the long evenings of the winter months, as it furnishes not simply amusement and recreation, but is specially adapted to prepare the young people to acquit themselves with credit in after life.

On Tuesday evening, March 27th, the closing exercises were held in the Guthrie school-house, which was crowded to its utmost capacity. A special effort was made to entertain the public pleasantly and profitably, and great credit is due the managers for the success of the entertainment. Messrs. Dayton, Hahn, McGinnis, and Arnett furnished instrumental music, with violin, guitar, and organ, which was highly appreciated. Several pieces of vocal music by Mrs. Sheats and others was well rendered. Eph Mowry and W. Maxwell rendered “Carve that Possum” and another two other plantation melodies with good effect. It is not possible to enter into the merits of the literary part of the entertainment. The recitations and selections were in good taste, and well rendered, while the dialogues brought down the house. The reading of the Regulator displayed the usual amount of dry wit and local thrusts which amused all. Owing to the lateness of the hour, the debate, which has always been a prominent feature of the programme at the regular meetings, was set aside and doubtless Bolton Town-ship will never know what pent up bottles of eloquence Messrs. Conway and Clark will have for private use the coming summer. On the whole the entertainment was excellent and the zeal of these Boltonites is worthy of imitation in other places. OBSERVER.

Winfield Courier, April 5, 1883.

The population of Kansas is, in round numbers, 1,000,000. The report of the State Superintendent of schools says that the number of school-going age enrolled is 269,978. Here we have the wonderful phenomenon of over one-fourth of the population of a great state going to school.

Excerpt...

[FLORAL CORRESPONDENT: “BUCKEYE.”]

Winfield Courier, April 5, 1883.

The Floral schools closed last Friday. Effective work has been done during the six months’ term. Our teachers have labored with earnestness and zeal and their efforts have been crowned with success.

Excerpt...

[FLORAL CORRESPONDENT: “D. O. GOOD.”]

Winfield Courier, April 5, 1883.

The Floral scholars with the teacher and visitors had a gay time, so they say.

Winfield Courier, April 5, 1883.

                                                              The Election.


The city election Tuesday passed off very quietly, but little interest being manifested. On Monday evening a number of citizens met at the Opera House and placed a ticket in the field. Another meeting was held the same evening, which made up a second ticket. Dr. George Emerson was the unanimous candidate for Mayor by both meetings. The two tickets represented no distinctive issue of any character, unless it might have been termed a “waterworks” issue. In the first ward John McGuire was elected to the council over H. Silver by three majority. In the second ward D. L. Kretsinger was elected over S. L. Gilbert by forty majority. Capt. H. H. Siverd and Frank W. Finch were re-elected constables.

                                                              Votes shown.

MAYOR: George Emerson: 4481.

POLICE JUDGE: J. E. Snow, 230; L. L. Beck, 255.

CITY ATTORNEY: Jos. O’Hare: 432.

TREASURER SCHOOL BOARD: George W. Robinson, 270; W. J. Wilson, 225.

CONSTABLES: H. H. Siverd, 299; Frank W. Finch, 251; David Long, 225; Jas. McLain, 222.

COUNCILMEN: 1st Ward, John A. McGuire, 132; H. Silver, 129.

COUNCILMEN: 2nd Ward, D. L. Kretsinger, 132; S. L. Gilbert, 92.

SCHOOL BOARD: 1st Ward, Dr. W. G. Graham, 259; 2nd ward, J. P. Short, 137; 2nd Ward, H. Brotherton, 89.

The new council is made up as follows.

All including the Mayor are Republicans, three councilmen and the Mayor are “anti-water-works”; in other words, in favor of holding the company down to the strict letter of their contract. Three are prohibitionists, and one an anti-prohibitionist.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 11, 1883.

Our schools will be opened next Monday—they being now closed for a week’s vacation.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “PANCAKE JIM.”]

Winfield Courier, April 12, 1883.

As Olivia met with a sad accident, I will try and write for her, but am a poor apology for a writer.

Miss Mary Randall commenced a term of school at this place on Monday inst. We wish her success.

Winfield Courier, April 12, 1883.

Some stranger has been traveling over the county taking pictures of farm houses, schoolhouses, and scenery. What his object is or what interest he is working under, several inquisitive citizens have failed to discover.

Winfield Courier, April 12, 1883.

The Governor proclaims Thursday the 26th day of April as “Arbor Day,” and advises all good people to plant, or cause to be planted, trees and shrubs, and to beautify the schoolhouse grounds. Let us hope that his injunction will be generally observed all over the state. Kansas’ greatest need is more trees. Especially is this so with the schoolhouses.

Winfield Courier, April 12, 1883.


The Odessa people have displayed most commendable enterprise in the improvement of their school grounds. They have put up a neat fence, fixed up the house, and planted over two hundred trees and shrubs. Why their example is not followed by every school district in the county we cannot tell. The improvement of school grounds is certainly a matter of much educational importance. A less inviting place than one of the bleak, bare schoolhouses scattered over the county could not easily be found. Around many of them the forlorn thousand-miles-from anywhere appearance is not even relieved by a hitching rack. Why not go to work and improve the school grounds? It won’t cost much, and the influence of a cozy schoolhouse, surrounded by trees and flowers, and fences, will be felt all over the district.

Winfield Courier, April 12, 1883.

The mail carrier on the Winfield and Dexter route has been raising considerable disturbance along the line lately. He carries a revolver and shoots promiscuously through schoolhouses, cripples, dogs, and does often reckless and peculiar things. Aside from this he has been known to stop at houses along the line an unusual amount of time. Several residents on the road he travels have become tired of his antics and one of them came in Tuesday to hunt up U. S. Commissioner Webb and have him taken in hand. If Uncle Sam gets hold of him, it will be but a short time till he is tamed.

Winfield Courier, April 12, 1883.

Mr. Ed. Rice returned with his family from New Matamoras, Ohio, Friday. Mr. Rice owns a good farm in Walnut Township, which he rented out four years ago and went to Ohio, hoping to improve his fortune. He will now occupy it again and settles down to stay, fully satisfied that Cowley is far ahead of any place in Ohio in advantages for the farmer. He brought four Ohioans with him who seek homes in this county, three of them school teachers.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 18, 1883.

The First Quarterly meeting of the Arkansas City Circuit will be held at the Coburn schoolhouse April 22 and 23. Preaching Saturday at 8 p.m. and on Sunday at 12 p.m. and at 4 p.m. The residing elder, Rev. T. Audis, will preach at 4 p.m. Sunday. H. S. LUNDY, Pastor.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 18, 1883.

The following pupils of the High School were perfect during the 8th month: Etta Barnett, Mollie Coonrod, Hannah Gilbert, Frank Gamel, Effie Gilstrap, Laura Holloway, Jessie Norton, Charley Randall, Alvan Sankey, Eliza Taylor, Lizzie Wilson, Dora Pearson, Carrie Rice, Ida Groves, Walter Pickering, Sarah Randall, Harry Shaw.

The following were imperfect: Mollie Christian, Harry Finley, Fred McLaughlin, John Kirkpatrick, Minnie McIntire, Eddie Marshall, Frank Wright, Arthur Parker, Peter Hollenbeck, Alice Lane, Robert Nipp, Fannie Peterson.

Excerpt...

[ROSE VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: “JETTA JAY.”.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 18, 1883.

Our school, taught by Mr. Geo. Wright, closed last Friday with a picnic. A good time is reported, although the wind blew with a vengeance. The pupils all unite in wishing for the same teacher next winter.

Excerpt...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “QUIT.”]

Winfield Courier, April 19, 1883.

A Sabbath school has been started at Victor under the superintendence of Mr. Watt. We prophesy a good school as the result of Mr. Watt’s labors.

Winfield Courier, April 19, 1883.

Miss Clute has almost lost her voice and has not taught her school for three days.

Winfield, Courier, April 19, 1883.


The Rose Valley school closed last Friday with a big dinner, sandwiched with literary exercises and a general good time. After the speaking the teacher, Mr. George Wright, was presented with a mammoth cake, a gift from his scholars. This was a fitting testimonial to Mr. Wright’s faithful and efficient work.

Excerpts...

[COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.]

Winfield Courier, April 19, 1883.

The school tax was remitted to James Gilleland in Spring Creek.

In the appeal of district 113, the action of the Superintendent was sustained.

Excerpt...

[LOCATION OF WATER HYDRANTS.]

Winfield Courier, April 19, 1883.

The apportionment of hydrants leaves the part of the city east of the schoolhouse entirely unprovided for. It will take forty more hydrants to give these citizens the fire protection necessary.

Excerpt...

[CAMBRIDGE CORRESPONDENT: “MOSS BACK.”]

Winfield Courier, April 19, 1883.

Singing class every Thursday night. Come out and try your voices and help us sing. Mr. W. T. Koons is our teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 25, 1883.

Rev. J. J. Broadbent will preach next Sunday, April 29th, 1883, at the Theaker schoolhouse in West Bolton. Morning services at 11 o’clock and evening at 7:30 o’clock.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 25, 1883.

We call attention to the card of Miss Fowler’s private school in this issue. The lady comes to our city well recommended and we hope will receive the encouragement she deserves. The school, we understand, will be conducted somewhat after the Kindergarten system.

CARD. Private School. Miss Fowler desires to inform the parents of Arkansas City that she has opened up a private school, for children, in the building south of H. P. Farrar’s residence. HOURS, 8:45 TO 11:15 A.M. TERMS: $3.00 per month.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 25, 1883.

                                                             Bolton S. P. U.

At the annual meeting of the Bolton Stock Protective Union at the Bland schoolhouse, last Saturday, the following gentlemen were elected officers for the coming year: A. J. Gilbert, Captain; J. W. Patterson, 1st Lieutenant; Dick Chinn, 2nd Lieutenant; and A. Ramsey, Orderly Sergeant. This organization has done first-class work in the past, and under the gentlemen just elected its efficiency will be fully up to its record.

Excerpt...

[COURIER CLIPS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 25, 1883.


The Rose Valley School closed last Friday with a big dinner sandwiched with literary exercises and a general good time. After the speaking the teacher, Mr. George Wright, was presented with a mammoth cake, a gift from his scholars. This was a fitting testimonial to Mr. Wright’s faithful and efficient work.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, April 26, 1883.

Mr. Christopher has a full school.

Miss Randall is delighted with her work of training the youth of Salem.

Excerpt...

[VERNON CORRESPONDENT: “WALLACE.”]

Winfield Courier, April 26, 1883.

Nothing has been heard lately about our grade school. Why don’t someone wake up the matter? Vernon could support a graded school in good shape.

Winfield Courier, April 26, 1883.

Mr. Bobbitt is moving his barn to the lots on Ninth Avenue west of the schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, April 26, 1883.

A couple of young lady school teachers have purchased Mr. Craine’s residence on east Ninth Avenue.

Winfield Courier, April 26, 1883.

Senator Ingalls will deliver his famous lecture on Garfield at the Opera House this Thursday evening. Benefit of the Library Association. Admittance 25 cents. School children 15 cents.

Winfield Courier, April 26, 1883.

New Salem is now a telegraph station. The wires and batteries were put in Friday. A new schoolhouse is also being built, which will cost upwards of $2,000. It is to be two stories high.

Excerpts...

[WIND STORM.]

Winfield Courier, April 26, 1883.

                                       FRIDAY NIGHT’S WICKED BREEZES.

        They Sweep Over Liberty, Tisdale, and Vernon Townships with Demoralizing Effect.

                                    Summary of the Damages so far as Ascertained.

The wind storm of last Friday night was no tame affair; indeed, it proved to be very interesting to many of the residents of Liberty and Tisdale Townships.


The storm seems to have passed north and struck Tisdale, where a large two-story frame house was blown to splinters. It contained ten persons at the time, all of them being on the ground floor. Mr. Green, one of the occupants, says that when he picked himself up, he was off on the prairie surrounded with the debree of the buildings and furniture. Reece Moore and wife were lying near him, both badly injured. The others were badly shaken up, but not damaged to any great extent. The furniture, stoves, and other household fixtures were totally demolished. The Conrad schoolhouse was also destroyed. In the north part of Tisdale Township, near New Salem, Milt Gilbert’s house was unroofed. The walls were of stone and withstood the force of the storm. Fortunately there was no one in the house at the time. Farther on Reube Mitchell’s house was wrecked, the two gables and half the roof blown in. It was a new frame house built this spring.

Excerpt...

[ROSE VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: “JETTA JAY.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 2, 1883.

We now have an extra good Sabbath school at the Barker schoolhouse. JETTA JAY.

Excerpt...

[ROCK CORRESPONDENT: “JIM.”]

Winfield Courier, May 3, 1883.

Miss Sue McWilliams commenced a 3 months school last Monday in Butler County, where she taught last winter. JIM.

Winfield Courier, May 3, 1883.

Fred Kropp has succeeded in locating the old livery stable on the lot west of the school-house. This is one of the finest locations in the city and it is a pity to spoil it with a livery stable.

Winfield Courier, May 3, 1883.

The scholars of the public schools had a vacation Tuesday and a grand May picnic in the park. The beautiful May queens, represented in the persons of Margaret Spotswood, Mollie Anderson, and Miss Alice Carson, were duly crowned, and mirth and joy reigned supreme.

Winfield Courier, May 3, 1883.

Mr. Lunday has sold his home residence opposite the East ward schoolhouse to Mr. Howard of Walnut Township for fifteen hundred dollars. This is a beautiful little place. Mr. Lunday will remove to his six acre place up near the mounds on which he will build a neat and roomy dwelling.

Winfield Courier, May 3, 1883.

                                                       The Courier Observes

That the city schools close the 11th inst.

Winfield Courier, May 3, 1883.

District 14, Torrance, has voted school bonds for a $1,500 schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, May 10, 1883.

The primary department of the public schools under Miss Rounds had a picnic Friday afternoon in Riverside Park. It was a jolly crowd of little ones, as we saw them marching toward the park with their lunch baskets and bright, happy faces. Why can’t the teachers give the little folks a picnic every Friday afternoon when the weather permits? Such hours spent in romping around under the trees would be worth a week of study, and the knowledge of its coming would give them more of an interest in school work. We are in favor of making the Friday afternoon picnic take the place of the usual dry and useless “Mary-had-a-little-lamb” exercises. It would be much more beneficial in the way of health and increasing the interest of the little ones in school. What do the parents say? Shall the Friday afternoon picnic be a part of the school curriculum?

Winfield Courier, May 10, 1883.


Mr. W. B. Beaumont closed his school at Odessa in Pleasant Valley last Friday, and the event was celebrated with a grand basket picnic in the afternoon. The whole neighborhood turned out at the schoolhouse to hear the closing exercises and then all repaired to the woods for a good time. Mr. Beaumont seems to have conducted the school very satisfactorily.

Winfield Courier, May 10, 1883.

                                                       School Board Meeting.

The Board met at the office of the Winfield Bank Monday. Present: Emerson, president; Fuller, Doane, and Wood, members. The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. Reports of all outstanding committees were accepted and the business of the old Board closed up as far as practicable. The new Board then proceeded to organize by electing Mr. Fuller, president; Mr. Wood, vice-president; and L. D. Zenor, clerk. The president then appointed the following committees.

Mr. Wood, committee on buildings and grounds.

Dr. Graham, common ways and means.

Mr. Short, committee on finance.

On motion the following order of business was adopted: First, reading of the minutes; second, reports of special committees; third, reports of standing committees; fourth, new business; fifth, old business; sixth, claims. The meeting then adjourned to meet next Monday night.

Winfield Courier, May 10, 1883.

                                                    Commencement Exercises.

The fourth annual commencement of the Winfield High School will be held in Manning’s hall on Friday evening, May 11th. The following is the program.

                                                     ALUMNI EXERCISES.

                                                          MUSIC—BAND.

Prayer: J. E. Platter.

                                                        GREETING SONG.

Essay: “Links”: Hattie Andrews, Class ’82

Declamation: “Flying Jim’s Last Leap”: James Cairns, Class ’82.

Essay: Mary Randall, Class ’82.

Recitation: “The Legend of Bregenz”: Jennie Lowry, Class ’81.

                                                          MUSIC—BAND.

Oration: “Perseverance”: James Lorton, Class ’80.

Recitation: “Charlie Machree”: Ida Trezise, Class ’82.

Essay: “A Chain of Fancies”: Anna Hunt, Class ’80.

Select Reading: “The Pilot’s Story”: Anna Hunt, Class ’80.

                                                          MUSIC—BAND.

                                                GRADUATING EXERCISES.

Essay: “Woman’s Work”: Fannie Harden.

Essay: “Whence, Where, and Whither”: Clara Bosman.

                                                          MUSIC—BAND.

                                            PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS.

                                                     GOOD NIGHT SONG.

Prayer: Rev. J. Cairns.

Excerpt...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “CAESAR.”]


Winfield Courier, May 10, 1883.

The Sunday school at Victor is prospering finely.

Excerpts...

[ROSE VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: “JETTA JAY.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 16, 1883.

Dr. Duncan will preach in the Rose Valley schoolhouse on Wednesday evening at 7:30.

Dr. Duncan, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is now visiting old acquaintances in Arkansas City and this vicinity.

Winfield Courier, May 17, 1883.

Miss Mollie Bryant and Mrs. W. B. Caton gave their pupils of the public school a picnic in the Riverside Park last Tuesday, and had a gay, frolicking time.

Winfield Courier, May 17, 1883.

Miss Zella Hutchinson came home at Mr. Tomlin’s last Friday from her school for a short vacation.

Winfield Courier, May 17, 1883.

Miss Theresa Goldsmith left Wednesday morning for her home in Clinton, Missouri, where she will teach this summer. Miss Huldah Goldsmith goes with her for a few weeks’ visit.

[HIGH SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT.]

Winfield Courier, May 17, 1883.

                                            COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES.

The Opera House was crowded on Friday evening last for the annual Commencement exercises of the Winfield High School. The principal part of the program consisted of performances by the Alumni of 1880, 1881, and 1882, which were all excellent, and showed that though their time of school day activity had passed, their intellects had lost no lustre, but improved with time and use. After the opening prayer by Rev. J. Cairns came the greeting song by the class, followed by an essay on “Links” by Miss Hattie Andrews, of the class of 1882. Miss Andrew’s voice was clear and distinct, and her essay exhibited a depth of thought which is very commendable. Succeeding this was a declamation, “Flying Jim’s Last Leap,” by James Cairns, another of the class of 1882. James did the piece full justice and brought out the points very nicely. Next came the recitation of Miss Jennie Lowry, class of 1881, “The Legend of Bregenz,” which is rich in sentiment. James Lorton, class of 1880, then made his first appearance as an orator. His subject was “Perseverance,” and he proved the necessity of this important factor in the human make-up in a manner which showed careful consideration and did himself much credit. Miss Ida Trezise, class of 1882, brought out in the next recitation the grit of “Charlie Machree” in battling against the tide to win a kiss. Miss Trezise’s appearance was pleasing, and she has the faculty of imitation necessary to good elocution. An essay by Miss Anna Hunt, also of the class of 1882, gave the audience some bristling thoughts on “A Chain of Fancies.” Miss Rose Rounds, of the same class, read in her interesting way the sensational tale, “The Pilot’s Story.”


Then came the graduating exercises. Miss Fannie Harden, being unable to be present, her essay on “Woman’s Work” was nicely read by Miss Etta Johnson. It asserted that woman’s sphere for work is broadening and ere long she will have equal rights with the men and use these rights for the accomplishment of much good. Miss Clara Bowman’s essay, “Whence, Where, and Whither,” sparkled with bright thoughts and fully demonstrated from whence we came, where we are, and whither we are tending. The presentation of diplomas was made by Prof. Trimble with appropriate words of advice. The program was interspersed with instrumental music by Miss Josie Bard and Prof. Farringer, the entertainment closing with a good night song by the class.

Excerpts...

Winfield Courier, May 24, 1883.

                                        WINFIELD AND COWLEY COUNTY.

We clip the following from the Indianapolis Sentinel, written by J. C. McKee, who recently visited this place.

There are two school buildings and the schools, which close this week, seem to be conducted in a first-class manner.

Excerpts...

[AKRON CORRESPONDENT: “AUDUBON.”]

Winfield Courier, May 24, 1883.

County Superintendent Limerick was out last Sabbath.

Constable Lacey and Prof. Weimer are getting to be experts in letter writing.

The Methodists will hereafter hold their services in the Valley Center schoolhouse, and Rev. Rose will resume his appointments as before. AUDUBON.

Winfield Courier, May 24, 1883.

Eugene A. Millard came down from Burden Monday to convince Judge Torrance that he knew too much for a juryman and just enough for a pedagogue. He was permitted to return to his school teaching.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 30, 1883.

Our public schools will close the present term June 7th, 1883.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 30, 1883.

Wild Plumb bushes are loaded down with fruit this year, and the Indian as well as the school boy will have a bountiful harvest.

[HIGH SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 30, 1883.

                                                          Commencement.

Closing exercises of the Arkansas City High School, Wednesday evening, class exercises and rendering of the drama, “Married Life.”  Thursday evening, June 7th, graduating address by the class. A programme of exercises will be printed in next week’s TRAVELER. Exercises at McLaughlin’s Hall.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 30, 1883.

                                                           Communicated.

                            SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 69, BOLTON TOWNSHIP.


Ed. Traveler: Quite a pleasant affair was held at the Bland schoolhouse, last Friday, at the close of the summer term of school, in the shape of a picnic or dinner, which was intended for a picnic in the grove, but the rain of Thursday night caused the change. Quite a number of the parents and neighbors came in to enjoy themselves with the children. Declarations and dialogues were ably rendered, after which presents were distributed to all the scholars. The school then closed with a unanimous vote of thanks to Mr. C. F. Cunningham, who has given entire satisfaction in teaching four successive terms in our district, and we hope to be fortunate enough to secure his services in the future. All went away feeling benefitted by being there, and expressed themselves as having had a very enjoyable time. Parents, you can do more for the future of your children by thus showing an interest in their education than by days of toil. VISITOR.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 30, 1883.

                                                             Courier Clips.

From the Fall River Echo, we learn that Prof. R. C. Story has received his household goods and settled down to housekeeping in that town and gone into the banking business as cashier of the Fall River bank. We wish him abundant success and bespeak for him and his estimable lady a kind reception—in their new home.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, May 31, 1883.

The Misses Gardener, Lawson, and Ettie Johnson are home from the Winfield school.

There will be singings at the old Salem schoolhouse on Sunday afternoons, conducted by Mr. C. Miller.

The New Salem schoolhouse is under headway, and the house of Mr. Q. E. Johnson will soon be completed.

Miss Randall is suffering with neuralgia, had to leave school for a week, and is not yet able for school duty.

School at Prairie Home closed on Tuesday and they had a very pleasant time, I am informed. They had a picnic dinner, or rather all took dinner together. I was sadly disappointed and did not get to share in the good time nor partake of the excellent goodies prepared by the good ladies of that district. They had pleasant exercises, all passed off pleasantly, and hearts beat high, except for the thought that they soon must part, perhaps never to all meet again on such a joyful occasion. The teacher, Mr. Ramage, and family, will move to Winfield next week, taking with them the esteem of the many kind neighbors and the love of his pupils.

Excerpts...

[UDALL CORRESPONDENT: “UNCLE FRANK.”]

Winfield Courier, May 31, 1883.

A new two-story schoolhouse is looming up at Udall. Cost: Sixteen hundred and fifty dollars ($1,650). Will be completed ready for school to commence the first of September.

Our long term of school will close next Friday. Miss Strong is a splendid teacher and has done good work here. The thought of her leaving causes one of our grain buyers to wear a very long face.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “LERIFUER.”]

Winfield Courier, May 31, 1883.


The carpenters will commence on the new schoolhouse as soon as the next car load of lumber comes, which is expected every day.

Winfield Courier, May 31, 1883.

The railroad surveyors ran lines all around over the city and surrounding country. As they set more stakes along the second street east of the schoolhouse than anywhere else, residents about there seem confident that a track will be run from the K. C. L. & S. Depot around through the east part of town, down through Loomis’ addition, striking the Santa Fe near the south bridge.

Winfield Courier, May 31, 1883.

                                                      Stock Protective Union.

The Stock Protective Union of Pleasant Valley will hold their regular meeting at the Odessa schoolhouse on Tuesday, June 5th, at 7:30 in the evening. A full attendance is desired. A. H. BROADWELL, O. S.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, June 6, 1883.

                                                           Library Benefit.

Wednesday, June 6th, a literary and musical entertainment and the Class Exercises of the class of 1883 will be held at McLaughlin’s Hall, for the benefit of the High School Library.

Programme: Music—Orchestra. Orations: Harry L. Finley; Etta M. Barnett. Music. Alice L. Lane; Mollie Coonrod; Hannah Gilbert; C. L. Swarts; Harry C. Shaw; Mollie Christian; W. M. Blakeney.

Dramatis Personal: [Drama put on] Anna Norton, Maggie Barrows, Etta Barnett, Sadie Pickering, Linda Christian, George Wright, W. D. Mowry, Harry C. Shaw, Harry L. Finley, F. C. McLaughlin.

Doors open at 8 o’clock. Admission 25 cents. Children under 12 years 15 cents. No extra charge for reserved seats, for which tickets can be obtained at the Post Office. All are cordially invited to attend.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 6, 1883.

The S. P. U. of Bolton will meet at Stony Point schoolhouse Saturday evening, June 15th, 1883, for the transaction of any business of the company’s. All members are requested to attend. A. J. GILBERT, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 6, 1883.

Prof. A. H. Limerick, our county superintendent, was in the city yesterday visiting the schools; and although we did not have a very lengthy talk with the gentleman, we gleaned the facts that he found the High School in all its departments in first-class shape, which indeed reflects credit upon our teacher, Prof. Atkinson, and his corps of assistants.

[SCHOOLS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 6, 1883.

                                   CLOSING EXERCISE OF THE SCHOOLS.

Tuesday and Wednesday, June 5th and 6th, annual examination of classes.

Wednesday evening, June 8th, at McLaughlin’s Hall, class exercises and rendition of drama, “Married Life.”

Thursday evening, June 7th, at McLaughlin’s Hall, graduating addresses by the class, at 8 p.m.


Friday forenoon, June 8th, exercises of the Grammar and Intermediate Departments to be held in the High School Room.

The patrons of the school are cordially invited to be present.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “ALLEGRO.”]

Winfield Courier, June 7, 1883.

Work commenced on the schoolhouse last Monday.

Winfield Courier, June 7, 1883.

Eight of the teachers of the public schools have been appointed, as follows: Misses Klingman, Dickey, Bryant, Hamill, Crippen, Gibson, Aldrich, Barnes, and Mrs. Caton. There still remain four places to be filled.

Winfield Courier, June 7, 1883.

Prof. Anson Gridley, Jr., is elected superintendent of the Winfield City schools for the ensuing year, an appointment eminently fit to be made. Mr. Gridley is fully equipped in every respect for the position and ranks high among the practical educators of the state.

Winfield Courier, June 7, 1883.

Notice to Contractors. Bids are desired on a stone schoolhouse two stories high, to be built at Torrance. The plans and specifications can be seen at D. Elliott’s, in Winfield, until June 9th. The contract will be let to one person. The board retains the right to reject any and all bids. By order of Board school district 14.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1883.

Prof. C. T. Atkinson has been engaged as Principal of our high school for the next school year.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1883.

Prof. C. T. Atkinson and family started for Zanesville, Ohio, on Monday last, where they intend to spend the summer, with friends, until the high school term commences.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1883.

The commencement exercises at McLaughlin’s Hall Thursday evening were attended by many of the parents of the high school scholars, and the exercises reflected great credit upon both teacher and pupils.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1883.

We are very sorry to learn that Miss Burrows, who has been engaged in teaching in our high school the last year, leaves for her home in Iowa tomorrow. Miss Burrows has proved herself an efficient teacher, and besides has made many friends in the country who will sincerely regret her departure.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1883.

Silverdale Stock Protective Union will meet at the Silverdale schoolhouse on Saturday, June 16th, 1883, at early candlelight. All members are requested to be present as important business will come up for consideration. B. F. HAYNES, Captain.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1883.

Harry Finley left for his home in Hiawatha, Kansas, last Monday. Harry has just graduated with honors in our High School and we presume will attend college next year. He has our best wishes for his success in the race of life.

[SCHOOL LIBRARY.]


Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1883.

                                                           School Library.

The entertainment for the benefit of the above last Wednesday night was literally crowded and the programme of the evening was much enjoyed. The drama “Married Life,” was ably rendered, the cast of characters was excellent, and fully sustained throughout. Those taking part therein are certainly deserving credit for affording an evening’s amusement hard to excel.

[SCHOOLS: REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1883.

                             REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS.

                                    ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS, June 8, 1883.

Gentlemen of the Board:

I have the honor herewith to lay before you the report for the year ending June 8th, 1883.

With one exception, the past year has been one of unexceptional discipline and order. The Principal has endeavored to instill within the minds of his pupils that self-government is as important as culture of the mind; that honor should direct every action; and that fear should be banished from the mind. It is gratifying to know that the code of honor observed especially by the pupils of the high school is seldom equaled by the pupils of any grade of schools.

A lamentable lack of knowledge of spelling and writing has induced the Principal to require a rigid drill in each every day, and especial prominence has been given to the analysis, definitions, and synonyms of words. The tasks required are such as the great majority of the pupils are able to perform. Great care has been taken by the teachers that undue stimulation be removed from ever-bright or over-ambitious pupils. It is the policy of many teachers to stimulate a mushroom growth and thus exhaust the mental abilities of the pupil ere he has arrived at the age of maturity.

The proper remedy for this is parental watch-care and cooperation with the teacher. The work marked out for each grade presupposes ability on the part of the pupil equal to the performance and naturally leads to the work of the succeeding grade, and when a pupil proves unequal to the task, it is a prima facie case that he should be in another grade where the work is easier. The value of an education does not depend upon the shortness of the time spent in its acquisition, or the rapidity with which the work is accomplished, but rather in the thoroughness of comprehension and the actual discipline of mind which is obtained. It is far better for a pupil to spend twice the time in a single grade than to pass to the next before the work has been fully mastered. A single study thoroughly pursued goes further toward a practical education than an imperfect understanding of many.

Tardiness, non-attendance, and lack of application will cause many to enter the same grade at the commencement of the coming year as they did at the commencement of the closing year. Many parents will believe that because their pupils do not advance with their class that they have been illy taught or illy-used. If they will examine the register, they will understand the cause. “No promotions except for merit and no degradations except for cause,” will be inexorably enforced.


Arkansas City has not the educational facilities her rank and growth demand. Basements are too damp in wet weather, too dusty in windy weather, and too dark in all weather. The present Board have endeavored to locate and build suitable houses, but their well meant endeavors have been unavailing. Though sickness has interfered, yet the work done will far excel that of the previous year.

With thanks to the members of the Board for the efficient aid extended to the Principal in the discharge of his duties, this report is respectfully submitted.

                                          C. T. ATKINSON, Supt. of Instruction.

Excerpts...

[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: “JULIANNA.”]

Winfield Courier, June 14, 1883.

School is out Friday.

Mr. Watt has sent for an organ. It would pay a first class music teacher to come here. There are quite a number of scholars around here.

A load of young folks went from here to the Victor schoolhouse last Sunday evening. Another load went to town, and another to the Randall schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, June 14, 1883.

Mrs. J. W. Johnston and her daughter, Ida, leave for Canada today to be gone all summer. Miss Ida will probably lengthen her stay through the winter and attend school at Toronto.

Winfield Courier, June 14, 1883.

Miss Ella Kelly returned from Wichita last week after having taught the grammar department of the schools successfully during the winter. She was re-elected to the position but refused to accept it again for the salary and will probably not return.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, June 14, 1883.

Our Salem neighbors at the New Salem, or Pleasant Hill, schoolhouse have organized a union Sunday School, with Mr. Bryant as superintendent, Mr. Douglass, assistant, and Miss Gilmore, chorister. I do not know who the other officers are.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, June 20, 1883.

                                                            Sudden Death.

DIED. On Wednesday morning of last week about 7 o’clock, Howard, the colored porter at the Leland Hotel, died suddenly of heart disease. He had been more or less affected with dangerous symptoms for several months past. It appears that the diseased arose feeling as well as usual and went about his morning work and was engaged in the kitchen when stricken by the hand of death to the floor from which he in vain attempted to rise, staggering and falling again at every attempt. Mr. Patterson, the landlord, sent for Dr. Chapel and in the meanwhile Howard was carried upstairs, but expired in about ten minutes despite all that could be done by the attending physician. The young man by reason of his courteous and pleasant manners was a general favorite with all and his untimely taking off is much deplored. The burial took place the same day from the residence of Mr. J. Hand, and Rev. Daily preached his funeral sermon last Sunday at the Guthrie schoolhouse in West Bolton.

[HIGH SCHOOL.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, June 20, 1883.


                                                          Our High School.

The following is the corps of teachers engaged for the next term of school in this city. Principal: C. T. Atkinson. Assistants: Miss Annie Norton, Miss Virginia Walton, Miss _____ Johnson, Miss Albertine Maxwell, Miss Mary Theaker.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 20, 1883.

                                                                  S. P. U.

The farmers of East Creswell are requested to meet at the Rose Valley schoolhouse on Saturday evening, June 30th, 1883, for the purpose of effecting the organization of a Stock Protective Union. It is hoped that all parties interested will make a point of attending the above meeting.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 20, 1883.

We announce the departure, for her home in Osceola, Iowa, of Miss Maggie Burrows, on last Thursday. Miss Burrows has been teaching in our public school the past year, and filled her position with much honor, winning the confidence and respect of all her pupils. We hope to see her in our city again, but be her destiny what it may, it must always be a source of gratification to her to know that she has many friends in Arkansas City who wish her well.

[SCHOOL MEETING.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 20, 1883.

                                                           School Meeting.

The annual school meeting in District No. 2 will be held in the High School building, Arkansas City, on Wednesday, June 27th, 1883, at 3:30 o’clock p.m. It is hoped that all parents and others interested in education will be present as in addition to the usual business, arrangements will have to be made for the erection of another school building to accommodate our school population. H. D. KELLOGG, Chairman; O. S. RARICK, Trustee; O. INGERSOLL, Clerk.

[STOCK PROTECTIVE UNION.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 20, 1883.

                                                        Prospective S. P. U.

A meeting was held at the Rose Valley schoolhouse in East Creswell last Saturday night, June 16th, for the purpose of talking up the organization of a Stock Protective Union. Meeting was called to order by Mr. Phillips, who was also elected chairman, and T. B. Norman, who was elected secretary.

Messrs. Kirkpatrick, Sankey, and Freals were appointed a committee upon by-laws, etc., to report at next meeting. Upon motion it was carried that notice of the meeting be handed to the TRAVELER for publication, with request to publish notice of next meeting for June 30th, 1883. After quite a talk upon the object of the meeting, which fully proved that all present meant business, the meeting adjourned to meet at same time and place on June 30th, 1883. T. B. NORMAN, Sec.

Winfield Courier, June 21, 1883.

District 119 had a warm fight Monday over changing the site of the schoolhouse. The vote was a tie, and the judges decided to hold a new election. There will be blood on the moon until it is over.

Excerpt...


[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, June 21, 1883.

Sunday school quite interesting. Singing at Prairie Home last Sabbath conducted by Mr. Thomas. The young people are anxious to secure his services as teacher and think they can get up quite a class in vocal music. Hope they will succeed.

Excerpt...

[UDALL CORRESPONDENT: “I GUESS.”]

Winfield Courier, June 21, 1883.

Udall is still booming. The bonds for a new schoolhouse were voted almost unanimously. Four new residences are now tending toward completion, viz.: A. J. Werden’s, James T. Dale’s, James Napier’s, and S. D. Randall’s. I GUESS.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 27, 1883.

School meeting today at 3:30.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 27, 1883.

                                                                  S. P. U.

The farmers of East Creswell are requested to meet at the Rose Valley Schoolhouse on Saturday evening June 30th, 1883, for the purpose of effecting the organization of a Stock Protective Union. It is hoped that all parties interested will make a point of attending the above meeting.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “ALGERO.”]

Winfield Courier, June 28, 1883.

Our carpenters being indisposed for the last week, the schoolhouse work lingers.

Excerpts...

[CORRESPONDENT: NORTHWEST CRESWELL. NAME NOT GIVEN.]

Winfield Courier, June 28, 1883.

Miss Zella Hutchins’ school closes next Friday, in order that she may attend the Normal at Winfield.

Miss Eliza Taylor is at home from attending school at Arkansas City, but will be gone again as soon as the Winfield Normal opens.

Winfield Courier, June 28, 1883.

Notice to Contractors. Bids will be received for the construction of a two-story stone schoolhouse at Torrance, until the 7th day of July. The specifications can be seen at the COURIER office or at the post office in Torrance. Sealed bids must be mailed to I. H. Phenis, Torrance, Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, July 4, 1883.

                                                    Annual School Meeting.

At the annual school meeting of District No. 2, held in the High School building in Arkansas City, on Wednesday last, the following represents the business transacted.


The meeting was called to order, Director H. D. Kellogg in the chair. Dr. H. D. Kellogg and O. Ingersoll were the only members of the school board present. Minutes of previous meeting were read and approved. Annual Report of the District Treasurer was read and approved. Annual Report of the District Clerk was read and adopted. Mr. Ingersoll then tendered his resignation as clerk, which was accepted.

The meeting then proceeded to the election of officers. T. H. McLaughlin was unanimously elected Treasurer of the school district for the next three years. Frank J. Hess was elected clerk of Dist. No. 2 to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of O. Ingersoll.

Motion made and carried that a tax levy of five mills be made for teachers’ fund, and a levy of 4 mills for incidental fund. Moved and carried that the Treasurer receive $10 and the Clerk $25 for services rendered the past year.

Motion made and carried that a tax levy of 6 mills be made for the purpose of raising a fund to be used in providing necessary temporary school buildings.

After considerable discussion on the question of another school building, a motion was made and carried that an election be called to vote $10,000 in bonds to be used for the purchasing of a site and erection of another school building.

It was decided by vote that the next school year be for nine months. Adjourned.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 4, 1883.

The S. P. U. of Bolton Township will meet at the Mercer Schoolhouse Saturday evening, July 7th, 1883. A full attendance is requested.  W. S. VORIS, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 4, 1883.

Mrs. E. A. McLaughlin yesterday concluded a term of three months school in the Theaker schoolhouse during which she gave entire satisfaction to all in the school district.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 4, 1883.

Miss Fowler, of the kindergarten school, left for Iowa last week to spend the summer vacation among home friends.

Winfield Courier, July 5, 1883.

Last week Miss Ella Kelly was tendered and has accepted the assistant principalship of our public schools. This is a deserving compliment to the lady’s intelligence and many accomplishments. She is a graduate of our public schools.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 11, 1883.

                                             NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.

Sealed bids will be received at the office of the Clerk of School District No. 2 for the erection of two one-story frame buildings (20 x 60 and 20 x 30) according to plans and specifications, which can be seen at Clerk’s office. Said buildings to be completed on or before the 3rd day of August, 1883. Bids will be opened July 16th at 11 a.m.

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids.

By order of the Board. FRANK J. HESS, Clerk.

Winfield Courier, July 19, 1883.

Republicans of Ninnescah Township at a meeting of the Republican Central Committee held in Winfield July 14, 1883, recommended that the primaries of each township and ward in Cowley County be held on Thursday, August 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m. You are therefor notified that the Republican primary for Ninnescah Township will be held in the schoolhouse at Udall Saturday, August 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m. sharp. July 14th, 1883. W. B. NORMAN.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 25, 1883.

The contract for erecting the temporary school buildings was let to Canfield & Tate for $1,122.


Arkansas City Traveler, July 25, 1883.

James Cady, representing Greenfeldter & Rosenthal, boot and shoe house of Chicago, Illinois, was here last week for the first time. In addition to being a traveling man, Mr. Cady is a fine artist, and an adept in pencil sketching, having performed considerable work for Harper’s Weekly and Scribner’s Monthly, under the marks of J. C. He is an old friend of C. M. Scott’s, having taught school in Cadiz, Ohio, and boasts of thrashing C. M. more times than he has fingers and toes, and don’t think now he gave him enough.

[PETITION: NEW SCHOOLHOUSE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 25, 1883.

                                                     School House Petition.

A petition to call an election for the purpose of building a new schoolhouse in this district was carried around last Monday and a sufficient number of signers secured. The petition calls for a building to cost $10,000, payable in $1,000 bonds, paying $1,000 a year from 1884 to 1894.

Winfield Courier, July 26, 1883.

A basket picnic will be held at the Prairie Home schoolhouse, three miles north of Tisdale, on the fifth Lord’s day of July. All are cordially invited to attend.

                                                      J. A. BROWN, Pastor.

Excerpt...

[ODESSA CORRESPONDENT: “M. S.”]

Winfield Courier, July 26, 1883.

Mr. Shane has purchased the west eighty of the schoolhouse quarter.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 1, 1883.

Mrs. M. H. Theaker and family have once more taken up their abode with us after a lengthened visit to former friends in Ohio. Miss Mary Theaker will teach in our schools the coming year.

Winfield Courier, August 2, 1883.

Mr. W. L. Holcomb of Butler County, brother-in-law of the musical Davis family, attended the teachers’ examination at this place last week, and will become a Cowley schoolteacher. He has settled in Rock Township.

Winfield Courier, August 2, 1883.

Misses Lena Bartlett and Mamie Garlick were elected by the school board to fill the vacancies in the list of city teachers for this winter caused by the resignation of Mrs. Caton and Miss Mattie Gibson. Miss Garlick has been teaching in the city schools of Augusta for some time past.

Winfield Courier, August 2, 1883.

Resolutions of the Cowley County Normal Institute, Adopted at the Close of the Session Ending July 25th, 1883.

Resolved, That we, the teachers of Cowley County, tender Prof. Davis our sincere thanks for the thorough, systematic, and agreeable manner in which he has conducted our Institute.

Resolved, That we recognize the good judgment, untiring energy, and ability of our County Superintendent, Profs. Trimble and Gridley, and that we offer them our thanks for the faithful manner in which they have performed their part of the work.


Resolved, That this Institute, coming as it has earlier in the season, will be remembered as one of the pleasantest we have ever attended. That while it has been a session of inestimable educational value, it has been one of pleasure and good feeling as well.

Resolved, That we will use in our schools this winter the practical Normal methods which we have been taught at this Institute.

Resolved, That a copy of the resolutions be sent to each of the city papers for publication.

   ANNA HUNT, LAURA ELLIOTT, LIDA STRONG, D. W. RAMAGE, COMMITTEE.

                                         L. C. BROWN, Chairman of Committee.

Winfield Courier, August 2, 1883.

Republicans of Ninnescah Township: At a regular meeting of the Republican Central Committee, held in Winfield, July 14th, 1883, it was recommended that the primaries of each township and ward in Cowley County be held on Thursday, August 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m. You are, therefore, notified that the Republican primary for Ninnescah Township will be held in the schoolhouse at Udall Thursday, Aug. 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m., sharp.  W. B. NORMAN.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, August 2, 1883.

Messrs. Downs, Kelly, and Elrod got up a select ball and warmed the floor of the new schoolhouse. There were fifty-six numbers sold, I am informed, and refreshments were served downstairs. A very enjoyable time was on the program, but dividing it with so many went against the grain with some. But all went off nicely and the committee are to be congratulated.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 8, 1883.

A Sunday school picnic will be held in the grove on the Melon farm, near the Coburn schoolhouse, on Grouse Creek, on Saturday, August 18th, to which all Sabbath schools are cordially invited. By order of Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 8, 1883.

Those boys who are in the habit of gaining access to the schoolhouse and amusing themselves with cards and other disreputable amusements had better go a little slow for they are known and will be prosecuted if such courses are persisted in.

Excerpts...

[ROCK CORRESPONDENT: “C. L.”]

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.

There will be a school meeting at Rock next Thursday afternoon.

Miss Nannie McWilliams’ school has closed.

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.

Prof. John W. Snyder of Jerseyville, Illinois, is visiting Mr. Will B. Caton. He is an old friend of Mr. Caton and a comrade during the war, and comes out to have a little reunion. It is hoped that he will locate in our midst. The following concerning him is clipped from a Jerseyville paper.


“We are glad to learn that Prof. J. W. Snyder will, in a few days, be in Greenfield, with the intention of organizing a class in rudimental and choral music with a view to bringing out in the future the cantata of Queen Esther, or some other first-class musical entertainment. In justice to the Prof., and it is no more than justice, when we say he is superior to any teacher or driller, in that line, we ever knew, and we profess to know whereof we speak. We are sure he will be heartily received, and numerously patronized, as his reputation as a teacher is widely known, since the well known Kemper Concert, which was so eminently successful a few weeks since. It you would learn music, don’t fail to take lessons under Prof. Snyder.”

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.

The township committee of Rock Township has called the Republican Primary to meet at Rock schoolhouse on the afternoon of the 30th.

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.

The Beaver Township Republican primary meeting will be held at the Beaver Center schoolhouse on Thursday, August 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m.

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.

The Republican Township Committee of Vernon Township announce the Werden schoolhouse as the place for holding the primary meeting of the party in that township, and Thursday, August 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m., as the time.

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.

The Republicans of Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday, August 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of electing five delegates to attend the County Convention at Winfield on Saturday, September 1st, 1883.

                                     J. D. Guthrie, Chairman, Township Committee.

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.

The Tisdale Republican primary will be held at the Tisdale schoolhouse, on Thursday, the 30th day of August, 1883, at half past two o’clock p.m., for the purpose of electing three delegates to attend the Republican Convention at Winfield on the first day of September.

                                  By order of Committee, H. McKibben, Chairman.

[KINDERGARTEN SCHOOL.]

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.

The Kindergarten school which has been conducted by Mrs. Garlick for some time past, closed last Friday. The term has been a very successful one and the school will open up next month with fresh interest. The writer spent two hours very pleasantly with the little folks Friday, and as we sat in the cool, airy schoolroom watching them, we thought it would be a blessing if all Winfield children could be thus employed this warm weather instead of running upon the streets or playing out in the hot sun. One grand object of the Kindergarten system is to give the children valuable and lasting information when they really do not realize that they are studying.

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.

                                                             Lawn Festival.

There will be a lawn festival at the residence of R. J. Yeoman, one-half mile north of Vernon schoolhouse, on Thursday evening, the 16th inst., where ice cream, candies, nuts, and cake will be served; the proceeds to be used toward buying an organ for the school and lyceum. All are cordially invited.

Winfield Courier, August 9, 1883.


                                                 Social and Ice Cream Festival.

A social and ice cream festival, for the benefit of the Presbyterian Church, will be held on Tuesday evening, August 14th, in the new schoolhouse at New Salem. A good time is anticipated and a cordial invitation is extended to all. By order of Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 15, 1883.

School boards will do well to see F. J. Hess before insuring school buildings. School buildings insured on time.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 15, 1883.

The Republicans of Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday, August 30, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of electing five delegates to attend the county convention at Winfield on Saturday, September 1, 1883.

                                  J. D. GUTHRIE, Chairman, Township Committee.

Winfield Courier, August 16, 1883.

                                                      Conservatory of Music.

The Conservatory of Music established six years ago in this city is at present in a very prosperous condition. It is patronized by ministers, teachers, bankers, lawyers, prominent grain and stock dealers, and a large number of the leading business firms of the city.

Three pianos and one organ are in constant use and three teachers are busily employed. Sixty music pupils are patronizing the institute, among them a large class of advanced performers, with a fair practical knowledge of thorough bass, piano, and organ playing and singing. These young ladies did not receive the most important part of their education from first-class teachers of other institutions, but commenced in the primary department under Prof. Farringer, who received his education from none but prominent professors in Germany, and who has been for the last twenty-three years the leading teacher with the largest classes in Boonville, Missouri, and in this city. He prides himself on having received as much abuse from semi-professionals and their friends as any teacher living, but claims that such attacks are a powerful stimulant to an ambitious man, and thinks that people who have been governed by ghost stories circulated against him, have suffered more damage than he himself.

Excerpt...

[ROCK CORRESPONDENT: “MAY.”]

Winfield Courier, August 16, 1883.

There will be an addition built to the Rock schoolhouse.

Excerpts...

[PRAIRIE HOME CORRESPONDENT: “C. HOPE.”]

Winfield Courier, August 16, 1883.

Prof. Thomas will hereafter meet his singing class on Saturday evening.

School district 39 levied a tax of 1/4 percent at their annual meeting towards furnishing a district library; also, voted to dig a well. Perhaps they will see the necessity of putting out trees while they are trying to improve the condition of things.


The Prairie Home schoolhouse was filled to overflowing the day of the basket meeting. The services of the Baptist brethren were interesting. That church is well represented here, having a membership of over twenty persons. The M. E. Church has also an organization of ten members. Their minister, however, has failed to put in an appearance this year. The reason is probably best known to himself. C. HOPE.

Winfield Courier, August 16, 1883.

Gene Wilber, accompanied by his wife and daughter, leave for a visit among friends in Illinois soon. Miss Wilber will remain in Bloomington and attend school during the coming year.

Winfield Courier, August 16, 1883.

                                                        Republican Primaries.

The Dexter primary will be held on Thursday, August 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m., the time recommended by committee.

The Pleasant Valley Republican Primary will be held at Odessa schoolhouse at 2 o’clock on Thursday, August 30th. Z. B. Myers, Chairman.

The township committee of Rock Township has called the Republican Primary to meet at Rock schoolhouse on the afternoon of the 30th.

The Beaver Township Republican primary meeting will be held at the Beaver Center schoolhouse on Thursday, August 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m.

The Republican Township Committee of Vernon Township announce the Werden schoolhouse as the place for holding the primary meeting of the party in that township, and Thursday, August 30th at 2 o’clock p.m., as the time.

Notice. The Republican electors of Walnut Township will meet at the Island Park north of Winfield, on Thursday, August 30, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of electing 5 delegates to the County convention. John Mentch, Chairman of Central Committee.

Republican Primary Convention for Richland Township will be held at Summit school-house on the 30th day of August at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of selecting delegates to the County Convention on Sept. 1st, 1883. N. L. Larkin, Chairman of Committee.

The Republicans of Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday, August 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of electing five delegates to attend the County Convention at Winfield on Saturday, Sept. 1st, 1883. J. D. Guthrie, Chairman, Township Committee.

The Republicans of Silverdale Township will meet at Butterfield’s, the usual place of holding elections, on Thursday, August 30, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of selecting 4 delegates to attend the county Convention, and to select a member of the Central Committee. A full attendance is desired. L. J. Darnell, Chairman, Township Central Committee.

The Tisdale Republican primary will be held at the Tisdale schoolhouse, on Thursday, the 30th day of August, 1883, at half past two o’clock p.m., for the purpose of electing three delegates to attend the Republican Convention at Winfield, on the first day of September.

                                 By order of Committee, H. McKIBBEN, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, August 16, 1883.

Notice. There will be a meeting of the Republican voters of Otter township, held at Otter Creek schoolhouse on Thursday, August the 30th, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of electing delegates to attend the Republican County Convention to be held at Winfield, on Saturday, September 1st; also to elect a Township Central Committee.

                                     By order of Com., John Stockdale, Chairman.


Arkansas City Traveler, August 22, 1883.

                                                         Railroad Meeting.

There will be a meeting of the citizens of Bolton Township at the Bland schoolhouse on the evening of Monday, August 27, to consider the proposition of the Missouri, Winfield and Southwestern Railroad company, which company propose to build a road through Cowley County from the northeast line to a point on the territory line somewhere in Bolton Township.

Excerpt...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “ELIZA.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, August 22, 1883.

School in district No. 10 will commence about the first of October.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 22, 1883.

Railroad meeting at the Bland schoolhouse next Monday evening.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 22, 1883.

Mr. Ed. Farringer advertises in this issue to give music lessons. Read what he says.

MUSIC LESSONS. Persons wishing instruction on the Piano, Organ, Violin, or Cornet will please leave word at Mrs. Wm. Benedict’s, or address Ed. E. Farringer, Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 22, 1883.

NOTICE. The city schools will commence Monday morning, September 10, 1883. The A grades of the different departments will advance to the next room immediately above them. C. T. ATKINSON, Supt.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 22, 1883.

The Republicans of Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday, August 30, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of electing five delegates to attend the county convention at Winfield on Saturday, September 1, 1883.

                                  J. D. GUTHRIE, Chairman, Township Committee.

Excerpts...

[CORRESPONDENT: “NOVUS HOMO” - NORTHWEST CRESWELL.]

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.

District No. 6 is to have a new schoolhouse.

Mr. I. Maurer was re-elected Director at our school meeting.

The school board has employed Mr. Topping as teacher at $45 per month.

Excerpt...

[CORRESPONDENT: “H. H. H.” - POLO.]

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.

Last Sunday the temperance people of Richland met at the Summit Schoolhouse for the purpose of pushing on the good work, and behold we were greeted by our worthy County Superintendent, Mr. Limerick. Mr. Limerick, after being introduced by Capt. A. Stuber, addressed the audience with an accomplished speech, followed by Capt. A. Stuber, President of the association. A general invitation was extended to all to help in the temperance cause.

Excerpts...

[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: “W.”]

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.


Candidates for nomination to the various county offices are not like angels’ visits, but their smiling faces are very pleasant to behold, and one feels certain that the last one is the right man. Poor fellows! You cannot all succeed, and yet the people wish you well.

The Democrats held their primary in the schoolhouse here last Saturday. A small turn  out, but enough probably to get delegates. A screech owl was found in the schoolhouse next morning, and the words, “The democrats are bound to take this country,” was found written on the blackboard. Do you think the presence of the owl accounted for the wisdom of the above statement?

[PICNIC NEAR COBURN’S SCHOOLHOUSE.]

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.

EDS. COURIER: I feel it a duty to tell you about a Sabbath school picnic held at a grove near Coburn’s schoolhouse, Silverdale Township, on the 18th inst. Between three and four hundred persons were assembled and the occasion was a success. A little after 11 o’clock the organ accompanied by a splendid choir made the grove resound with their beautiful music. Bro. Phillips offered a prayer. The president then introduced Rev. Fleming, of Arkansas City. His address was one of power, full of thought, and everyone felt they had listened to an orator. Then came dinner, such a dinner as makes one glad to look upon and trebly glad to partake of. Silverdale Township proved to every visitor that they not only had a plenty of the good things of this world, but that they knew how to prepare them with a cordial hospitality. After a musical concert Rev. Henderson, of Illinois, was introduced, and when he was through with his address, we felt we could justly say we had listened in one day to two of the most appropriate addresses we had ever heard on such an occasion. There never was a more unanimous effort to please and make the occasion a happy and profitable one, and the good people of Silverdale succeeded. S.

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.

Prof. and Mrs. E. T. Trimble will remove about the first of September, to Colfax, Washington Territory, where they will make their future home. For the last five years Mr. and Mrs. Trimble have been closely connected with the moral and intellectual welfare of our city and will be very regretfully parted with. Through the labors of the Professor, our public schools have become the equal of any in the state, now advancing graduates sufficiently in the classes to admit them to the State University proper without the preparatory course. Materially and socially they have taken an active part, always zealous in the upbuilding of everything for the advancement of the community. We wish them success and happiness in their new home, and can assure the people of Colfax that in Mr. and Mrs. Trimble they will find persons worthy of esteem and confidence. The Professor takes the Principalship of the Baptist Academy of Washington Territory, which is situated at Colfax.

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.


We had the pleasure of attending a moonlight festival at the residence of A. J. Yoeman, in Vernon Township, Thursday evening. Mr. Yoeman’s place is one of the best in the country. His house is large and commodious, surrounded by beautiful shade trees, orchards, and out-buildings. The tables were set out under the trees, and the throng of handsome ladies moving under the moonlight and many-colored Chinese lanterns presented a most attractive scene. The net returns were about fifty dollars, which is to be used in the purchase of an organ for the public school. Altogether it was one of the most pleasant of Vernon’s many neighborhood gatherings—and Vernon leads the county in this respect. To Mr. and Mrs. Yoeman and their accomplished daughters, Misses May and Emma, the company is especially indebted for many kind attentions.

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.

Rev. J. Cairns went up to Udall last Saturday to organize a Baptist Church, which he did, and preached for them twice on Sunday. He reports excellent congregations, intelligent and attentive, with a first-class union Sunday school, Mr. Smith, superintendent. There is a Congregational, Methodist, and now a Baptist Church organized there. The Congregationalists are about to build a meeting house. The Baptists have bought the old schoolhouse to meet in for the present and will enlarge it. Udall is growing fast and business is good. Many of Winfield’s former patrons are now going there. It will be to the interests of Winfield to look after her laurels.

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.

On next Thursday Misses Rose and Ella Rounds will start for the State University, at Lawrence, where they expect to enter and take a thorough course. Miss Rose is a graduate of our public school and last winter filled a position in the same as teacher. they are both young ladies of substantiality and sterling qualities and have the ambition and ability to make this step successful.

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.

MARRIED. Married in Florence, Kansas, August 18th, 1883, by Rev. E. P. Foster, Mr. Mac. C. Klingman, of Topeka, and Miss Ina T. Sweet, of Canon City, Colorado.

McClellan is well known in this city, being an old resident and having graduated in 1880 from our High School. Where here not long ago, he breathed no intention of committing this matrimonial deed, and it will therefore surprise his friends. “Mac” is a young man of ability and good judgment and, though unacquainted with the bride, we are satisfied that his selection has been a good one. He being a member of the noble band of printers and having assisted on the COURIER at different times, all can join heartily in extending congratulations and good wishes.

Winfield Courier, August 23, 1883.

To Teachers. An examination of applicants for teachers’ certificates will be held at the High School building, Winfield, beginning at 8 o’clock a.m., August 31, 1883. Applicants will please appear promptly at that time. A. H. Limerick, County Superintendent.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 29, 1883.

Bonds were voted yesterday in enlarged school district No. 59 to the amount of $1,000 for the erection of a new schoolhouse. This district embraces the northeast corner of Creswell and a portion of Pleasant Valley township.

Excerpts...

[NORTH CRESWELL CORRESPONDENT: “BOOZE.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 29, 1883.

By telephone we receive the following items from the ragged edge of Creswell and Pleasant Valley Townships.


“Monkey Hill” is no more. We are told that its funeral was tolled at Mr. Tolles’ place a few days ago, where a meeting of school district 59 was held, and located the site for the schoolhouse in “Possum Hollow.”  This district has been “Wrighted” up considerably lately.

Superintendent Limerick came down, and caused the district to “come down to Limerick.”  Its territory has been enlarged: receiving a Blessing, a Toombs (who is in disguise), and several others. Yesterday bonds were voted to build a new schoolhouse. The old building will be sold to relic hunters to make into cases, etc.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 29, 1883.

Bolton Township Attention. There will be a meeting of citizens of East and West Bolton Township held as follows: On Tuesday evening, September 4, 1883, at Stony Point school-house, and on Wednesday, September 5, at the Theaker schoolhouse, to take into consideration the proposed action with reference to its indebtedness. All are earnestly invited to be present. P. A. LORRY, Trustee.

Excerpts...

[AKRON CORRESPONDENT: “AUDUBON.”]

Winfield Courier, August 30, 1883.

Health is unusually good considering the season of the year.

The school board of Valley Center has secured Miss Barnes [Baines?] as teacher this winter.

Singing school every Sabbath afternoon at the schoolhouse, for the benefit of the M. E. Sabbath school.

Winfield Courier, August 30, 1883.

Mrs. Garlick’s Kindergarten school commences again Sept. 3rd.

Winfield Courier, August 30, 1883.

                                                              Kindergarten.

Mrs. Garlick will open her Kindergarten school again on Monday, September 3rd, with prices of tuition the same as formerly. She has discovered a superb modeling clay in this vicinity and will commence teaching modeling in clay, which will be a new and very interesting feature. It is very gratifying to note the pleasure and enthusiasm of the little pupils of this school, to see their happy faces and bright smiles. The school is our best institution, very valuable to the pupils, and deserves encouragement.

Winfield Courier, August 30, 1883.

The Beaver Center Sunday School has bought a superb Mason & Hamlin chapel organ of the agent, M. J. Stimson. Mr. Smith, of Udall, has also bought a Mason & Hamlin organ. Mr. Stimson has a large stock of Mason & Hamlin organs, sheet music, music books, and small instruments; in fact, everything wanted in the music line.

Excerpt...

[PRAIRIE HOME CORRESPONDENT: “CHARITY.”]

Winfield Courier, August 30, 1883.

The well at  Prairie Home schoolhouse is completed; it is now ready for rope and bucket.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 5, 1883.

Mr. and Mrs. Stacy Matlack returned to the city from their eastern trip last Wednesday. They were accompanied by Miss Walton, a sister of Mrs. Matlack, who has accepted a position as teacher in our high school.


Excerpt...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “ELIZA.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, September 5, 1883.

Last Friday evening a number of folks of all ages gathered at the residence of Mr. Anderson to give Elihu Anderson a farewell party, as he starts to Manhattan to attend school. A pleasant time was had, and all wished Elihu as pleasant a time this winter as they enjoyed that night. September 3, 1883. ELIZA.

Excerpt...

[CORRESPONDENT “W.” - TANNEHILL.]

Winfield Courier, September 6, 1883.

Rev. Mr. Whitson preached an interesting discourse at the schoolhouse Lord’s day morning.

[MUSICAL CONCERT: PROF. FARRINGER & MRS. GARLICK.]

Winfield Courier, September 6, 1883.

A musical concert will be given at the Baptist Church this Thursday evening under the management of Prof. Farringer, who has engaged the best talent to be had to assist him. It will be interspersed with exercises by the children of the Kindergarten school, conducted by Mrs. Garlick, who will also explain the Kindergarten mode of instruction. The proceeds to go toward purchasing a bell for the church. Doors open at 7-1/2 o’clock; exercises to commence at 8 sharp. Admission: adults, 25 cents; children under 11, 10 cents. This is the concert of the season. Don’t fail to be present and aid a worthy cause.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 12, 1883.

Read the bids for supplying school district No. 2 with cord wood in this issue.

Ad. PROPOSALS FOR WOOD. Bids will be received at the office of the clerk of school district No. 2 for 40 cords of hard wood. Wood to be cut in two foot lengths and half to be dry. Bids will be opened September 17. By order of the Board. FRANK J. HESS, Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 12, 1883.

Owing to sickness in the family of C. T. Atkinson, the public schools of this place will not open till next Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 12, 1883.

Miss Fowler will commence her next term of private school on Monday, September 17, 1883, in the building south of H. P. Farrar’s residence. Terms $2 per month.

Excerpt...

[ODESSA CORRESPONDENT: “M. S.”]

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

The shout of the merry boys and girls will soon be heard again as the school vacation will soon be over. Odessa is still undecided for a teacher yet, still there have been several applications.

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

                                                        Our District Schools.

From the records of County Superintendent Limerick, we get the following information regarding the length of the winter terms of our district schools and the teachers who teach them.


Nannie A. Crum will shoot the young ideas in district 88 for 20 weeks from Oct. 1st.

Mrs. F. E. Craven advances the rising statesmen of District 113 to the extent of a 24 weeks term, beginning Sept. 17th.

Miss Hattie Andrews, of this city, has contracted to teach a term of 16 weeks in district 114, beginning on Nov. 10th.

The bright Republican youths of district 19, Queen Village, will have H. S. Wallace as their teacher for five months after Nov. 1st.

Laura Phelps will instill true American principles and learning into the youngsters of District 110 for 16 weeks from Sept. 30.

For 24 weeks after Sept. 17th, the school in district 125 will be taught by Annie F. Barnes, of Winfield.

Jennie Pollock will care for the intellectual welfare of the pupils in district 42 for a term of 20 weeks after Oct. 13.

District 105 also has a 20 weeks’ term conducted by Carrie A. Plunkett, commencing Oct. 8th.

Cyrus Perkins trains the rising generation of district 80 for 24 weeks after Oct. 13.

The future statesmen of district 14 will be taught to “speak” for a period of 24 weeks, after Oct. 13, by Emma L. McKee.

The future “agitators” of district 61 will receive instruction from Emma Rhodes for 20 weeks from October 15.

We hope a few Republicans will be turned out of district 134 by A. L. Primrose, who has engaged the school for 16 weeks from October 1st.

Peter A. Alderson will manage the busy youngsters of district 30 for 20 weeks after October 1st.

The rising congressmen of district 55 will be taught for 36 weeks from Sept. 10 by W. H. Lucas.

The little Democrats of district 45 will be shown the errors of their papas’ ways during the 28 weeks after Oct. 18, by A. P. Fuller.

S. L. Herriott will advance the pretty little girls and boys of district 68 for the 24 weeks following Sept. 17.

District No. 10 has secured B. F. Myers to teach them a 24 weeks’ term, commencing on Oct. 1st.

J. R. Smith will assist the youths of district 62 in rising up to be an honor to their country during the 20 weeks succeeding Sept. 10th.

The coming politicians and woman suffragists of district 31 will be reared by Anna D. Martin for 24 weeks from Oct. 1st.

Jas. E. Ford will culture the young ideas of district 48 during the 20 weeks following Oct. 1st.

District 53 has a 24 weeks’ term of school presided over by C. F. Cunningham, to commence Oct. 1st.

The would-be dudes and dudesses of district 50 will soon learn the errors of the pattern under Jas. H. Hutchinson for 28 weeks succeeding Oct. 1st.


The pretty girls and brave boys of district 95 will be “shaped” during the 24 weeks following Sept. 20th by Grant Wilkins.

Ella Kempton will assist the young of dist. 10 in the road to usefulness during a term of 16 weeks from Oct. 1st.

Hattie Daniels manipulates the festive school pupils in district 91 for the 8 weeks succeeding Sept. 30.

Some bright thoughts will be developed by Chas. Messenger while teaching the 4 months term of district 76 which commences Sept. 17.

Maggie Kinney, of Winfield, teaches a 24 weeks school in dist. 38, beginning Sept. 10th.

For the 24 weeks succeeding Oct. 1st, W. P. Beaumont will have charge of the school in district 41.

Will C. Barnes, of this city, will govern his first Kansas youths in dist. 15 for a term of 32 weeks after Oct. 1st.

The school books of dist. 20 will be rigidly perused by the pupils for their term of 22 weeks beginning on Oct. 1st under the watchful eye of S. W. Norton.

We anticipate the instilling of good Republican virtues into the minds of the children of District 65, during the twenty-four weeks’ term of P. L. Shaffer, which commences on September 19th.

Laura Elliott will keep in check and teach the youth of District 75, for a term of twenty-eight weeks after September 17th.

The reins of school government in District 133, for the sixteen weeks following November 5th, will be held by Miss Anna McClung.

That “knowledge is a useful thing” will be shown in District 39, by D. W. Ramage during his term of thirty-six weeks, which commenced September 3rd.

The youths in District No. 1 will be shown the path to usefulness by Miss Leota Gary, of this city, for a nine months’ term, commencing October 1st.

Claude Rinker, one of Winfield’s substantial young men, teaches a sixteen weeks’ school in District 29, beginning on October 3rd.

Book-learning will be administered to the lads and lasses of District No. 2 for the thirty-six weeks after September 10th, by Annie L. Norton.

District 46 will be presided over by F. P. Vaughan, Jr., for a twenty-eight weeks’ school, commencing October 1st.

Frank A. Chapin will advance, intellectually and otherwise, the young of District 43, during the twenty-four weeks following October 1st.

Among the above list we notice but few who will receive less than forty dollars per month.

Some of the districts commence a little late, but a majority of them will be in full blast before October 5th.

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

WINFIELD KINDERGARTEN. MRS. E. D. GARLICK, Kindergartner. All the apparatus and appliances found in a first-class Kindergarten. Terms, $3.00 per month for single pupils or $5.00 where there are two pupils from the same family.

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

The public schools of this city open on the 17th inst.


Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

The public schools of the county are generally getting in running order this month.

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

At the teachers’ examination in this city last week, thirty-one applicants passed and received certificates.

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

Every school book in use in this county for sale at publishers prices by Henry Goldsmith, the Post Office Bookseller.

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

An ice cream festival for the benefit of the Presbyterian Church, will be held on Tuesday evening, September 18th, in the new schoolhouse at New Salem. All are invited. By order of committee.

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

The school board has decided, on account of lack of room, to adopt the half-day system in our public schools this winter with pupils from five to seven years of age—part attending in the forenoon and part in the afternoon. Winfield has an immense number of children of this age and it would be impossible to afford them all proper advantages without this system.

Winfield Courier, September 13, 1883.

Hunnewell, that home of the cowboy, advertises for a school teacher; not one of  those delicate youths fresh from an Eastern college, and only waiting around for a call to the chief editorship of one of the big dailies, but a stalwart, broad-shouldered, big-handed man, who can knock down a bullock or shoot the eye-lashes off a fly at ten paces. They offer big wages and a life-insurance premium to one who can manage the school. The Texas steer can’t be having a very civilizing effect on the youth of Hunnewell.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 19, 1883.

Our school bell was heard for the first time this term on Monday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 19, 1883.

We are requested to state that Prof. Atkinson will arrive in the city next Friday, and his class in the high school will commence Monday next without fail.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 19, 1883.

Our old time friend and former principal of our schools, Mr. C. H. Sylvester, surprised his many friends by unexpectedly putting in an appearance last Saturday. The gentleman has been excurting in New Mexico for the past month, and takes in Arkansas City on his return home. We are pleased to see him looking so well, and also to hear that he is prospering in every way, as why shouldn’t he?—virtue being its own reward.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 19, 1883.

Professor Ed. C. Farringer, of Winfield, is meeting with quite flattering success in our city as a music teacher, having a sufficient number of pupils for the piano and organ to necessitate his spending four days of each week in the city. The professor is a first-class musician, and we are pleased to chronicle his success.

Excerpts...

[PRAIRIE HOME CORRESPONDENT: “C. HOPE.”]

Winfield Courier, September 20, 1883.


Mr. Lucas has moved, house and all, to the little burg of New Salem, and is teaching a second term of school at that place.

D. W. Ramage began school in District No. 39, last Monday, for a term of nine months, being a second term in the same place.

Lydia Gardner will not attend school in Winfield this winter, but will take the benefit of the pure air of the country for the present.

Miss Ettie Johnson has gone to Lawrence, to complete her education in that highly favored city. Her sister, Alice, has gone to Topeka, I believe.

Let every man and his girl come out to singing-school next Saturday night, as our school will soon be numbered with the things that were.

Thornton and Annie Baker, also Lizzie Lawson, will leave their country home soon and try city life and the Winfield High School for the next eight months.

Annie Lawson is again at home, and will start to school as soon as she recovers from the chills. She was accompanied by her aunt, who came on a short visit to Mrs. Sparrow’s.

New blinds on the schoolhouse windows, and new pump at the well. Oh dear! don’t we put on style, though. Just wait till we get our new library, and then come and see us enjoying ourselves.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, September 20, 1883.

Our young friends, Mr. W. M. Christopher and his sister, Miss May, are attending college in Iowa, or went there for that purpose.

Teachers are engaged for the Salem schools. At the new schoolhouse Mr. Wm. Lucas will be principal and Miss Davenport, assistant; while at the Old Salem schoolhouse Mr. Roberts will instruct the young ideas and keep them in proper bounds.

The Misses Johnsons left this week—Miss Ettie to attend the University at Lawrence, and Miss Alice to enjoy looking at the pretty sights and articles at the State Fair in Topeka. Miss Ettie intends to stay two months, and her many friends in Salem will miss her pleasant face, and it seems she can scarcely be spared so long a time. We are glad, indeed, to see young people digging up treasures from knowledge’s inexhaustible mine, but may they all come home to the friends that miss them ere long.

[TEACHERS.]

Winfield Courier, September 20, 1883.

There are one hundred and thirty teachers now holding certificates in this county, not quite enough to supply the one hundred and thirty-nine school districts.

Winfield Courier, September 20, 1883.

Mrs. J. W. Johnson, her son and little daughter, are again at home after a three months’ sojourn in Toronto, Ontario. Miss Ida remains to attend school there this winter. She is a favorite with our young folks and will be greatly missed from the social circle.

Winfield Courier, September 20, 1883.


The Central division of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association holds its first meeting on Sept. 28th and 29th at the High School building in this city. Their program consists of music, essay, recitations, address, and general discussion of the different methods of school government. The opportunity thus afforded the teachers of mingling together socially and exchanging their different views on this question will no doubt be very beneficial to our public schools. The Dexter Division of the Association meets next Friday and Saturday at Dexter.

Winfield Courier, September 20, 1883.

The School Board last week allowed Miss Ella Kelly to withdraw her contract as assistant principal in our city schools, and she accepted the principalship of the Douglass schools. She receives from Douglass a salary of seventy dollars per month, and an increase in wages is the cause of this change. We regret very much to lose Miss Kelly, for we consider her one of the brightest and most energetic young ladies in this county. Her abilities as a teacher are receiving merited recognition.

Winfield Courier, September 20, 1883.

Miss Alice Dickie, teacher of the grammar department in our city schools, returned last week from a three weeks’ visit with Grenola friends.

Winfield Courier, September 20, 1883.

M. E. Quarterly Meeting for New Salem Circuit at South Fairview schoolhouse, Sept. 23 and 24, 1883. A full attendance of the official members desired.

Rev. Thomas Audis, P. E., Geo. W. Lacey, preacher in charge.

Winfield Courier, September 20, 1883.

                                                           Our City Schools.

The public schools of this city opened for the fall and winter term on Monday last, with good attendance. Under the principalship of Prof. A. Gridley, with Miss Caro Meach in charge of the high school and the following excellent corps of teachers in the other departments, our schools start off very auspiciously and promise good results for this year.

East Ward: Second grammar room, Mis L. C. Barnes; first grammar, Miss Lois Williams; second intermediate, Miss Alice Dickie; first intermediate, Miss Mattie Berry; second primary, Miss Lena Bartlett; first primary, Miss Mamie Garlick.

West Ward: Second intermediate, Miss Allie Klingman; first intermediate, Miss A. Aldrich; second primary, Miss Elma Crippen; first primary, Miss M. E. Hamill.

The teachers are all experienced, are going to work zealously, and will do their part toward making the schools a success.

The parents should also do all they can to promote the best interests of the schools.

A word of commendation and encouragement is easily spoken and will always be of benefit to the teachers and pupils. Visit the schools, see how they are managed, and show that you take an interest in the proper education of your children. It will be appreciated by the instructors, and you will then be better able to understand any complaints that the children may make.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 26, 1883.

                                               Board of County Commissioners.

The following order of business was adopted by the board of county commissioners at their July meeting of 1883, by which all their future regular meetings will be governed, and persons having business to bring before the board will appear on the day set apart for the transaction of such business as they may have for consideration.


First day: Legal claims.

Second day: Road petitions in order as filed.

Third day: School matters.

Fourth day: Tax matters.

Fifth day: Miscellaneous matters.

                                J. S. HUNT, County Clerk and Clerk of said Board.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 26, 1883.

The central division of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association holds its first meeting on September 28 and 29, at the high school building in Winfield. Their programme consists of music, essays, recitations, address, and general discussion of the different methods of school government. The Dexter division of the association meets next Friday and Saturday at Dexter.

Excerpts...

[AKRON CORRESPONDENT: “ZEBIDEE.”]

Winfield Courier, September 27, 1883.

Steps have been taken by the way of organizing a singing school, with Mr. Hittle as teacher. A good institution.

The school board of Valley Center has improved the looks of the schoolhouse in the way of a new porch.

Winfield Courier, September 27, 1883.

The Misses Hooker, of Polo, this county, are attending the Winfield High School.

Winfield Courier, September 27, 1883.

Teachers Association. The Northwestern division of the Cowley County Teachers association holds its first meeting Oct. 6th, at the Rock schoolhouse. Let the teachers of this division be in attendance and make their first association a success.

Excerpts...

[DEXTER CORRESPONDENT: “GRANGER.”]

Winfield Courier, September 27, 1883.

Miss Waldsmith is soon to leave us for a seminary in Missouri. She goes to finish her education and will be much missed in our small town.

A festival was held at Fairview schoolhouse on Saturday evening. The night was lovely, everybody brought a basketful of eatables, and all was joy.

The pupils and people of Dexter welcome Miss Vaught back to the school room. She will be assisted by Miss Davis of Tisdale. Both are experienced teachers and we feel assured of a good school.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 3, 1883.

Miss Fannie Skinner, teacher at the Otoe school, spent last Sunday in the city visiting friends and returned to her scholastic duties the following day.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 3, 1883.

                                                         Notice to Teachers.


The southwestern division of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association will be held at the High school building in this city, commencing on Friday evening, October 13, and closing the following day at 12 o’clock noon. All wishing to attend from the country will please notify Miss Albertine Maxwell, vice president of the association, so that arrangements can be made for their entertainment. The full programme will be published next week.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 3, 1883.

Political Meeting. T. H. Soward and other speakers will address the voters of Silverdale Township at the Silverdale schoolhouse on Monday evening, October 8, 1883, at 7:30 o’clock. This is the opening speech of the campaign. Voters come out and bring your wives

and children. L. J. DARNELL, Chairman, Township Central Committee.

Winfield Courier, October 4, 1883.

School district 98, in Maple Township, is building a substantial new schoolhouse, 22 x 28 feet in size.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, October 4, 1883.

Mr. Edward Christopher attended the State Fair and was taken down sick at his grandfather’s. He was improving at last accounts. I do not know if he is home yet or not. Mr. W. M. Christopher was also sick in Iowa, and if not home yet will soon be, or as soon as he can travel. Misfortunes never come singly, it seems. That the boys may soon return to their Salem home and enjoy good health is the wish of their many friends. Their sister, Miss May, will teach the Moscow school this winter.

The Sunday school at the old Salem schoolhouse was not very fully attended on Sunday last; but a new corps of officers was elected, as follows: For superintendent, Mr. Wm. Starr; assistant, Mr. Shields; secretary, Miss Etna Dalgarn; treasurer, Mr. W. B. Hoyland; librarian, Miss Mary Dalgarn. Teachers will be chosen next Sunday by the classes. Let us all attend and make the Sunday school a success. OLIVIA.

Excerpt...

[PRAIRIE HOME CORRESPONDENT: “CHARITY.”]

Winfield Courier, October 4, 1883.

Mr. Thomas closed his term of singing Saturday night. Mr. Thomas is a successful teacher, and his labors were highly appreciated by his class.

Excerpt...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “ELIZA.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 10, 1883.

School began last Monday with F. B. Myers as teacher.

[SCHOOL REPORT.]

Winfield Courier, October 11, 1883.

                                                     Report of District No. 65.

The report of the school in district 65, Cowley County, for the month beginning September 16th, 1883, and ending October 5th, is as follows.

Number of days taught, 20; number enrolled this month, 40; number days attendance, 587; average daily attendance, 30; number neither absent nor tardy, 10.

Names of those neither absent nor tardy: Morgan Wood, Hattie Clark, Lee Marsh, Walter Strange, Lillie Wood, Laura Graves, Eddie Wood, Louie Clark, Nannie Strange, James Albert. T. L. SHAFFER, Teacher.


Winfield Courier, October 18, 1883.

                                                                  ROCK.

On Saturday, Oct. 6th, the most successful meeting of the Northwestern Division of the Teachers’ Association ever held, took place at Rock schoolhouse. Certainly anyone who doubted the utility of such a meeting or the ability of the teachers in this part of the county to give the whys and wherefores of their different methods of teaching the studies that came up for discussion would have had all doubts cleared away had they been present. Miss Lida Strong, vice president of the Central Association, called the meeting to order and the appointment of officers was proceeded with. Messrs. Corson and Ellis were at once placed in the field as the representatives of two parties for the presidency. If excitement is what such assemblies live on, the Association might have bottled up enough during the next few minutes to last a year. The contest was short, sharp, decisive; the ballot box giving Mr. Corson a majority of one. The newly elected president, who was cheered heartily by all parties, took the chair and called for nominations for vice president. Miss Lida Strong was unanimously elected to this office, and after another hard struggle that brought out the latent powers of the two parties as canvassers, Mr. Ellis was elected to the secretaryship. The subjects arranged for discussion were then taken up, and so many different methods, hints, and suggestions were offered to effect the successful teaching of the studies under discussion that the oldest and most experienced teacher could not fail to learn something, and the more inexperienced were enabled to pick up hundreds of little improvements on their own methods. In the afternoon the numbers of the Association were largely increased and the discussion continued till 4 p.m., when the Society adjourned, after making arrangements to meet at Udall for the next regular meeting, and to have a public entertainment on the evening preceding the Teachers’ Meeting. P. ELLIS, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1883.

                                                                  OTTO.

The teachers of the Southeastern Division met at Maple City Saturday, October 6th, at 10 a.m., according to program. By the assistance of Prof. A. H. Limerick, who was present and went enthusiastically into the work, the occasion was made both pleasant and profitable to all present. The teachers seemed to enjoy the meeting hugely. The session ended after three hours of very animated discussion which seemed to be brightened ten-fold by the wonderful magnetic power, executive ability, and skill continually displayed by Prof. Limerick during the entire discussion of the various subjects handled by those present. The citizen ladies were very much pleased with the free, affable courtesy and social qualities manifested by Mrs. Limerick, who was present with her husband; and highly entertained by her during the time allotted to general converse. We hope she will call around this way often. Among the teacher celebrities present, was Mr. ____, recently of Normal, Illinois, who has in view the Maple City school. The few teachers who were not present missed a rare treat.

                                              S. F. OVERMAN, Vice President.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1883.


The old “Pleasant Hill” schoolhouse has traveled from its old quarters to the village of Salem, and is used as a crib or granary. It was recently bought by Mr. J. J. Johnson.

Our Sunday School came out with flying colors last Sunday and we had a very interesting session. Teachers were chosen for the classes as follows: Bible class, or rather 1st class, males, Tirzah Hoyland; teacher 2nd class, females, Mr. S. Edgar; 3rd class, mixed youths and misses, Miss Mary Dalgarn; 4th class, Mrs. Edgar. There is a very interesting Sunday School at the new schoolhouse, I understand, and I intend to visit it some time.

Excerpt...

[AKRON CORRESPONDENT: “ZEBIDEE.”]

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1883.

Akron School is progressing finely under the management of Mr. Warren of Arkansas City.

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1883.

Rev. W. H. Rose, of Douglass, informs us that the public schools of that place have made a successful beginning under the superintendency of Miss Ella Kelly, of Winfield.

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1883.

                                              Division of the City School District.

It was decided by the Board of Education of the city of Winfield at their last meeting that the boundary line dividing the city school district as to the first primary and the first and second intermediate departments be as follows.

Commencing at the north end of Millington Street and run south (including both sides of said street) to Eleventh Avenue, thence east along the south side of  Eleventh Street to Fuller Street, thence south along the west side of Fuller Street to the south line of the district. All pupils that are in the above named departments living east of the line designated are to attend the east ward school, and those living west of this line to attend the west ward school.

The action of the Board as above indicated was necessitated from the crowded condition of the above named departments. As will be seen by reference to the monthly report in another column, the First Primary and the First Intermediate departments in the East ward were full to overflowing, and in justice to the teacher and pupils it was decided to make the transfer specified in the above resolution.

Excerpt...

[PRAIRIE HOME CORRESPONDENT: “C. H.”]

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1883.

Grange meetings are on the programme again, but this time will be held in the new schoolhouse, Worthy Master J. J. Johnson presiding. Grangers, awaken! Renew your strength and accomplish all you used to think you could if the railroad was only here. There is a good chance now to exhibit your business qualifications to the world.

Winfield Courier, October 18, 1883.

For sale. At Berkeys, South Main street, you will find a No. 1 organ, second hand, 2 large coal or wood heaters, suitable for schoolhouse or church. They are nearly new and will sell at a bargain.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 24, 1883.


There will be a Republican speaking at the Bland schoolhouse in Bolton Township, on Monday evening, Oct. 29, at 7:30 o’clock p.m. Come out and hear a good speaking. Bring your ladies with you. J. D. GUTHRIE, Chairman, Township Committee.

Excerpt...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT. NAME NOT GIVEN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 24, 1883.

Our school is progressing finely.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 24, 1883.

The very lively interest felt in the teachers’ association by some of Winfield’s fair teachers is inspiring to say the least.

Winfield Courier, October 25, 1883.

Teachers’ Examination. An examination of applicants for teachers’ certificates will be held at the High School building, Winfield, beginning at 8 o’clock a.m., November 3rd, 1883. Applicants will please appear promptly at that time.

                                       A. H. LIMERICK, County Superintendent.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1883.

MARRIED. Our rising young lawyer, Mr. C. L. Swarts, is expected home this week, and will bring with him Mrs. C. L. Swarts, nee Miss Susie Hunt. Cal. has journeyed far into the Lone Star state for his favored bride, who was formerly a teacher in the schools of this city, and is well known in our society circles. May they be spared to each other for many years of wedded happiness.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1883.

                                                       Teachers’ Association.

The Teachers’ Association of the southwestern division will meet at the High school building in Arkansas City, Saturday, November 10, at 9 o’clock a.m. The following programme will be given.

Course of Study: Miss Ramage.

The Use of the Globe and Maps: Cyrus Perkins.

How to Teach History: Miss Albertine Maxwell.

The Adaptation of Methods to the Development of Mind: Mr. Phillips.

Libraries—How to Organize and How to Use: Miss Annie Norton.

Song: Miss Mary Johnson.

                             VIRGINIA WALTON, MARY THEAKER, Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1883.

                                                            School Matters.


Ever since the opening of our schools, their crowded condition has constantly presented to our directors the necessity of more room and more teachers. Prof. Atkinson’s and Miss Norton’s departments have been crowded to such an extent as to make it impossible to do justice to the pupils. The board have now taken steps to remedy this evil by employing another teacher and will rearrange the interior of the large school building so as to greatly facilitate the work. Miss Anna Hunt, of Winfield, has been engaged as Prof. Atkinson’s assistant, and as soon as the seats arrive and the necessary arrangements are completed, she will enter upon her new field of work, which the board hopes to accomplish in a week or ten days. Miss Hunt holds an A grade certificate, has had valuable experience in her chosen work, and is in every way fitted to prove the wisdom of the school board’s action in securing her services. Wishing her success in her new field, we congratulate the board on this step, which augurs well for the growing youth of our city.

[SCHOOL BUILDING, BOARD.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1883.

Mr. Hess, of the school board, informs us that very material changes are soon to be made in the arrangements of our school building, by which the inconvenience resulting from the over crowded condition of the school will be greatly lessened. Mr. Hess is proving himself a most earnest worker on behalf of our schools, and is setting an example worthy of emulation—by the principal as well as others. If school boards made a more general practice of looking into the workings of the school and seeing to it that their wishes received due attention, it is fair to infer that better satisfaction would be given by the principals.

Winfield Courier, November 1, 1883.

                                                        Dexter’s Political Pot.

Dexter has once more taken up the line of march. It makes the citizens of Dexter and vicinity feel good to see the way the busy workmen are rearing up the many substantial buildings that add so much to the appearance of our little village. We welcome the strangers to stay with us and help us to improve and build here in the Grouse Valley, a flourishing town.

Now that the election is drawing near, candidates are becoming numerous. Last Friday and Saturday we were honored with about all the lofty politicians of the day. First came J. B. Lynn, Democratic candidate for Treasurer, who did his electioneering in a quiet way among his friends. Then on Saturday came the squad of Republican candidates, arriving early, to hold a Republican rally as per advertisement. Though the weather was very unfavorable, they were not without a splendid audience; for at half past seven o’clock when the ring of the bell and music of our excellent band told the citizens that there was something rich for them at the schoolhouse that night, the masses poured into the house in a short time, would have told a stranger that there was a wide awake set of Republicans there and that some good speeches were anticipated. The meeting being called to order by H. C. McDorman, Chairman T. H. Soward was introduced and spoke for an hour and a half, making an able and eloquent speech, which was alike interesting to all classes and parties.

Our old friend, Booth, from Rock Township, then attempted a reply and in his comical way, gave the boys plenty of fun, and during his remarks gave the audience some instructions as to the way the knowing ones in Winfield get their drinks, since prohibition closed the saloons.

The band then struck up one of their favorite national tunes, and everyone seemed to enjoy themselves and to leave well satisfied with their entertainment. J. B. Nipp and George McIntire each in a short speech asked the votes of the people, and Capt. Siverd followed in a humorous speech making some good points and plenty of fun. In short, everything done seemed the right thing for the occasion, and all the Republicans went home feeling that on the 6th of November next, Dexter Township would roll up a good round majority for every candidate on the Republican ticket. A. REPUBLICAN.

Winfield Courier, November 1, 1883.

                                                         Grand Prairie News.


This part of the “Garden” is seldom represented in your worthy paper, therefore we come to claim space to let your many readers know of our existence. Grand Prairie is the northwest corner district in Cowley County. Though we are far from Winfield, the great Center, we have many things which should entitle us to the notice of the admirers of “Sunny Kansas.” We have as rich farms, as deep soil, as large orchards, as fine cattle, as fat hogs, as fast horses, as brave men, as pretty women, as big babies, and as good rabbit dogs as any district in the county. Our school this winter will register fifty (50) pupils. The crops here never were better nor the farmers in better spirits. New buildings are being built and more good men coming among us. If in the future we find space in your newsy columns, we will make you better acquainted with our people, but for this time we stop on account of our TIMIDITY.

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[BEAVER CORRESPONDENT: “R. E. PORTER.”]

Winfield Courier, November 1, 1883.

The Rev. Mr. Brown preached at Beaver Center Sunday evening. Subject: Immortality of the Soul.

Mr. Stimson will organize a singing class at this place if he gets the right sort of encouragement.

Some of our young bloods took in the Springs last Sunday. When they returned their conduct led us to think they had drunk something besides water. Young men should behave at meeting, and especially those that assume the role of teachers. R. E. PORTER.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 7, 1883.

Next week a telephone will be put in the Indian industrial school on the Shilocco, six miles south of this city; one in Landes & Beall’s mill, and one in their office; one in the schoolhouse, and one in A. J. Pyburn’s office. Quite an effort is being made to run a line to Ponca Agency, Indian Territory, which would result in the placing of three or four more instruments here and probably one at Willow Springs, the half-way station between this city and Ponca. Our businessmen thoroughly appreciate this convenience, and there is no town in the state, of the same size, which patronizes the telephone so liberally as does Arkansas City.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.

                                               WHAT THE TAXES ARE FOR.

In another column will be found the rates of taxation in this country and what for. The state tax levy is 4-1/2 mills. The county tax altogether amounts to 16-1/2 mills, of this 10 mills is for general purposes, 3 mills for sinking fund on old indebtedness of the county not railroads, 1 mill for interest on the same, 1-1/2 mills for county poor farm and only one mill for Railroad bond interest. The total state and county taxes are 21 mills. The heaviest tax is the school district, from 2 up to 33 mills, with five districts not taxed and a general average nearly equal to the total county tax. The township taxes are mostly light, but Creswell has 14 mills, Bolton 11, and Winfield City 7-1/2 to which must be added 6 mills for old Winfield township bonds and 5 mills on real estate for Carpenter judgment. The average total is about 33 mills.

Excerpts...

[PRAIRIE HOME CORRESPONDENT: “CHARITY.”]


Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.

The school in District 39 was visited by the Co. Supt., Prof. Limerick, one day last week.

W. P. Hackney and Supt. Limerick addressed the people of Tisdale Township at the New Salem schoolhouse Friday evening, November 2nd. Olivia, am I trespassing? (We get our mail at New Salem.)

Excerpt...

[SEDAN CORRESPONDENT: “JASPER.”]

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.

The Sedan schools are progressing finely under the direction of Prof. Woodward. And we challenge any city in the state to produce a finer lot of girls and boys to the population than this same progressive burg. With our small girls, school ma’ams, old maids, and grass widows, we could not advise New England girls to immigrate with a view to teaching school or getting married.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.

Minutes of the Second Meeting of the Central Division of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association. Winfield, Kansas, October 27, 1883.

Meeting called to order at 2 o’clock p.m., President A. Gridley in chair.

Prof. A. H. Limerick stated the object of the meeting in a few very appropriate remarks.

Moved and supported, That the programme for the second and third meetings be combined in one; the one to contain the more important topics of both.

Moved and supported, That the Saturday meeting convene at 9 o’clock a.m., and continue till 1 p.m.

The propriety of continuing the Friday evening meeting was discussed to some length. It was decided to continue it by having a literary program on that evening; the program to consist in declamations, select readings, debates, etc.

Moved and supported, That the following resolution, presented by Mr. L. C. Brown, be adopted.

Resolved, That we, the teachers of the Central Division of the Cowley County Teachers Association, ask that the school boards of our respective schools allow us the privilege of closing our schools at noon on the Friday of each month set apart for the teachers’ meeting, in order that the teachers may attend this meeting.

Moved and supported, That a committee of three be appointed by the chair to adopt a program for the next meeting. Miss Dickey, Prof. A. H. Limerick, and Mr. H. G. Norton were appointed.

On motion, the meeting was adjourned to meet on the evening of Nov. 23rd.

                                                     F. P. Vaughan, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.

                                             Northwestern Teachers Association.

                                                UDALL, November 3rd, 1883.

There being a political meeting in the schoolhouse Friday evening, no meeting was held by the teachers, but they met according to appointment on Saturday morning.


Those present were Misses Lida Strong, C. L. Cronk, Jennie Knickerbocker, Kate Martin, Hattie Andrews, and Fannie McKinley; Messrs. R. B. Corson, S. L. Herriott, J. W. Campf, J. W. Warren, C. A. Lewis, Chas. Daugherty, and L. McKinley.

The regular secretary being absent, L. McKinley was elected to fill the vacancy.

The discussion of the various topics was spirited, interesting, and instructive, most of the teachers taking part. At its close the general feeling was that it had been a great success.

It was decided to hold the next meeting at Akron schoolhouse, beginning on Friday evening, Nov. 30th. The program was arranged for that time as follows: Address of welcome, J. W. Warren; Response, J. W. Campf; Exercises by Akron school; Declamation, C. A. Lewis; Essay, J. W. Campf; Recitations, Misses Lida and Lou Strong; general discussion of the subject, “Needs of our School System.”

The topics for Saturday’s session were assigned as follows: “Methods of Teaching Primary Reading,” Misses Jennie Knickerbocker, Leota Gary, and Lou Strong; “Causes of the Revolution,” Mrs. Gammon, Miss Fannie McKinley, and Mr. J. W. Warren; “Franklin and Hamilton,” Miss C. A. Cronk and Messrs. C. A. Lewis, C. Bradshaw, and J. W. Campf; “To What Extent Shall Teachers Share in Amusements?” Misses Lida Strong and Annie Barnes and Mr. L. McKinley.

School boards and patrons are cordially invited to attend. Come and see what your teachers think about these matters and exchange views with them, especially on Friday evening. Teacher! do not fail to come! McKINLEY, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.

A dramatic entertainment at the New Salem schoolhouse on Thursday, the 15th inst. “Sylvia’s Soldier” will be rendered by home talent. A full house is solicited. At the station schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.

                                UDALL. One of Cowley’s Thriving Little Towns.


Last Friday the COURIER reporter visited the little town of Udall, thirteen miles north of Winfield on the A. T. & S. F. railroad. Having never visited the place before, we were surprised at the improvement and amount of business being done. The town was laid out the spring of 1881 by a town company composed of P. W. Smith, James T. Dale, Geo. A. Jennett, Jas. Chenoweth, Jas. H. Bullene, and Jas. Napier. With the exception of Mr. Bullene, all the members of the town company were farmers and residents of the vicinity. The land on which the town was laid out (40 acres) was purchased of P. W. Smith. Since that time three additions have been added to the original plat—two by E. L. Moffitt and two by Lewis Fitzsimmons. From the commencement the infant town had an opponent in the Santa Fe railroad. They were not given a depot sidetrack or conveniences of any kind. The station was merely a platform alongside the track. In spite of this, the projectors went to work with a will. Every encouragement was offered to persons desiring to locate. Members of the town company put up buildings and soon the few new and scattered houses grew into a prosperous little town. Then began the struggle for a depot and sidetrack, and through the able assistance of Senator Hackney, these things were soon forthcoming. Today the tracks are lined with coal and grain cars and the railroad company is doing a better business than at any station between Winfield and Wichita. There are still many things that the railroad company should do for the town. They need stock yards properly equipped with water and scales and improvements about the depot. The town now has upwards of fifty buildings. Several large new stores are going up. The businesses of the town are well represented. There are four general merchandising stores, two hotels, two hardware stores, two coal yards, one lumber yard, one harness shop, one tin shop, four physicians, one land office, five grain dealers, one barber shop, one restaurant, a millinery store, a photograph gallery, a billiard hall, and a livery stable. The congregationalist are erecting a neat church at a cost of $2,000. The Baptist are also putting up a church building. The school interests of the town are well looked after. They have a large building with two well furnished rooms. The school is graded and is under the charge of Prof. Campf, with Miss Knickerbocker as assistant. One of the best men for the town is W. B. Norman. He has charge of the town company’s interests and is doing a land and loan business. He has clear business ideas, a wide acquaintance, and exerts every influence that can be brought to bear in favor of Udall. The town is surrounded by a splendid scope of country and the rich valley of the Walnut and Arkansas are tributaries to it. With such advantages it cannot fail to be a good business point.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.

Last Wednesday evening quite a company of little folks, about twenty in all, got together and marched to the residence of Mrs. Trump, to make a surprise call on her daughter, Miss Hattie Trump, who received them graciously at the door, they shouting “birthday surprise to Hattie.” The party were invited in and treated to a gay little feast. The table was spread with the nice things of the season and all was pleasure, lively chat, laughter, frolic, and enjoyment for about two hours. Their teachers, Miss Crippen and Miss Hamill, came in and enlivened the party.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.

                                                       Teachers’ Association.

The Central Division of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association will meet November 17th, 1883, at the High School building, Winfield. Following is the program.

                                             SATURDAY—9 O’CLOCK A.M.

1. Course of study: S. I. Herriott.

2. Adaptation of Methods: Miss Laura Elliott.

3. Libraries: S. W. Norton.

4. How to Teach Notation and Numeration: Jas. Hutchinson.

5. Methods for Primary Reading: Miss Mamie Garlick.

6. Franklin and Hamilton: F. P. Vaughan.

7. Needs of our School System: General Discussion.

8. Amusements for Teacher and Pupils: H. G. Norton.

                                    SATURDAY EVENING—9 O’CLOCK P.M.

1. Select Reading: Miss Mary Hamill.

2. Essay: Miss Anna Barnes.

3. Declamation: W. P. Beaumont.

                                                                 SOCIAL.

An Address by President Taylor of the State Normal School.

Winfield Courier, November 8, 1883.


To all whom it may concern. I will be in Winfield, Kansas, November 13, 1883, for the purpose of organizing a class in instrumental music, and will say to all persons who wish to engage my service as music teacher, to call at M. J. Stimpson’s music store at 2 p.m., and improve the opportunity as this will probably be my only trip to this city. Prof. E. W. Allen.

[HIGH SCHOOL.]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 14, 1883.

The following named pupils of the High school department were perfect in deportment during the second month: SKIPPED! Next to impossible to read.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 14, 1883.

                                                             School Notice.

Notice is hereby given to the parents of the pupils who are in the habit of fighting upon the road to the school house and from it, that they will be informed of the next violation on the part of said pupils, and that the parents must instruct the teachers to punish said misdemeanors, or withdraw said pupils from school. C. T. ATKINSON, Supt.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 14, 1883.

                                                            School Matters.

The seats for the new room in the brick school building arrived yesterday, and it is expected that Miss Anna Hunt, the new assistant principal, will enter upon her duties next Monday. Ever since the completion of our large school building, there has been a great deal of room that could not be utilized. This has been remedied by the tearing out of partitions and remodeling in such a manner as to provide suitable quarters for the long needed extra teacher; and relieve the over-crowded condition of the other departments.

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[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “ELIZA.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 14, 1883.

The panorama at the Holland schoolhouse last Saturday night disappointed many, who had formed a good opinion of its merits.

The entertainment to be given at the Holland schoolhouse next Friday night bids fair to be as good as any ever held there. The programme will consist of numerous serious, comic, and Ethiopian dialogues, interspersed with songs, tableaux, etc. Admission fifteen cents. Proceeds for the benefit of the church. ELIZA.

[MUSICAL CONSERVATORY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 14, 1883.


Musical. Steps have been taken to secure the services of Miss Grace E. Medbury, a most talented musician and instructress in the art, both vocal and instrumental, in the formation of a conservatory at this place. Miss Medbury is a graduate of the Wilbraham academy, Wilbraham, Massachusetts, besides having had the advantage of a thorough course of vocal training under Prof. Wheeler, one of Boston’s finest musicians and instructors, and has signified her willingness to come if sufficient support were guaranteed. Of this there is no doubt, as there is an abundance of musical talent of a very high order in our city, only waiting to be called into action by the hand of a competent leader. Miss Medbury will organize her classes and conduct her teachings on a purely conservatory basis, giving the most thorough and systematic course of training ever offered to western pupils. The very generous response of our citizens to the paper requesting her to come is sufficient evidence that such an institution has long since been desired by our musically inclined population, and we look for the speedy growth of this movement into a school of much larger proportions, requiring assistant teachers, and productive of much good. Miss Medbury will be here ready for business by November 26th.

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[GRAND PRAIRIE CORRESPONDENT: “TIMIDITY.”]

Winfield Courier, November 15, 1883.

The school under the guidance of C. A. Lewis is progressing nicely. The schoolhouse will soon be refitted with new furniture.

Your correspondent attended the Teachers’ Association at Udall Saturday. The meeting was not very largely attended by the “wielders of the birch,” but those present seemed to be striving to make a success of the organization. The next meeting will be held at Little Dutch, and the teachers, assisted by that school, will give an entertainment on the first Friday evening in December. We would give a full account of the proceeding of last meeting, but suppose it will be reported by the Secretary. TIMIDITY.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, November 15, 1883.

A literary is being organized at the new schoolhouse.

Our friend, Miss Christopher, we hear spoken of in the most flattering manner as an excellent teacher. The young people of Moscow are lucky in securing her services this winter.

There will be a literary or dramatic entertainment at the new schoolhouse in Salem on Thursday evening, November 15th. A good time is anticipated and every soldier and his friends are requested to attend and see if Sylvia’s soldier makes love in the modern way. Singing, declamations, and so on are on the program.

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[SOUTH FAIRVIEW CORRESPONDENT: “AMANDA.”]

Winfield Courier, November 15, 1883.

Our school is progressing nicely. Miss Randall understands the business of teaching the young urchins.

Fairview Literary Society has opened up in full blast. At their last meeting they had quite a lively time. The following officers were elected: H. U. Curfman, President; Miss Randall, Secretary; W. C. Horton, Treasurer; Frank Wallis, Editor. The question for next eve: Resolved, That capital punishment should be abolished. There will no doubt be some able speeches on this question, as it is a good one. The literary bids fair to be a success, and a benefit to all who will attend. The Society adjourned to meet Friday evening, November 16. It has been well said that Fairview has had the best literary in the county.

Winfield Courier, November 15, 1883.

[Skipped report for month ending November 9, 1883, A. Gridley, Jr., Supt. Could not read it. MAW]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 21, 1883.

School election one week from next Tuesday.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 21, 1883.


Let us have a new schoolhouse in the west part of the city; we need it.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 21, 1883.

Miss Hunt, of Winfield, arrived Saturday and entered upon her duties as assistant principal of our schools last Monday.

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[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “ELIZA.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 21, 1883.

Rev. Snyder preached a very interesting sermon at district No. 10 last Sunday night.

The entertainment given at the Holland schoolhouse was a success. The proceeds will be used toward purchasing a bell for the church. The entertainment consisted of numerous dialogues, songs, and declamations, given in fine style; also some good tableaux. A defect in the lights, however, spread a very consumptive appearance over the audience. The performance closed early, and all went home expressing themselves high satisfied. ELIZA.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 21, 1883.

                                                            School Election.

There will be an election held on Tuesday, December 4, for the purpose of voting bonds to the amount of $10,000, to be used in securing a new schoolhouse for this district. At the same time the question of location will be voted on. This proposition should carry by all means. Our schools have been overcrowded for the past two years, and the rapidity with which our city is filling up makes it imperative upon the people to provide more commodious quarters. It seems hardly necessary to urge the importance of this measure upon our citizens, the very general response of the voters in signing the call evincing the interest felt and showing that they are nearly unanimous in its favor. While the question of location is nothing to us individually, we would suggest that the western part of the city is justly entitled to the new building. Doubtless this will be the quarter selected.

The following did not occur in Cowley County, but is of interest!

[COWBOY RUFFIANS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 21, 1883.

The Caldwell Journal complains of ruffianism among cowboys hanging around that town, and not without cause, judging from the following account of the little pleasantries indulged in by these festive youths.

Stopping at the Mayhew schoolhouse, they forced the teacher, young Mr. Beals, to drink whiskey out of a bottle they had. Arriving opposite the next schoolhouse, they fired several shots at it. On the other side of Bluff creek, a few miles of Donaldson’s ford, is the schoolhouse of district No. 144. Here they amused themselves by shooting the knob off the door, filling the door full of bullet holes, and shooting the lights out of several windows. They fired several shots into the next schoolhouse west, doing but little damage.

At the schoolhouse in district No. 72, they gave the teacher, John Lowry, about the same treatment they did Mr. Beals, compelling him to drink their villainous whiskey.

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[CORRESPONDENT: “A COURIER PATRON.”]

Winfield Courier, November 22, 1883.

                                                PLEASANT VALLEY NEWS.


The Holland school expect to give an entertainment at the Tannehill schoolhouse on Saturday evening, December 1st. Proceeds to be used toward the purchase of a bell for the new Constant Church. Admission 15 cents. All are cordially invited to come and bring your lady, and a quarter will let you in.

On Friday evening, November 16th, the members of the Holland school gave an entertainment, proceeds for the purchase of a bell for the church now being built at Constant. They had a full house, an attentive audience, and all seemed well pleased with the performances. The pieces were many of them well performed and very entertaining. The program was so large we will not copy it, but name some of the best selections. There were twelve actors in all.

Song, Welcome; declamation, Warden, Keep a Place for Me, by Miss Edith Holland.

Declamation, On the Piazza, by Master Chas. Chapin.

Song, Grandpa’s Spectacles, by Miss Nellie Midkiff.

Tableau, The Little Angel; music by Orchestra; song, Murmuring Sea, by Miss Inez Buck and Edith Holland.

Dialogue, grief too expensive, by Miss J. Holland and Zack Midkiff.

Tableau, Stealing a March on the Old Folks; declamation, The Gambler’s Wife, by Cora Eastman.

Dialogue, The Boot Black, colored; tableau, Evening Prayer, closing song, Good Night.

Messrs. Miller and Albert furnished the music and were highly complimented by the audience. A COURIER PATRON.

Winfield Courier, November 22, 1883.

                                                       Teachers’ Association.

The Teachers’ Association (Central Division) met in the East Ward school building Saturday, November 17th, at 10:30 a.m. S. L. Herriott presented some very valuable suggestions on course of study for our common schools. General discussion followed. Messrs. Limerick, Lucas, and Gridley were participants. Amusements for teachers and pupils was the next topic introduced by H. G. Norton, whose remarks provoked a very lively discussion, engaged in by Messrs. Limerick, Brown, Lucas, Herriott, and Gridley. At the close of this discussion, the Association adjourned to meet at 1-1/2 o’clock p.m. At the afternoon session there was a large attendance. A spirited discussion engaged in by various members of the Association, on the following topics: “Libraries” and “Defects in our School System.” President Taylor of Emporia Normal School, being present, made an address to the teachers with much wholesome advice. An evening session was held at the Courthouse, with select reading by Miss Mary Hamill, declamation by W. P. Beaumont, and an excellent lecture by President Taylor of Emporia. It is to be regretted that more teachers and school officers did not hear the above lecture. The next meeting of the Association will be held December 21 and 22, to which all the teachers of the county are cordially invited.

Winfield Courier, November 22, 1883.

Mrs. E. D. Garlick started yesterday afternoon for Chicago, being suddenly called away by the death of her father-in-law. She will be absent about two weeks, but the Kindergarten school will not be interrupted. It will continue under the charge of Miss Garlick.

[CRENSHAW: ELOCUTIONIST.]


Winfield Courier, November 22, 1883.

Mrs. T. Edith Crenshaw, an accomplished elocutionist of this city, leaves tomorrow evening for Winfield, Kansas, where she will devote the winter to teaching Elocution. Mrs. Crenshaw has devoted some years to the study of elocution and voice culture, and has reached a degree of proficiency which eminently qualifies her for the duties of a teacher. We most heartily commend her to the people of Winfield. Toledo (Ohio) Bee.

We feel much pleasure in inserting the above notice, and in announcing to our readers that Mrs. Crenshaw will open a school of elocution and voice culture on the first of December. In the meantime she is to be found at the residence of her father, the Rev. Wm. Brittain, corner of Twelfth Avenue and Millington Street.

Winfield Courier, November 22, 1883.

There will be a Thanksgiving supper at New Salem on the evening of the twenty-ninth. Funds to be used for the purpose of purchasing an organ for the school. Admittance twenty-five cents.

Excerpts...

[PRAIRIE HOME CORRESPONDENT: “C. HOPE.”]

Winfield Courier, November 22, 1883.

Prairie Home is too dull at present to start even a Literary. It might possibly sustain a singing school could the services of a good teacher be procured without any extra effort.

The Winfield pupils who spend their Sabbaths in the country with parents, will not find the early Monday morning rides quite so agreeable now as in the months just passed.

Little Mattie Conrad has been afflicted with hoarseness for more than a month past, much of the time unable to speak above a whisper. We are glad to learn she is better and was able to attend school last Friday.

The literary at New Salem station holds it sessions Saturday nights. At their last meeting, W. Lucas was elected president of the society; C. C. Krow, vice-president; Miss D. Gilmore, secretary, and Mr. Cox, treasurer. No question for discussion, to my knowledge.

Miss Cook, of Winfield, a former teacher at Prairie Home, made a flying visit out to Mr. Miles on Saturday last, returning on the evening train. We had heard she was coming and thought perhaps we might be favored with just a glimpse of her face, but were doomed to disappointment.

Mr. Ramage continues to sway the scepter and deal out knowledge to over fifty Prairie Home children, of all grades and ages, ranging from five to eighteen years. What a demand for tact, talent, and patience is a teacher! We think D. W. possessed enough of each to insure success with his school.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, November 28, 1883.

                                                    Notice of District Election.

In compliance to a petition dated the 23rd day of July, 1883, and signed by the legally required number of voters of school district No. 2, County of Cowley, and State of Kansas, it is hereby ordered by the district board of said district that an election be held at the office of I. H. Bonsall, commencing at 8 o’clock a.m., and closing at 6 o’clock p.m., on the 4th day of December, 1883, upon the question of issuing bonds of the district to the amount of $10,000 for the purpose of erecting a school building. Said bonds to be payable as follows:


Bond No. 1, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1885.

Bond No. 2, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1886.

Bond No. 3, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1887.

Bond No. 4, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1888.

Bond No. 5, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1889.

Bond No. 6, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1890.

Bond No. 7, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1891.

Bond No. 8, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1892.

Bond No. 9, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1893.

Bond No. 10, $1,000, to become due June 1, 1894.

And to be sold at not less than one hundred cents on the dollar.

The votes shall be by ballot. On the tickets in favor of the bonds shall be written the words, “For the Bonds,” and on the tickets against the issue shall be written “Against the Bonds.”

By order of the board. FRANK J. HESS, District Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1883.

School bond election next Tuesday, December 4.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1883.

An extra session of school was held on last Saturday, and two days vacation were granted this week—Thanksgiving and Friday.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1883.

Under the rules, our public school will be closed Thursday and Friday this week. An extra day of school was held last Saturday.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 28, 1883.

There are seven teachers employed in our public schools, each one having from 53 to 98 pupils in charge. Is there any stronger argument needed in favor of a new school building and more teachers?

Winfield Courier, November 29, 1883.

The ladies of the Presbyterian mite society will have an oyster supper at the schoolhouse at Tisdale Friday evening, November 30th. Come one and all and have a good time.

                                                          Order Committee.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, November 29, 1883.

A fine time is anticipated at the new schoolhouse on Thanksgiving evening. A good supper is on the program and the proceeds to buy an organ for the schoolhouse. It is a district supper and has no connection with the church socials recently held in this vicinity. A full attendance is solicited and if people do not enjoy themselves, the fault will certainly be their own.

[STREAKS OF SUNSHINE.]

Winfield Courier, November 29, 1883.


Mrs. T. Edith Crenshaw, Teacher of Elocution and Voice Culture. Mrs. Crenshaw respectfully informs the residents of Winfield that she will receive pupils in Elocution and Voice Culture at her room, No. 2, Town Clock building (upstairs). Terms can be had on application. Classes meet at 4-1/2 and 7 p.m. Engagements made for public and private readings.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 5, 1883.

E. A. Barron and O. A. Titus furnished the new seats for the school here. They are also to furnish seats for the Mercer district. These are the handsomest, most durable, and comfortable seats in the market.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 5, 1883.

There was a very light vote in this district yesterday on the erection of the new school building—hardly a fourth of the votes in the district being polled—though the bonds carried by a nearly unanimous vote.

The ladies who are so keen to vote should have made the best of their opportunity yesterday, and voted for the school bonds.

Block 141 is the site selected for the new school building.

                                               SCHOOL COMPOSITIONS.

Winfield Courier, December 6, 1883.

The pupils in Miss Crippen’s room, West Ward schoolhouse, were shown a picture of a boy and rabbits and requested to each write a composition on the picture. The following are some of the results. The compositions are given verbatim et literatim et “punctuatim.”

                                                       THE, PET, RABBITS.

I see a little boy with his pet rabbits. He is feeding them carrots. He has seven of them. They have long ears and pink eyes. He has curly hair. And red cheeks and blue eyes. I think that his mother has sent him to feed them. He is about three years old. He is in barn yard.

                                                  May Harter, Aged, 9, years.

                                                        THE PET RABBITS

Oh see that little boy, he has seven pet rabbits. Do you think that little boy likes his rabbits? I do, because he would not put his arm around them if he did not like them. He has brought out some carrots for them to eat. His rabbits have quite long ears. He has red rosy cheeks, and bright blue eyes. He has golden hair. The boys name is Fred.

                                               Berenice Bullen, Aged-10 years.

                                                        THE PET RABBITS

Once upon a time there was a little boy. He had seven pet rabbits. He has a cage for them but when he feeds them he lets them out. They are white ones. His name is Bennie. He hugging them.

                                                   Artie Wood. Aged-9 years.

                                                        THE PET RABBITS

Hear is a little boy with his seven little white pet rabbits he is feeding them some carrots. The rabbits has pink eyes. The rabbits will eat bread cake and clover and hay and drink milk.

                                                Nellie Anderson Age 10 years.

                                                        THE PET RABBITS


I see a little boy and his rabbits. He has seven little rabbits. He is hugging them. He is feeding them carrots. The little boy has rosy cheeks. And golden hair. He has a red dress on. His sleeves are rolled up. The rabbits are on a table. I will call him willie. O Hattie come here and see this little boy and his rabbits. His rabbits are white.

                                                     Elda Fitch. Age 9 years.

                                                        THE PET RABBITS.

O’h see that pretty picture! It is a little boy and his pet rabbits. Their are seven of them in all. If I had them I would feed them grass twigs bread and other things. He is feeding them carrots. He is hugging them he has red curley hair. The rabbits have pink eyes. He has a little red coat on. He has a sweet smiling face his cheeks are as red as roses. I think one of them is named Benny. The little boys name is Tommy. I think they are having a happy time.

                                             Laura B. Parkhurst. Age 11 years.

                                                        THE PET RABBITS

I see a little boy and seven rabbits in a picture. I think the little boy is willie. I think he is feeding his rabbits turnips or readishes in a pan. The rabbits has brown eyes and has long ears and pointed nose. They are white rabbits. And he has his arms thrown around them. I think they are having a nice time.

                                                Edgar. L. Stone. Age. 9. years

                                                        THE PET RABBITS.

This little boys name is Harry. He has seven pretty white rabbits. He is feeding them some carrots. Harry and his rabbits look very happy. Harry has curly hair. He loves the rabbits. Harry has a red dress on.

                                                  Mollie Kennedy Age 9 years

                                                        THE PET RABBITS.

I see the picture of a little boy and his rabbits. They are pet rabbits. He loves them. He calls them Bunney. He is feeding them carrots. He loves his rabbits. If I would have a rabbit I would make a pet of it. Did you ever see a rabbit?

                                                  Alexis Snyder Age 11 years

                                                        THE PET RABBITS

I see a little boy and he has fetched his pet rabbits some gras to eat. How many rabbits has he? He has seven of the nicest white rabbits in the town of winfield. He has golden hair. And he has a red coat on. And his name is Eddie. He is eight years old.

                                             Willie, S, T, Conrad. Age 10 years.

                                                        THE PET RABBITS

Charlie has six young Rabbits and one old one. This little boy has brought them out to feed them some corn. Charlie has red cheeks. He has blue eyes. The rabbits are precious little things. If I had some rabbits I would feed them good. These rabbits has black years. His father got him these Rabbits.

                                               Charlie E. Trump Age 10 years

                                                       THE. PET. RABBITS.

These is a little boy with his pet rabbits. There are seven of them. They are white as they can be. I think his mother has sent him one to feed them. He is feeding them carrots. He has very curley hair. And blue eyes And red cheeks. He is not more than two years old. The rabbits have very pink eyes. The little boys name is Frank.

                                                  Ella L. Gentry, Age 9 years.

                                                        THE PET RABBITS


Here is Harry with his rabbits. Harry has seven white rabits. He loves his rabbits and his rabbits love him. Harry would not put his arms around them if he did not like them, I think so dont you? Harry is a pretty little boy. He has golden color hair. His hair is curly. He looks as if he was saying O Alma come here and see how tame my rabits are. I can put my arms around them and they wont haredely move. Here they all are. The large one and the little ones.     Lillie Trezise Age 9 years

Excerpts...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “MARK.”]

Winfield Courier, December 6, 1883.

Last Wednesday evening Miss Mollie Holcomb was surprised by a party of her young friends and schoolmates, headed by her teacher, who came to celebrate her fourteenth birthday.

The United Brethren church at Constant is progressing remarkably slow. It will doubtless be pushed rapidly toward completion as soon as the amateur dramatic club, composed of the scholars of district No. 10, succeed in raising the building fund.

Winfield Courier, December 6, 1883.

                                                   The School Fund Booming.

Last week Fairclo & Holloway, druggists at Arkansas City, were arrested on eight counts for violation of the prohibitory law. The defendants came up, plead guilty, and paid eight hundred dollars, fines and costs, which amounted to three hundred more. This makes a total of eleven hundred dollars which went into the school fund of the county last week. If the thing keeps up at this rate for a short time, the expenses of the public schools of the county will be very light. In the old license days the towns in the county got all the revenue from whiskey selling, “while the country furnished its proportion of the whiskey drinkers. The present arrangement is much more equitable as the lines are divided up among all the people.

Winfield Courier, December 6, 1883.

                                                         From The Traveler.

Miss Anna Hunt, of Winfield, arrived Saturday and entered upon her duties as assistant principal of our schools last Monday.

Excerpts...

[SOUTH FAIRVIEW CORRESPONDENT: “AMANDA.”]

Winfield Courier, December 6, 1883.

There was preaching at Fairview schoolhouse on last Sabbath by the Rev. Irvin of New Salem.

Our literary went off booming at last meeting. There was a good turnout. Miscellaneous exercise very good; also a very interesting debate. There were several persons out from Winfield. We have for our question next night: “Resolved, That prohibition in Kansas is a failure.” Let everybody come out on Friday evening, Nov. 30th. AMANDA.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 12, 1883.

Parents will please require their children to produce the monthly reports given to the pupils. Blanks denote failures; 75 to 80 percent passable, and require effort to keep up with class; 80 to 90 percent good; 90 to 100, excellent. C. T. ATKINSON, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, Supplement, December 12, 1883.


The following named pupils were perfect in deportment during the third month: Mahlon Arnett, Mollie Duncan, Effie Gilstrap, Laura Gould, Laura Holloway, Minnie Kirtley, Fred McLaughlin, Howard Maxwell, Dora Pearson, Carry Rice, Mountferd Scott, Emma Theaker, Horace Vaughn, Alice Warren, Sarah Crocker, J. C. Endicott, Lizzie Gilbert, Flora Gould, Ida Hackleman, John Kirkpatrick, Minnie McIntire, Jessie Norton, Lillie Purdy, Alvan Sankey, Eva Splawn, Clarence Thompson, Martin Warren, Stella Wilson.

The following were imperfect and received 65 percent: Sarepta Abrams, Sammie Beall, Alice Lane, Robert A. Nipp, Frank Wright, Lida Whitney, Frank Barnett, Ella Crocker, Edith Marshall, W. S. Pickering, Edna Worthley, Mary Dakin. C. T. ATKINSON, Teacher.

Excerpt...

[OTTER CORRESPONDENT: “OTTERITE.”]

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1883.

J. P. Hosmer is teaching us a good school in No. 63.

Excerpts...

[SOUTHEAST COWLEY CORRESPONDENT: “PHINEAS.”]

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1883.

Literary at the Cedar Creek schoolhouse every Saturday night.

School will be closed for one week during the holidays in Dist. 63.

When boys go 12 miles to spelling school, there must be some attraction.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1883.

Literary at Salem on Saturday evening.

Mr. Lucas received a telegram stating that his father, living in Missouri, was dangerously ill. He left on the first train, it being the freight. Such news is sad to those that prize their dear ones. We all hope Mr. Lucas may find his father better. Of course, his school is dismissed for the present. Miss Davenport still continues in the primary department.

Excerpts...

[ODESSA CORRESPONDENT: NAME NOT GIVEN.]

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1883.

Thanksgiving Day the school children assisted by their teacher gave a big dinner at the schoolhouse. All enjoyed themselves splendidly and had lots of victuals left.

There will be a festival at Odessa schoolhouse on Saturday evening, December 23rd. Proceeds to go for an organ for the school. Come one, come all, and Odessa folks will make it as pleasant for you as they can.

On last Friday night both young and old of this neighborhood gathered at the schoolhouse in order of spelling school given by the teacher, W. P. Beaumont. After spelling was organized a lyceum. It will meet every Friday night. The officers were elected: Mr. A. DeTurk, president; W. P. Hostetter, vice president; Miss Emma Hunt, secretary; Louie Martin, assistant secretary; Mr. Jim Devore, treasurer. All are invited to come.

Excerpt...

[PRAIRIE HOME CORRESPONDENT: “CHARITY.”]

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1883.


Miss May Christopher is giving general satisfaction as a teacher.

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1883.

The Odessa people will have a festival at their schoolhouse in Pleasant Valley Township Friday evening, Dec. 21st. The proceeds are to be used in the purchase of an organ.

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1883.

Mrs. T. Edith Crenshaw, teacher of Elocution and Voice Culture. Room No. 2, Tower Building. Classes meet Tuesday and Thursday at 7 o’clock p.m. Terms for full course of Elocution and Voice Culture, 12 lessons for $6.00. Physical and Vocal Culture, 20 lessons for $2.00. Pupils can enter classes at any time.

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1883.

                           TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION, NORTHERN DISTRICT.

The Friday evening meeting on November 30th, of the Northern District of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association, at Akron schoolhouse, was well attended by the people of the vicinity. Pleasant exercises filled the evening. County Superintendent Limerick addressed the meeting on the subject, “Needs of our School System,” in a comprehensive way. On Saturday several teachers were present, among whom were Messrs. J. C. Bradshaw, Parker Ellis, our honored President R. B. Corson, and the Misses Fannie and Gertrude McKinley.

The topics of the day were discussed with no little enthusiasm, interest, and profit, considering that everyone was wholly unprepared. But no one pleaded lack of preparation when surrounding a bountiful repast supplied by Miss Kate Weimer and others, and all manifested their sincere thanks for favors conferred. The next meeting will be held at Centennial schoolhouse, two and one-half miles north of Udall, on the first Friday evening and Saturday in January, 1884.

Program for Friday as follows: Address of welcome, C. McKinley; Response, J. W. Campf; Declamation, C. A. Lewis; Recitation, J. C. Bradshaw; Recitation, Parker Ellis; Essay, J. W. Campf; Select reading, Miss Fannie McKinley; Exercises by Centennial school.

Topics for Saturday were assigned as follows: “Methods of Teaching Primary Reading,” Misses Jennie Knickerbocker, Leota Gary, and Lou Strong; “General Exercises,” Parker Ellis, J. C. Bradshaw, and Miss Fannie McKinley; “Causes and Results of the War of 1812,” J. W. Warren, and Misses Hattie Andrews, C. Cronk, and Gertrude McKinley; “Morals and Manners,” C. A. Lewis, J. Martindale, and Miss Lida Strong; “Graduating System of Country Schools,” Misses Hattie Daniels, Annie Barnes, C. Egan, and L. McKinley; “Methods of Teaching Penmanship,” J. R. Campf, Miss Lou Strong, and Mrs. Fannie Gammon. Teachers, don’t forget the time of the next meeting. L. McKinley, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 19, 1883.

                                                      EVENING SCHOOL.

                                                            F. E. FULLER.

                                     Opening on Wednesday Night, December 12.

                                                    SEE DRAWING IN P. O.

                                                       No money in advance.

                               Juveniles from 4:30 to 5:30. Adults from 7:30 to 10:00.

                                                            F. E. FULLER.

Winfield Courier, December 20, 1883.


                                                       Teachers Examination.

An examination of applicants for teachers certificates will be held in the high school building at Winfield on Saturday, December 29, 1883.

                                          A. H. Limerick, County Superintendent.

Winfield Courier, December 20, 1883.

MARRIED. Married at the residence of the bride’s father, Mr. Cronk, in Pleasant Valley Township, December 14th, 1883, by Rev. J. Cairns, Mr. Leander C. Brown and Miss Estelle M. Cronk, both teachers in the county.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 26, 1883.

                                                       School District No. 96.

Following are the names enrolled in the above school district.

Lena Guthrie, Minnie Arnett, Gertie Coldwell, Ophelia Arnett, Lizzie Phelps, Estella McGinnis, Dora Andrews, Fannie Andrews, Maris Marshall, Maggie Brown, Eva Brown, Missie Phelps, Stella Sheats, Ettie Coldwell, Mabel Brown, Adaline Bass, Webb Hays, Albert Wright, Harry Beck, Frank Guthrie, Eddie Phelps, George English, Floyd Arnett, Frank Marshall, Pleasant Banks, Willard Banks, Bertie Andrews, Henry Donelly, Otis Coldwell, Sterling Marshall, Alexander Carr, John Carr, Willie Mathews, Ollie Coldwell, Willie Bass.

Number of pupils 35; average daily attendance, for two months ending December 21, 1883: 21. H. D. WALKER, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 26, 1883.

Prof. Fuller’s writing school has been postponed till after the holidays. Due notice will be given of its commencement.

Winfield Courier, December 27, 1883.

Young Knox of Beaver Township went up to Mount Zion schoolhouse Christmas eve night, and created a disturbance in the house. He was promptly knocked down by a bystander after which he got up and attacked someone with a loaded whip. After getting in two or three licks, he was taken in by a constable, brought to town, and cooled off. This young man is getting to be a noted offender, probably due to liquor as much as anything else.

Winfield Courier, December 27, 1883.

The eighty acre tract of school land in Creswell Township known as the “Hughes tract,” was sold at public sale Saturday. It brought twenty-two dollars per acre. Mr. Hughes, the gentleman who resides on it, being the purchaser. His purchase cost him $1,760, less $224, the appraised value of the improvements he has made on the land.

Winfield Courier, December 27, 1883.

                                                   What’s the Matter Anyway.

We have received a couple of communications, the import of which we don’t exactly understand. The first is written in a racy, off hand sort of way and so clearly elucidates the points aimed at that we give it verbatim etleteratim.


“Hurrah for the beaver center opera house if it should not fall or go back with Baskets Christmas tree either the mules or driver was blind for they mist the hitching post and tied to the shutter hurrah for beaver center, who dont cares for expences whoope it up boys, no  he was blind when he fell into the coal house. O no he wasent drunk when he fell off the stone steeps and pulled lightened rood down hurrah Boys, for cigars and who can use the most profain language. CITIZEN.”

The second explains the first by giving us more light on the vexed question—stating in plainer terms what the writer of the first referred to only in a series of “glittering generalities.”

TANNEHILL, December 20th, 1883.

The taxpayers of Beaver Center district were taxed $60.07 last summer for repairing the schoolhouse. After fitting it up in nice style, it was taken possession of by certain parties of that and surrounding districts, who used it for an Opera House, holding religious meetings, political meetings, singing, writing, etc., and at the same time tying their horses to the window shutters, lightning rod, door knob, and hardly giving the teacher a chance to hold school. The taxpayers of the district got tired of paying taxes to repair the house for such doings, and will probably surrender the house to the mob, thinking it cheaper to build a new schoolhouse, to be used for school purposes only. Hurrah for Beaver Center, “who treats to the cigars.” X.

Both correspondents seem to be dissatisfied because the district allows the schoolhouse to be used for “an Opera House, holding religious meetings, political meetings, singing, writing, etc.” In all the category we fail to see a thing that the schoolhouse should not properly be used for. It is built by all the taxpayers—those who attend “Operas, religious meetings, political meetings, singings, writings, etc.,” and while ostensibly for school purposes is properly the place for all neighborhood meetings of a public character which do not interfere with the school. Of course, persons who deface or injure the building such as the “lightened rod” annihilator so feelingly referred to by “Citizen,” should be properly and severely dealt with, but should not debar public meetings from the building. Both “Citizen” and “X” should look at this matter in a clearer light and rather lend their energies toward suppressing the “drunk and disorderly” element in their community than closing the house to all community gatherings.

Winfield Courier, December 27, 1883.

                                                             From Odessa.


The festival held at Odessa last Friday night resulted in an immense success, as indeed does everything undertaken by the enterprising people of this neighborhood. But little effort was required to obtain the necessary provisions for the supper as everyone gave liberally. The DeTurk’s, Martin’s, Gramms, et al., were untiring in their efforts to make it a pleasant and profitable affair. That the large number of persons present was amply provided for in the way of eatables was shown by the amount of good things auctioned off after supper, consisting of cakes, pies, turkeys, and chicken without number. Oysters, candies, and a fish-pond were profitable additions to the general supper. The highest number of votes for the cake to be given to the prettiest girl was received by Miss Lucy Henderson, but through some mistake it was awarded to her contestant, Miss Nettie Crawford, of Excelsior. Both the cakes for being the ugliest and laziest man was awarded to Larby Henderson; there being a large number of contestants for each, he felt himself more than doubly honored by the distinction. All seemed to enjoy the occasion to the utmost, and most generously helped along the enterprise. the net receipts were $118.50 and with these proceeds a good organ is forthcoming. We understand another enterprise is on foot to provide for the purchase of a bell to place in the belfry of the schoolhouse. Success to them. W. P.

Excerpts...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “MARK.”]

Winfield Courier, December 27, 1883.

Two enthusiastic revivals are progress in this vicinity. Rev. Brown is steering the gospel ship at Victor Schoolhouse and Rev. Snyder is directing the battery on Satan’s stronghold at Holland Schoolhouse. Both are successful.

Miss Minnie Sumpter is one of Cowley’s pluckiest and brightest school ma’ams. She boards at home and rides a horse seven miles to her school. The winters of Southern Kansas are favorable to school ma’ams.

The mischievous urchins of School District No. 4 have been congratulating themselves over the fact that they had a kind and merciful teacher who was opposed to corporal punishment. Their opinion slightly changed one day recently when said teacher marched five of them out in a row and administered unto them a strong dose of birch ointment.

Your correspondent would like to call the attention of the Horticultural Society of this county and, also, of the energetic, enterprising, and practical farmers generally, to the fact that the faculty of the Kansas State Agricultural College, located at Manhattan, have expressed a desire, in a letter to the writer in cooperating with them by holding a farmers’ institute at some convenient point in this county. They volunteer to furnish half the program and bear their own expenses, the farmers supplying the balance of the program and securing a hall. About three members of the college faculty would be present at the exercises and deliver lectures on some of the important subjects pertaining to agriculture and its kindred departments. The college has inaugurated a series of farmers’ institutes in several counties in the central and northern portions of the State. These institutes are highly spoken of as being beneficial to the farmers participating in them. Here is an opportunity for our farmers to gain much valuable information from men of recognized ability—professors in their special spheres—who are practical as well as theoretical, and good authority on subjects in their respective fields. The date of such a meeting could be arranged to suit the convenience of our farmers. I would suggest that the Horticultural Society work up this matter and the President of the same place himself in communication with the President of the college, Geo. T. Fairchild, or Prof. E. M. Shelton, Manhattan, Kansas. MARK.

 

                                                                    1884.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 2, 1884.

                                                   Our Conservatory of Music.


Miss Medbury, of whom the TRAVELER has had occasion to speak before, arrived in this city today noon, and can be seen at the Perry house parlors. It was the lady’s intention to get here last Saturday and commence her instructions in music today, but she was unavoidably detained. She will be ready to receive pupils and commence the organization of classes tomorrow. Miss Medbury is accompanied by Miss Annie L. Jackson, a thorough teacher in elocution, who, we believe, contemplates the forming of a class in the above study in this city. These ladies are highly recommended, and we doubt not will receive the liberal encouragement they merit. They have for some time held high positions as instructors in the McKendree University, in Illinois, and have only consented to come here at the earnest solicitation of friends. We trust their new home will prove as pleasant and profitable as was the one they leave.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, January 3, 1884.

Mr. Lucas has returned to his family and school—left his father much better.

Mr. Roberts has a vacation of two weeks and has gone to visit friends in this state. He treated his pupils to some nice candy before he left, and “Olivia” was remembered, for a nice little package was sent to her quiet home. Many thanks for the same, Mr. Roberts.

Our Sunday school and preaching service will be moved to the new schoolhouse. So our school has not died as yet, but if it does, it will have the honor of passing away in the little Salem City, but we trust and hope all hands will pull together and make the Sunday School a grand success, and we are confident a larger attendance can be had at the station than in the old place, but we see it go with reluctance, for many pleasant hours have been spent in the old schoolhouse. May success be with all the Sunday schools in our beautiful land, and to all my dear class I bid adieu, for we are entering on a new quarter, a new year, and a new place for working. OLIVIA.

Winfield Courier, January 3, 1884.

Rev. E. P. Hickok will preach in the Walnut Valley Church next Sunday morning, and at the Star Valley schoolhouse in the afternoon.

Winfield Courier, January 3, 1884.

Miss Elma Crippen resigned her position last week as teacher in our city schools and started Monday afternoon for Oswego, New York, to remain. She has made many warm friends during her several years’ residence here, who will very much regret her departure, and who wish her much happiness and prosperity wherever she may be.

Winfield Courier, January 3, 1884.

Supt. Limerick, Prof. Gridley, and Miss Allie Klingman attended the meeting of the State Teachers Association at Topeka last week. Supt. Limerick was honored with a place on the board of directors of the association.

Winfield Courier, January 3, 1884.

L. M. Dalgarn and Willie Files, of Richland Townships, started Monday for Manhattan, where they will attend the State Agricultural College this winter. There are a goodly number of Cowley’s youths under instructions there.

Winfield Courier, January 3, 1884.

     Proceedings of the Meeting of the Central Division of the Cowley Teachers’ Association.

                                                 WINFIELD, Dec. 29th, 1883.


Meeting called to order by vice president J. B. Norton, president Gridley having gone to Topeka to attend the State Teachers’ Association. The topics spoken on were as follows:   “Methods of Teaching Penmanship,” by Wm. Gridley, of New Salem. The gentleman handled his subject ably, in the course of his remarks offering many valuable suggestions. The discussion of this topic was somewhat protracted, though spirited, most of the teachers taking part.

“Causes and Results of the War of 1882,” by Mr. Ford. He briefly gave his ideas in regard to the topic. The discussion of this subject happily took the course of methods of teaching history. It was lively in the extreme, all of the teachers taking an active part.

By motion of Mr. Lucas, the meeting adjourned to meet on the evening of January 25. All teachers are respectfully invited to attend.

The city teachers have kindly offered entertainment to all teachers who will come. Mr. J. B. Norton of Winfield is chairman of the committee on entertainment. By letting him know, parties wishing to attend the association will be provided for. Teachers, come one and all and bring your friends. F. P. VAUGHAN, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 9, 1884.

Miss Medbury and Miss Jackson, the musical and oratorical acquisitions in our city, arrived last Thursday. The former lady commenced her teaching in McLaughlin’s hall on Monday last under most favorable auspices, and will continue to give instructions in this hall until more convenient quarters can be obtained. Miss Jackson, we believe, will make her headquarters at Wichita for the present, visiting this city each week, or as often as the growth of her classes will warrant. We trust they will be favored with the success which their sterling worth most richly merits.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, January 10, 1884.

Miss Etta Johnson has returned to school, and will be sadly missed by friends.

On the 2nd our friend, Mr. Mc. Dalgarn, started for school at Manhattan. Mr. Dalgarn will be missed in Sabbath school and by his many friends. We wish for him a pleasant time and bright laurels when he returns to his home.

Winfield Courier, January 10, 1884.

Friday morning last was a very bad day for school children. Six children had their toes  or ears frosted while going to the Red Valley school, in Liberty, on that morning.

Winfield Courier, January 10, 1884.

We had a pleasant call yesterday from Geo. L. McDonaugh, traveling agent of the Southern Kansas Railway. By the way, the Southern Kansas R. R. Co. is doing more to induce immigration to this part of the State, by the publication of the Southern Kansan, than any other agency in the west. Mr. McDonaugh’s object in visiting here was to secure cuts of our church and school buildings for insertion in the next issue of their paper. It is a shame that each of our churches do not procure, for the use of both home and foreign publications, cuts of their buildings. The School Board should also get several cuts of the school buildings.

Winfield Courier, January 10, 1884.

There is this week school holding in every schoolhouse in Cowley County but one. The school in 110 closed two weeks ago. The number of teachers now at work in the county is 135. The services of these teachers costs the county about five thousand dollars per month. Cowley probably spends during each winter month for her schools, eight thousand dollars, counting all expenses. This is a grand record.

Winfield Courier, January 10, 1884.


                                                  Teachers of Cowley County.

We present below a list of the teachers of Cowley, their post office addresses, and the amount they are receiving per month for their services. This list will be valuable to teachers, school officers, and the public generally. It is taken from the records, through the courtesy of Supt. Limerick.

                                                              WINFIELD.

District Teacher                              Amount

       1         Emma Robins                     $ 35.00

       9         H. G. Norton                         40.00

      12        Anna Marks                          40.00

      21        Mary L. Randall                    40.00

      25        Leota Gary                      35.00

      37        Maggie Kinne                        30.00

      40        L. C. Brown                          40.00

      41        W. P. Beaumont                    50.00

      43        Lida Howard                         32.50

      45        O. P. Fuller                           40.00

      48        Jas. E. Ford                           40.00

      49        Clara V. Pierce                35.00

      50        Jas. H. Hutchison                   40.00

      51        M. Estelle Cronk                   37.50

      64        Emma Rhodes                 32.50

      68        S. L. Herriott                         50.00

      75        Laura Elliott                           40.00

      77        Mary B. Burkey                    30.00

      97        Mary J. Rief                          30.00

      99        Haidie Trezise                  33.00

     115       Celina Bliss                      45.00

     116       Anna Robertson                    30.00

     127       Claud Rinker                         40.00

                                                        ARKANSAS CITY.

        2        Prof. C. T. Atkinson              80.00

                  Anna L. Morton                    40.00

                  Virginia Walton                35.00

                  Albertine Maxwell           35.00

                  Mary A. Johnson                   35.00

                  Mary Theaker                       35.00

                  Anna Hunt                       35.00

       6         Ella King                               -------

      28        Lizzie Wilson                         35.00

      32        R. P. Henderson                    -------

      33        Hannah Gilbert                30.00

      34        S. G. Philips                          40.00


      35        Lousetta Pyburn                    35.00

      36        Elsie McLaughlin                   38.00

      42        Jennie Pollock                 30.00

      53        C. F. Cunningham            55.00

      62        J. R. Smith                       40.00

      69        C. W. Crank                         45.00

      80        Cyrus Perkins                        38.00

      89        Chas. Wing                           40.00

      96        H. D. Walker                        40.00

    131        Hannah Ramage                    35.00

                                                                DEXTER.

        5        Anna Vaught                         45.00

                  Sadie Davis                           40.00

        7        Wm. Carrens                         35.00

      54        S. A. Smith                      40.00

      56        Kate L. Ward                        35.00

      82        A. P. Cochran                       35.00

    111        J. C. Weaver                         -------

    123        Mary Miller                           30.00

    124

    138        Gertrude McKinlay          30.00

                                                                BURDEN.

      30        Peter L. Alderson                  40.00

      78        H. F. Albert                           60.00

      78        Lizzie Burden                         33.00

      78        R. O. Stearns                        35.00

      88        Minnie A. Crumb                  35.00

      90        T. J. Rude                             40.00

      92        May Christopher                   35.00

    113        Mrs. F. E. Craven                 40.00

    119        Harry C. Shaw                30.00

    103        E. W. Woolsey                40.00

                                                             TANNEHILL.

        4        L. P. King                             45.00

      44        W. E. Tapping                 45.00

      65        T. L. Schaffer                        45.00

    106        Minnie Sumpter                     30.00

                                                            CAMBRIDGE.

      15        W. C. Barnes                        55.00

      15        Lizzie Palmer                         33.00

      16        M. P. McName                     40.00

      95        Grant Wilkins                        40.00

    104        Emma Coil                      40.00


    112        Hattie Utley                           30.00

    117        Maggie Seabridge            35.00

    118        Allie Wheeler                         -------

                                                             CONSTANT.

      10        B. F. Myers                           40.00

      59        Amy Chapin                          -------

                                                                 SEELEY.

      13        Fannie Gammon                    35.00

      27        Fannie McKinlay                   35.00

      72        Lincoln McKinlay            40.00

    133        Anna Kuhn                      35.00

                                                                 UDALL.

      11        Carrie Cronk                         30.00

      71        J. W. Campf                          50.00

      71        Jennie Knickerbocker            35.00

    114        Hattie Andrews                     32.00

                                                                  ROCK.

      23        Lou Strong                      33.00

      24        Parker Ellis                      40.00

      25        Leota Gary                      35.00

      29        J. C. Martindale                     40.00

      73        C. H. Eagin                           40.00

      74        S. M. Kirkwood                    58.00

    108        J. C. Bradshaw                65.00

    128        W. L. Holcomb                     35.00

      81        Lida Strong                           40.00

    122        Fannie Bush                           35.00

                                                                 AKRON.

      26        J. W. Warren                        40.00

    125        Anna F. Barnes                     38.00

                                                             BALTIMORE.

      18        Ella Kempton                        31.00

      76        Chas. Messenger                   40.00

    100        Alice Johnson                        35.00

                                                                    BOX.

      17        Emma Briles                          -------

      94        Elsie A. Taylor                 40.00

                                                         GRAND SUMMIT.

      57        O. M. Akers                         40.00

    101        Ida Hemmenway                   30.00

                                                                  OTTO.

     84         R. B. Overman                40.00

   102         S. F. Overman                38.00


   107         Belle Bartgis                          33.00

   110         Laura Phelps                         30.00

                                                                  POLO.

     60         Zoe Kephart                          35.00

   121         Cora B. Beach                35.00

                                                            MAPLE CITY.

     58         W. E. Ketcham                     40.00

     84         Cora Robins                          40.00

     98         R. A. Robinson               35.00

                                                            CEDARVALE.

     63         J. P. Hosmer                         35.00

     60         J. H. Bartgis                          40.00

     83         Clara Forbs                           33.00

     81         J. R. March                           45.00

                                                           CLOVERDALE.

     70         Emma Howland                     35.00

   120         James Stockdale                    30.00

                                                            NEW SALEM.

     39         D. W. Ramage                40.00

     52         Ed. G. Roberts                35.00

     55         W. H. Lucas                          45.00

                  Clara Davenport                    39.00  [District No. not given.]

                                                                TISDALE.

     46         F. P. Vaughan                       50.00

     47         M. E. Johnson                 40.00

                                                                WILMOT.

     22         A. D. Stuber                          40.00

   105         Carrie Plunkett                -------

                                                                FLORAL.

     19         H. S. Wallace                        40.00

     20         S. W. Norton                        40.00

     20         Ora Irvin                               30.00

                                                               RED BUD.

       3         Dido M. Carlisle                    40.00

     91         Hattie Daniels                        30.00

                                                                OXFORD.

       8         Milton Stiles                          40.00

     31         Anna Martin                          38.00

     61         C. M. Harrison                38.00

Arkansas City Traveler, January 16, 1884.


Miss Anna L. Jackson left for Wichita last Monday to make arrangements for her classes in that city, but will be in our city today and tomorrow, and on Wednesday and Thursday of each week. Our school directors are considering the advisability of securing the services of Miss Jackson in the interests of a thorough course in elocution in the public schools here—a measure which cannot but result in much good.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 16, 1884.

                                                       High School Report.

The following pupils of the High School department were perfect in deportment and received 100 percent.

Mahlon Arnett, Frank Barnett, Ella Crocker, Mary Dakin, Jacob Endicott, Lizzie Gilbert, Flora Gould, John Kirkpatrick, Rose Morse, Fred McLaughlin, Jessie Norton, Dora Pearson, Carrie Rice, Mountferd Scott, Horace Vaughn, Martin Warren, Clarence Thompson, Sarepta Abrams, Sammy Beall, Sarah Crocker, Mollie Duncan, Effie Gilstrap, Laura Gould, Laura Holloway, Eddie Marshall, Minnie McIntire, Howard Maxwell, Robert Nipp, Walter Pickering, Alvan Sankey, Emma Theaker, Edna Worthley, Lida Whitney, Lillie Purdy, Eva Splawn.

The following were imperfect and received 55 percent: Alice Lane, Frank Wright, Hattie Laird.

Let the parents call for the monthly report.

                                                  C. T. ATKINSON, Teacher.

Excerpts...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “MARK.”]

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

School at Victor, District 115, has not been in session for two weeks. Their teacher, Miss Celina Bliss, has been recreating and celebrating the holidays, but is expected to put in an appearance Monday next.

Supt. A. H. Limerick was reconnoitering in this vicinity this week. It is presumed that he was around scaring the school ma’ams. By his energy and enthusiasm for school work, he is a potent power in the cause of education.

Recently, while attending the State Grange Association as a representative from this county, Mr. McKerlie visited the State Agricultural College at Manhattan. He reports the institution in a flourishing condition. Elihu Anderson and Misses Amy Robertson and Maggie Stansberry expressed themselves as being well pleased with the school and progressing rapidly in their studies.

Excerpt...

[UDALL CORRESPONDENT: “C. Z. B.”]

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

We hear that the Teachers’ Meeting at Centennial froze out, to be revived again by the gentle breezes of next summer’s Normal.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

                                                           MATCH HUNT.


A grand match hunt having been talked of for some time by the citizens of Maple Township, a meeting was held at the Canton schoolhouse December 19, 1883, for the purpose of making arrangements for the same. It was decided that the hunt should take place on Saturday, December 23, 1883, with Adam Walck and Wm. Rader as captains; the game to be counted at Adam Walck’s by Adam Walck and Jas. McKown; each captain to choose three assistants, and the losing side to act as committee on arrangements to get up the dinner.

Below we give the register of each man’s game, Capt. A. J. Walck’s side winning.

Capt. A. J. Walck, 3 rabbits.

A. M. Weatherhead, 7 rabbits.

H. I. Walck, 19 rabbits.

J. R. Norman, 8 rabbits and a coon.

Jack Walck, 5 rabbits.

Geo. [? NOT SURE...PARTLY OBSCURED] Rader, 8 rabbits, 1 hawk, and 1 thunder pump.  [THUNDER PUMP???]

J. F. McKown, 3 rabbits and 1 duck.

L. A. Walck, 6 rabbits.

Will Burton, 7 rabbits and 1 hawk.

M. Burch, Sr., 2 rabbits and 1 owl.

                                        TOTAL: 64 RABBITS AND SIX FOWL.

Capt. Wm. Rader, losing side, 11 rabbits.

Geo. Walck, 4 rabbits and 1 duck.

Jake Walck, 2 rabbits.

M. A. Burch, 5 rabbits.

E. L. Walck, 6 rabbits and 1 flicker.

H. C. Rader, 18 rabbits.

Andy Rader, 3 rabbits and 1 flicker.

Adam Walck, 1 jacksnipe.

                                     TOTAL: 50 RABBITS AND FOUR FOWL.

The dinner was served at Mr. Wm. Rader’s on Christmas Day, 75 persons being present, and a more pleasant affair I have not seen for a long time. I think I am safe in saying the entire party were well satisfied. Mirth and good humored jokes ruled the day, and the exercises closed by organizing another hunt to take place Saturday, December 29, in view of permanently organizing a hunting club for the protection of birds that are a benefit to the farmers. M. A. BURCH, Secretary.

Excerpt...

[SUMMIT CORRESPONDENT: “W. P. F.”]

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

The Richland folks have built a new schoolhouse. They have sold the old one, and that keeps their teacher, Mr. A. D. Stuber, back with his school.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

                                                        SCHOOL REPORT.


The following is a report of school district 61 for the month ending December 28, 1883: Number of pupils enrolled, 34; average daily attendance, 28. The highest grade obtained in Class A, in arithmetic, was 80 by Ed. Riggs and John Colier; grammar, 90 by Laura and Maude Wertman; geography, class A, 95, by Flema Crabtree, Ed. Riggs, Maude and Laura Wertman. Pupils standing 100 in deportment were Flema Crabtree, Sadie Glasgow, and Carrie Brien. Pupils neither absent nor tardy were Anna Riggs, Maude Wertman, Nettie Nelson, Joe Fulton, Mamie Corbin, and Everett Crabtree. All patrons of the school and persons interested in education are cordially invited to visit the school.

                                                 C. M. HARRISON, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

                                                        SCHOOL REPORT.

The report of Windsor Academy school for the first three months commencing October 1st, and ending December 21, 1883, is as follows: Advanced grade, general average: May Kinley, 93; Ida Stranghan, 93; Mary Cue, 83; Carrie Warr, 85.5; Flora Bedell, 75; Joanna Bedell, 70; Clara Cue, 76; Luna Cue, 78; Rebecca Smith, 86; Rebecca Weaverling, 85; Bettie Smith, 78; James French, 89. M. C. SEABRIDGE, Teacher.

Excerpts...

[DEXTER CORRESPONDENT: “REPUBLICAN THE 2.”]

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

Christmas and New Years have come and gone, the former bringing joy to the little folks, and the latter ushering in new hopes and good resolutions for those of maturer years. The entertainment at the schoolhouse New Years eve was a success, notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather. The school now possesses sufficient funds to purchase an organ. Much credit is due Miss Vaught and Miss Davis for the energy displayed in bringing this enterprise to a successful termination.

Some of the boys of Dexter concluded to have some fun, not long since, and having surrounded a goodly supply of the fluid extract of Democracy, they next surrounded the schoolhouse, where were some school children, with their teachers, rehearsing for an entertainment. They demanded an unconditional surrender, and on being refused, sent a bullet through one of the windows. These youthful buccaneers, ranging from twelve to twenty one years of age, were brought before His Honor, Esq. Hines, who being a tender hearted man, only taxed them collectively $112.50. There is a moral to this somewhere.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

                                                         Teachers, Attention!

On account of the intense cold of Jan. 4th and 5th, the teachers’ meeting appointed for “Centennial,” two miles north of Udall, was a failure. The next meeting will be held at the same place on Saturday, February 2nd, at which time the same program will be followed that was published in the COURIER of 13th, 1883, with the following alterations: The topic, “Kansas, Past, Present, and Future,” to be substituted for “Causes and Results of the War of 1812,” and the following topics in addition: “Written Recitations,” L. McKinley; “Periodicals Versus Readers for Higher Grades,” Prof. J. W. Campf; “Closing the Term,” J. Martindale. Let all come who can, as this will be the last meeting this winter in the northwest district. L. McKINLEY, Secretary. R. B. CORSON, President.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

There will be a festival at Centennial schoolhouse on Friday night, February 1st, the proceeds to be used in buying a school library for the district. A fine time is expected and no gambling; so, ladies, come and bring your beaux, with no danger of being insulted by a voting contest. Come one and all, have a good time, and help in a worthy cause. M.

Excerpts...

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.


                                                  Commissioners Proceedings.

The school tax of S. S. Smith was transferred from District 119 to District 47.

C. T. Atkinson and Nellie Aldrich were appointed school examiners.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

A good many houses have been burned in the county this winter. Every residence and schoolhouse in the county should be insured. No one knows when their home may go, and the expense of farm insurance is very light. Look over the advertising columns of this paper, select what company you want, then call on the agent at once and have it done.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

The Darien schoolhouse in Rock Township was destroyed by fire Friday night. Some wood had been put in the drum of the stove to dry. This caught fire, fell out on the floor, and set the building on fire. All of the paraphernalia of the school, many of the scholars’ books, and some belonging to the teacher, Miss Leota Gary, were destroyed. Darien was one of the oldest schoolhouses in the county, and has been a place of rendezvous for the denizens of Upper Walnut for many years. The old walls could have told many tales of red-hot political meetings where Uncle Reuben Booth held the boys level, or deep-laid plans to “capture the delegation” or “put up a trick,” in which George Williams, Harcourt, Strong, Gale, Grow, Wilber, and a host of others, were participants. Let a new house, raised on the ashes of the old one, be called “Darien.”

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

John Stalter, of Rock Township, is convalescing, after a very severe attack of pneumonia. He was taken with congestion of the right lung and liver, on the evening of Dec. 24th, while at Richland schoolhouse, having taken his family to a Christmas tree at that place. Not wishing to deprive them of their enjoyment, he started to walk home, some five miles, and after wandering over the prairie for some time, finally got to his daughter’s, Mrs. John Snyder’s, nearly frozen, and was taken home almost dead. With much labor and unceasing care by Dr. Hornaday and the friends of the family, reaction was brought about. Considering all, he had a very close call, but his many friends now rejoice at his recovery, and hope to see his countenance many years hence.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

The central division of the Cowley County Teachers’ Association will meet in the High School building, Winfield, on Saturday, January 26th, at the usual hour.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

Notice. There will be a Republican convention at the Dexter schoolhouse on Saturday, January 26th, 1884, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of placing in nomination a township ticket. By order of Committee, L. C. Pattison, chairman.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1884.

Township Convention. There will be a Republican convention of the Republican voters of Richland Township at the Summit schoolhouse, on Saturday, January 19th, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of putting in nomination candidates to fill the offices of said township.

                                    J. R. Cottingham, Chairman, Central Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 23, 1884.


The Bolton Township board will meet at the Bland schoolhouse in West Bolton on Saturday, January 26, 1884, for the transaction of township business. All interested are requested to be present. P. A. LORRY, Trustee.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 23, 1884.

Republicans of East and West Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday evening, January 31, at 7 p.m., for the purpose of nominating a township ticket for spring election. Please turn out. J. D. GUTHRIE, Chairman, Committee.

Excerpts...

[REPUBLICAN PRIMARIES.]

Winfield Courier, January 24, 1884.

The Republican primary of Beaver Township will meet at Tannehill on Friday, Feb. 1st. By order of township committee.

The township election of Fairview Township will be held at the Akron schoolhouse, Feb. 5th, 1884. R. B. Corson, Trustee.

The Republicans of Liberty Township will meet at Rose Valley schoolhouse on Thursday, Jan. 31st, at 2 o’clock p.m. S. A. Cochran, chairman.

There will be a Republican convention at Little Dutch, Fairview Township, on Jan. 30th, at 7 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of nominating a township ticket. J. W. Douglas, Chairman.

There will be a meeting of the voters of Tisdale Township at the Tisdale schoolhouse, on Saturday, the 2nd day of February, 1884, at 2 o’clock, to nominate candidates for township officers. H. McKibben, Trustee.

There will be a convention of the Republicans of Vernon Center at Vernon schoolhouse on Saturday, Feb. 2nd, at 7 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of nominating a ticket for township officers. J. B. Evans, Chairman.

The Republican voters of Maple Township are requested to meet at Red Bud, the 29th day of January, at 7 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of putting in nomination a full township ticket. E. J. Cole, Chairman, Township Committee.

There will be a Republican convention at the Dexter schoolhouse on Saturday, January 26th, 1884, at 2 o’clock p.m., for the purpose of placing in nomination a township ticket. By order of Committee, L. C. Pattison, chairman.

Winfield Courier, January 24, 1884.

The Republican Primary convention of Richland Township met pursuant to call of Township Central Committee, at Summit schoolhouse, on January 19, 1884. Adam Stuber was chosen chairman and S. J. Holloway, secretary, and proceeded to nominate candidates for township offices. James Groom was chosen as candidate for Trustee; N. J. Larkin, for Clerk; J. R. Cottingham, for Treasurer; J. W. Watt, for Constable of North Richland; J. S. Holloway, for Constable, South Richland. Road Overseers: District No. 1, Phillip Stuber; District No. 2, W. J. Shrubshell; District No. 3, S. J. Holloway; District No. 4, J. S. Hamilton. After ordering the minutes of the Convention published in the Winfield COURIER, the meeting adjourned. S. J. HOLLOWAY, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, January 24, 1884.

There will be a festival at Science Valley schoolhouse, three miles northeast of Winfield, on Friday evening, February 1st. The proceeds to be a donation to the minister. All are invited to attend and will have plenty to eat, lots of fun, and some music.


Arkansas City Traveler, January 30, 1884.

An examination of applicants for teachers’ certificates will be held at Arkansas City beginning at 8 o’clock a.m., February 2, 1884. Applicants will please appear promptly at that time. A. H. LIMERICK, County Superintendent. C. T. ATKINSON, Assistant Examiner.

Winfield Courier, January 31, 1884.

The Dexter Township convention was held at the Dexter schoolhouse, in Dexter, January 26. Meeting called to order by the chairman of Dexter Township committee, and H. D. McDorman called to the chair and R. C. Maurer, Secretary, and the following candidates were placed in nomination: L. H. Wells, trustee; C. A. Walker, treasurer; L. C. Pattison, clerk; J. V. Hines and Willis Elliott, Justices of the Peace; Thos. Blakeley and E. V. Elliott, constables. After some more minor nominations, the meeting adjourned.

                         H. C. McDORMAN, Chairman; R. C. MAURER, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, January 31, 1884.

Miss Emma Gridley, sister of the Professor, takes the place of Miss Lena Bartlett, resigned, in the first primary department in our city schools.

Winfield Courier, January 31, 1884.

Wanted. Two Catholic teachers, ladies or gentlemen. None but competent and experienced teachers need apply. Rev. Kilian Call, M. P., pastor of Winfield, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, January 31, 1884.

Miss Lena Bartlett has resigned her position in our public schools and will take a clerical position in a Fort Scott bank. Miss Lena is one of the best teachers our schools have had, and her departure is much regretted by the Principal, the Board, and the Public.

Winfield Courier, January 31, 1884.

                                                              Kansas Day.

The twenty-third birthday of our beloved state was celebrated with appropriate exercises in all the departments of our schools on Tuesday, January 29th. A program was prepared by Prof. Gridley, the Supt. of schools, and given to the pupils of the various departments who, with the assistance of their teachers, succeeded in making the exercises very pleasant and profitable. Numerous interesting facts were repeated by the pupils relative to the early history, resources, geography, and miscellaneous topics referring to Kansas. All of the school rooms were more or less decorated. In the High School was a beautiful drawing of a bird in whose bill was a scroll on which was written the motto of our nation. The motto of our state was also neatly printed on an imitation of the Great Seal of our State.

In Miss Williams’ room a beautiful motto, “Kansas is our home,” adorned the wall together with pictures and evergreens.

Miss Dickie’s room was beautifully decorated with a large flag upon which was printed in bold characters the significant word, “Prohibition.” The motto, “Kansas the Key to Freedom,” was on the south wall of the room. Suspended from the wall was a large horseshoe attached to which were two pipes, which were to signify that peace reigns.

In Miss Barnes’ room very extensive preparations had been made. The following motto, “We Celebrate the 23rd Birthday of Kansas,” was on the west wall. A table covered with beautiful plants and flowers added much to the cheerfulness of the room. There were more than fifty flags upon the walls in this room.


The pupils of Mrs. Buford’s department did themselves credit by the decorations which they made. Flags and mottoes were neatly displayed.

In Miss Klingman’s room a neat motto of evergreen, “Kansas,” was on the wall together with flags and pictures.

Pictures, flags, and evergreens were made to make Miss Gibson’s room attractive.

The pupils in all the departments took an unusual interest in all the exercises of the hour, and it is to be hoped that all present received such an inspiration that shall result in making more patriotic citizens than they otherwise would have been. Many of our citizens were present and witnessed the exercises. Altogether we think the hour was profitably spent and will result in making such impressions as shall be of lasting good.

Excerpts...

[CORRESPONDENT FROM MT. WASHINGTON: “A. H. G.”]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

Our school taught by Miss Ramage is in a prosperous condition; both teacher and scholars being hard at work to make it a success.

Two or three old fashioned spelling schools have been held at our schoolhouse at which pleasure and profit were combined. As several teachers were present, it did the children good to see one wilt occasionally.

Supt. Limerick was presented one of our social events this winter and used his opportunity of talking to the people about taking an interest in our common schools. His remarks and advice were good and should be followed by all parents.

Excerpts...

[CORRESPONDENT: “A.”]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

                                                        RECOLLECTIONS.

After an absence of four years, none can be more astonished than I to note the change and improvements in our young city, Winfield.

January 29, being the 23rd birthday of the state of Kansas, was duly celebrated by our public schools. We visited ten school rooms where the joy of the young people knew no bounds. We heard music, vocal and instrumental; all of the early history, trials and struggles of young Kansas. The rooms were all gaily decorated with paintings, flowers, flags, fruits, and grains, with beautiful mottoes prepared by the children of each grade, in beautiful artistic style. We give a few: “Kansas Our Home!” “Kansas the Key to Freedom,” “Kansas 1861— Our 23rd Birthday,” in the primary rooms. Kansas darlings! We are proud of them and the great seal of Kansas. When the schools were dismissed, the scholars, teachers, and visitors went from one building to another until all the rooms had been visited. We were struck with the fine bearing of the scholars as they marched from room to room keeping time to the music furnished by the advanced grades, while the smiles of the professor and corps of teachers lit up the halls. A.

Excerpt...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “MARK.”]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.


An epidemic is raging among the obstreperous school youths of District 4. Out of an enrollment of thirty, the attendance has been reduced to five. The girls seem to be its favorite victims, as there has not been a scholar of this sex, either big, little, tall, slim, short, or stout, in attendance for a week to cheer and brighten the gloomy hours of the pedagogue. The writer has an idea that the general health of the pupils has been disturbed by the teacher’s fogyish and barbarous method in calling school by whaling the schoolhouse with a long pole till the building fairly trembles and the neighborhood is distracted with the reverberating echoes. The teacher being a muscular specimen of the genus homo, is capable of striking heavy blows, and the colder the weather, the harder the beating the poor, old, helpless schoolhouse receives. It would be more prudent for the Board to purchase a bell for him than to repair the schoolhouse each term. Forty-five dollars a month ought to justify any teacher in providing himself with a more suitable instrument to attract the attention of his pupils. Otherwise, he is a hale good fellow and a competent instructor. MARK.

Excerpt...

[OTTER CORRESPONDENTS: “TIM & JERRY.”]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

Turning north again to Mr. Hempy’s, here we see that Mr. J. Burright is moving into Mr. Hempy’s old house. Mr. Burright has rented a portion of his (Mr. Hempy’s) farm for the coming season. On inquiring for the young gentleman, we were informed that they are not at home, but are attending the school at Ft. Scott.

Excerpt...

[OTTER CORRESPONDENT: “JACK SUGGS.”]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

The school on Cedar is doing finely, from what we can learn from the boys. They say John lets them do about as they please. Euchre parties are common at the schoolhouse. Of course, the boys enjoy themselves.

Excerpt...

[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: “JOHN A.”]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

S. F. King says he can lick any school teacher of Beaver Township. Look out, boys, he is a good one.

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

                                                       Teachers’ Association.

The Central Division of the Cowley County Teachers Association will meet Feb. 23, 1884, at the High School building, Winfield. Following is the program.

                          SATURDAY, 10 O’CLOCK A.M., FEBRUARY 23, 1884.

1. “What improvements are needed in our examinations and certificates?” Prof. Limerick, W. P. Beaumont, and Anna Robertson.

2. “Periodicals versus readers for higher grades.” Miss Helen Mentch, S. L. Herriott, F. P. Vaughn.

3. “Closing the term.” Miss Allie Klingman, Miss Laura Barnes, S. W. Morton.

4. “General Review.” Leota Gary, Celina Bliss, Claude Rinker, Emma Gridley.

All are invited to attend.

BY ORDER OF COMMITTEE.


Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

Wanted. Two Catholic teachers, ladies or gentlemen. None but competent and experienced teachers need apply. Rev. Kilian. Call M. P., pastor of Winfield, Kansas.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

The Salem teachers are doing their best to elevate the thoughts of the youth in this vicinity.

Miss Mary Dalgarn will teach in the Crooked Elm district this spring. Success to all our teachers.

Excerpts...

[AKRON CORRESPONDENT: NAME NOT GIVEN.]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

J. W. Warren is talking of having an exhibition in his school the last day.

Rev. Rose has been holding a series of meetings for two weeks past, with good success, at Valley Center schoolhouse.

[MAPLE CITY CORRESPONDENT: “A RESIDENT.”]

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1884.

Our school closed last Thursday. The teacher, Miss Cora Robins, has left for Winfield. She will be greatly missed from our community, for, besides being a very successful teacher, she was organist for our Sabbath school and Lyceum. Our good wishes go with her.

A RESIDENT.

Excerpt...

[BETHEL CORRESPONDENT: “CANARY.”]

Winfield Courier, February 14, 1884.

Miss Maggie Kinney, our school teacher, has only two weeks more to teach for the present term; she has taught five months and has given perfect satisfaction. We, of Bethel, are sorry to see her leave and the board should by all means secure her for the next term.

Winfield Courier, February 14, 1884.

Professor Atkinson, of the Arkansas City schools, will begin the publication of a paper at that place soon, to be called the Republican. This will give the city by the canal three papers. We suppose the new one will be a patent outside, following suit with the other two. If the new proprietor is wise, he will put out an all home print full of live, bright, newsy matter, if it’s only four columns to the page. That city is a good field for such a paper. Another patent wouldn’t live six months.

Excerpt...

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 16, 1884.

                                   ARKANSAS CITY AND SURROUNDINGS.

                                                               SCHOOLS.


The schools of Arkansas City are of high grade. Latin, bookkeeping, physiology, philosophy, algebra, Rhetoric, and German are taught in the High School. The board and superintendent contemplate such a curriculum as will enable its graduates to enter the Freshman Department in the State University. A class of eight or ten pupils will graduate; it already possesses twelve graduates. Bonds have been voted for a new $10,000 building, which will be erected in the spring. An excellent system of common schools prevails.

Arkansas City Republican, February 16, 1884.

                                                       SCHOOL COLUMN.

                                                    SENIOR DEPARTMENT.

                                            HORACE C. VAUGHN, EDITOR.

                                                         INTRODUCTION.

This column will be devoted to school matters, and to the interests of the Senior class. This column is to be edited by a member of the Senior class; the editor or editors to be chosen by the members of the class, and such editor or editors to choose another member for assistant. This space is to be devoted exclusively to school matters. No topic concerning weather, fashion, or politics will be tolerated. Each successive member of the editorial staff should try to raise our column of the paper higher and higher, with one towering above his predecessor. This column will be expected to give the names of the scholars who have been perfect in deportment, to give the highest grades obtained in examination; together with the names of the scholars obtaining such grades. It shall also be the duty of the editor or editors to give space for the four best compositions composed by the senior class—the best composition to be printed first week; the second best second week; and so forth until the four best are printed.

                                                         SCHOOL TERMS.

The school was honored by a visit from Prof. L. D. Davis, principal of the school at Pawnee agency, and was accompanied by his sister-in-law, Miss Woodin, who is teacher at the Otoe agency. Mr. Davis remarked to our teacher that hearing the grammar and Latin classes made him want to go back to school soon. Everyone that visits the school speaks well of our school system. This reflects great credit on our teachers and ourselves.

The school is now crowded; there are more pupils than the seats can accommodate, and more scholars still coming. There are at present twelve members in the senior division.

We had a parsing match two weeks ago last Friday, but we suppose the junior editor will tell all about that. The juniors do parse rather well, but our motto is “Try, try again.”

The good people of Kansas and the United States generally will excuse the scarcity of items, as we have been too busy to devote much of our time to frolic.

The following named pupils of the senior class were perfect in deportment for the last month:

Effie Gilstrap

Minnie McIntire

Jessie Norton

Emma Theaker

Alice Lane

John Kirkpatrick

Alvan Sankey

F. C. McLaughlin

H. C. Vaughn

Dora Pearson


The highest grades obtained in examination are as follows:

Algebra, Emma Theaker, 100; Rhetoric, Effie Gilstrap, 100; Jessie Norton and Emma Theaker, 100 each; Latin, Minnie McIntire, 90.

We submit a copy of the best composition for this month; by Miss Emma Theaker. [NOTE: DID NOT COPY COMPOSITION...VERY HARD TO READ AS PRINT IS SO SMALL.]

                                                   JUNIOR DEPARTMENT.

                                           MOUNTFERD J. SCOTT, EDITOR.

By request of the class and permission of the editor, we take pleasure in representing the Arkansas City High School through your columns. If any pupil in this department does not want his toes trod upon he must keep them out of the way. We are representing the school and do not intend to misrepresent it. This column to be for the benefit of the parents in this vicinity, and we will publish evil as well as good report, and if we offend anyone, we are glad of it as we will always wish we had said more. . . . [HARD TO READ REST OF THIS PARAGRAPH AND ONE THAT FOLLOWS.] THEY HAD A LIST OF NAMES: BUTCHERED IN PRINT! THINK THEY WERE:

Mahlon Arnett

Viola Bishop

Frank Harper

Ella Crocker

Sarah Crocker

Mary Dakin

Jacob Endicott

Eddie Marshall

Laura Gould

Flora Gould

Lizzie Gilbert

Richard Hostetler

Eddie Garris

Howard Maxwell

Carrie Rice

Mountferd J. Scott

Eva Splawn

Clarence Hutchison

Martin Warren

Constance Woodin

Rose Morse

                                                             [LATER ON.]

Horace Vaughn studies grammar now. New pupils are coming in everyday. We do not know what will be done if very many more apply. The Professor will have to set them on the floor or the rostrum.


Miss Edna Worthley returned to school Monday, after an absence of one month. Her absence was caused by sickness at her home. If Miss Edna was a less studious pupil, we would doubt her catching up, but as it is, she will soon come to the front.

The Misses Gould look so much alike, they have to go home every day at noon to find out which one they are.

President M. L. Ward of the Ottawa University honored the school with a call and short address Wednesday morning. Mr. Ward has had a great deal of experience in school interests, and he highly recommended our school. If the scholars take his advice, they will profit by it.

We publish the following names of pupils carrying the highest grades in the different classes: History, Loyd Ruby, 100; Grammar, Eddie Marshall and Eva Splawn, 97 each; Spelling, Eva Splawn and Mollie Duncan, 100; Arithmetic, Frank Armstrong, Jacob Endicott, and Richard Hutchison, 100 each; Geography, Sammy Beall, Mollie Duncan, Flora Gould, Lida Whitney, and Joseph Campbell, 100 each.

The senior editor favored us with his photograph St. Valentine’s day.

We introduce the following as a specimen of the essay handed to us for this month: THE SOLDIER, COMPOSED BY MISS ELLA CROCKER.

                                              [DID NOT COPY THE ESSAY.]

Arkansas City Republican, February 16, 1884.

And now the school boy sketch.

Arkansas City Republican, February 16, 1884.

Let the parents read the school column.

Arkansas City Republican, February 16, 1884.

Rev. M. L. Ward, president of Ottawa University, favored us with his presence, last Wednesday. He is traveling in the interests of his school. This seat of learning is under the auspices of the Baptist Church. President Ward is visiting every church of his denomination, in the state, soliciting an endowment fund. He is an earnest worker, and we wish him the best of success in his noble work.

Arkansas City Republican, February 16, 1884.

Professor Atkinson, of the Arkansas City Schools, in connection with C. W. Coombs and J. J. Clark, will begin the publication of a paper at that place soon. This will give the city by the canal three papers. We suppose the new one will be a patent outside, following suit with the other two. If the new proprietors are wise, they will put out an all home print, full of live, bright, newsy matter, if it’s only four columns to the page. That city is a good field for such a paper. Another patent wouldn’t live six months. Winfield Courier.

The suggestion of the Courier was acted upon before it was received. THE REPUBLICAN, as can be discerned by an experienced eye, is “an all home print.” As for the printed matter, it appears for itself.

Arkansas City Republican, February 16, 1884.

Notice to Teachers. Notice is hereby given to applicants for teachers’ certificates, that a meeting of the board will be held at Arkansas City, in the high school room, on Saturday, March 8th, 1884. Applicants are requested to present themselves as early as 8 o’clock, as they will be required to finish the examination in one day.

A. H. LIMERICK, County Superintendent.

C. T. ATKINSON, Examiner.


Arkansas City Traveler, February 20, 1884.

                                                      Graveyard Association.

There will be a meeting of the Parker Cemetery Association held at the Parker schoolhouse in East Creswell on Thursday, March 6, 1884, for the transaction of business. A full turnout of those interested in desired. JOHN COOK, Clerk.

Excerpt from a most peculiar article...

[BEAVER TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: “YAWCUB.”]

Winfield Courier, February 21, 1884.

                                         (Ruf Wich Tannyhill Ish De Kounty seat.)

Neber since Ole Abe sot de niggers all free, and ven de last cannon ball pusted, und de poys und graybacks in blue cum marchin’ home, has dere pin such a time uv rechoicing among de vimens as der vos at our last lexun, ven it vos sure dings dot Mithur Browning be our asxsessor und Thomas Clift road overseer. Now den ve are most sartin dot de ole played oud mules and cows wots got no teeth, owned by de plack abolition party, vont pe sessed vay up so high as Demccratic thorougbreds. Ve feels sure dot de very nexth leetle owl dot comes to sthay all nite mit our schoolhouse, vill dake fur his text de busthed condition of de Democratic party uv Beaver township.

Winfield Courier, February 21, 1884.

                                                       SING SMALL, SAM.

The Kansas City Journal charges Sam Riggs, who is now so fiercely denouncing railroad land grants—when nobody “under the broad cannister of the heaven,” as Mrs. Partington said, is proposing to make any land grants—with being the person who drafted the bill giving five hundred thousand acres of school lands to four railroad companies, and with assisting in lobbying that bill through the Legislature. It also alleges that Mr. Riggs, when the attorney of the L. L. & G. Road, assisted in consummating a treaty with the Osages whereby that corporation secured 9,000,000 acres of Kansas lands for nineteen cents per acre. It is evident that Samuel had better sing very small on the railroad land grant key.

Excerpt...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “Y. W. C.”]

Winfield Courier, February 21, 1884.

There will be a grand festival at the Holland schoolhouse next Thursday evening. Benefits go toward the new Constant church. A good time is anticipated by all.

Winfield Courier, February 21, 1884.

[SKIPPED SCHOOL LAND SALE NOTICE CONCERNING ABOUT 14 SCHOOL LANDS THAT WERE TO BE OFFERED FOR SALE TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER ON MARCH 14, 1884.]

Winfield Courier, February 21, 1884.

The Ladies of the Presbyterian Mite Society give an Oyster supper at the schoolhouse in Tisdale Friday evening, Feb. 22. All are cordially invited.

Winfield Courier, February 21, 1884.

                                                             School Funds.


The County Superintendent has received $2,409.00, our semi-annual apportionment of the State school fund. It is 35 cents per capita for all school children. He has also made an apportionment of the county funds accruing from violations of the Prohibitory Law in Cowley County during the last six months. It amounts to $2,836.53, being 35 cents for each school child in the county. Out of this whiskey fund the Winfield schools get $860.15, Arkansas City $211.40, Dexter $44.30, Cambridge $35.00, Burden $63.00, Udall $27.00, New Salem $35.35, Maple City $36.75, and so on all over the county. So it seems that the fellows who have been so anxious to sell liquor lately have been compelled to run the schools of the county about a month. The total of State and county funds is $5,246.13, for six months. Ten thousand dollars a year is quite an item in the expense of running our schools.

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

The school was honored by an appreciated call from Mr. S. W. Duncan and Mr. Geo. E. Hasie. Call again, gentlemen.

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

                                                       SCHOOL COLUMN.

                                                   SENIOR DEPARTMENT.

                                            HORACE G. VAUGHN, EDITOR.

The school is progressing finely. We had another parsing match last Friday with the usual result. One week from next Monday night we have a spelling match. Now we are sorry that matters have turned out unfavorably for us, but, the juniors will remember that, “Talent differs all is well and wisely but,” if we cannot teach them how to parse, we will teach them how to spell. After school the juniors remain and spell from four to six.

                             [SORRY! DO NOT UNDERSTAND QUOTATION!]

The Jr. Ed. received his photo on St. Valentine’s day, and now he says the photo is ours, don’t repudiate your own picture, Mountford.

                                                           RUMOR SAYS:

That Alice L. Lane is the best grammarian in school. That Emma Theaker is the best mathematician. That Jr. Editor is cultivating a mustache. That Mountford Scott can make more noise than a brass band, a locomotive, a span of mules, and a saw mill. Jrs. are very much elated but “pride goeth before a fall.”

                                                  Composed by H. G. Vaughn.

[SKIPPED HIS ARTICLE ENTITLED “PROGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES.”]

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

The School House to the front; the saloon to the rear.

Miss Laura Holloway returned to school Monday, after an absence of one week.

                                                   JUNIOR DEPARTMENT.

                                           MOUNTFERD J. SCOTT, EDITOR.

[MOST CONFUSING! FIRST PART CALLED HIM “MOUNTFORD”...HEADER ON THIS PORTION CALLS HIM “MOUNTFERD”...???]

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

Senior editor’s likeness still on hand. Every scholar thinks it favors him.


We suppose the seniors will not say anymore about parsing matches, “seeing they were so easily beaten” last Friday. They have now challenged us to a spelling match which will take place one week from next Monday evening. It is generally supposed that they will best us spelling, but they will not do it as easily as they anticipate, and they would feel bad if they should get beaten again.

Joseph Campbell and Loyd Ruby are the best historians in the class.

The singing class is the most interesting class in the school, and it is wonderful how the pupils are learning; some are a little bashful yet, but they will soon get over that. We will take up drawing in a couple of weeks, and that will be an interesting branch of the school.

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

Mrs. Worthley paid the school an appreciation visit last Friday afternoon; she was very much pleased with the way the parsing match was conducted. Now a word to parents, you should take Mrs. Worthley as a criterion and visit the school yourself. It would show that you were interested in the welfare of your pupils, and teacher. During this term there has been but twenty visitors, that is what you would call visitors. It’s something to think about and act upon. If you had as many swine some place, you would go to see them at least once a week, and surely you could spare time enough to visit the school once in nine months. “Well,” says one, “there is a teacher at school to attend to the children.” So there is but that is not it, do you know for yourself how your pupil is getting along? Do you suppose if your pupil is at the foot of his class, he will tell you as quickly as he would if he was head unless you ask him? Come and see the position of each pupil in his or her classes and you will know how to talk to them, and what advice to give, or how to compliment your children.

Our teacher ridiculed us a little last Friday, the senior thinks. He made the remark that the juniors had slept with two grammars and a dictionary all last week. We do not deny it, but we accomplished our end if we did, and it makes no difference how heavy the scales are just so they balance, you know. The juniors will soon be through Meredith’s geography; we have had a thorough course this winter and there will be about twenty-five to graduate next year.

The seniors are losing no time; every spare moment they have they are studying Patterson’s spellers and analyzer.

THERE WAS MORE...WHICH I SKIPPED...FUNNY THING! AT THE END THIS LONG ARTICLE WAS SIGNED BY “EVA SPLAWN.”

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

Through the generosity of the school board, the teachers and pupils of the city schools enjoyed a holiday yesterday.

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

                                                   JUNIOR DEPARTMENT.

                                           MOUNTFERD J. SCOTT, EDITOR.

There was some mistake in the school column last week; if the good people will excuse us, we will try and do better hereafter.

The seniors take advantage of small mistakes, especially the editor.

Next Monday evening will witness the scene of the spelling match at the Arkansas City high school. Turn out those who want to see the discipline in that department, in that branch of the course; all are expected to spell exceedingly well except the editors.

Miss Lida Whitley stays at the head of the geography class “in good shape.”


The following is a list of people of Miss Hunt’s department that received 100 percent: Ida Lane, Mary Dunn, Cora Taylor, Anna Wagstaff, Mervin Miller, Harry Gilstrap, Jimmie Kirkpatrick, Willie Wilson, Mattie Patterson, Elsa Darrough, Sarah Hill, Maggie Ford, Emma Wilson, Wyatt Hutchinson.

Those who were imperfect in the same department are: Larkin Endicott, James Williams, Eddie Endicott, Charley Taylor, Jay Fairclo, Amy Landes, Flora Kreamer, Ella DeBruce, Mary Lewis.

Next week is examination week; most of the pupils stand good examinations.

                                 MORE ITEMS...BUT NO NAMES! I SKIPPED.

Arkansas City Republican, February 23, 1884.

On the evening of March 3rd, a match-spelling, between the members of the senior and junior classes of the Arkansas City schools, will take place at the High School room. The admission fee will be 10 cents, and the proceeds will be for the benefit of the school library.

Excerpt...

[CORRESPONDENCE FROM “J. A.”]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 27, 1884.

                               “And Darkness Was Upon the Face of the Deep.”

[The following was handed to Mr. Atkinson for publication, but was refused by that gentleman, who seemingly does not accord to others the privilege he claims for himself. ED. TRAVELER.]

Said a mother to us recently: “My boy and girl came from school repeating the most filthy and abominable language, too horrible for me to repeat. It sickens me. Oh, I don’t know what to do to stop it,” she said, in much distress. Are not you, sir, largely responsible for this immorality of our schools, by ignoring as you do the reading of God’s word, the Bible, in the schools? Oh, man, “first cast the beam out of thine own eye.” J. A.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 27, 1884.

DIED. Miss Hattie Jordan, aged 14, died last Sunday morning, of brain fever. She having been a pupil in our schools, no school was held in her room on Monday morning, when all that was left of the young life was carried to the grave. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the community in this their hour of affliction.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1884.       

Mr. Christopher and family will go to Topeka in a short time. They are good neighbors and true friends to those they associate with. We shall miss them sadly. Miss May has finished her school at Moscow.

[GRAND PRAIRIE CORRESPONDENT: “ONE OF THE BOYS.”]

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1884.

We have three more weeks of school.

And we have preaching every two weeks by Rev. Tyler.

There is some sickness in this neighborhood. Mr. W. F. Smith’s little child is quite sick at present.


There was a birthday party at Mr. Hodgson’s in honor of their daughter, Miss Anna. There were present twenty of our schoolmates, and our teacher, Miss Carlisle. We all had a good time. The table was loaded with good things, such as roast turkey, cranberry sauce, etc.

Mr. Editor, this is my first trial at writing for a paper, and if I escape the wastebasket this time, I may come again. I am only 13 years old. ONE OF THE BOYS.

[An excellent start. Come again. ED.]

Excerpts...

[PRAIRIE HOME CORRESPONDENT: “HOPE.”]

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1884.

Miss May Christopher closed her school at Moscow on the 2nd instant.

Mr. Lowe, successor to M. Christopher, has gone to Ohio for his family and expects to be settled on his new place early in March. He intends to take up his residence in Topeka the present season.

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1884.

                  Report of Winfield Public Schools for the Month Ending Feb. 15, 1884.

                     HAD TO SKIP STATISTICAL DATA...TOO HARD TO READ!

One bad feature in the above report is the great number of cases of tardiness. In one department there were six pupils each of which was tardy 15 times during the month, and each brought written excuses from parents for these delinquencies. Will the parents assist in overcoming this, by urging their children to be prompt in their attendance.

                                                      A. GRIDLEY, Jr., Supt.

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1884.

Mr. M. A. Smalley, of Carey, Ohio, an old friend and school teacher of James McLain, was in the city Tuesday. Mr. Smalley passed through Winfield fourteen years ago on a buffalo hunt, when only one or two houses were here. The only thing he now recognized was the old ford near the Tunnel mill, which he remembered as the place where one of the hunting party of 1870 was drowned. Buffalo were not far from this point in those days.

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1884.

                                                          Moving Comment.


The writer had the pleasure on last Saturday afternoon of accompanying a bright party of Winfield people to Cambridge. The day was clear and calm and many things were observed along the way which are worthy of note. We had been feeling very good over the rapid improvement of the queen city of the valley, Winfield, but a drive over this beautiful country revealed forcibly the vast strides being made in other parts of Cowley in the way of permanent improvement. Almost every farm shows new buildings, of one kind and another, a corral full of cattle and hogs and a general air of thrift. Some of Cowley’s best land and many of her wealthiest farmers are between Winfield and Cambridge. New Salem, the first town we strike, has the appearance of having come out of winter quarters in good spirits. Several new houses were noticed and the number of cars standing on the side track at the depot would denote quite a shipping trade. The little city over on the hill, Burden, has done itself proud during the past few months. On approaching the town we counted forty nine houses newly built or in course of erection. The place presented a business like appearance, the merchants were busy, and the streets were crowded with teams. We called around to see Brother Henthorn, but found nobody but the post office in. The Enterprise has several times accused the COURIER of being inimical to the interests of Burden, which it knew was a mistake, and we wanted to see its good looking and efficient young editor, J. W. Henthorn, and inform him of our intention to give the Enterprise and Burden a puff. The COURIER  has always claimed that Burden was a remarkable little town, and while the railroad and splendid country around it have done much, there is no doubt that the town owes more of its prosperity to the Enterprise than to anything else. It has advertised and made Burden: the town never could have been what it is without a good local paper. Torrance has made but few recent changes. The most prominent thing is its fine schoolhouse, which is a very creditable structure. In traveling through Cowley, in any direction, the schoolhouses are a noticeable feature. At New Salem the schoolhouse would do honor to a much larger town. Burden’s schoolhouse is the finest building in the place, while that at Cambridge is superior to any outside of Winfield, Arkansas City, or Burden. It is a two story stone structure, 30 x 60 feet, is splendidly furnished, and has a fine bell. Mr. Will C. Barnes, a Winfieldite, to whom the company are under many obligations for courtesies extended, is principal and Miss Lizzie Palmer, well known to many Winfield people, is assistant. They are among Cowley’s most capable teachers and are giving good satisfaction. Of course, we called on the Cambridge News, and found the proprietors, Messrs. S. B. Sherman and H. F. Hicks, at home. One of them was busily engaged trying to explain to a rural gentleman that the News had ten times as many subscribers as that “vile sheet,” the Burden Enterprise, and that their list had increased until it contained one-fiftieth as many as the Winfield COURIER, the oldest and most reliable paper in the county. He must have been correct. Mr. W. G. Seaver, the energetic, intelligent young editor of the News, was at his post, but instead of writing narrow gauge editorials, he was making selections of type from a specimen book, with which to start a paper at Dexter in a few weeks. He thinks he can make a paper pay at that place. He is a racy writer and was at one time connected with the St. Joe Gazette. Should he start a paper at Dexter, it will undoubtedly be a success in point of excellence, the only uncertain thing being a sufficient patronage. We supposed that no Satanic angels ever visited a sequestered spot like Cambridge, but they do. A man with a grip and twenty-five cents worth of soap done up in little wads, opened out there during our stay. His lusty voice drew a crowd around him, and after placing five and two dollar bills in some of the wrappers and rolling them up, he commenced to dispose of the soap to persons who were anxious to get five dollars for two. After clearing fifty dollars, twenty of which came from a young man who seemed illy able to make such a contribution, he quietly slid out of town. There are always men ready to fall into such traps, and the only lamentable thing about it is that experience dost seem to teach them anything. We were pleased to meet at Cambridge Miss Tirzah A. Hoyland, who has been the regular correspondent of the COURIER from New Salem for many years. She is one of Cowley’s most intelligent ladies and has written many good things for this paper. She was visiting friends there. In and around Cambridge are many substantial, intelligent men, and other than those already named, we might mention F. S. Coons, proprietor of the Cambridge House, W. H. Palmer, Thos. S. Griffin, J. B. Lukens, L. B. Carter, J. P. Craft, J. S. Bernard, James B. Rowe, and others whose names we did not get. It is also the home of County Commissioner, J. A. Irwin.

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1884.

                                                                Why Is It?


“I am always particularly interested in reading the items in the COURIER from the different neighborhood correspondents, and when I read of the many thorough, efficient teachers employed in the different schools of the county, I wonder why it could not have been our lot to have had such an one this winter, in District 97.” Crooked Elm.

Like everything else in this world, the quality of the teacher depends very much upon the price you pay. In turning to the list of Cowley teachers, we find that district 97 pays its teacher but thirty dollars per month: one of the smallest salaries in the county. Persons who have spent years fitting themselves for teachers can’t afford such remuneration. A large majority of Cowley’s teachers get over forty dollars per month and earn every cent of the money, and more.

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1884.

Rev. W. H. Rose, in charge of Douglas circuit, has just closed a protracted meeting at Valley Center schoolhouse, which resulted in 29 accessions to the church. The society is in a prosperous condition; peace and harmony prevail. Measures will be taken in the near future to build a church.

Winfield Courier, February 28, 1884.

Miss Therrie J. Taylor, the youngest daughter of Dr. Taylor of this city, is expected to arrive in town this week from the city of Baltimore, Maryland. We understand that she comes to southern Kansas for two purposes: to put herself under the professional care of her father, who differs with her physician in Baltimore; and when she recovers her health, intends to devote herself to the teaching of instrumental music.

      Arkansas City Republican, March 1, 1884.

                                                       SCHOOL COLUMN.

                                                   SENIOR DEPARTMENT.

                                            HORACE G. VAUGHN, EDITOR.

One week from Monday night we have a spelling match; admission 10 cents. Come out everybody and hear us. Read the soul-stirring, heroic ode found in the junior column last week. The junior editor must have been up late the night before the paper was published. “The leaders seems to be horribly annoyed about something.” “Oh! Juniors; you should not let such angry passions rise. Your hands were never made to tear out junior’s eyes.” Considerable logic about that we will admit. Now, we have heard of the mule kicking another mule; we have heard of a young man who went to the fair, spent all his money, came home and whipped himself for being such a fool; but we never before heard of one junior tearing out another junior’s eyes.

Everyone should take the advice given by the junior editor, and visit our schools often. It would be a great encouragement to our teachers and to ourselves. Miss Effie Gilstrap returned to school last Monday; we are always pleased to see seniors coming in, as the call can ill afford to lose any of its members. We need all our members to compete with the juniors, in the branches they are studying. To tell the truth, the junior class is a class of which any school ought to be proud.

We publish the following, as third best essay for this month. Composed by John Kirkpatrick. [CALLED “THE BOY.” DID NOT COPY IT.]

Arkansas City Republican, March 1, 1884.


George Myers, Charles Myers, and Jerome Branson, were tried before Judge Bonsall, last Thursday, on the charge of disturbing the peace of Cyrus Perkins and others, by throwing eggs against the schoolhouse, in district No. 80, East Bolton, and were fined $1 each and costs, amounting to about $33 apiece, we are informed.

Arkansas City Republican, March 1, 1884.

DIED. Miss Hattie Jordan, a pupil of Mrs. Geo. Wright’s department, died last Sunday, of brain fever. The department in which she had attended school was dismissed at 10 o’clock, in order that her mates might attend the funeral services. She was a pleasant pupil and will be sadly missed by both teacher and pupils.

Arkansas City Republican, March 1, 1884.

DIED. Last Sunday morning, a little son of Mr. T. R. Brown started as usual for Sunday school, at the Parker schoolhouse. In a short time he was found insensible on the ground. It is supposed the horse stumbled and threw him. He was insensible when discovered. All that love and skill could do was done, but in vain. On Wednesday morning he died, and was buried at the Parker graveyard on Thursday. He was nine years of age and was a bright and noble lad. All who knew him loved him. On the morning of the accident, he had for recitation the verse, “Boast not of tomorrow; for we know not what a day may bring forth.” Elder Gans made the above the text of the funeral discourse.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 5, 1884.

                                                        From the Other Side.

Mr. Editor: What are these doctors trying to dose us with, these days? What do the general public care about “codes” and whether doctors advertise or not? If I were you, Mr. Editor, I’d shut off their steam pretty quick and end their misery. Let ‘em take a column, if they want to blow their horns in an advertisement, and pay for it at regular rates, and no personals thrown in. I think this would quench their advertising ardor right away. I suggest a cut of a fat and lean man with the legend, “I take Dr. So-and-So’s medicine,” and “I don’t,” as a warning to the dear people. A doctor’s creed is to get more money and if he can make more money out of eyes and ears than head and feet, why let him, I say. We never met Alma Mater, and don’t want to. Guess she’s a nice enough girl, though, or the boys wouldn’t talk about her so much. Vindex needn’t feel bad about “the best doctor in town,” for we presume said doctor is the only one that has found out he’s any better than the average, and as long as he sticks to “Fiziologizing,” there isn’t much harm likely to be done. If the teacher likes to tell the school children about his particular pet in the pill line, who’s to hinder. But if I don’t quit, you’ll think me as bad as the doctor fellows, so ta ta. From one of the LAITY.

[RICHLAND TOWNSHIP AGAINST NARROW GAUGE PROPOSITION.]

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

From Richland. At a meeting of the voters of the south precinct of Richland Township held Monday night at Floral schoolhouse, Feb. 25th, 1884, Captain Stevens was chosen chairman, S. W. Norton, Jr., was chosen secretary. The object of the meeting was to consider the proposition of the projected Narrow Gauge. Rousing speeches against the proposition, as stated, were made by the chairman, Mr. Howard, and Mr. Irwin. The following resolutions were adopted by the meeting unanimously.


Whereas, The Commissioners of Cowley County have submitted to the voters a proposition to aid the Denver, Memphis & Atlantic railroad, which proposition we believe to be unfair, because, 1st. It is not binding enough on the company as to the kind of material to be used in the construction of said road, 2nd. Because said company does not bind itself to have in operation any connecting road outside of Cowley County, and 3rd. Because we believe the amount asked is exorbitant for the kind of a road to be built. Therefore, be it

Resolved, That we believe that it is to the interest to the voters of Cowley County to vote against the proposition of said Narrow Gauge.

Resolved, That we urge upon the people of other townships in the county to organize for the purpose of making a systematic fight against said proposition.

S. W. NORTON, Secretary.

Excerpt from a long article...

[THE NARROW GAUGE.]

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

                               THOSE ALONG THE LINE MOST BENEFITTED.

It is natural to expect that the most unanimous support of the proposition will be found along the line of the proposed road and the most general opposition will be found in places most distant from the road, because along the line of the road people are benefitted most by it. In addition to the benefit of nearness to the accommodations and the greater enhanced value to property, the railroad is taxed for the townships and school districts it runs through while townships and school districts in the county which the road does not touch get no benefit from township and district taxation of railroads. This is neither fair, just, nor right, and should be remedied by a constitutional amendment if, as is concluded, it cannot be remedied without. But this injustice is not in itself a reason that persons not benefitted by these taxes should vote against the bonds, for they are benefitted in other ways to such an extent that they are better off with the bonds than without them because of taxation for county purposes alone. It cannot help them to vote against what will do them good because the same thing will do the others more good.

Excerpts...

[CAMBRIDGE CORRESPONDENT: “CLYDE.”]

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

On Saturday evening quite a number of the young folks met at the schoolhouse to ride the Goat. Quite a number from Winfield were present, and among the number was one of the COURIER boys, Mr. Frank Greer. I presume quite a number will join the temperance ranks. I expect to myself if they don’t black ball me.

School is going off finely and the youths of this vicinity are learning rapidly under good instruction from Prof. Barnes and Miss Parmer. They seem to give universal satisfaction.

Excerpt...

[GRAND PRAIRIE CORRESPONDENT: “ONE OF THE BOYS.”]

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

We had a spelling school at Grand Prairie Friday night. There were a large number out. All passed off well except going home. Mr. John Reddishes’ horses got frightened while he was paying attention to his best girl; might have been serious, but fortunately help came and he got off with only a split double-tree.


Excerpt...

[ODESSA CORRESPONDENT: “M. S.”]

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

Our school is progressing nicely with W. B. Beaumont as teacher.

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

The railroad election of Fairview Township on March 11th will be held at Akron schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

Miss Mary Berkey left last Saturday for Emporia, where she will take a course in the State Normal school. Miss Mary is a bright young lady and we are glad to see her afforded an opportunity of advancing in educational matters.

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

Miss Annie Barnes of Winfield has just closed a six months’ term of school at Valley Center Schoolhouse, which was the most interesting, systematic, and best governed school in this part of the county. It is the wish of many of the patrons that the school board try and secure her to teach the next term of school.

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

Mr. H. G. Norton closed his winter term of school at Excelsior, three miles south of town, last Friday. Everybody in the district turned out with filled baskets and had a grand picnic. Mr. Norton is one of our best teachers and has given excellent satisfaction. Excelsior was about the first schoolhouse put up in Cowley County, and during the early days the writer imbibed ideas and shot paper wads within its walls. The district has seen many changes since then, and the places of many “old timers” are filled by others.

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

MARRIED. Mr. George Wright, nephew of Dr. W. T. Wright of this city, and Miss Anna Norton were married in Arkansas City on last Thursday evening. George is one of Cowley’s brightest young men and has many friends in Winfield, who wish himself and bride a long and happy life. Miss Norton was, for a long time, a teacher in the Arkansas City schools and is an accomplished lady.

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1884.

The Senior Class of the High School will be pleased to meet all their friends on Friday evening, March 7th, at East Ward school building. Admission 10 cents.

Arkansas City Republican, March 8, 1884.

The school column was left out this week for want of space.

Arkansas City Republican, March 8, 1884.

At a meeting of the school board, held last Thursday evening, it was decided that pupils who are neither absent or tardy for a whole month, will be dismissed one hour earlier on one Friday afternoon of each month.

Excerpt...

[NORTH RICHLAND CORRESPONDENT: “DICK RELVIG.”]

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1884.

District 23 has built a good new house, size 24 x 32. School will close soon. Mr. Stuber has given the boys and girls a good start.


Excerpts...

[OTTER CORRESPONDENT: “OTTERITE.”]

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1884.

Our school board are all women’s rights men.

Miss Robbins, of Winfield, will teach our summer school of three months.

Most everyone is interested now about the D. M. & A. railroad. They think that those last stipulations that the Company filed with the county Clerk are enough, and that it is to their interest to vote for the bonds. Hon. Jas. McDermott of Winfield addressed quite a number of the sturdy yeomanry of Otter Township at the Cedar Creek schoolhouse on Wednesday evening and convinced, it seems, most all the doubting Thomases that they should fall in with offered mercy before it is too late. OTTERITE.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVIA.”]

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1884.

The school at the station closed on the 7th. With regrets the students see Miss Davenport leave.

The school in old Salem has closed for this term. Mr. Roberts awarded prizes to the deserving ones, and treated all the pupils and his numerous guests to candy. It seems I was lucky enough to get treated to all the goodies, as I just returned from my visit in time for the exercises at school. I presume I ought to tell you what a delightful time I had in my travels. Left Salem on Saturday morning the 23rd. Arrived all right at my destination, Cambridge, and was warmly welcomed by dear, kind friends. That evening I, with quite a number of the Cambridges, had a ride on the I. O. G. T.’s goat, in the Cambridge schoolhouse. The Lodge, like myself, was a stranger there, but I trust the young people who seem to possess plenty of energy will keep the Temperance boat from sinking and may their Lodge be the means of saving many. On Sunday morning with my friends, I attended Sunday school, and listened also to an excellent discourse from the Rev. Knight. Attended prayer meeting in the evening. On Monday morning, behind the spirited horses of the Row brothers, I enjoyed a ride of four miles to the Ranch, where I spent two days very pleasantly and feasted on the sweets of the land, and was “honeyed” to my heart’s content. Returned to the little city and on Tuesday evening the Rowe brothers entertained quite a number of their friends, and thus I formed some very pleasant acquaintances. The rest of my visit was quietly passed and on Thursday eve I returned home, but my trip was far from lonesome, as I met Mrs. Olds, also Mrs. Asp, of Winfield, at the Cambridge depot, also Mr. Beasley of Burden, and Mr. James B. Rowe formed our little party and we had plenty of fun. The ladies, also Mr. Beasley, dropped off at Burden. We arrived in Salem in time for Christian service (came on the local), were kindly entertained a few moments by Mrs. Lucas, and after church was brought home by my good brother, and so ended my travels. But I forgot to mention that I met quite a number of Winfieldites while there, and among the number Mr. Frank Greer, and enjoyed a friendly little chat with that amiable gentleman. OLIVIA.

[TEACHERS EXAMINATION.]

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1884.


An examination of applicants for teachers’ certificates, will be held at the Courthouse beginning at 9 o’clock a.m., March 21, 1884, and continues two days. Applicants will please appear promptly at that time. A. H. LIMERICK, County Superintendent.

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1884.

The winter terms of our district schools are now closing and contracts are being made for spring and summer terms.

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1884.

H. G. Norton commenced a spring term of school last Monday at Excelsior, south of town, where he closed a winter term a week previously.

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1884.

The Senior class entertainment at the high school building on last Friday evening was very pleasant, and largely attended. Music, recitations, etc., formed the program. The proceeds go toward hiring the Opera House for the graduating exercises at the close of the term.

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1884.

The Kindergarten entertainment given by Mrs. Garlick on Tuesday evening was the cutest thing that our citizens have yet enjoyed. The participants exhibited perfect training and played Mother Goose, dramatized in a way that would do credit to even grown persons. Mrs. Garlick is making a grand success of her Kindergarten school and is being well patronized.

[SCHOOL REPORT.]

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1884.

The report of Valley View school for term commencing Oct. 1st, 1883, and ending Feb. 22, 1884. Number of pupils enrolled 41. Average first two months 16 11-40. Average last three months 24 1-3. A grade general average 97-3/4. Wilber Martin 100, Carrie Schwantes and Pearl Martin 98, B. Grade Peter Schwantes, George Staggers, and Charlie Staggers 92, May Blanchard and Mary Bryan 87, Alice Pennington 90, average 90. C. grade, Charley Schwantes and Sandy Craig 92, Jessie Staggers, Nellie Martin, May Allen, Robert Craig, Heartie Schwantes and Ben Perrin, 89, general average 89-3/4.

Number whose deportment was 100 last month: Pearlie Perrin, Ben Schwantes, Wilber Martin, Sandy and Robert Craig, Charlie Staggers. James Craig’s deportment averaged 100 during term. Only one scholar, Pearly Herrin, was not absent during term.

The following is a program of closing exercises.

Select reading by Wilber Martin, subject “Inchape Afloat.”

Declamation by Charley Stewart, “Meeting of the Birds.”

“Nobody’s Child,” Jessie Staggers.

“Spring,” Sandy Craig.

“Missionary Music,” Nellie Martin.

“Trust in God,” Charlie Staggers.

“Little by Little,” Charlie Schwantes.

“Buckle down Boys,” Robert Craig.

“Forty Acre Farm,” Pearl Martin.

“Corn of Kansas,” Carrie Schwantes.

Select reading by May Bryan, “She has outlived her usefulness.”

Pearlie Perrin, “How to tell it.”


Ben Schwantes, “Look not upon the wine when it is Red.”

Earl Lee, “Speak Gently.”

John Schwantes, “Come Again.”

Eva Forbs, “Be in Time.”

Ida Schwantes, “My Mother.”

Alvah Smith, “The Little Teacher.”

Lizzie Simcocks, “How it Happened.”

Cora Schwantes, “The Bridge of Sighs.”

Wilber Martin, “Look at Both Sides.”

Select reading by Pearl Martin, “Washington and the Poor Widow.”

Carrie Schwantes, “Independence Bells.”

All the smaller scholars had declamations without a single exception, and the scholars all did exceedingly well. After the exercises closed, Mr. J. F. Martin and others addressed the school. ANNA MARK, Teacher.

Arkansas City Republican, March 15, 1884.

At the teacher’s examination, last Saturday, held at the high school room, there were three applicants: Misses Minnie Turner, Hannah Gilbert, and Mary A. Johnson. They succeeded in securing certificates for one year. Miss Lizzie, Gilbert and Horace G. Vaughn, obtained grades sufficient for a six month’s certificate, but do not wish to teach.

Arkansas City Republican, March 15, 1884.

The following pupils of the high school department were perfect in deportment during the sixth month of the term.

Mahlon Arnett, Cora Armstead, Sammie Beall, Joseph Campbell, Sarah Crocker, D. C. Duncan, Jacob Endicott, Effie Gilstrap, Laura Gould, Ida Hackleman, Richard Hutchins, Alice L. Lane, Eddie Marshall, Minnie McIntire, Howard Maxwell, Birdie Martin, Dora Pearson, Sarepta Abrams, Frank Barnett, Viola Bishop, Ella Crocker, Mary Dakin, Mollie Duncan, Lizzie Gilbert, Eddie Ganes, Flora Gould, Laura Holloway, John Kirkpatrick, Hattie Laird, Rosa Moore, Fred. McLaughlin, Mettie Marbin, Jessie Norton, Walter Pickering, Lillie Purdy, Lloyd Ruby, M. J. Scott, Emma Theaker, Clarence Thompson, Martin Warren, Lida Whitney, Frank Wright, Carrie Rice, Alvan Sankey, Eva Splawn, Frank Theaker, Horace Vaughn, Edna Worthley, Constance Woodin, Frank Wright.

The following pupil was imperfect and received 36 percent: Robert A. Nipp.

Arkansas City Republican, March 15, 1884.

                                                       SCHOOL COLUMN.

                                                   SENIOR DEPARTMENT.

                                            HORACE G. VAUGHN, EDITOR.

School is progressing finely.


Our spelling came off in due season, and now the howls of the juniors are heard throughout the land of “previous question,” referring to our parsing matches. The junior editor was very restless Monday night, and, as he was tossing his head upon his pillow, he was heard to murmur something like the following: “Oh ye juniors, ye juniors! Why have ye forsaken me. How often, O ye juniors, have we met at the neighbors’ houses and practiced from 6 to 12, and how often we have boasted of defeating the seniors; but now we are beaten. We will try them again, but it will amount to the same thing.” . . . .

We publish the following as the fourth best essay for this month, written by Miss Effa Gilstrap...”AIMING AT PERFECTION.” [DID NOT COPY.]

Arkansas City Republican, March 15, 1884.

                                                   JUNIOR DEPARTMENT.

                                           MOUNTFERD J. SCOTT, EDITOR.

Oh! How bad we feel, the seniors beat us in spelling. . . .

Miss Lizzie Gilbert has learned a new song.

Miss Mollie Duncan held up the junior flag, at the spelling match, till all the others had failed. This shows that Miss Mollie was in earnest, and meant to excel. The musical convention took considerable patronage from the spelling match.

The following is the fourth essay for this month, “DELAYS THE DANGEROUS,” by Sarepta Abrams. [I DID NOT COPY.]

Arkansas City Republican, March 15, 1884.

BOOKS IN HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY WERE LISTED...NEXT TO IMPOSSIBLE TO READ! BELIEVE TRAVELER DID THIS ALSO.

Excerpts...

[MAPLE CITY CORRESPONDENT: “FLO.”]

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1884.

The ladies of District 98, a few days since, had an entertainment for the purpose of raising money to purchase an organ for the school and Sunday school. The net proceeds amounted to $43.

Mr. Quincy A. Roberts, who has been teaching at 98, is taking a few days vacation and visiting friends and relatives in your city.

Excerpt...

[AKRON CORRESPONDENT: “OLIVER.”]

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1884.

J. W. Warren’s school, at Akron, closed last Tuesday with a big dinner and lots of nuts and candies and a good time in general, and on Friday night the school gave an exhibition in the schoolhouse, which was first class. The house was crowded to its utmost capacity. The principle part of the play was a drama entitled “Down by the Sea.” The actors performed their parts well and it was comic as well as interesting. Prof. Hittle with three fiddlers furnished excellent music during the evening. Mr. Warren has given general satisfaction in the school this winter and we hope the district will be so lucky as to secure him for another term. OLIVER.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1884.

School contracts for spring terms of three months are being made throughout the county and some of the schools have already commenced. The winter and spring terms of a majority of the districts will cover nine months, which affords splendid educational advantages. But few counties are as forward as Cowley in matters of education.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1884.


A very pleasant surprise party was given Mr. Gridley last Wednesday evening, it being his birthday. Mrs. Gridley provided a supper to which all the teachers of the city together with Mr. Buford and Mr. and Mrs. Limerick were invited. Mr. Gridley was made the recipient of a fine arm chair and an elegant volume of Bryant’s collection of poems. The evening was pleasantly spent in social conversation and all present agreed that the occasion was one of pleasure and profit.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1884.

The past winter has been a very effective one in our public schools, and the many terms which are now closing show most satisfactory results. County Superintendent Limerick was on the go all winter and every school in the county was visited often by him. The Professor is an indefatigable worker, and to him much of this success in educational matters is due.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1884.

There has been a call issued for a convention of the teachers of this and neighboring counties to be held at Wichita March 28th & 29th for the purpose of permanent organization. We are in receipt of a program of the exercises. Every teacher should attend.

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

SKIPPED SCHOOL COLUMN...APPEARED ON SECOND PAGE...BUT COULD NOT READ SECTION WHERE NAMES WERE MENTIONED FOR THE SENIOR DEPARTMENT.

FOLLOWING ITEMS CAME FROM THE JUNIOR DEPARTMENT.

The Junior department have completed Monteith’s Comprehensive Geography, and will now take up Cornell’s Physical course.

Miss Eva Splawn was compelled to leave school last week on account of her parents going to Iowa. We regret the loss very much.

Martin Warren, one of our best pupils, also relinquished school at the beginning of this month.

No more cayenne cases up this writing.

Red aprons are fashionable nowadays.

Miss Lizzie Wilson, after finishing her school on Grouse Creek, where she has been instructing youthful minds the past winter, called at the Arkansas City High School last Wednesday afternoon. We hope Miss Wilson appreciated the appearance of the school as much as we did her call. Come again.

Robert Nipp is unable to study very hard. The reason is unknown, unless his eyes are getting dim. Be careful, don’t get any red pepper in them, Bob.

The Senior editor says if they beat the Juniors spelling again he will have his head shaved, and greased, too, if he keeps us from beating them parsing.

Arkansas City Republican, March 15, 1884.


The following pupils received the highest grades in examination last month: Arithmetic—Jacob Endicott, Lloyd Ruby, Mountferd Scott, Eva Splawn, Clarence Thompson, each 100 percent. Those who received 100 percent are: Sammie Beall, Sarah Crocker, Campbell Duncan, Mollie Duncan, Flora Gould, Hattie Laird, Eddie Marshall, Rosa Morse, Lloyd Ruby, Eva Splawn, Clarence Thompson, Edna Worthley, Lida Whitney; Miss Lizzie Gilbert received 99 percent in geography. Mahlon Arnett, Sammie Beall, and Lida Whitney received 97 percent in English grammar. Those who averaged 95 percent through the whole examination are Lizzie Gilbert, Mountferd Scott, Lloyd Ruby, Ida Hackleman, Edna Worthley, Lida Whitney, and Sarah Crocker.

Arkansas City Republican, March 15, 1884.

Miss Lettie Dakarn of Silverdale visited our school last Friday afternoon, which was very highly appreciated. Call again, Miss Lettie.

Arkansas City Republican, March 15, 1884.

We publish the following as the best essay for this month, written by Frank E. Barnett: “CAYENNE PEPPER.” [DID NOT COPY.]

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

At the last meeting of the school board, it was determined to grant a vacation of one week, at the end of the seventh month.

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

The time for receiving bids on the new schoolhouse has been extended to April 14. Let our home mechanics attend to this matter. Some responsible home firm should be awarded the contract.

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

Miss E. A. Taylor is teaching school this week. Geuda Springs Herald.

Miss Taylor was last year one of the best pupils of the Arkansas City High School. Her success as a teacher is pleasing to her instructor.

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

The spelling match at the public school building came off according to appointment last Monday night. There were not so many pupils present as at the match spelling two weeks previous, but the spelling was much better, it taking about a quarter of an hour longer to decide the contest. The juniors were victorious this time, Miss Sarah Crocker and Mr. Campbell Duncan remaining after all the seniors were spelled down. This necessitated a contest between these two as it was arranged to give a prize to the pupil standing up the longest. Mr. Duncan gained the prize, and deserves much credit for it, for he has been in school only a short time, and had attended school very little before entering this school. We think the young gentleman must be related to us—he spells very much like our relatives.

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

“J. W. Warren’s school at Akron, closed last Tuesday, with a big dinner and lots of nuts and candies and a good time in general, and on Friday night the school gave an exhibition in the schoolhouse which was first-class. . . . Mr. Warren has given general satisfaction in the school this winter and we hope the district will be so lucky as to secure him for another term.” Oliver in Winfield Courier.

Mr. Warren is one of our former pupils, and a young man of fine ability and excellent character. Nothing pleases us better than the success of our boys and girls.

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

RECAP OF JOB WORK DONE BY REPUBLICAN PLAYED UP:

                                                  School Library, 200 dodgers.

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.


DIED. On March 16, 1884, Mrs. Mary Drenan Francisco, wife of Mr. Louis Francisco, of Silverdale Township. Mrs. Francisco has long been a most patient sufferer with that dread disease, consumption. She was a firm believer in the christian faith, and for a long time a member of the U. P. Church. The funeral services, held at Parker schoolhouse, were conducted by Revs. Harris and Campbell.

Arkansas City Republican, March 22, 1884.

The vacancy in the Intermediate Department of the city schools, caused by the sickness of Mrs. Geo. Wright, was filled by Miss Emma Theaker, on Monday, and by Miss Jessie Norton, the remainder of the week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 26, 1884.

There will be a vacation of one week commencing April 7, 1884, in the public schools of Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 26, 1884.

At Wichita next Friday and Saturday, March 28 and 29, will be held a teachers’ convention for Southwestern Kansas. A very interesting and instructive programme has been arranged, and every attention will be given the teachers who are fortunate enough to be able to visit Wichita this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 26, 1884.

The S. P. U. of Bolton will meet at the Bland schoolhouse the first Saturday in April at 9 o’clock p.m. All members are requested to turn out. AL RAMSEY, O. S.

Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.

                                                       SCHOOL COLUMN.

                                                         Senior Department.

The senior class has lost two more of its members: Misses Alice Lane and Minnie McIntire. There are at present only eight members in the class. We do not know what is to be done; but if scholars will persist in quitting school, they had as well stop now as any time. The singing class is doing well.

We publish the following as second best essay for this month, written by Miss Emma Theaker.

                                                           OUR SCHOOL.

I am afraid that the people of Arkansas City do not take as much interest in the public schools of this place as they should. The children are sent to school and the teachers are expected to take charge of them and teach them. If the scholars do not learn as much as the parents think they should, the whole blame is thrown upon the teacher. The parents do not seem to think that the teacher as well as the scholar needs help and encouragement.

At present there are in our schools three hundred and ninety-four scholars enrolled and seven teachers employed. These scholars do not all attend regularly, yet the rooms are all full, and it is to be hoped that the new school building will be ready for use at the beginning of the next school year.

In the high school department there are fifty pupils. These comprise the senior and junior classes. The senior class has ten members, but I believe that these do not all intend to graduate. The rest of the pupils in this department are juniors. The studies in the senior year are algebra, rhetoric, spelling, Latin, physiology, bookkeeping, and natural philosophy. In the junior year, reading, arithmetic, spelling, writing, grammar, history, political geography, and physical geography. At least one new study is expected to be added to the course each year until a higher course is obtained.


One of the most interesting classes in the school is the singing class. It is surprising how much the voices of some of the pupils have improved since this class was organized.

There have been two parsing matches and one spelling match between the senior and junior classes this winter. In both of the parsing matches the seniors, on account of being out of practice, were beaten. They had better success in the spelling match, however, four of them remaining standing after the last junior was spelled down. There will be another spelling match on next Monday evening. We hope that more of the friends of the scholars will be present than there were the last time. The money that is taken in is used for the benefit of the school library, unless some one scholar spells the remainder of the school down, when a part of it will be used to buy a prize for that scholar.

The first books for the school library, which now contains two hundred and nineteen volumes, were purchased during the second year of Mr. Sylvester’s teaching. A museum was started at the same time, but the interest in it seems nearly to have died out, though we hope it will soon revive. The interest in the library, however, has never diminished. Since Mr. Atkinson first took charge of the school, there have been about one hundred and ninety books added to it. The library now contains many standard works of history, poetry, biography, and fiction. There are fifteen volumes of Universal Knowledge among the works. Any person not a scholar can, by paying ten cents, obtain the use of a book for two weeks.

Six months of this school year have already passed. During this time there has been good work done by most of the pupils. The warm weather will soon be here and then it will be much harder to study; but let the pupils remember that if they neglect their studies, they will be sure to regret it. There are but three more months until vacation. No doubt some of the pupils are already longing for that time to come, yet, when it does come, they will all say “farewell” with a feeling of sadness.

Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.

                                                       SCHOOL COLUMN.

                                                   JUNIOR DEPARTMENT.

The spelling match last Monday night resulted in the defeat of the seniors, as all the juniors expected. . . .

Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.

Mr. Hasie, one of Arkansas City’s liveliest businessmen, and who has lately determined to unite his fortunes with this people, called at the school Wednesday in the interest of the Choral Society of Arkansas City. Mr. Hasie shows that he is interested in the welfare of those about him. We would be pleased to have him call in often.

Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.

Friday evening after the last recess those who were not tardy or absent during last month were dismissed, in accordance with the action of the school board. There were but twelve of us that had to remain till the usual hour of adjournment. Prof. was very complimentary towards us; he said we were the best looking.

Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.

The two main classes of the High School have compromised. The seniors were so totally defeated that the most of them deserted the flag. We contemplate going abroad, as the public will see, in a couple of weeks, in consequence of which we have consolidated.


Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.

We desire to inform the public of a little incident that befell the senior editor. Last Saturday being the last day of school at the Parker schoolhouse, and the famous editor thinking it a good chance to distinguish himself, he collected his wits, and betook himself to that place, in the afternoon; as is customary in most schools on the last day, they had a spelling match. The leaders thinking the famous speller could spell anything in the book, of course chose him first, but when the teacher began to give out the man of the pen “lost his grip,” and missed the first word that was pronounced to him; a word of only five letters, too; and still he wants to spell against us juniors. It would never do for anyone who spells cedar with three e’s and an s, to spell against the juniors.

Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.

Mr. James Warren, a teacher of this county, after finishing his school north of Winfield, favored the Arkansas City school with his presence last Monday.

Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.

The following is the second best essay for this month, composed by Miss Edna Worthley:

                                                               TEMPERS.

Everyone ought to control his temper, or the least we could do is to try; for “practice always makes perfect,” whatever be the undertaking. A person may be very beautiful, but if he has a bad disposition and makes no attempt at controlling it, and is always cross and disagreeable to those around him, it will render him utterly repulsive. Some people seem to be naturally disagreeable, and take their sole and only enjoyment in making others unhappy; such persons ought to be pitied for a disposition that is beyond control rather than despised, as they seem to deserve. If a person is always cross at home, making the lives of all around him unbearable, it will in time become a part of his nature, and when he leaves home, he will show his real nature no matter how hard he may try to conceal it. For what we have been for years acquiring, cannot be rooted from our natures in a moment. We should all try and control our tempers, no matter what it may cost at the time. Some may say it is too late, but the poet says:

“It is too late! Oh, nothing is too late,

 Till the tired heart shall cease to palpitate.”

Arkansas City Republican, March 29, 1884.

The sickness of Mrs. George Wright continuing, her place in the public school has been filled this week by Miss Jessie Norton.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 2, 1884.

The legislature adjourned on Tuesday of last week after passing the following bills: A bill to protect domestic animals, a bill providing for a sanitary commission and expenses thereof, one providing for a veterinary surgeon, two local bills applying only to Cloud County, and a supplemental bill allowing cities of the third class to organize across a county line similar to joint school districts.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 2, 1884.

                                                             Aid for Ohio.


The good work started by Sedgwick County is being seconded throughout the country about us, and everywhere we hear of the farmers responding to the call for help from the overflowed districts of Ohio. Not to be outdone in this respect, Cowley County is now making an effort to send several cars of corn to the Ohio relief committee. Free transportation is promised from Winfield by the Southern Kansas Railroad company. Several of Bolton’s prominent farmers waited on the TRAVELER last week and requested that a call be issued for the people to meet at Theaker, Bland, and Stony Point schoolhouses on next Friday evening, and ascertaining just what can be done in this direction. This is a good plan, and it should result in every farmer coming out and constituting himself a committee of one to help in this grand work. If there should be any difficulty in obtaining transportation, the corn could easily be sold to grain buyers in this city and the money forwarded to the proper parties in Ohio. Whatever progress is made can be reported to Mr. N. T. Snyder, who will act in conjunction with the Winfield parties who are pushing this matter. Let our Bolton farmers bear in mind the date and place of meeting—Friday, April 4, at the Theaker, Bland, and Stony Point schoolhouses.

               [NOTE: ALL THIS ACTION DUE TO HORRIBLE FLOOD IN OHIO.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 2, 1884.

NOTICE. The S. P. U.’s will meet at Bland schoolhouse next Saturday evening at 7:30 o’clock. There is business of importance to transact. Members cannot afford to remain away. Let there be a full turn out. FRANK LORRY.

Excerpts...

[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: “MARK.”]

Winfield Courier, April 3, 1884.

Messrs. Chapin and Myers this week step down and out of their schoolrooms in district 93 and 10 respectively.

Elihu Anderson is expecte