COWLEY COUNTY SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, AND DISTRICTS.

[PART TWO: 1879 THROUGH 1882.]

1879

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 2, 1879.

The following is a list of new buildings erected in the city of Winfield since January 1, 1878, with the name of owner and cost of building.

Schoolhouse, frame: $1,600.

Winfield Courier, January 2, 1879.

FARRINGER, PROF. C., is one of the most skillful music teachers in the state. He teaches vocal music and performance on various kinds of instruments and keeps instruments for sale.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 8, 1879.

School Report.

The following are names of scholars who have been absolutely perfect in attendance and punctuality during the last school month.

GRAMMAR DEPARTMENT.

Fred. McLaughlin, 96; Linnie Peed, 85; Charlie Grimes, 86; Mary Theaker, 92; Jerry Adams, 95; Samuel Reed, 88; May Benedict, 85; Susie Hunt, 84; Willie Patterson, 74.

INTERMEDIATE.

Ella Bowers, 81; George Endicott, 94; Edward Garris, 90; Frank Theaker, 90; Jessie Rentschler, 89; Mary McClung, 88; Charlie Randall, 83; Myrtle McNelly, 67; Walter Patterson, 55.

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT.

Lillie Mitchell, 85; Elmer Howard, 70; Jimmie Roberson, 90; Maggie Ford, 85; Harry Rentschler, 80; Lucy Simpson, 80; Lizzie Garris, 80; Lydia Petcel, 75; Henry Simpson, 75; Thomas Petcel, 75; Clara Ford, 75; Rosa Garris, 60; William Harden, 60; Tom Harden, 70.

Note: Petcel may be wrong. Could be Peteel or Petrel. Could not determine! MAW

Linnie Peed, Fred McLaughlin, Chas. Grimes, Frank Theaker, and Lillie Mitchell have been present every day during the term. C. H. SYLVESTER, Principal.

ASSISTANTS: Miss Ela, Mrs. Theaker.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 8, 1879.

School Report.

Deportment and standing of pupils in the "A" and "B" grades, in District No. 69.

DEPORTMENT.

Allie Bowen, 100; Angie Bowen, 100; Nannie Scott, 100; Clara Scott, 100; Maggie Turner, 100; Sadie Scott, 100; May Deweese, 100; Kate Deweese, 100; Callie Donelly, 100; Joseph Ramsey, 100; Willie Ramsey, 85; Hattie Wood, 100.

ARITHMETIC.

Allie Bowen, 100; Angie Bowen, 85; Nannie Scott, 100; Clara Scott, 85; Maggie Turner, 85; Sadie Scott, 85; May Deweese, 85; Katie Deweese, 90; Callie Donelly, 60; Joseph Ramsey, 90; Willie Ramsey, 85; Hattie Wood, 60.

[Skipped Geography and Grammar. Repetition of many names already given.]

Reading and spelling of both classes were of high grade. J. O. WILKINSON, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 8, 1879.

School Report.

District 53, Bolton Township, for the month ending January 3rd, 1879.

Lester Burnett, 97; Mary Lorry, 89; Annie Coulter, 97; Martin Coulter, 95; Frank Bland, 95; Ruth Voris, 94; Rose Sample, 96; Hattie Rice, 96; Alvin Voris, 96; Hannah Lorry, 94; Willie Voris, 93; Maggie Sample, 94; David Bristow, 95; Frank Lorry, 96; Eddie Voris, 91; Lulu Bland, 94; Clara Lorry, 92; Carrie Rice, 95; Fred Lorry, 95; Mamie Schnee, 93; Willie Schnee, 95; Moses Coulter, 95; James Michael, 92; Stevie Rice, 94; Clyde Akers, 91; Earnest Frost, 89. L. E. NORTON, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 15, 1879.

We are told that Col. McMullen is negotiating with the authorities of Winfield for the sale of his new residence to the city for purposes of a schoolhouse. Winfield is greatly in need of such a building and we have no doubt the trade will be consummated at an early day. Should the Colonel close this sale, we are assured that he will return to this city for a permanent home as his valuable property here remains unsold.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 15, 1879.

We acknowledge the receipt of the Biennial Report of Hon. A. B. Lemmon, State Supt. of Schools. The report is full of interest and is conclusive evidence of the right man in the right place.

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Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

Beaver Filberts.

Miss Ella Grimes is wrestling with the boys at the Centennial schoolhouse.

"Victory" school house in dist. No. 115 still remains in an unfinished condition and a monument of emptiness, as regards school-keeping.

Miss Henrietta King has prestige at Thomasville schoolhouse, and enjoys the enviable reputation of teaching the best school ever taught in that building.

C. L. Swarts puts on pedagogical airs at Enterprise No. 93. DIXON'S GRAPHITE.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

Our city schools are running over with scholars.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

Mrs. Amy Chapin has begun teaching in district 115, Pleasant Valley.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

Miss Fannie Pontious closed her term of school in district 22 on the 8th.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

C. L. Swarts has been engaged to teach the school in district 93, Beaver Township.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

The Jarvis school, district 30, supports a literary, the session being on Wednesday evening.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

The Sheridan school, district 47, has a grammar school twice a week, on Tuesday and Saturday evening, conducted alternately by Sol. Smith and Emery Johnson.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

A necktie festival for the benefit of the Crooked Creek Library Association is to be held at Crooked Creek Schoolhouse on Friday evening Jan. 31, 1879. The price of a necktie is to be 50 cents. Those not desiring neckties can have their supper for 25 cents each and those just wishing to look around can look for 10 cents. All efforts are being put forth by the energetic executive committee to make it an enjoyable occasion and all should turn out.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

FAIRVIEW, JANUARY 10, 1878.

MR. EDITOR.--The following named pupils have the average standing attached to their respective names, on a scale of 10, for the last school month ending December 20th, 1878.

Mary Orr, 9 ½; Lilly Wilson, 8; Maggie Limbocker, 8 ½; Mary E. Curfman, 8 ½; Archie Harlow, 8 ½; Elmer Curfman, 9; Richard Morgan, 8 ½; Mattie Baird, 7 ½; Clara Limbocker, 7; Bell Curfman, 8 2/3; Samuel Wells, 6 ½; Maggie Wilson, 9 2/3; Annie Orr, 9 2/3; Minnie Larimer, 9 1/3; Oscar Curfman, 9; Jimmie L. Baird, 9; Minnie Burton, 9 2/3; Emma McGee, 9 ½; H. U. Curfman, 9 2/3; George Carter, 9 2/3; Frank E. Limbocker, 7 ½; Earnest Wilson, 6 ½; Fred Limbocker, 8 2/3. Total number of pupils enrolled to-date 46. Number of visitors this month 18. A. B. TAYLOR, Teacher.

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Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

FAIRVIEW, KAS., Jan. 11th, 1879.

The festival at our schoolhouse was well attended and everybody happy. Rev. Lahr and lady visited the Fairview school a few days ago. The festival at Maple Grove was a success. The literary is still in progress. Yours truly, ANONYMOUS.

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Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

Board of County Commissioners met in regular session [January 6, 1879]. Present: R. F. Burden, W. M. Sleeth, and G. L. Gale, commissioners, James McDermott, county attorney, and M. G. Troup, county clerk.

Among other proceedings had, bills against the county were presented and passed upon by the board as follows.

G. W. Robinson, school examiner.

F. Jennings, school examiner.

R. C. Story, Co. Supt. salary. [$200.00]

[TEACHERS' EXAMINATION.]

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

On the 31st day of January, at Arkansas City, Dexter, and Winfield, an examination will be had of applicants for teachers' certificates. At that time questions upon the metric system and upon the best methods of teaching of the English branches will be submitted to every candidate, and exact and comprehensive answers to these questions will be expected. Teachers should govern themselves accordingly. An examination will be held in Winfield March 28th. Work will begin at 9 o'clock a.m. R. C. STORY, Co. Supt.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 22, 1879.

Our school is filling up with many new faces.

Winfield Courier, January 23, 1879.

It is said that the Germans of this city have secured a German teacher, Professor Backus, a gentleman of high education, for the purpose of establishing a private school, in which the German language will form a special branch of study. We wish them success.

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[FROM RICHLAND CORRESPONDENT: DEEDS AND TAXES.]

Winfield Courier, January 23, 1879.

MR. EDITOR:--We up here are being exercised somewhat over our rights, and there are two nearly equal sides so far as members go; that is, there are fifteen tax-payers on real estate in our school district, and twelve holders of claims, that pay no tax on real estate, and nearly all of them have run over their time--in fact, some of them three of four years over the time given by law. There has been for some time a listlessness in deeding, and the tax-payers are getting very restless under the heavy burden of tax to build a school-house and keeping up a school in the district and other taxes beside; consequently, they called a meeting of all interested on both sides--a sort of neighborly gathering--and talked the matter over, then adjourned one week; then held another meeting, talked some more, and adjourned again till next Saturday night. These meetings are conducted in good order, and I think will be a good thing for all concerned. One side claims they are not able to deed yet, while the others say when they deeded, money was worth from thirty to fifty percent, and now can be had at less than half what they were obliged to pay; and further, that they have had time to make their improvements before being called on to deed, while the first that deeded had to make their payments on their land before they could raise much of a crop. Then the claim holders say what they did raise was worth so much more than it is now. L.

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Arkansas City Traveler, January 29, 1879.

There are 111 school districts in the county, all of which have substantial schoolhouses; these affording facilities for education nearly equal to those of older countries. . . .

Winfield Courier, January 30, 1879.

Winfield Needs To Build a Schoolhouse.

Why does not someone move in the matter of building a schoolhouse in this city? Everyone admits the necessity, and as a matter of economy there can be no doubt of its advisability. Someone must attend to the matter. Who shall it be? You must not depend upon the editor of the COURIER. He cannot attend to all these things. Call a meeting and decide what shall be done. We think the school board should call the meeting and everybody should turn out. It is an important matter. Wake-up! Stir around!

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Winfield Courier, January 30, 1879.

Northeast Ninnescah, January 26, 1879.

The school at Green Valley is in a flourishing condition; two of the boys have graduated and left school--H. Hopkins and F. W. Wentz.

The spelling-school last Tuesday evening was a success. Miss Davis, from the Beck school, and some of her scholars were there.

Miss Ella Olmstead and Miss Anna Martin are taking music lessons with Mrs. Rothrock.

MRS. VERY SOFT.

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Winfield Courier, January 30, 1879.

Maple Township, January 26, 1879.

The Rev. Harrison, pastor of the M.E. church, has just concluded a series of meetings at the Centennial schoolhouse. Twenty-seven persons united with the church.

Winfield Courier, January 30, 1879.

Teachers' Directory.

District No. 1: WINFIELD.

Geo. W. Robinson

Emma Saint

Sarah Aldrich

Sarah Hodges

Mary Bryant

Allie Klingman

Ioa Roberts

Connected with Winfield. District Number

Alice Aldrich 48

Mattie Minnihan 43

Mina Johnson 13

Celina Bliss 9

Mrs. Alice Bullock 106

R. A. O'Neill 77

A. B. Taylor 21

Ella Freeland 50

Maggie Stansbury 108

Ida Carey 97

Anna Hunt 90

John Bower 12

F. Starwalt 49

S. T. Hockett 64

Fannie Pontious 22

Sarah E. Sitton 31

District No. 2: ARKANSAS CITY.

C. H. Sylvester

Mrs. L. M. Theaker

Connected with Arkansas City. District Number

T. J. Rude 51

Lizzie Landis 42

Chas. Hutchings 89

J. M. Hawthorn 6

Albertine Maxwell 32

Charles Swarts 80

H. G. Blount 41

J. O. Wilkinson 69

Risdon Gilstrap 33

Frank A. Chapin 10

L. E. Norton 53

Flora Finley 34

James Perisho 62

District No. 20: FLORAL.

G. B. Richmond

Connected with Floral.

Squire Humble 19

District No. 45: TISDALE.

E. A. Millard

Connected with Tisdale.

S. A. Smith 47

District No. 30: MOSCOW.

R. B. Hunter

District No. 26: LITTLE DUTCH.

T. J. Floyd

Connected with Little Dutch.

R. B. Corson 81

District No. 52: NEW SALEM.

Ella Davis

Connected with New Salem.

Sarah Bovee 39

[Miss] Ray Nawman 55

District No. 14: LAZETTE.

Mary A. Tucker

Connected with Lazette.

H. T. Albert 15

Emma Burden 95

M. Hemenway 94

District No. 5: DEXTER.

W. Trevett

Connected with Dexter.

W. E. Merydith 54

R. C. Maurer 7

Allie Hardin 88

Viola Hardin 88

S. F. Overman 56

Alpha Harden 29

District No. 84: CEDAR VALE.

H. P. Attwater

Connected with Cedar Vale.

Alice Dickie 79

N. P. Seacord 56

James Seacord 83

District No. 60: POLO.

Thos. B. Kidney

Connected with Polo.

Mrs. Sarah Hollingsworth 74

District No. 18: BALTIMORE.

Lou Bedell

District No. 24: ROCK.

Electa F. Strong

Connected with Rock.

E. Limerick 25

Simeon Martin 29

District No. 72: RED BUD.

J. T. Tarbet

Connected with Red Bud.

R. A. Hall 91

District No. 73: DOUGLAS.

L. L. Hollinger

District No. 11: BUSHNELL.

L. McKinley

Connected with Bushnell.

Sadie Davis 71

District No. 85: SILVERDALE.

Jennie Scott

District No. 8: OXFORD.

Hattie McKinley

District No. 107: OTTO.

E. B. Poole

Winfield Courier, January 30, 1879.

TEACHERS OF COWLEY COUNTY:

In 1878 the following circular was sent out by the State Superintendent. Circumstances prevented my submitting the matter therein to your attention. The object of this work is an excellent one, and it is not too late to begin the desired work. In a short time sample pages of paper, fools-cap size, showing headings and rulings, will be sent to every teacher in the county. Can you not put on record the work of your classes? Let some subject be taken every week, or every month if time permits, and have the pupil write the questions and answers on fools-cap paper, using but one side of a leaf. This work, when completed, should be collected and sent to my office. It is intended to use all material thus sent in to make an educational exhibit at our next county fair. Read the circular carefully, then follow its suggestions.

R. C. STORY

Winfield Courier, January 30, 1879.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, TOPEKA, KANS., NOV. 10, 1878.

DEAR SIR:--Most teachers require of their students occasional written exercises in study, recitation, and examination. The value of such exercises is unquestioned. It is now proposed to use them in the collection of the material for an educational exhibit that shall show what is actually being done in all the classes of every grade of schools in the state. Your cooperation in this undertaking is earnestly solicited.

It is proposed that this collection shall be divided into three sections, viz.:

1. Common or country-school work.

2. Graded-school work.

3. The work of higher institutions of learning, including the State University, State Agricultural College, Normal School, and denominational colleges.

To make such a collection valuable, the work should be prepared on a plan that should be followed strictly by all participating schools. To aid in securing uniformity of work, the following rules are respectfully suggested:

1. All exercises should be prepared on paper uniform in size and ruling with the enclosed.

2. The work should be collected by classes; every member of the class should be represented, either by work, or by a sheet of paper on which the teacher shall give the reason of the child's failure.

3. Use pen and ink in making all written exercises.

4. Specimens of work should be collected from time to time as the teacher thinks best. These should illustrate--(a) methods of study, (b) recitations, (c) examinations. During a term, every member of each class should be required to prepare several papers.

5. Students should not be given time for special preparation for this work. The papers should show the average work of each student, nothing more. Teachers should require their students to be prepared to put themselves upon the record at any time. By so doing, they can make the preparation of these exercises an excellent incentive to study.

6. In assigning a written exercise in study, recitation, or examination, the teacher should announce the time to be given for its preparation, and at the expiration of that time, he should collect all papers and note the exact time in which they had been prepared. These papers should be fastened together and put in covers similar to those sent herewith.

Students' work prepared as herein suggested, can be made a very interesting part of a school examination. It will give parents and others a better idea of the teacher's methods, and the actual progress made by students than can be obtained in any other way.

The next meeting of our State Teachers' Association will be held at Lawrence. Is it not possible to make a collection of school work an interesting and valuable feature of that meeting?

If you think so, and if you are willing that your work shall be compared with that of others, you are requested to begin to make such a collection at once. Attend the meeting of the Association, if you find it possible, and bring your "fruits" with you. If unable to be present at the meeting, send your work by express, addressed to me, and it will be placed on exhibition. It is proposed, finally, to place the collection in the office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, where it may be examined at any time.

Very respectfully, your ob't servant,

ALLEN B. LEMMON,

State Superintendent of Pub. Instruction.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 5, 1879.

G. W. Robinson, principal of the Winfield schools, was in town Friday and Saturday conducting the teachers examination.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 5, 1879.

The teachers examined on Friday and Saturday last, developed a remarkable faculty on the part of one of the applicants for drawing, his map of Lake Michigan representing the probable state of his feelings, if not the geographical position of the lake.

Winfield Courier, February 6, 1879.

Sidewalks.

WINFIELD, KANS., Feb. 3, 1879.

MR. EDITOR:--Is it not somewhat strange and something of a neglect, that with all the beautiful magnesia stone sidewalks we have laid to almost all parts of the city, we have none on the north side of courthouse block and block west of it, and south side of 9th avenue, this being one of the most traveled thoroughfares in the city, about two-thirds of the school children passing over it twice a day, and being thronged during court week and the main outlet to the east part of the city. When the spring rains set in, from the position of the ground, the old rickety makeshift we have now will be inundated over two feet in water for probably days. Is it not the wish that our city fathers have us a good, substantial, eight-foot sidewalk put down on north side of these two blocks above high water mark. W. A. LEE.

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Winfield Courier, February 6, 1879.

MAPLE MUSINGS.

No school at Star Valley schoolhouse last week owing to sickness in the teacher's family. Star Valley has an interesting debating society which meets every Saturday night. REFLEX.

Red Bud, February 1, 1878.

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Winfield Courier, February 6, 1879.

BEAVER FILBERTS.

That there is virtue in prayer was amply verified last week by the clerical gentleman who conducted a series of meetings at the Centennial schoolhouse. The attendance not being satisfactory, he prayed that the wagons of those farmers who deliberately and premeditatedly started for Wichita, while an opportunity was presented for the redemption of their souls, would break down. K. J. W. was the victim selected for its verification.

I venture the assertion that district No. 93 supports one of the most interesting, entertaining, and instructive lyceums in the county; meets every Wednesday evening. The exercises are profusely interspersed with excellent vocal and instrumental music, of which the violin plays a prominent part. The question discussed last evening was: "Resolved, That intemperance has caused more misery than war." Chief disputants: Messrs. C. W. Roseberry and C. L. Swarts. It was decided in the affirmative. DIXON'S GRAPHITE.

January 31, 1879.

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Winfield Courier, February 6, 1879.

VERNON, February 1, 1879.

J. S. Baker is doing a good work in the Pleasant Grove school. He occasionally "teaches the young idea how to shoot" with a cottonwood shoot.

Winfield Courier, February 6, 1879.

REPORT FROM LITTLE DUTCH BY T. J. FLOYD, TEACHER.

The following is a report of the Little Dutch school for the month ending January 24, 1879: No. enrolled during this month, 60; total No. of days of attendance, 783; No. off days school was in session, 19; No. of cases of tardiness, 97.

The following are the names and grade of those having an average standing of 90 percent and upward: Thos. Covert 91, E. E. Rogers 91, Ida Schock 98, Clara Green 94, Ella Schock 91, Elty White 92, Alfred Savage 90, Mary Taylor 90, Gardie Taylor 90, Alex. Cox 93.

There were seven visits from patrons of the school during this month.

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Arkansas City Traveler, February 12, 1879.

[FROM THE REAL ESTATE BULLETIN.]

Arkansas City: We have a splendid school now giving advantages to 200 pupils that cannot be excelled in any school of its grade in the county, and under the superintendence of a Wisconsin graduate.

[SCHOOL REPORT.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 12, 1879.

The following are names of scholars who have been absolutely perfect in attendance, punctuality, deportment, and good in scholarship.

ROLL OF HONOR.

Mollie Christian Mary McClung

Mattie Mitchell Linnie Peed

Mary Theaker Emma Theaker

Charlie Grimes Fred. McLaughlin

Walter Patterson

The following are deserving of honorable mention for diligence, good behavior and nearly perfect attendance.

May Benedict Laura Gregg

Jessie Finley Anna Hutchison

Susie Hunt Stella Swarts

Annie Norton Jessie Sankey

Jerry Adams Lute Coombs

George Endicott Samuel Reed

Wm. Randall Charlie Randall.

C. H. SYLVESTER, Principal.

INTERMEDIATE.

Perfect in attendance and punctuality.

Maggie Ford, 95; Frank Theaker, 85; Jonnie Garris, 80.

But once tardy.

Clyde Marris, 90; Harvey Roberson, 60; Perry Fullerlove, 85.

M. L. ELA, Teacher.

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT.

Perfect in attendance and punctuality.

Lizzie Garris, 90; Grace McClung, 90; Clara Ford, 70; Jasper Fitzpatrick, 70; Elmer Howard, 70; Abe McClaskey, 85; Allie Harris, 60; Oak McClaskey, 60; Tom Howard, 50; Arthur Howey, 50. MRS. THEAKER, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 12, 1879.

Notice.

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 32, FEBRUARY 3RD, 1879.

There will be a Cemetery meeting, held at the Parker Schoolhouse on Friday afternoon, February 14th, at one o'clock, p.m., to clear off the grass from the ground, and also to repair some sunken graves, elect officers, etc. Friends turn out and repair the resting place on your departed friends. G. H. SHEARER, Sec.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Misses Nellie Aldrich, Sarah Bovee, Mattie Minnihan, Estella Crook, Annie Hudson, Hattie McKinley, Electa Strong, Lyda Strong, Mrs. I. E. Brown, Ed. S. Smith, J. S. Baker, A. E. Hon, L. McKinley, and Mrs. S. E. Litton were at the teachers' examination held in this city on the first of this month.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

C. H. Sylvester, principal of the Arkansas City schools, was in town Saturday last.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Miss N. P. Seacord's school, district 66, closed on the 27th ult.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

R. C. Maurer's school, in district 7, closed Wednesday of last week.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Squire W. E. Ketchum has reopened the Maple City school after a vacation caused by sickness.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

District 54, Dexter Township, has a literary society every Friday and a spelling school every Thursday evening.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Dr. Cole, of this place, delivered a very interesting lecture before the pupils of the Winfield High School on last Friday afternoon.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Miss Viola Harden closed school in the Plumb Creek district, No. 38, on the 30th ult.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Miss Electa Strong has closed her first term of school in district 24, Rock Township. She will soon begin a second term.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Thomas Rude teaches singing as well as school in district 51.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

N. S. Armstrong has closed the winter term of school in the Stalter district No. 23.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Miss Ray E. Nawman has ended the winter term of school in district 25.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Can our school board call an informal meeting of citizens to determine what action should be taken for our city schools next year? But few months remain in which proper arrangements can be made. Let us act promptly.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Go to the school house meeting.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Miss Allie Harden has finished her first term of school in District 88.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

Building a Schoolhouse.

There will be a meeting of the citizens of District No. 1, at the schoolhouse in Winfield, on next Saturday, 15th inst., at 2 o'clock p.m., to consider the matter of building a school- house. Let everybody turn out and give a full expression.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

News from Richland Correspondent "L."

Ed. COURIER: The tax-payers' meeting took place according to adjournment, and with Mr. E. B. Sawtell in the chair, passed the following preambles and resolutions.

Whereas, There is over one-third of the land in this school district yet undeeded and held by claimants, and most of said claims have already been held over the time allowed by law and have not, or are not, paying taxes of any kind; and

Whereas, The land that has been heretofore deeded has been paid for when money was worth an average of thirty percent, and can now be had at a rate below one-half that rate; therefore,

Resolved, That we, the tax-payers of School District No. 22, Richland Township, do earnestly request our fellow citizens to deed their claims before the 1st of March, 1879, such of them as have exceeded the time allowed by law.

Resolved, That we think they ought to deed for the following reasons:

1st. To secure their homes to themselves and families, which can be done in no other way.

2nd. To thereby increase the taxable property so as to keep up our schools for longer terms.

3rd. To make themselves our equals (as they are otherwise) in bearing the burdens of state, county, and district taxes.

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Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

News from "Cedarite" in Cedar Township.

The teachers of the various schools in Southeast Cowley were edited by a visit from the efficient and gentlemanly county superintendent, Prof. Story, a few days since. This is the first time that a county superintendent has ever visited schools in this part of the county.

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Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

WALCK SCHOOL HOUSE, Feb. 10, 1879.

A festival was held at the house of Mr. Hodgson's recently, and about $16 was realized, which is to be applied towards purchasing a library for the Grand Prairie Sabbath school.

The good people of District 91 gave the school children a grand dinner on New Year's Day. There were about sixty persons that partook of the excellent dinner, and still enough remained for nearly as many more. Among those who were instrumental in getting up the dinner and who contributed largely to the same were Mrs. Daniels, Mrs. Walck, Mrs. Whipple, Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Johnston and others. Stirring speeches were made by Squire Walck, Mr. Whipple, R. A. Hull, and others. Whenever the patrons of any school district manifest a deep interest in the welfare and advancement of the charge they commit to the care of a teacher, no fears need be entertained as to results.

Winfield Courier, February 13, 1879.

CENTENNIAL SCHOOL HOUSE, SILVERDALE TOWNSHIP.

There will be a festival held at the Centennial Schoolhouse, in Silverdale Township, on tomorrow evening, Friday the 14th, St. Valentine's day, for the benefit of Rev. Rose, of the Dexter circuit.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 19, 1879.

The Supreme Court decides that a teacher of a public school must be employed by the school board at a regular meeting, and proceedings of the meeting then and there entered on record.

[SCHOOL REPORT: DISTRICT NO. 53.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 19, 1879.

The following is the standing, by examination, of the pupils of School District No. 53, for the term ending February 6th, 1879.

LISTING NAMES ONLY.

Maggie Sample, Rose Sample, Lester Burnett, Hannah Lorry, Annie Coulter, Lulu Bland, George Coulter, Frank Lorry, Frank Bland, Fred Lorry, Mamie Schnee, David Bristow, Mary Lorry, Martin Coulter, Clara Lorry, Carrie Rice. L. E. NORTON, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, February 20, 1879.

District 114 has a good stone schoolhouse in which is a good school.

Winfield Courier, February 20, 1879.

The Science Valley Free Baptist Church will have a festival at the Pleasant View schoolhouse, 3 miles east of Winfield, on Friday night, February 28, for the benefit of their minister, Rev. James P. Henderson.

Winfield Courier, February 20, 1879.

E. B. Corson's school, district 81, Ninnescah Township, has spelling schools on Tuesday nights.

Winfield Courier, February 20, 1879.

The schoolhouse in district 116, built by Captain Myers, is one of the best little houses in the county.

Winfield Courier, February 20, 1879.

Simon Martin, teacher in district 29, Rock Township, gives his school written examinations monthly. The effect of this work is seen in the marked improvement of his pupils.

Winfield Courier, February 20, 1879.

There will be a festival at Excelsior schoolhouse Friday night. The people of Excelsior are noted far and wide for their success in catering to the appetites of the hungry; and this will undoubtedly be better than any held in that vicinity heretofore.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, February 20, 1879.

NORTHEAST NINNESCAH, Feb. 14, 1879

R. B. Corson is doing a good work in the Green Valley school. Long may he live to teach and instruct the rising generation. VERY SOFT.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 26, 1879.

EDITOR TRAVELER: I wish to ask whether there is any city ordinance against ringing bells at improper hours? Last Friday evening after the Literary the schoolhouse bell was rung some fifteen minutes. It was at a late hour and it was enough to startle any person. For my part I took a good deal of trouble to go and look to see if there was not a fire. If there is no ordinance at present, ought not the Council to pass one imposing a fine and imprisonment on any person ringing any of the public bells when there is no occasion for it? CITIZEN.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 26, 1879.

The Stock Protecting Co. of Creswell Township, will meet at Parker's schoolhouse on Thursday evening, March 6th. All the members are requested to be present.

R. L. MARSHALL, Sec'y.

Winfield Courier, February 27, 1879.

M. S. Ticer has closed his school in Vernon Township, district 68.

Winfield Courier, February 27, 1879.

Harry Blount closed this week his second term of school in district 41.

Winfield Courier, February 27, 1879.

Districts 29 and 114 were in town Saturday trying to settle their differences growing out of division of school property.

Winfield Courier, February 27, 1879.

C. C. Critz closed his school in Rose Valley, district 41, on the 21st.

Winfield Courier, February 27, 1879.

Squire Humble closes tomorrow his school in district 19, Queen Village.

Winfield Courier, February 27, 1879.

A festival, in aid of Rev. Mr. Lahr, will be held Friday evening in district 27, Ninnescah Township.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, February 27, 1879.

"CEDARITE" FROM CEDAR TOWNSHIP.

Mr. E. B. Poole's school in District No. 107 closes Monday, the 24th inst.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 5, 1879.

We call special attention to the new ad of Prof. Wilkinson in this number. Those in need of musical instruments will find the best at his rooms, on sale, where every attention will be paid the purchaser.

AD. T. A. WILKINSON. ESTEY ORGANS AND MATHUSHEK PIANOS.

WINFIELD, KANSAS.

[SCHOOL REPORT: M. L. ELA, TEACHER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 5, 1879.

NAMES ONLY: INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT.

John Sankey, Seymore Goff, John Garris, Arthur Coombs, Archie Coombs, Manford Walch, Frank Theaker, Angie Small, Fleeta Cox, Ella Hoyt, Maggie Ford, Lillie Mitchell, Annie Speers, Laura Holloway, Myrtle McNelly, and John Howard. M. L. ELA, Teacher.

[SCHOOL REPORT: MRS. L. M. H. THEAKER, TEACHER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 5, 1879.

Scholars perfect in attendance in Primary Department, Arkansas City:

Lizzie Garris, Grace McClung, Clara Ford, Turner Sankey, Maggie Patterson, Lone Ware, Della Poland, and Johnnie Milan. MRS. L. M. H. THEAKER, Teacher.

Excerpt...

CAPITAL CORRESPONDENCE FROM "A. PARTICIPANT."

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1879.

The House has passed a bill which punishes any person for driving or riding over the growing hedge of another; also reducing interest on tax sales to 25 percent; also changing time of holding annual school meeting to first Thursday in July; also giving purchasers of school land twenty years to pay for same at 7 percent interest and extending the time for delinquent purchasers to September next; also an act making it a felony for any bank officer or owner of a private bank to receive deposits when the bank is insolvent or is in a failing condition; also an act which prevents cities of the second class from issuing license to sell intoxicating drinks; also an act reducing fees of county clerks and county treasurers; and has pending before it ready for final passage a bill which makes it a misdemeanor to disturb any kind of public meeting. Most of these bills will pass the Senate and are the ones in which our people have some interest.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1879.

"VERY SOFT" FROM NORTH EAST NINNESCAH.

The spelling school Tuesday evening at Green Valley was a failure on account of bad weather. VERY SOFT.

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1879.

REPORT FROM T. J. FLOYD, TEACHER, LITTLE DUTCH SCHOOL.

The following is a report of the Little Dutch school for the month ending February 21st, 1879.

Number enrolled this month, 64; total attendance in days this month, 966; average daily attendance, 48.3; number perfect in deportment, 17; number neither absent or tardy, 26; number of cases of tardiness, 71; number of visits from patrons of the school, 11; number of days school was in session, 20.

The following is the total average grade of those having a grade of 90 percent, and upward, in scholarship, deportment, and attendance: Clara Green, 95; Maggie Heffner, 96; Ida Schock, 96; Elda Schock, 96; Effie White, 92; Lulu Rogers, 91; Mary Taylor, 92; Carrie Smith, 90; Franklin Savage, 94; Alex. Cox, 90; Thos. Covert, 95; E. E. Rogers, 94; Gardie Taylor, 93; Clem Schock, 90.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "AS YOU PLEASE" - MOSCOW.]

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1879.

MOSCOW, KANS., Feb. 28, 1879.

Moscow, school district No. 92: The Moscow schoolhouse is almost completed and school will open about the first of April.

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1879.

TEACHERS' EXAMINATION.

Hereafter the work of examination will be confined to one day, and the studies considered will be limited to a given number of minutes. The metric system and the principles of teaching will form part of every examination. The standing of applicants in spelling and in grammar will be taken largely from their written work. The next examination will be held in the Winfield high school room, beginning at 9 o'clock a.m., Saturday, March 29. Parties interested should take due notice. R. C. STORY, County Superintendent.

Excerpts...

Winfield Courier, March 6, 1879.

REPORT FROM "ANNA PENNINGTON", VALLEY VIEW.

VALLEY VIEW, KANS., March 2, 1879.

The festival held at Blue's schoolhouse Feb. 28th was a success. The festival was given for the benefit of Rev. Mr. Lahr. The people of the Winfield circuit will shortly have to part with their minister, Rev. Mr. Lahr. We hope the next minister will be as good a preacher as he is. Mrs. Hood furnished some splendid music for the festival.

The Crooked Creek Lyceum is still under headway.

There has been some talk of starting a Temperance Lodge at the Valley View schoolhouse.

[SCHOOL REGULATIONS IN CITIES OF THE SECOND CLASS.]

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1879.

As our city is about to assume the dignity of second class, the following will be of interest to our citizens.

Cities of the second class have special laws for their regulation in school matters. The board of education consists of two members from each ward, who hold office for two years, one being elected annually. No member of the board of education shall be a member of the council, and no councilman shall be a member of the board of education.

For the want of room for schools, children between the ages of five and seven may be excluded from the schools. Territory adjacent to cities of the second class may become attached thereto for school purposes only, application being made to the board of education, and the territory, if attached, is entitled to elect two members of the board of education when equaling any one ward in population or taxable property.

The annual election comes on the first Tuesday of April. The board must organize at its regular meeting in May, and meets on the first Monday of each month. It elects its own officers, excepting the treasurer makes its own rules and regulations, and has sole control of the schools and school property of the city.

A superintendent of schools shall be appointed by the board, shall constitute the committee to examine all applicants for teacher's positions. In other particulars, cities of the second class are subject to laws similar to the general school laws of the State.

[REPORT FROM "X" - PRAIRIE GROVE.]

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1879.

PRAIRIE GROVE, March 7, 1879.

MR. EDITOR:--Some fever in these parts, such as railroad, gold, and spring fevers. Some danger of buck ague since shotguns have been so freely used of late in the County. Literary at Prairie Grove will soon close with an exhibition. Give us an east and west road; bonds will carry up this way. Miss Fannie Pontious goes back to Richland to teach the summer school, which is an evidence of her ability to give satisfaction as a teacher.

In reply to U. R. A. Brick & Co., permit me to say if they would use the word Prairie Grove, the proper name of Dist. No. 108, given to it when organized, it would be some credit to them for if it was a buzzard's festival, U. R. A. Brick & Co. were the buzzards. They state they were attacked by the buzzards before they were done eating. Buzzards will congregate around carcasses.

Excerpt...

[BEAVER FILBERTS BY "DIXON'S GRAPHITE."]

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1879.

Sickness prevented Mrs. Ed. Chapin from discharging her duties as governess in Dist. No. 115 last week. Miss Grimes' school in No. 4 in one more week will be enumerated as one of the things that were.

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1879.

In the United States the cost for public schools is $2.02 for each inhabitant. The army taxes us $1.39 per head, while whiskey is only $20 a head.

Winfield Courier, March 13, 1879.

State School Fund.

The quota of state school fund apportioned to this county, amounting to $3,692.62, has been received by the treasurer and is ready for distribution. Superintendent Story informs us that it will amount to 68-1/4 cents per scholar of school age.

[MISCELLANEOUS ITEM RE TAXES IN COWLEY COUNTY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 19, 1879.

The lowest rate of tax in Cowley County is 13 mills on the dollar; the highest 45 mills; the average about 25 mills. The only localities where taxes are high, being Winfield and Arkansas City, where substantial improvements have been built, such as bridge, schoolhouses, etc. Winfield has two iron and one combination bridge across Dutch creek, as well as a good courthouse and jail, each brick structures, and a large stone schoolhouse. Arkansas City has a large combination bridge across the Arkansas River, erected at a cost of $13,000, and one across the Walnut River that cost $3,000; also a splendid brick schoolhouse which cost $10,000 and is the finest building in the county. The entire indebtedness of the county is but $31,500. According to the last assessment our taxable property amounted to $2,020,000.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 19, 1879.

Arbor Day.

By order of the Mayor and Council, Tuesday, March 25th, A. D. 1879, is appointed as an arbor day, and all citizens interested in improving the town are most respectfully requested to furnish trees and turn out and take part in the work of the day. Quick growth trees will be the most suitable. It is desirable to have the ground around the School House well supplied with trees. It is also suggested that each person furnish as many trees for their own lots as their circumstances will permit. JAMES BENEDICT, Mayor.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879. Editorial Page.

STATE SENATOR, HON. A. J. PYBURN.

For more than two months our State Senator, Hon. A. J. Pyburn, has been constantly at his post at the capital. His return to his home and friends is taken as an opportunity for speaking of his work.

Though differing from Mr. Pyburn politically, we take pleasure in commending his course during the winter. In his support of Mr. Ingalls, he obeyed the wishes of a very large majority of his constituents of all parties. By securing the enactment of the law governing the issuance, payment, etc., of school district bonds, he has rendered the entire State a service, this being one of the most important laws enacted by the legislature. Should it ever be our fortune to be again represented in the State Senate by a democrat, we shall hope that Mr. Pyburn will be the man.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

The state of Kansas has 266,575 children of school age, and 4,520 schoolhouses, or about sixty children to each school.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

The Arkansas Valley Teachers' Association will hold a spring session at Newton, April 3, 4, and 5. A good time is expected. Reduced rates on cars and at hotels have been secured for teachers going to this association. Our county superintendent is on the program for a paper on "Supervision of Schools."

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

The Presbyterian Synod of Kansas has appointed a committee and is taking steps toward locating a Presbyterian college somewhere within the limits of the Synod. Emporia has offered $10,000 toward having it located at that place, and Salina proposes to give $15,000.

Rev. J. E. Platter, who is one of the committee, has offered to donate 20 acres of land adjoining Winfield toward having the college located at this place, and we understand that an effort will be made to get additional subscriptions. With the building of the A. T. & S. F. from the north, the L. L. & G. from the east, and the Mo. Pacific from the northeast, Winfield would be a desirable point for the location of such an institution. Would it not be well to work this matter up?

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

Several hundred dollars were paid last week on orders for state school fund, "and still there's more to follow."

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

Can't our school districts appoint an "arbor day" for the purpose of planting trees? This is a matter that all good citizens should encourage.

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

The students of our city schools presented a pleasing sight as they marched up Ninth avenue Tuesday afternoon to witness the phonograph exhibition at the Opera House. There were between three hundred and four hundred in line marching in two ranks. The older students had the lead and as the long line tapered down to the A B C folks, it looked as if the professor in charge or someone else had whittled the school down "almost to a fine point."

Winfield Courier, March 20, 1879.

District 75 has had two prairie fires which, owing to the energy of teacher, scholars, and neighbors, were kept from doing the destruction they otherwise would have done. Look out for fires.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 26, 1879.

Our District School closes on Friday next.

Excerpts...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, March 27, 1879.

COUNTY SUMMARY.

From the First Biennial Report of the State Board of Agriculture.

VALUATION AND INDEBTEDNESS.--Assessed valuation of personal property, $447,200; total assessed valuation of all property, $2,020,074.60; true valuation of all property, $3,866,789.33. Total indebtedness of county, township, city, and school districts, $145,668.82; percent of indebtedness to assessed valuation, .07+.

SCHOOLS.--Number of organized districts, 115; school population, 5,681; average salary of teachers, per month, males, $33.35; females, $26.48. Schoolhouses built during 1878, 9; frame, 8; stone, 1. Total number of schoolhouses, 98; log, 1; frame, 89; brick, 8; stone, 5. Value of school property, $77,250. No report on shade trees.

Winfield Courier, March 27, 1879.

KANSAS SCHOOLS.

At the close of the last school year, July 31, 1878, Kansas had a school population of 266,575. Of this number 177,806 were enrolled in school--the average daily attendance being 106,932. The increase of school population for the year was 33.701; in enrollment, 19,731, and in average daily attendance, 12,023. The average length of school term for the entire State was 22.6 weeks, this being an increase of 1.1 weeks over the previous year.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, March 27, 1879.

REPORT FROM "ALEXANDER," OMNIA TOWNSHIP.

Some of our farmers start to Wichita tomorrow for lumber to build a schoolhouse in District 109. They expect to build it immediately and have a school this summer.

[R. C. STORY REPORTS ON SCHOOL BOOKS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 2, 1879

WINFIELD, March 28th, 1879.

The late Legislature passed a law requiring school boards, each and every board in the State, to adopt within six months a uniform series of text books in each branch of study in our schools. When this adoption shall have been made, the law forbids any change therein for five years, unless asked by petition from four-fifths of the legal voters of the district desiring the change. School boards can adopt any set of books that may now be in use or that may be wanted by their respective districts.

This adoption should be made at the next annual meeting, and should be made with due deliberation. Many books now in use are not first-class text books, many others are too expensive when bought by retail. Boards should follow the recommendations of the State and County Superintendents, and should give book agents a wide berth.

The State Superintendent proposes to submit a list of the best and cheapest books for our schools, and when this list comes out boards can follow it without fear or mistake. An effort will be made to have the new law go into operation with an even exchange of new books for old ones.

The State tax of one mill, which made up a part of the State fund, was not renewed by the Legislature. This will reduce the State fund for 1880 and 1881 about one-half. Districts should bear this fact in mind in making arrangements for the next school year.

R. C. STORY.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 2, 1879.

MONDAY, April 7th, the public schools will open for a summer tern of two months. It is desirable that scholars should attend during the remainder of the year. The classes will all advance in studies and absence will entail irregularity or entire loss of grade. The examinations show marked improvement in almost all students. Good work has been done by them all. Let it continue. C. H. SYLVESTER, PRINCIPAL.

Winfield Courier, April 3, 1879.

School boards should "look a leedle oud," as the Legislature struck out the one mill state tax that has been levied heretofore for the state fund. The new law authorizes boards to adopt a uniform series of books in each grade, and forbids any change for five years, except on petition of four-fifths of the legal voters.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1879

The genial face of Mr. Bacon, principal of our public school last year, is with us for a little while.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1879.

There will be a meeting of the S. P. U.'s at Bland's School House on Saturday evening, April 19th, at early candlelight.

Excerpt...

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1879.

Bolton, April 5th.

We want to tell you something from the east end of the banner township. Arbor day will have a memento in green and flowering beauty, at Spring Side schoolhouse for years to come. Messrs. Myers, Gassaway, Chamberlain and Mavis with others were on the ground early under the lead of East Bolton's Martyr, T. Armstrong. The result: 150 nice trees set out, with roses and flowering shrubs, which will tell their tale in years to come.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 9, 1879.

Arbor day at the Linton Guthrie Conover Schoolhouse witnessed the setting out of a number of fine shade trees and preparation for still further beautifying the grounds, which are to be enclosed with a fence.

Excerpts...

[REPORT: "DIXON'S GRAPHITE," - BEAVER FILBERTS.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 10, 1879 - Front Page.

Beaver's literary institutions at the Tannehill and Enterprise schoolhouses, after a pleasant and interesting winter session, have adjourned, to meet again when another season's crop is garnered.

Miss Grimes' school at Centennial closed last Saturday with a dinner entertainment. Clara Browning received an excellency for scholarship.

[COWLEY COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICTS.]

Winfield Courier, April 10, 1879.

There are one hundred and seventeen school districts in this county. Around the school house in each of these a grove should be planted this spring. If the ground has not been broken or is not fenced, then the district board should see that it is put in cultivation; at the next annual meeting provision should be made for the fence and a year hence the trees should be planted. Delay not but go to work at once.

Excerpts...

[TISDALE ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 17, 1879. Front Page.

School begins this morning with Mrs. Ida Brown as teacher.

Mattie West is teaching school in district No. 78.

Sadie Davis will soon close her school in the northeast corner of the county. NIP.

Lazette, April 11, 1879.

Winfield Courier, April 17, 1879.

In view of the change in Winfield from a third class to a second class city, some changes in school district No. 1 will be made before the annual meeting. The superintendent contemplates forming a district east of town out of the following territory: S. W. 1/4 of 13, S. ½ of 14 and 15; the N. ½ and S. E. 1/4 of 22; all of 23, 24, 25, and 26, and the E. ½ of 27, T. 32, R. 4.

All interested in this matter would do well to see the county superintendent, Saturday next, at 2 o'clock p.m.

Excerpt...

[LITTLE DUTCH - "BONER"]

Winfield Courier, April 17, 1879.

T. J. Floyd's school is progressing finely.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

The Legislature passed a law of considerable importance concerning schools, of which the following is the substance.

The district board, each board of education, and each and every school district board shall require a uniform series of text books to be used in each branch of study in each school; but each board shall determine for itself, within six months from the passage of this act, the particular series of text books which shall hereafter be adopted and introduced in pursuance of the provisions of this act by said boards. No change shall be made for a period of five years from the date of the introduction of any particular series of text books, unless four-fifths of the legal voters of any district shall petition for a change in the series of text books adopted; but no member of the said boards, or either of them, nor any teacher, while employed as such teacher, shall act as agent for any author, publisher, or bookseller, nor shall any member of the said boards, or any of them, or any employed teacher, directly or indirectly, receive any gift, emolument, or reward for his or her influence in recommending or introducing any book, school apparatus, or furniture of any kind whatever.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

There will be preaching next Sabbath afternoon (April 27th) at three o'clock in the Stony Point Schoolhouse. After which if the way is clear, a Union Sunday School will be organized.

Excerpt...

["ALEXANDER" FROM OMNIA TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, April 24, 1879.

The new schoolhouse in district 100 is completed, and last Sabbath witnessed the organization of a Union Sabbath school therein.

Excerpt...

["NEBUCHADNEZZAR" FROM FAIRVIEW - DISTRICT NO. 21.]

Winfield Courier, April 24, 1879.

A. B. Taylor is teaching school in district 39. We saw him a few days ago in our midst shaking with the ague.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Divine service was held in Stony Point schoolhouse last Sabbath by Rev. McClung. A large number were present. After service a Sabbath school was organized.

Excerpt...

["VERY SOFT" - NORTHEAST NINNESCAH]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 1, 1879. - Front Page.

School closed at Green Valley March 26. Teacher: Mr. Corson.

Excerpt...

["L." - RICHLAND.]

Winfield Courier, May 1, 1879.

Richland school has opened for a three month's term: Miss Fannie Pontius, teacher. She taught the winter term of three months and gave general satisfaction.

Excerpts...

["DIXONS GRAPHITE" - BEAVER]

Winfield Courier, May 1, 1879.

School reopened at the Centennial last Monday, under the supervision of Miss Henrietta King.

Now is a golden opportunity afforded the school board of district No. 4 to exhibit usual energy and enterprise in accepting the advice of the COURIER in a recent issue, to plant shade trees around the schoolhouse. The board might appoint an arbor day and request that each family in the district send one representative with a young, thrifty, growing tree. The hearts of posterity would surely overflow with gratitude to the energetic board that engineered the work to a successful issue. Who will be the first to establish a name on the scroll of fame in this direction?

Victor schoolhouse has considerably improved its appearance by a coat of paint and a supply of hitching racks for securing horses. This is a good example for other schoolhouses to follow.

Buck Anderson, once a week--every Thursday night--at Beaver Center schoolhouse, explains to the rural minds the intricacies and rudiments of vocal music.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

The Auditor of State has just forwarded to Washington a list of 225,000 acres of indemnity school lands. The claim of Kansas for the sixth and thirty sixth sections Indian reservations is the first and only one of the kind allowed to any State.

Winfield Courier, May 8, 1879.

School boards would do well to follow the instructions sent out last week by our county superintendent regarding purchase of textbooks for their schools. Book agents will come into the county, but they should be recognized only so far as endorsed by the county superintendent, and no farther.

[Refers to act of the late legislature, wherein each and every district board in the State is required to adopt, within six months, a uniform series of text-books, to be introduced and used in each separate branch of study. When adopted, books cannot be changed for five years, unless four-fifths of the legal voters of a district petition for a change.]

[ORGANIZATION OF BOARD OF EDUCATION.]

Winfield Courier, May 8, 1879.

The Board of Education, elect, met Monday evening in pursuance of the provisions of the law for the purpose of effecting an organization.

The meeting was called to order by Mr. M. G. Troup, after which officers for the ensuing year were elected as follows.

President: F. S. Jennings.

Vice President: N. L. Rigby.

Clerk: Fred C. Hunt.

The clerk's salary was fixed at $50.00 per annum.

The Treasurer's bond was fixed at $10,000.

Resolution passed that no application for position as teacher be considered until after the middle of June, and that in the meantime all applications be filed with the Clerk of the Board.

Board adjourned to meet again at the office of Jennings & Buckman, when the report of the retiring Board will be received. A full attendance of the retiring Board at that time is

requested.

Excerpts...

["DIXON'S GRAPHITE" - BEAVER.]

Winfield Courier, May 15, 1879.

Miss Jennie Rouzee is teaching a subscription school at Enterprise.

Miss Amelia Jones is conducting a subscription school at Beaver Center.

Last Monday Miss Amy Robertson began a three months' term of school in district No. 44.

Winfield Courier, May 15, 1879.

Last Friday afternoon a lively gent from the country was in Joe's saloon, and not behaving to suit, Joe ordered him out, when he seized a cuss, and threatened vengeance. Someone called out "Police!" and the country gent ran away like an antelope, with Ed. Nicholson and several others after him, followed by an excited crowd of men, boys, bootblacks, loafers, and school was just out, and a crowd of school children followed in the wake, making a very exciting and amusing affair of it. The pursued was finally overtaken and captured and marched back into Main street followed by the crowd. Here two ladies fell upon the prisoner and cried and moaned as though he was their only stay and support and was going to his execution. The prisoner was taken before Judge Boyer and Joe was summoned to make his complaint. Joe appeared and said he had no complaint to make, and no one else having any, the prisoner was told he could go, but someone suggested that he should jump out of the window and let the crowd have another race, which he accordingly did, and someone sung out that the prisoner had escaped. Again, there was excitement and rushing to and fro and searching in every notch and room along the street to find him. When found he was marching proudly along the sidewalk with a lady on each arm, but was not further molested.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "SCREECH OWL" AT VERNON.]

Winfield Courier, May 15, 1879.

Rev. J. A. Rupp preaches every two weeks at Valley View at eleven o'clock.

District No. 48 has for the first time started a Sunday school, with J. A. Rupp, Supt.; Chas. McClung, Ass't Supt.; Mary McClung, Sec.; Ada Kimble, Librarian and Treasurer. All are invited. We can now boast of three Sabbath schools.

Pleasant Grove will have a picnic the last of May. All the schools around will be invited.

Mt. Zion Sunday school is to have a concert.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

The people over in Bolton held a picnic in Moore's grove last Saturday afternoon. In the evening a dance took place at the Bland Schoolhouse and everything passed off lovely.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "TRAVELER" AT GROUSE CREEK.]

Winfield Courier, May 22, 1879.

On the west side of the river lays the farm of Mr. Morris, of Black Hills fame. He has just finished building a large stone barn, costing I am informed, from $600 to $800. Here I may state that the Grouse valley between Lazette and Dexter contains more and better barns and stables than any other part of the country, some of the stone buildings costing many hundred dollars more than the one above mentioned.

To the south of this place lays the farm of George Gardenhire. This farm has been under the charge of Mr. Tucker, the pedagogue of this school district. He seems to be a success, both as farmer and teacher, a young man of good acquirements and excellent ability.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "PHIL." AT PLEASANT HILL.]

Winfield Courier, May 22, 1879.

Pleasant Hill and Floral schools look rather thin; the children have the measles.

Winfield Courier, May 22, 1879.

The voters of district No. 1 will meet at the King schoolhouse Friday, May 31, at 1 p.m. to select temporary officers to serve until the annual meeting.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

The present term of school closes Friday.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

All members of Co. C. (Bolton Militia), are requested to meet at the Bland Schoolhouse on Saturday, May 31st, at 2 o'clock for the purpose of signing the muster rolls.

R. HOFFMASTER, Captain.

Winfield Courier, May 29, 1879.

DASTARDLY--Some galoots supposed to be from Arkansas City, have lately been in the habit of passing by the schoolhouses between the city and Winfield, and firing pistol balls through the schoolhouse doors and walls. If they do not get well peppered with a few charges of salt, they will fail to meet their desserts.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Rev. J. S. McClung will preach at the Starry Point Schoolhouse, next Sabbath afternoon, at half-past two o'clock.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

There will be an informal meeting of the citizens of School District No. 2, on Saturday, June 7th, at 2 o'clock, for the purpose of taking into consideration the hiring of a teacher for the next school year. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

School closed last Friday with a good year's work done. Mr. Sylvester has given the very best of satisfaction in his management of the school. He has succeeded in doing, what very few teachers are able to, that, of establishing a true and lasting friendship between himself and his pupils; and has won by his gentlemanly conduct and assiduous attention to the duties of his school, a host of friends. We hope to welcome him back again next year.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

NAMES OF PUPILS, DISTRICT 53, TEACHER: L. E. NORTON.

Maggie Sample, Rose Sample, Annie Coulter, Clara Lorry, George Hunt, Frank Lorry, Frank Bland, Ruth Voris, Fred Lorry, Mamie Schnee, Marion Hunt, Mary Lorry, Clyde Akers.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "DIXON'S GRAPHITE" - BEAVER FILBERTS.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 5, 1879. - Front Page.

Miss Jennie Rouzee suspended school at Enterprise on account of illness.

Winfield Courier, June 5, 1879.

H. T. Albert's school is full, and work moves along well toward the close of the term.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM PRAIRIE GROVE.]

Winfield Courier, June 5, 1879.

Richmond's school is out after a nine month's siege.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Mr. Sylvester left for his home in Wisconsin last Monday morning. As this is the annual vacation of the public school, he expects to remain away about ten weeks, and then return with fresh vigor to commence his task anew.

Excerpts...

[BALTIMORE ITEMS: REPORT FROM "X. Y. CAESAR."]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 12, 1879. - Front Page.

Miss Bolcourt is teaching a summer school at the Baltimore schoolhouse now.

Charles Messenger and George F. Thompson returned from Manhattan on the 25th of May, where they have been attending college since last September. Both are well pleased with their first year in college, and will probably return again in the fall.

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1879.

A. E. Hon has closed his term of School in District 10.

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1879.

R. B. Huster, formerly teacher in district 30, has gone to Lawrence.

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1879.

School District 118 has been organized by our county superintendent.

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1879.

District 82, Liberty township, has voted bonds for a schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1879.

Charles Powell has accepted an agency from Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., publishers of the widely known Eclectic series of school books. Charley is a responsible representative of a responsible firm.

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1879.

On last Friday the spring term of the Winfield school closed. This has been the most successful term of school ever taught in Winfield. The principal, Mr. Geo. Robinson, has worked earnestly and faithfully to bring our schools to a high state of perfection, and his success is justly merited.

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1879.

The annual meeting for the election of school officers will come on Thursday the 14th day of August. Clerks, directors, and treasurers should get their districts in ship-shape for this meeting, and patrons should turn out in full force to do their duty in supporting and regulating school matters.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "REFLEX" - MAPLE MATTERS.]

Winfield Courier, June 12, 1879.

Miss Strong, of Rock, is teaching a summer school at the Centennial schoolhouse.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

The Ethiopians of Beaver Township gave a concert at Victoria School House last Saturday evening.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM LAZETTE.]

Winfield Courier, June 19, 1879.

James Kelly called on Tuesday evening. Jim is trying to induce the school boards to adopt the school books published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., which we did just a few hours before Jim got in. I am sorry Jim did not get in sooner.

Prof. Story was over and called on us last week. We are always glad to see our old friend, Mr. Story, and have him stop and see us. "Seems like some of our folks."

Our spring term of school will close this week, which ends a series of nine months of school by Prof. H. T. Albert, one of the best teachers in Cowley. Hope we will be able to procure his services again next fall and winter.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM DEXTER.]

Winfield Courier, June 19, 1879.

Miss Allie Harden is teaching school in district 54, on Crab creek.

Arvilla Elliott is teaching school in district 110.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

There will be a meeting of the people at Bolton, at Bland's Schoolhouse, Saturday night, to discuss bridge matters.

[SUITABLE SCHOOLHOUSE IN WINFIELD.]

Winfield Courier, June 26, 1879.

We observe that the Mayor of this city has called an election for next Tuesday in the school district composed of the city of Winfield, to vote upon a proposition authorizing the issuance of bonds of the city or district not exceeding $10,000 with interest not exceeding seven percent, to build a suitable schoolhouse. Now we have had no hand in getting up this matter, have not been consulted, and have consulted with no one in regard to the matter; do not know who has been active in the matter and what are their intentions further than appears in the election proclamation, but we are of the opinion that the bonds should be voted.

So far as the taxes are concerned, we presume they will affect us personally fully as much as they will affect our neighbor across the way, who opposed the bonds on the ground of taxation, and says that if we vote these bonds "we will keep voting them until a debt of $50,000 is made."

The absurdity of this freshman statement is apparent when we consider that this district once voted $5,000 for a similar purpose and have not more in several years and that now these bonds are paid.

It is a fact that we need a great deal more school room now, that our city is growing and promises in the immediate future to require still more. During the last session six school rooms have been well filled and it has become a moral certainty that eight rooms will soon be required. We have now only four belonging to the district, have been renting two at $350 per annum (if we remember correctly), and if we do not build, we must rent two more at similar cost, thus making our rents amount to $700 a year, besides the danger to the health of our children by confining them in badly ventilated and damp basements. Now if the $10,000 bonds be issued, the interest could not be greater than $700 per year, the amount we must otherwise pay as rents; therefore, our taxation would not be increased thereby, at least until money must be raised to sink the principal.

We should say, build a main school building on the south end of our present stone wing sufficiently large to add four large and convenient school rooms and for hall, closets, and other modern conveniences, employ a first class schoolhouse architect (we shall not apply for the job) to attend to it, remodel the roof, and some other parts of the present building to make the two one harmonious whole, and make it an architectural beauty such as we shall feel proud of. We believe this can be done for $8,000, and we believe our school bonds bearing six percent interest can be sold at par. If these should prove facts, our yearly interest would be only $480 and it would actually decrease our taxation.

But were it a fact that it would increase our taxation, would it not be vastly better to preserve our children in life and health by providing healthy, well ventilated and convenient school rooms above ground? And were there nothing in this, what friend and citizen of our proud young city is not willing to put his hand into his pocket a little way in order to give his city the credit of having a fine school house?

We are daily receiving letters of inquiry from other states in relation to this city as a desirable location for residence and business, and among these inquiries those concerning our school and church buildings, schools and churches are always prominent in well written letters, while the illiterate letters rarely refer to them. On strangers who are intelligent and who would make valuable citizens, the appearance of the schoolhouse will have a decided effect in deciding their location. We are gaining a proud name for our churches, let us have a schoolhouse of which we need not be ashamed. Vote for the bonds.

Winfield Courier, June 26, 1879.

At a meeting of the School Directors on Monday, June 16th, F. S. Jennings in the chair, the following appointments were made for the coming year: Principal, Prof. E. T. Trimble, of Illinois, who takes the place of Mr. G. W. Robinson, resigned; Helen E. Meach, of Chicago, who takes the place of Miss Aldrich in the grammar department; Miss Sarah Hodges, who takes the place of Mrs. Moffit, resigned--second intermediate; Miss Minnie Johnson, a new appointment, 1st intermediate; Miss Allie Klingman, returned, 2nd primary; Miss Mollie Bryant, 1st primary. The Chair appointed the committees for the ensuing year, to-wit: M. G. Troup, Finance; N. L. Rigby, Ways and Means; I. W. Randall, Care of School property. The first Monday in July was set for the next meeting of the Directors. The fall term of school opens September 1st.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

The Semi-Weekly boils at the thought of ten thousand dollars for a public school building for the city of Winfield, and says that if you want to stop emigration, commence to vote bonds! You see, Brother Conklin, we are none of us selfish. It would hurt the city of Winfield to vote her into debt, but to create a debt to build another courthouse for the people of Cowley to pay is really a pretty thing. No, don't give ten thousand dollars for that schoolhouse to enlighten and ennoble the minds of countless numbers who are soon to make our laws and fill public places, but put the money into the courthouse and make cells and chains to protect society.

[EDITORIAL ABOUT SCHOOLHOUSE IN WINFIELD.]

Winfield Courier, July 3, 1879.

We did not take any interest in the school bond election last Tuesday, because of the fact that there was no registration as required in cities of the second class, and this, whether it would make the bonds invalid or not, would render the bonds unsalable.

Therefore, when this question was raised, we concluded it was best not to vote the bonds, and feeling sure of a defeat, we paid no attention to the matter.

Now, we have to urge that the citizens take hold of this matter at once, have the proper registration effected, and call an election to vote $6,000, or such sum as is necessary to build a main part to our present school house and make such changes in the old as will make it correspond with the new, making in the new part four large and convenient school rooms, hall, closets, and other conveniences, and making a good looking and substantial building of it. This with the two rooms in the wood structure will make all the school room we shall need until the city is richer and more populous, and we think can be effected for $6,000, in district bonds drawing six percent interest, or $360 interest per year.

If we do not do something of this sort, we must pay about $600 per year rent. We take no stock in the idea of building more board shanties scattered around the city. When we need more school room than the above place will furnish, we should build another fine schoolhouse in the south or southwest part of the city, but we don't like the stingy idea of building low, dirty board barracks near as well as we do paying taxes for good buildings, especially when the barracks are going to make about as much taxes as the fine school buildings.

Winfield Courier, July 3, 1879.

Keep it before the people. The annual school meeting comes on the second Thursday of August.

Winfield Courier, July 3, 1879.

Mr. H. C. Holcomb will have a stand on the grounds next Friday. Mr. Holcomb has been a cripple from his birth, and deserves the patronage of all kind hearted people. He is a school teacher by profession, and not having a school at present, feels desirous of doing something for himself whenever occasion offers. Let all of our readers who have a spare dime to spend patronize Mr. Holcomb.

Winfield Courier, July 3, 1879.

The storm Friday night last did considerable damage in Harvey township. Mr. Callahan's house was blown down and he received some damage from the falling timbers. John Mason's house was blown over. A house belonging to Mr. Pattison was torn down. Mrs. Campbell's house and the schoolhouse in Cedar Valley were also blown down. The trees along Grouse were fearfully twisted and torn, and the immense rainfall put the creek on a big tare.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM PRAIRIE GROVE.]

Winfield Courier, July 3, 1879.

Miss Fannie Pontious' school at Richland closed last Saturday. I was not there but heard that the parents came with full baskets. Miss Fannie set up the lemonade and thus closed a pleasant school. She is going to attend the normal and somebody will get a good teacher this winter if they employ her.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "X. Y. CAESAR" - BALTIMORE ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, July 3, 1879.

During one of the late storms the lightning struck our schoolhouse, doing some damage to the south end. Miss Bolcourt's school closed at this place one week ago to-day.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "ALEXANDER" AT OMNIA TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, July 3, 1879.

OMNIA, Tp., June 27, 1879.

It has rained and rained, and all we have been able to do for some time is to be interviewed, not by politicians exclusively, but mostly by book agents without rest. Our legislature is responsible for a great loss of breath on account of the new school law. We have adopted, but not until we were convinced that there was a terrible lot of good books published in the U. S., and that about forty good natured agents were very much interested in having us adopt their particular series, just for our own good.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "KNICKERBOCKER" AT NEW SALEM.]

Winfield Courier, July 10, 1879.

Miss Mollie Buck's school closed on the 3rd. She had a full attendance throughout the term.

Winfield Courier, July 10, 1879.

The bidding on school land Saturday got quite exciting, and the school fund gained considerable thereby. One quarter section brought $912.

Winfield Courier, July 10, 1879.

Mr. Anderson Battery, of Omnia township, was in the City Tuesday, taking the initiatory steps toward the organization of a new school district in Omnia.

Winfield Courier, July 10, 1879.

Surveyor Haight has just completed a beautiful and accurate school district map of Cowley County. It was made for the use of the superintendent's office.

Winfield Courier, July 10, 1879.

The petition for the attachment of adjacent territory to the city of Winfield for school purposes was presented to the Board Monday night. It was signed by a very large majority of the people living on the land in question.

Excerpts...

[COWLEY COUNTY: FROM THE TOPEKA COMMONWEALTH.]

Winfield Courier, July 10, 1879.

SCHOOLS.

The schools of Cowley County, under the efficient management of Supt. R. C. Story, are second to none in the State. I insert the following statistics on schools.

No. of Districts in the county: 115

School population: 5,681

No. of pupils enrolled: 3,766

No. of districts having school: 100

Value of school property: $68,810

Taxable property: $1,979,487

State fund received: $9,713

Total expense for schools: $27,092

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM DEXTER TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier July 17, 1879.

Preaching every two weeks in the schoolhouse by the Rev. W. H. Rose, pastor of the M. E. church. Congregations large.

Winfield Courier, July 24, 1879.

The foolish business of cutting and slashing up townships, which commenced in this place by making it a city of the second class, has been continued. While we were absent, the new township of Walnut was made and Winfield township was whittled to pieces. We are disgusted with the whole business. Nothing but harm will be the result. Winfield has lost much of the value of its schools by weakening them, has assumed a much more expensive city government, and cut itself off from its best helpers and supporters. The change of township lines has done no one any good, while it has complicated everything and will doubtless lead to much litigation and bad blood. If anyone expects that these changes will in any way release him from taxes on the bridge bonds, he will find himself mistaken.

Excerpt...

[REFLEX - MAPLE MATTERS.]

Winfield Courier, July 31, 1879.

Lightning struck the Olive schoolhouse in a recent thunderstorm, entering at, and tearing away one-half the brick flue above the roof, passing down the stove pipe to the stove, thence through the floor, leaving a little round hole and a splintered place to show its place of exit.

[PLEASANT VALLEY.]

Winfield Courier, July 31, 1879.

According to previous arrangement the citizens of Pleasant Valley township and vicinity met at Odessa schoolhouse for the purpose of organizing a stock protective union. The following officers of Bolton Stock Protective Union were elected: Captain, C. C. Pierce; 1st Lieut., R. C. Devore; 2nd Lieut., Wm. P. Hostetler; Orderly Sergeant, E. T. Green; General Messengers, S. B. Hunt and A. DeTurk.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 13, 1879.

C. H. Sylvester, principal of the school at this place, who has been visiting his "parents on the farm," at Boscobel, Wisconsin, starts on his return trip today, and expects to arrive in Winfield next Saturday. As soon as the Normal Institute adjourns, Herbert will be ready for business at his old post.

Winfield Courier, August 21, 1879.

The school fund, amounting to $4,033, is now deposited with the County Treasurer. It will be ready for distribution by the last of this week.

Winfield Courier, August 21, 1879.

The semi-annual apportionment of the State school fund to the counties was made on the 15th. The amount apportioned was $189,232.75. Cowley County gets $4,033.51. Nine counties get more each.

[SCHOOLS OR NO SCHOOLS.]

Winfield Courier, August 21, 1879.

ED. COURIER: On the 8th of September, the city schools will open. Under the law controlling such cases the Board of Education has determined to exclude all children under the age of 7. Will this relieve us of the difficulties which now face us? Last year the rooms were crowded though the primary grade was put in two divisions. The enrollment of children of school age is now over six hundred. Of this number, not more than one hundred and fifty will fall under the order; and of the others not more than fifty will remain out of school. This will leave at least four hundred children to be accommodated in six rooms and instructed by only six teachers; an average of more than sixty-four to a teacher.

By cutting off those under seven years of age, the bulk of the first primary department is thrown out of school. Can our city afford to compress schools and departments in this manner, and to this extent? If the rule of seclusion were to become a fixed one in school matters, the Board of Education could reorganize the schools on the new basis. This regulation will be enforced only so long as the lack of room is so great that all cannot be accommodated. But when the Board may wish to restore the privilege to children under seven years, a second reorganization of the primary schools will be necessitated.

By using the basement of the Presbyterian church, the city is taxed at the rate of $300 a year, an amount equivalent to the interest on $3,000 in bonds. For $4,000 two good, brick Ward schoolhouses can be erected, furnished, and finished, ready in every particular for use. By moving in this matter at once the Board could put up these buildings in time for use this fall, and so accommodate all children of school age, and thus keep our system on the basis it now occupies. Would it not be well to call a public meeting to consider this question, and to give the Board that aid which comes from a public expression of opinion on this subject?

TAXPAYER.

P. S.: The question of the unfitness of the basement for school purposes--a grave one--should also be looked at.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 27, 1879.

Notice. There will be a regular meeting of the Pleasant Valley S. P. U. on Thursday night, September 4th, at the Odessa schoolhouse. A full attendance is requested.

PER ORDERS.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 27, 1879.

C. H. Sylvester, principal of our schools, arrived Sunday night. He will spend this week at the Institute in Winfield, and be ready for business on the 8th of September. Mr. Cal. Swarts has been employed as teacher in the intermediate department, which meets the approval of all parties.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 27, 1879.

Billy Arlington, the champion humorous lecturer in the country, will lecture at the schoolhouse in our city next Tuesday evening. This gentleman has been before the public for more than twenty-five years, first as a minstrel, but of late years as a lecturer, and has given such entire satisfaction that his name is a household word in Eastern circles. While in the Arlington, Cotton & Kemble troupe he built the Meyer's opera house at Chicago, playing there until 1874. Mr. Arlington's lecture is without exception the best thing of its kind before the public. In order to start a library for the school in our city, this lecture is given under the auspices of the literary society, and the proceeds will be devoted to purchasing books. Such a worthy object should not fail in drawing a large audience, and Mr. Sylvester promises to keep the ball rolling until we can boast of a good library. The Baptist church handles Arlington at Winfield, the proceeds to aid their society in building, and the library associations of Wichita and El Dorado take him in those cities. Reserved seat tickets are for sale at Eddy's drug store; price fifty cents; regular admission thirty-five cents. For the sake of our school and library, let there be a good turn-out.

[SCHOOL BOOKS ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF EDUCATION--FIVE YEARS]

Winfield Courier, August 28, 1879.

The school board met on Monday evening, and adopted the following series of school books for the next five years.

Monteith's Geographics.

White's Practical, Robinson's Mental Arithmetic.

Wilson's Algebras.

Harvey's Grammars and Spellers.

Barnes' Brief History of the United States.

Loomis' Physiology.

Steele's Philosophy.

Spencerian System of Writing.

Youman's First Book, and Wood's Class Book in Botany.

Morse's Zoology.

Andrew's Manual of the Constitution.

Cornell's Physical Geography.

Wentworth's Geometry.

Swinton's Language Lessons and Word Analysis.

Hepburn's Rhetoric.

McGuffy's Revised Readers.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 3, 1879

School commences next Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 3, 1879.

The schoolhouse grounds are covered with weeds. They should be cut down without delay.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 3, 1879.

The belfry of the schoolhouse is now the roosting place of a colony of pigeons. The entire schoolhouse needs a thorough cleaning before next Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 3, 1879.

School district No. 89, Bolton Township, has flourished to such an extent as to necessitate the building of a larger schoolhouse. The school interests rank first with our farmers, and every facility is given to the children that they may become useful citizens and ornaments to society.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 3, 1879.

The city schools begin Monday next. As they are to be graded, it is requested that all the pupils be present at the opening. Let them bring the books used last year and not buy until they have ascertained exactly what they need. C. H. SYLVESTER, Prin.

Winfield Courier, September 4, 1879.

Miss C. F. C. Meech will open a school for children Monday, September 8th, on 11th Avenue. Patronage solicited.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 10, 1879.

There were 128 pupils enrolled at the opening of school last Monday--just double the number of last year.

Winfield Courier, September 11, 1879.

School district 121, comprising eight sections and a half, has not a single acre of taxable property within its boundaries, none of the land being entered.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 17, 1879.

PREACHING. There will be preaching at the Coburn schoolhouse, Silverdale township, next Sunday evening, by Rev. Rose.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 17, 1879.

S. P. U.'S Take Notice.

There will be a meeting of the Stock Protective Union, next Friday night, at the Bland schoolhouse, Bolton township. Every member is requested to be present as business of great importance is to be transacted. Don't fail to come out, men. We have work to do.

R. HOFFMASTER, Captain.

[COURSE OF STUDY: ARKANSAS CITY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, September 17, 1879.

The School Board has, at our suggestion, adopted the following course of study for the schools of the city.

Primary Department.

1st year: Reader--First. Writing. Drawing. Numbers.

2nd year: Reader--Second. Spelling. Writing. Drawing.

Numbers, Addition, Subtraction.

3rd year: Reader--Third. Spelling. Writing. Drawing.

Arithmetic--Primary. Geography. Oral.

Intermediate Department.

1st year: Reader--Third (completed). Spelling. Writing.

Drawing. Arithmetic--Primary (completed).

Geography--Elementary.

2nd year: Reader--Fourth. Spelling. Writing. Drawing.

Drawing. Arithmetic--Intermediate.

Geography--Elementary (continued).

Language.

3rd year: Reader--Fourth (completed). Spelling. Writing.

Drawing. Arithmetic--Intermediate (com.).

Geography--Comprehensive. Language Lessons.

Grammar Department.

1st year: Reader--Fifth. Spelling. Writing. Drawing.

Arithmetic--Complete. Geography--Comprehensive,

(com.). Grammar.

2nd year: Reader--Fifth (completed). Spelling. Writing.

Drawing. Arithmetic--Complete, (completed.)

U. S. History. Grammar (completed).

HIGH SCHOOL.

1st year: Reading--Miscellaneous. Drawing. Algebra.

Book-keeping. Physical Geography. Rhetoric.

Physiology.

The course has been made as comprehensive as circumstances will permit. A diploma will be given to pupils who have completed, in a satisfactory manner, the course prescribed.

The schools do not at present conform exactly to the standard. This difficulty, however, will soon be remedied. In closing we ask the cooperation of the parents in this work. Changes will be made in the grade of a scholar only when his best interests demand it.

C. H. SYLVESTER, C. L. SWARTS, MRS. THEAKER.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 24, 1879.

The district school at Stony Point, Bolton Township, commenced Monday morning.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 24, 1879.

Teacher wanted in district sixty-nine. Male teacher that has had several years experience in teaching, and that is capable of teaching music. Young teachers need not apply.

E. BOWEN, Director.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 1, 1879.

NOTICE: There will be a meeting of the members of the Prairie View Cemetery Company, at Parker schoolhouse, on Thursday, October 9th, for the purpose of cutting the grass. By order of the COMMITTEE.

COWLEY COUNTY TEACHER, PUBLISHED MONTHLY, OCT. 8, 1879.

SALUTATORY.

For three years my labors have been earnestly put forth to advance the cause of education in Cowley County. Thro' the columns of the county papers, in visits made to a large part of the schools and districts of the county, and in addresses in many neighborhoods this work has been untiringly pushed. The territory is so large, the district so numerous, the interests so vast and so varied that the question of meeting the demands made upon me compels me to seek new and additional forces with which to carry on successfully the duties of my office. In the hope of meeting these demands and duties, and in the broader hope of reaching more widely and more deeply all who are concerned in the welfare of our common schools, this new venture is undertaken. There will be much labor and little money in it. The means to meet the expenses of publishing and editing this paper come from the generous businessmen who advertise in its columns. The full tax however may not be met this way, but the balance will be gladly met should the paper prove to be serviceable in promoting the cause for which it appears.

Its constant aim will be to reach and benefit the pupils and teachers in the public schools, the families from which come teachers and pupils, and the district officers, who are the educational guardians of their people. R. C. STORY, Co. Supt.

Cowley County Teacher, October 8, 1879.

The attendance at the late Normal Institute was all that could be wished by anyone. For the first time the number of teachers enrolled exceeded the number of districts in the county. . . .

Cowley County Teacher, October 8, 1879.

TEACHER'S WAGES.

The question is often asked by parties living in the east, what wages do you pay teachers in Kansas? In this county wages for female teachers, in 1877 and 1878 averaged $25.99; for male teachers, $31.52 per month. The average number of weeks of school was 18.08. The returns for last year are not all in, and no exact estimate can be given. Probably the wages will range about as they were the year before.

The length of terms and the quality of teaching are increasing, while districts are growing stronger in value of property and in the number of children. These are the causes that determine the wages of teaching. As districts get out of debt; and grown in school population and in resources, it is natural to infer that better wages will be paid.

Occasionally one hears that teachers have formed a combination to put up wages; or that the examining board advises teachers to demand higher wages; or that the county superintendent is seeking to raise the pay of teachers. How or why these silly rumors begin no one can tell. The pay of teachers, like the wages of all working classes, depends on laws which are above the control of superintendents, examining boards, and teachers. The factors that make the wages given teachers are three: the financial resources of the districts, their freedom from indebtedness, and the quality of teaching. Only one of these factors can be affected by any influence from teachers or school officials, and that is the quality of the teaching. Who can exert the greatest influence on this factor? Who would be benefitted most, financially, by its increase in worth? Those who labor in the school-room in the position of teachers. In this county, as elsewhere, good teachers are sought for, and are paid good wages for their labors. When teachers cry out for better wages, they should be told to increase the worth of their wares, and their pay will increase proportionally.

Cowley County Teacher, October 8, 1879.

First paragraph partially torn...ends up with the following words: "and organized a permanent association." Article then goes on with resolutions...

The work of the general institute was practical and successful, and was summed up in the following resolutions.

Resolved, That monthly reports should be made by teachers strictly in accordance with the blank reports sent out by the county superintendent, and that such reports should be made promptly at the close of each calendar month.

Resolved, That both written and oral class examinations should be held as often as once a month, and that oral reviews should be had at least once a week.

Resolved, That county schools should be divided into primary, intermediate, and grammar grades, and that the teacher should grade his school according to its needs and advancement.

Resolved, That written work in schools should consist (1) of written preparation for recitations; (2) of written work at recitation; and (3) of written work at monthly examinations.

Resolved, That this work should be prepared frequently, and kept by the teacher for the inspection of parents, officers, and visitors.

Resolved, That while we, as teachers, do not condemn the judicious attendance of pupils and teachers at socials and lyceums, yet we recommend that such meetings be held only on Friday or Saturday night.

Resolved, That no class of entertainments should continue in session later than 10 o'clock, p.m.

Resolved, That such entertainments should not be held oftener than once in two weeks.

Resolved, That the teachers of Cowley county hereby tender Hon. Allen B. Lemmon their sincere thanks for his recent visit, and for his hearty words uttered in behalf of education. We deeply appreciate the worth of his devoted and untiring efforts in the cause of common schools, and we trust that all true friends of education will recognize in him a worthy and conscientious co-laborer.

Resolved, That our thanks are due, and are hereby tendered, to all who have been engaged in working with us in our normal, in the capacity of instructors.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 8, 1879.

Mr. Sylvester resumed his duties in the School last Monday morning.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 8, 1879.

Affidavit signed by the District Board of 69.

We, the undersigned District Board of School District No. 69, County of Cowley, State of Kansas, sign our names to the following declaration, to wit:

Mr. J. O. Wilkinson was never turned out of our school by us nor had we the slightest occasion to take any legal steps for his dismissal; believing, as we now do, that he taught us the best school we ever had in the District. ELISHA BOWEN, Pres.

MARY URQUHART, Clerk.

Winfield Courier, October 9, 1879.

Married on Sunday, September 28th, at Pleasant Grove schoolhouse, by Rev. P. B. Lee, Mr. William D. Stoddard and Miss Lora Easterly.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 15, 1879.

There will be a republican meeting at the Elisha Parker schoolhouse, east Creswell, on Saturday night next, and it is to be hoped a full house of earnest republicans will be present to hear the arguments of good speakers.

[TEACHERS' WAGES.]

Winfield Courier, October 16, 1879 - Front Page.

From the Cowley County Teacher.

The question is often asked by parties living in the east, what wages do you pay teachers in Kansas. In this county wages for female teachers, in 1877 and 1878, averaged $25.00; the male teachers, $31.52 per month. The average number of weeks of school was 18.08. The returns for last year are not all in, and no exact estimate can be given. Probably the wages will range about as they were the year before. The length of terms and the quality of teaching are increasing, while districts are growing stronger in value of property and in the number of children. These are the causes that determine the wages of teaching. As districts get out of debt, and grow in school population and in resources, it is natural to infer that better wages will be paid.

Occasionally one hears that teachers have formed a combination to put up wages; or that the examining board advises teachers to demand higher wages; or that the county superintendent is seeking to raise the pay of teachers. How or why these silly rumors begin, no one can tell. The pay of teachers, like the wages of all working classes, depends on laws which are above the control of superintendents, examining boards, and teachers.

The factors that make the wages given teachers are three: the financial resources of the districts, their freedom from indebtedness, and the quality of teaching. Only one of these factors can be affected by any influence from teachers or school officials, and that is the quality of teaching. Who can exert the greatest influence on this factor? Who would be benefitted most, financially, by its increase in worth? Those who labor in the school-room in the position of teachers. In this county, as elsewhere, good teachers are sought for, and are paid good wages for their labors. When teachers cry out for better wages, they should be told to increase the worth of their wares, and their pay will increase proportionally.

[COMPLYING WITH THE NEW SCHOOL LAW.]

Winfield Courier, October 16, 1879.

The State Superintendent, A. B. Lemmon, states that in the event school district boards have not completed the work of adoption and introduction of school books by the 16th Sept., 1879, the date of the expiration of the new school law, it is their duty and right to proceed until the work is completed.

Winfield Courier, October 16, 1879.

School district 51, two miles above the mouth of Silver Creek, in Silverdale township, wants a male teacher. Don't all speak at once.

Winfield Courier, October 16, 1879.

The Board of Education met Saturday evening. A petition was presented for the attachment of the southeast quarter of section 27, and the southwest quarter, section 26, to the city for school purposes, which was granted.

Winfield Courier, October 23, 1879.

Nearly seven thousand school children in Cowley County, July 31st, an increase of about one thousand over the year '77 and '78.

Winfield Courier, October 23, 1879.

When Judge Gans arrived at the residence of Mr. Parker, east of Arkansas City, an unusual number of people had collected together. The judge supposed the crowd had congregated for political purposes, as a meeting had been announced at the Parker schoolhouse. His mistake was soon pointed out by Jerry Tucker, who, as spokesman for the meeting, proceeded to explain the cause of the gathering. The neighbors had made up a purse, a lot of household valuables, a good amount of the "staff of life," in all about forty dollars, and then and there turned over the same to the astonished judge. For the first time in his life, Hirm was unable to argue the case, and quietly submitted to this knock-down argument.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 29, 1879.

The Literary will meet at the schoolhouse on Friday night, November 7th. Turn out and help the good cause along.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 29, 1879.

We notice from our exchanges that the courts are overthrowing the titles to the school sections on the Osage Indian lands. The treaty with the Osages made no provision for any of these lands to be appropriated for a school fund, but are in trust for the exclusive benefit of that tribe of Indians.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 29, 1879.

Miss Mattie Mitchell is teaching in Bolton Township. Miss Mattie is one of our accomplished young ladies who has been raised from childhood and educated in our city to do honor to any position she may be called to fill.

Winfield Courier, October 30, 1879.

All teachers who want monthly report cards should at once notify the County Superintendent, as he is at work getting up a form for use in the county. The cost will be about fifty cents a hundred.

Excerpts...

[FROM "MORE ANON" - FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, October 30, 1879 - Front Page.

The Pleasant Hill schoolhouse will be removed twenty feet on to a lot which Mr. Nickel deeds to the district.

The work on the new schoolhouse is to be completed this week. Mr. F. Beck does the plastering.

[G. S. STORY.]

Winfield Courier, October 30, 1879.

Don't vote for G. S. Story for clerk under the impression that he is the county superintendent of schools. That Story is "R. C.," and a very different person in many respects.

Cowley County Teacher, November, 1879.

No. of districts having nine months' school: 5

No. of districts having six months' school: 42

No. of districts having four months' school: 33

No. of districts having three months' school: 28

Cowley County Teacher, November, 1879.

For the purpose of holding teachers' associations in the different parts of the county, the following division of townships has been made.

District No. 1. Ninnescah, Maple, and western portion of Rock.

District No. 2. Eastern portion of Rock, Richland, and Omnia.

District No. 3. Harvey, Windsor, Silver Creek.

District No. 4. Walnut, Vernon, Beaver, Pleasant Valley, Tisdale, Liberty, and city of Winfield.

District No. 5. Creswell, Bolton, Silverdale.

District No. 6. Spring Creek, Cedar.

District No. 7. Dexter, Liberty, Otter.

Cowley County Teacher, November, 1879.

THE LATE EXAMINATIONS.

The examinations held in September and October disclosed two serious defects in the education of a majority of our teachers. The lack of accurate knowledge of general literature and of general information is indeed lamentable. What shall be said of applicants who class Shakespeare, Tennyson, Cowper, Dryden, Byron, Milton, among American poets? Of what use has the study of history been to those who locate Bunker Hill, Lexington, and Yorktown in New Jersey, and who make Franklin and Hamilton generals in the Black Hawk war? What does that teacher know of current events who says that the Isthmus of Darien is the "body of water" that connects the Red Sea and the Mediterranean? Why should so many applicants say that John Brown's raid was one of the most important events in Kansas history?

One other serious defect in the education of our teachers is shown in the bad spelling, bad composition, and erroneous use of capitals and punctuation marks. Many papers were given in which contained not a single mark of punctuation. Others were found in which capitals seemed to have been scattered broad-cast, in the old manner of sowing wheat.

Such ignorance and such errors must be eradicated. It will take time, labor, and perseverance, but it must be done. Applicants for certificates must show an ability to use correct English. They must know something of the present generation and of the current events of national importance.

To secure these two ends follow this course: Take Swinton's or Pinneo's Composition, and study it, making it a basis for much original work in writing. Read a selection, or memorize one--then write it out on paper, and compare this work with the original in regard to capitals, punctuation, spelling, and language. Subscribe for some leading paper of national reputation, and read and study its contents, using atlas, dictionary, and note-book constantly.

To those whose standing has been running low, let a word of warning be given. Make such use of the fall and winter months as will find you next spring able to pass a thorough examination in every subject in which your standing is low. A hint to the wise is sufficient.

Cowley County Teacher, November, 1879.

Educational Summary of Cowley County for the Year

Ending July 31, 1879.

No. of districts organized: 122

No. of districts reported: 122

Total school population: 6,779

No. of pupils enrolled in school: 4,485

Average daily attendance: 2,580

Percentage enrolled: .66

Percentage in daily attendance: .38

Percentage not in daily attendance: .62

No. of persons between 8 and 14 not attending school 3 months: 192

No. of teachers required: 117

Grade "A": 10

Grade "B": 76

Grade "C": 58

Total No. of different teachers employed: 137

Average salary--males: $30.34

Average salary--females: $22.10

Average No. of weeks of school session: 21.3

No. of rooms used for schools: 116

No. of private schools: 9

Teachers in private schools: 9

Pupils in private schools: 176

Average weeks of private schools: 10

Reported No. of persons over 16 who cannot read or write: 60

Estimated value of buildings and grounds: $52,251

Estimated value of furniture: $6,966

Estimated value of apparatus: $1,208

Amount of bonds issued this year: $2,590

Present bonded indebtedness: $36,738

Assessed valuation of personal property: $370,043

Assessed valuation of real property: $1,443,942

No. of districts furnished with record books: 89

No. of districts furnished with unabridged dictionaries: 16

No. of districts that have uniform text-books: 89

No. of persons examined: 177

Average age of applicants: 23

No. of applications rejected: 36

No. of certificates granted: 141

No. of districts visited by county superintendent: 64

No. of visits made by Co. Supt.: 134

No. of new districts organized: 6

No. of districts having 3 months school: 108

Cowley County Teacher, November, 1879.

FINANCIAL EXHIBIT.

Balance in hands of district treasurers July 31, 1878: $3,328.82

Amount received for teachers' wages: $15,144.42

Amount received from State Fund: $5,420.95

Amount received site & building fund: $1,844.41

Amount received library fund: $121.80

Amount received sale of bonds: $2,360.00

Amount received all other sources: $1,753.27

Amount received from all sources: $29,973.41

Amount paid for teachers' wages: $17,420.89

Amount paid for rents, fuel, etc.: $4,285.36

Amount paid for text books: $440.92

Amount paid for books for library: $51.50

Amount paid for maps and apparatus: $289.33

Amount paid for sites, buildings: $3,126.47

Total amount paid out: $35,614.47

Amount in hands of district treasurers Aug. 1, 1879: $4,359.10

TEXT-BOOKS USED IN DISTRICTS.

Reading and Orthography.

McGuffey: 17

Harvey: 19

Monroe: 14

Edward: 16

Independent: 43

Arithmetics.

Ray: 36

Felter: 7

Hagar: 10

Peck: 17

White: 39

Penmanship.

Spencerian: 53

Eclectic: 40

Feltor's Book-Keeping: 5

Swinton's Language Series: 15

Geography.

Mitchell: 2

Warren: 9

Eclectic: 26

Monteith: 33

Harper: 29

Grammar.

Harvey: 46

Greene: 14

Swinton: 6

Clark: 27

History.

Barnes: 45

Ridpath: 3

Goodrich: 6

Anderson: 8

Venable: 5

Beard: 5

Swinton: 10

Unabridged Dictionaries: 16

Cowley County Teacher, November, 1879.

Five teachers sent in reports for September, districts 29, 42, 48, 77, and 99.

The Winfield teachers are over-worked, and two of them think of going out of the service.

Miss Fannie McKinley is seriously ill. Hopes of her recovery have been given up by her friends.

Sixty-seven teachers have reported contracts made for teaching school, while only 39 have sent in reports for work done in October.

A supply of the new edition of the School law has been received, and district clerks can get copies by calling at the Superintendent's office.

Six hundred copies of the first and seven hundred copies of this number of the TEACHER have been sent out. This paper goes into the hands of every teacher and school official in the county.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 5, 1879.

For the benefit of the school library, at the School House Friday evening, November 7th, 1879, a play will be given.

Participants: C. H. Sylvester, C. M. Swarts, F. B. Hutchison, S. B. Reed, J. Leonard, Miss Annie Norton, Miss Linnie Peed, Miss Laura Gregg.

Admission 25 cents. Reserved seats 35 cents. Tickets for sale at Eddy's Drug Store.

[CORRESPONDENT "X. Y. CAESAR" WRITES FROM MANHATTAN.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, November 6, 1879 - Front Page.

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, MANHATTAN, Oct. 26, 1879.

ED. COURIER: I again seize the opportunity of writing you a few items from this point. Perhaps it would be expedient to speak about the college first.

At present there are two hundred and sixteen students enrolled, all of whom seem to be striving for that kind of an education which will be of the greatest benefit to them hereafter. Being a student of this "practical school," probably I am one-sided; but there are instances in this vicinity where very fine professional men are thrown out of employment, while all skilled mechanics are constantly engaged. Viewing from this standpoint, I am naturally inclined to believe that this is the place for the masses.

Rhetoricals is a feature which has not been very prominent in the college heretofore, but they will receive due attention this year; and you may hear, originating from this college, the voices of men equal to those of Clay and Webster reverberating from hill-top to hill-top, proclaiming justice, freedom, and "practical education."

Our new president, Prof. George T. Fairchild, will be among us about the 25th of November. We are all eagerly waiting for him, as he comes to us with the highest recommendation from the oldest agricultural college in existence, viz., the Michigan Agricultural College.

The college does not teach the classes, but Prof. Walters has organized a class in German, which he hears recite on Saturday of each week.

A college orchestra has also been organized by Prof. Hofer, and several of the students have joined and are improving rapidly.

Mr. C. M. Aley, the gentlemen who has written so many interesting letters from Utah and other western places to your newspaper, has been stopping over at this place for a few days on his way to his old home in Cowley County. At the request of the Webster Society, Mr. Aley delivered a short lecture on phrenology before its members. He is a fine speaker, and advanced some very able remarks on the science of phrenology. It was truly a sententious lecture, and we all wondered how "one small head could hold so much." He will probably take the train for Cowley County tomorrow.

[WHERE OUR MONEY GOES.]

Winfield Courier, November 6, 1879.

The total amount of taxes due the State from Cowley County for the year 1879 is $14,034.45, Of this sum $9,716.19 will be applied to the general revenue fund, $1,079.55 the Capitol extension, $215.91 to the sinking, $863.65 to the interest, and $2,159.15 to the school fund.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "MORE ANON" - FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, November 6, 1879.

School commences Monday, Nov. 3rd.

Mr. Floyd, of Winfield, is teacher of the higher department of our school and Miss McKinley of the primary.

Winfield Courier, November 13, 1879.

At the meeting of the Board of Education Monday evening, it was decided to admit no pupils residing outside of the city to the public schools, and also to expel those admitted before. This measure was needed because of the crowded condition of our schools.

Winfield Courier, November 13, 1879.

Two of the most efficient of the Winfield teachers, Miss Johnson and Miss Meech, have tendered their resignations, to take place at the close of the present term. The crowded condition of our schools makes it almost impossible for a teacher to keep up with the work. The grammar department, over which Miss Meech presides, had an average attendance for the month of October of 52, when 40 is as many as one person can possibly teach and do justice to the pupils. Some step should be taken in this matter.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 19, 1879.

The following is the standing of the pupils of District 96 at the examination for the month ending Nov. 14, 1879.

AM LISTING NAMES OF PUPILS ONLY.

A CLASS.

Malinda Conaway, Lizzie Watts, Maria Marshall, Finley Marshall, Frank Donnelly, Willie Woolsey.

B CLASS.

Maggie Grown, Theodore Matthews, Henry Donnelly, Sterling Marshall.

C CLASS.

Mable Brown, Ollie Colwell, Gertie Colwell, Etta Colwell, Dora Andrews, Lora Guthrie, Charlie Geis, Willie Geis, Mary Bass, Adaline Bass.

MATTIE MITCHELL, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, November 20, 1879.

We were shown Monday an abstract upon which one of the fraudulent land sales that have been going on in Indiana for some time past was based. It purports to be an abstract of a piece of land near Tisdale. The first transfer is "State of Kansas to Wm. B. Brown, patent," bears date of June 10th, 1859, and claims to be recorded in book 31. The abstract is a fraud on its face as any person knows that the state of Kansas has nothing to do with granting patents, except on school land, and that in 1859 this county was a howling wilderness inhabited only by buffalo and Indians; besides, there is no such book as "31" in the recorder's office. The abstract is neatly written, and certified to by a notary public. An attorney of this place, together with lawyers of Indiana, have been engaged to look up the matter; and if possible, bring the criminals to justice.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 26, 1879.

Prof. May and Mr. Wilkinson desire to express their thanks to the city authorities, Prof. Sylvester, and the School District Board for their gentlemanly courtesy and assistance in connection with their recent presentation of Pinafore.

Excerpts...

[FROM "GRAPEVINE TELEGRAPH" AT VERNON.]

Winfield Courier, November 20, 1879.

Rev. S. B. Lee, graduate of Otterheim University, Ohio, is teaching school at Vernon Center. He is an excellent man as well as teacher, and would make us a respectable county

superintendent.

A Literary Society was organized last week at the Randall schoolhouse.

[ANNUAL SCHOOL REPORTS.]

Winfield Courier, November 27, 1879.

The annual report of the schools of Cowley County has reached the State Department. County Superintendent Story exhibits much care in the compilation of his reports and they are always very accurate as to facts, and neat in workmanship.

This report announces the school population of Cowley County at the close of the year ending July 31st, to be 6,779, being an increase over the figures given last year of 1,098. Cowley County ranks number six in point of population in the State, having passed all competitors except Leavenworth, Shawnee, Atchison, Douglas, and Labette. Her schools are in a flourishing condition, having maintained over one hundred schools during the year at a cost of $25,614. Township Com.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM BEAVER TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, November 27, 1879.

Miss Lizzie Conrod, of Salt City, is teaching our school in district 61, and is giving good satisfaction. District 61 has been organized 7 years and has never been visited by the county

superintendent.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "ALEXANDER" AT OMNIA.]

Winfield Courier, November 27, 1879.

The Old Christian Church, sometimes called "New-Lights," (not Campbellite), hold services at Omnia schoolhouse on the 2nd and 4th Sabbaths in each month, conducted by Elders A. Henthorn and F. E. Williamson.

Cowley County Teacher, December, 1879.

Miss Fanny McKinley has recovered from her late serious illness.

The problem given in the November TEACHER was solved by Miss Fannie Skinner, Miss Henrietta King, Jerry Adams, and Harry C. Shaw, the last named being a pupil of Miss Lizzie Landis and aged thirteen years.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 3, 1879.

ATTENTION VOTERS. There will be a meeting at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday evening at 6 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of considering the interest of Bolton in regard to bridge and other matters. Turn out. A CITIZEN.

Excerpt...

[THANKSGIVING IN WINFIELD.]

Winfield Courier, December 4, 1879.

Our city was visited on Wednesday by a trio of very nice-looking young ladies who had apparently just escaped from some village "sem." or district school, and were determined to enjoy their brief vacation to the utmost. In the evening they serenaded some of their friends with fragments of old college airs, which "awakened fond remissness of the ancient memories of bye-gone days" in the breasts of the passersby.

Such classic songs as "If I had a Peanut I'd give you the Shuck," "Gathering up the Smells from the Shore," etc., were gaily caroled forth, but when their sweet voices again united in that grand and solemn refrain, "Saw my Leg off, Short," it was too much, and I sat down on the cold stone pavement, oh, so cold - and- and - wept!

Winfield Courier, December 4, 1879.

Miss Mamie Rankin, after spending Thanksgiving week with her parents and friends in Winfield, returned to her school in the Henthorn district, last Sunday. Miss Rankin has a pleasant school and a home-like boarding place with the family of Mr. Jesse Leonard, near Polo.

Winfield Courier, December 4, 1879.

The school examinations for the present term will occur in the High school on Wednesday and Thursday and in the other rooms on Thursday and Friday. The examinations will be both oral and written, and by attending parents can judge of the advancement of their children. The teachers will be pleased to have parents and friends of the schools present at the examinations.

Winfield Courier, December 4, 1879.

A festival was held in school district 90, Prairie Center Schoolhouse, in Sheridan township, on 26th ult., to raise money to seat the schoolhouse. The proceeds were $167.45. One premium cake sold for $96.20, being on a strife vote to the fairest lady. Grouse presented Miss Laura Elliott as a candidate, and Sheridan presented Miss Emma Bailey, who won the cake. The treasurer, Mr. Treadway, received the cash and has deposited it to the credit of the district. Good for No. 90.

[ARTICLE FROM "A FATHER" TO EDITOR.]

Winfield Courier, December 4, 1879.

ED. COURIER: Is Winfield a first class city? And does it propose to keep that rank among the cities of Kansas? If such are its pretensions and aspirations, would it not be well to stir up the school board to a proper realization of the educational demands from towns that plume themselves on being first class?

If the glory of our county lies in its system of free schools, does not our share of that glory grow beautifully less when our schools are run on a basis that was demanded for them when the city was half its present size? When there were less than four hundred children in the district, six rooms and six teachers were considered necessary. Now, when there are nearly eight hundred children, six teachers and six rooms are still deemed sufficient! Granting that only half the children of school age attend regularly, that would give more than sixty pupils to a room. And what are the facts? In the COURIER of a few weeks ago a statement of the enrollment was given by rooms or departments, and it is seen that the total enrollment was 378 and the average attendance 329, thus giving an average of over fifty to each teacher. But the case is still worse if we look at the schools separately. The primary schools had an average attendance during October of 69 and 63; the intermediate, 54 and 60; the grammar, 52; and the high school, 31. Here we find our rooms overcrowded, three in a seat, and many of them scattered promiscuously around the rostrums, or hanging on the corners of teachers' desks. But to cap the climax, our children below seven are forced out of school because there is not room for them! Then to make matters even worse, those who do go to the primary school can drink at the fountain of learning only half a day at a time. Truly somebody needs punching up, and if it isn't the board, who in the world is it? Why don't they rent rooms, and employ three or four more teachers? A couple of temporary frame buildings could be erected at an expense of two or three thousand dollars, and our children could then be allowed to go to school. I for one don't like the way things run in the school line. A FATHER.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 10, 1879.

At a bridge meeting held at Spring Side schoolhouse, it was resolved that our trustee be requested not to expend any more money on the old part of the bridge, as said bridge is regarded as unsafe and in an unsound condition.

MATTHEW CHAMBERS, Chairman. CHARLES WEATHERHOLT, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 10, 1879.

One of the great needs of this city is a public hall. Every week demands are made for a public hall and resort is finally made to the school room. A public hall would be a paying

investment.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 10, 1879.

There will be a meeting of the Bolton militia company at Bland's schoolhouse on Friday evening for the purpose of electing officers and completing the muster roll which must be done before arms can be drawn. R. HOFFMASTER, Lieutenant Commanding.

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

In another column will be found a term report on the state of the schools by Prof. Trimble. The professor appends to his report some very timely remarks on the crowded condition of the schools and the consequent inefficiency of the work. Parents should read this report; and if possible, devise some means of remedying the evil.

[REPORT OF THE WINFIELD SCHOOLS.]

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

TABLE SHOWING DEPARTMENTS/NO. ADMITTED, ETC. I SKIPPED AS IT WAS TOO HARD TO READ.

In presenting to the School Board and citizens the above report, I wish to call attention to a few facts regarding the term's work in the different departments of the public schools.

According to the school census taken last fall, there were in the school district 132 persons of school age. Since that time some territory has been admitted into the school district, and the number has been still further increased by families moving into the city. Owing to the fact that we have but six rooms, it was necessary to keep all under seven years of age out of the schools.

During the present term there has been enrolled in all the departments 550 pupils; 113 of these have for various reasons withdrawn, leaving an actual attendance of 437. Could this number be equally divided, it would give 73 pupils to each room. But this cannot be done, as the greater number are in the Primary and Intermediate departments. In the First Primary there is at present an attendance of 107, with a daily average of 70 for the term. The last week of the present term the daily average was 86. In the Second Primary there are 86 pupils in attendance, with an average of the last week of the term of 74.

In the First Primary it became necessary to divide the school into two divisions, and have one division attend in the forenoon and the other in the afternoon, as there are not seats to accommodate over one half the pupils.

In some of the other rooms, pupils are compelled to sit three in a seat, and should there be an increase in attendance during the coming term, there will be no alternative but to divide the other departments as has already been done in the First Primary.

The work of the term, while as good as could be expected under the circumstances, cannot but be unsatisfactory to both parents and teachers, for no teacher can do thorough work under such unfavorable circumstances.

By an examination of the above report, it will be seen that the average attendance is not so large as it should be, and yet it is really larger than could be expected, as it is not surprising that children should prefer to remain away from school when they are obliged to sit on the rostrum while there.

If we are to have prosperous and pleasant schools, some steps should immediately be taken to provide better facilities. With the present enrollment we should have at least two more teachers, and were we to admit children between 5 and 7 years, we would need at least four more teachers.

It certainly is a wise policy for any community to furnish the best of facilities in the way of public schools, as no other ever does so much toward raising a people to that plain of knowledge and enlightenment upon which every American citizen should stand.

In a state having a compulsory school law, every community should have the power to provide schools for all its children, and it is unjust that people should be compelled to pay school tax and yet be obliged to send their children to private schools.

Yours respectfully, E. T. TRIMBLE.

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

We would call the special attention of the people of this district to the report of Prof. Trimble on the condition of our schools. It is a shame to the people of Winfield that they neglect to furnish sufficient school room. It is a waste of the school-funds to expend them under such disadvantages. Six or seven thousand dollars expended at once in completing the present school structure giving four more rooms, and a similar amount soon thereafter to build another schoolhouse in the southwest part of town, would be real economy.

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

Owing to the resignation of Misses Johnson and Meech, the following changes have been made in the public schools. Miss Alice Aldrich succeeds Miss Johnson in the First Intermediate department. Mrs. Trimble takes the place of Miss Meech in the Grammar department, and Miss E. S. Cook succeeds Mrs. Trimble in the First Primary.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "REFLEX" - MAPLE.]

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

The Olive Branch school district is being taught this season by a lady.

[REPORT RE FLORAL SCHOOLS.]

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

The following is a report of the Floral schools for the month ending Nov. 28, 1879.

ADVANCED GRADE.

Number enrolled, 36, total number of days of attendance, 645; average daily attendance, 28.77; number neither absent nor tardy, 18. The following are the names, with their grades, of those who have an average standing of 90 percent and upwards, in scholarship, deportment, and attendance: E. E. Rogers, 94; Brilla Reed, 90; Curtis Wright, 91; Maggie Wright, 93; Helen Wright, 93; Jasper Files, 91; Michael Maher, 97; Etna Dahlgran, 90; Jam Cottingham, 93; Wm. Hart, 91; Mary Dahlgran, 92; Wm. Files. [THEY SKIPPED PERCENTAGE FOR HIM.] T. JAY FLOYD, Teacher.

PRIMARY GRADE.

Number enrolled, 37; total days of attendance, 618; average daily attendance, 32.8; number neither absent nor tardy, 32. The following are the names of those who averaged 90 percent, in scholarship, attendance, and deportment: Lurena Hart, Ida Hedrick, Anna Jarvis, Willie Holloway, Edie Stone, Willie Dahlgran, Effie Jarvis. HATTIE McKINLEY, Teacher.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "GUNBOAT" AT GRAND PRAIRIE - DISTRICT 95.]

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

Miss Tucker is teaching our school this winter, and is giving satisfaction.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 17, 1879.

RECAP OF COMMITTEE FOR CHRISTMAS TREE AT PARKER SCHOOLHOUSE.

PROGRAMME. Singing followed by prayer. Opening remarks by U. Spray.

COMMITTEE ON MUSIC: Mrs. Murphy, Mrs. J. N. Huston, Miss Zadie Parker, Mr. J. B. Tucker.

PROCURING TREE: Mr. J. B. Tucker and Mr. J. N. Huston.

DECORATING TREE: Mr. and Mrs. Murphy, Mr. and Mrs. Coryell, Mr. and Mrs. Hollister, Mr. and Mrs. Shearer.

RECEIVING PRESENTS: Miss Effie Kimmel, Miss Mary Parker, Miss Ruth Purdy, Mr. T. B. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. A. Spray.

ARRANGE PRESENTS ON TREE: Mr. and Mrs. Perry, Miss Zadie Parker, Mr. J. B. Tucker, Miss Kate Purdy, Mrs. Lizzie Monroe, Mr. J. N. Huston.

TAKE PRESENTS FROM TREE: Mr. S. C. Murphy, Mr. J. B. Tucker, Mr. T. B. Hall.

MARSHALS: Mr. F. M. Vaughn, Mr. John Purdy, Mr. G. H. Shearer.

Presents received from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Exercises to commence at 7 p.m. By Order of Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 17, 1879.

The ladies are making an effort to secure a building on Summit street for their festival. If they fail to secure one, it will be held at the schoolhouse.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "BONUS HOMO" AT FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, December 18, 1879. Front Page.

The foundation of the new church is laid, and the greater part of the material for the edifice is on the ground. We hope the building may be finished ere many months as the schoolhouse is very inconvenient in size and congregations remaining outdoors receive little good preaching.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 24, 1879.

There will be a meeting at the Bland schoolhouse on Friday night, December 26th, 1879, for the purpose of discussing the questions of the bridge and cattle drive. All are expected to be present. J. M. SAMPLE, Trustee.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 24, 1879.

Our public school closed on Friday for a vacation of two weeks. This will give the little ones a chance to hunt Santa Claus while the big brother can enjoy a few hours with his girl and return to school in apple pie order.



1880

Cowley County Teacher, January, 1880.

T. J. Floyd has gotten married, and of course will make no school reports during the next few months.

Foster Tucker came home from the State University to spend the holidays. He likes his school well, and reports all interests flourishing.

George Thompson, of Baltimore, now a student in the Agricultural College, Manhattan, writes us a pleasant letter about that institution. He seems well pleased with the school, and is making good progress.

Cowley County Teacher, January, 1880.

MARRIED.

Miss Nina C. Johnson, one of our county's leading teachers, was compelled to quit teaching because of heart disease. We are glad to say that she has found a complete cure. Her name now is Mrs. Ira McCommon.

[MORE DISTRICTS SUBMIT SCHOOL REPORTS.]

Winfield Courier, January 1, 1880.

ED. COURIER: Seeing in your paper reports from several of the districts in the country, I concluded to send you the report of district No. 81 for the month ending Dec. 23d. No. of days school was in session, 17; No. of pupils enrolled, 32; average daily attendance, 23. The following are the names of those whose average standing at our last examination was 90 and upward.

Kate Martin: 95

Maggie Martin: 93

Ed. Kinnaman: 90

Belle Martin: 92

John Olmstead: 92

George Hopkins: 90

P. W. SMITH, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, January 1, 1880.

The following are the names of scholars in district 48, who have an average standing of 90 percent, and upwards, in scholarship, deportment, and attendance, for the month ending Dec. 19th, 1879.

Anna McClung: 98

Virgil Taylor: 96

John Hess: 94

Charley McClung: 93

Godfrey Ward: 91

Rush McClung: 90

Mollie Taylor: 90

Arcadia Taylor: 90

JOHN BOWER, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 7, 1880.

Notice is hereby given that I will settle with and audit the accounts of the Township Treasurer, and all the supervisors in this Township at Theaker School House, District No. 36, on Thursday, the 8th day of January, 1880, a.m.

J. M. SAMPLE, Trustee of Bolton Township.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 7, 1880.

There were 150 scholars present at school Monday. The rooms can at present seat comfortably only 135.

Winfield Courier, January 8, 1880.

The schoolhouse in district 53, Bolton township, was struck by lightning not long since, and the school stopped one week for repairs.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "RUDY" IN SALT CITY.]

Winfield Courier, January 15, 1880.

District 79 has built a schoolhouse and have a full, interesting school now in operation, under the management of Mr. Sam. Gilbert.

Winfield Courier, January 15, 1880.

The people of Little Dutch are making an effort to have their school graded, and Prof. Story was up last week looking after the matter. The district contains 76 scholars, and the present room is insufficient to accommodate them.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 21, 1880.

The school room for the infant classes will be opened on Monday next. We would suggest to the teacher of this department to look well to the ventilation of the room. Frail constitutions and the germs of disease that follow the victim through life often have their origin in the school room.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 21, 1880.

Notice is hereby given to the citizens of Bolton Township that there will be a meeting held at the Bland schoolhouse on Saturday, January 31st, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of nominating township officers for the ensuing year.

JAMES M. SAMPLE, Trustee of Bolton Township.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 21, 1880.

Mr. Smith, who resides in the Centennial school district, reports that quite an excitement exists in that neighborhood, arising from Mr. James Mann being bitten by a rabid dog on Saturday last. Several head of stock were also bitten by the same dog. Mr. Mann is now en route to Paola in quest of that notorious mad stone, and God knows we hope his faith will make him whole.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 21, 1880.

The School Library.

The following is a list of the books at present in the High School Library.

HISTORY.

NAME, AUTHOR, NO.

History of Greece, Smith, No. 9.

History of Rome, Smith, No. 25.

Fifteen Decisive Battles, Creasy, No. 10.

Knickerbocker New York, Irving, No. 1

Child's England, Dickens, No. 11.

History of Chivalry, James, No. 14.

Conquest of Granada, Irving, No. 56.

BIOGRAPHY.

NAME, AUTHOR, NO.

Wm. the Conqueror, Abbott, No. 3.

Madame Roland, Abbott, No. 4.

Julius Caesar, Abbott, No. 5.

Hernando Cortez, Abbott, No. 6.

Emperor Nero, Abbott, No. 45.

Mary Queen of Scots, Abbott, No. 46.

Alexander the Great, Abbott, No. 47.

Queen Hortense, Abbott, No. 48.

Romulus, Abbott, No. 49.

Richard III, Abbott, No. 50.

Walter Scott, Hutton, No. 13.

Life of Washington, Bancroft, No. 15.

TRAVEL AND EXPLORATION.

NAME, AUTHOR, NO.

Alhambra, Irving, No. 5.

Siam, Bacon, No. 38.

Central Asia, Taylor, No. 39.

Arabia, Taylor, No. 40.

Japan, Taylor, No. 42.

Wild Men & Wild Beasts, Cuming, No. 41.

Yellowstone Park, Richardson, No. 43.

A Kansas Abroad, Prentis, No. 27.

POETRY.

NAME, AUTHOR, NO.

Complete Works of Tennyson, No. 18.

Compete Works of Longfellow, No. 55.

Complete Works of Scott, No. 52.

Complete Works of Burns, No. 51.

Lucile, Owen Meredith, No. 22.

Kathrina, Holland, No. 44.

FICTION.

NAME, AUTHOR, NO.

Northern Lands, Optic, No. 32.

John Halifax, Muloch, No. 16.

Victor of Wakefield, Goldsmith, No. 17.

Dombey & Son, Dickens, No. 21.

Nicholas Nickleby, Dickens, No. 23.

David Copperfield, Dickens, No. 58.

Undine, etc., Fouque, No. 24.

Twice Told Takes, I, II, Hawthorne, Nos. 53 and 54.

Jane Eyre, Bronte, No. 57.

Romola, Eliot, No. 59.

Swiss Family Robinson, No. 60.

Ivanhoe, Scott, No. 61.

Robinson Crusoe, Defoe, No. 62.

ESSAYS AND MISCELLANEOUS.

NAME, AUTHOR, NO.

Politics for Young Americans, Nordhoff, No. 7.

Natural History, Wood, No. 8.

Juvenile Speaker, Russell, No. 12.

Recollections of a Literary Life, Mitford, No. 19.

Four Georges, Thackeray, No. 20.

Good Morals & Manners, Gow, No. 26.

Earth and Man, Guyot, No. 28.

Rhetoric, Hill, No. 29.

Sketches of Creation, Winchell, No. 30.

Story on the Constitution, No. 31.

Ag. Rep. Kan., 1877-1878, No. 33.

Cyclopedia Com. Things, Champlin, No. 34.

Words, Use and Abuse, Mathews, No. 35.

Hours with Men & Books, Mathews, No. 36.

The Great Conversers, Mathews, No. 37.

The Library is open from four till five p.m. of every Friday.

Books are loaned at the rate of ten cents per volume. This entitles the person paying to keep the book two weeks. Fines are assessed according to Rules, which will be found in each volume.

It is hoped that the town's people will take an interest in this. Donations of money, or books of standard value, can be handed to Librarian or any of the Teachers. Make this a success. Give the aid of your purse liberally. It will advance the interests of education and progress materially. C. H. SYLVESTER, Librarian.

Winfield Courier, January 22, 1880.

The funds accruing from the sale of school lands in this county are getting to be no small matter. Last Friday Treasurer Bryan settled with the State Treasurer and paid over the sum of $8,000, accruing from sale of, and interest on, school lands. When it is remembered that the Treasurer settles with the State every four months, it will be seen that Cowley pays no small revenue into the State School Fund.

Excerpt...

[WINFIELD AND COWLEY COUNTY.]

Winfield Courier, January 22, 1880.

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS.

Any schools? Six large rooms full.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 28, 1880.

Charles Hutchins is teaching the school in Stony Point District, and giving good satisfaction.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 28, 1880.

The Berry Bros., accompanied by Miss Susie Berry, came up from Pawnee Agency last Monday en route for Lawrence, where George, Robert, and Miss Susie will attend school the coming year.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "REFLEX" - MAPLE TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, January 29, 1880.

A neat, new stone residence has been erected on the school land in section 36.

Winfield Courier, January 29, 1880.

District No. 58 has voted bonds for a schoolhouse, and hopes soon to have school running under the direction of 'Squire W. E. Ketcham, whose school at Maple City closes this week.

Winfield Courier, January 29, 1880.

Died. Mrs. Sarah E. Sitton, formerly a teacher in the western part of the county, died recently near Maple City.

Winfield Courier, January 29, 1880.

The school board has decided to submit a proposition to vote $12,000 bonds for the purpose of building a schoolhouse, in the second ward, and an addition to the one in the first ward.

Winfield Courier, January 29, 1880.

Several of our citizens are talking of sending their children away to school because of the insufficient accommodations afforded at home. Our school rooms are a blot on the fair fame of our city.

[WALNUT TOWNSHIP CONVENTION.]

Winfield Courier, January 29, 1880.

The Republicans of Walnut township will meet in convention on Saturday, the 31st of January, 1880, at 2 o'clock p.m., at the schoolhouse near Mr. Hoenscheidt's residence, to nominate the following officers: One township trustee, clerk, treasurer, two justices of the peace, and two constables. All voters of the township are earnestly requested to attend. By order of the committee. S. BURGER, Chairman. J. HOENSCHEIDT, Sec'y.

[TOWNSHIP CONVENTION: DEXTER TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, January 29, 1880.

The Republicans of Dexter township will meet in convention, on Saturday, Jan. 31, 1880, at 2 o'clock p.m., at the schoolhouse at Dexter, to nominate the following officers: One Township Trustee, one Clerk, one Treasurer, Justice of the Peace, and the rest of the township ticket. H. C. McDORMAN, Ch'm. J. A. BRYAN, Sec'y.

Cowley County Teacher, February, 1880.

Out of one hundred and twenty teachers in the county, about thirty-five have put their names on our subscription list. A few district officers have also shown their good intentions and wishes in a substantial manner.

Cowley County Teacher, February, 1880.

An examination of applicants for teachers' certificates will be held March 19 at Winfield. The work will begin at 9 a.m. precisely.

Certificates will be issued as follows: Grade B to every applicant whose average standing is 90, and who falls below 80 in no one subject. Grade C to every applicant whose average standing is 80, and who falls below 70 in no one branch. Answers to questions will be carefully examined and rigidly graded. Candidates must show good scholarship in the papers submitted to entitle them to certificates. The standard herein mentioned will be insisted upon invariably.

The subjects on which examinations will be made are Orthography, Orthoepy, Reading, Penmanship, Geography, Arithmetic, Grammar, U. S. History, U. S. Constitution, and Theory and Practice. R. C. STORY, County Superintendent.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1880.

There was a lyceum at the Guthrie schoolhouse last Tuesday evening.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1880.

Miss Mattie Mitchell has given up her school at the Guthrie schoolhouse in West Bolton on account of the measles.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 4, 1880.

The Stock Protective Union of Bolton Township will meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Wednesday night, February 4th, at early candle light. By order of R. HOFFMASTER.

[COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, FAILURE, MAKE TAX LEVY, SOME DISTRICTS.]

Winfield Courier, February 5, 1880.

It seems that our county commissioners last fall forgot to make a tax levy on certain school districts to pay maturing schoolhouse bonds. District No. 90 is said to be one of them. It has a $100 bond maturing in June, and no money to pay it with. Perhaps the omission was another case of "want of authority."

[SCHOOL BOND ELECTION.]

Winfield Courier, February 5, 1880.

The call for a schoolhouse bond election by the Board of Education, is as follows.

To: J. B. Lynn, Mayor of the City of Winfield, Kansas.

SIR: You are hereby, by the Board of Education of the said city, requested, in accordance with Section 173, Chapter 92, Dassler's Compiled Laws of Kansas, to call an election for the purpose of submitting to the qualified electors of said city, the proposition of issuing Twelve Thousand ($12,000) Dollars worth of bonds, for the character and denomination, and for the purposes hereinafter set forth, as follows.

Said bonds are to be of the denomination of Five Hundred Dollars each, and to run Twenty years at the rate of six percent, per annum; the interest payable semi-annually on the first days of January and July of each year, and the principal payable at the end of Twenty years from the date thereof. Both principal and interest payable to the Commissioners of the Permanent School Fund at the office of State Treasurer of the State of Kansas. Said bonds to be sold at not less than 100 cents on the dollar, and the proceeds thereof used by the Board of Education of said city in purchasing a suitable site, and erecting a suitable ward schoolhouse, containing four school rooms, centrally located, in the second ward of said city of Winfield; and further, in erecting such an addition to, and making such alterations in, the present stone school building now located in the first ward of said city of Winfield, as will make said building a convenient and suitable schoolhouse, containing six (6) school rooms for said first ward. And still further, if said proceeds be not all exhausted in the purchase of said site, and the erection of said buildings, in fencing and ornamenting the grounds of said ward school buildings.

Done by order of the Board of Education of the city of Winfield, this 19th day of January, A. D. 1880. F. S. JENNINGS, President of the Board.

Attest: FRED C. HUNT, Clerk of said Board.

Winfield Courier, February 5, 1880.

Elder Downs, of Methodist Church South, will on next Sunday, February 8th, at Bethel schoolhouse, preach the funeral sermon of Hon. T. B. Ross.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "L. J. N." AT NORTH RICHLAND.]

Winfield Courier, February 5, 1880.

The arm of the Baptist church at Floral, located at Richland, has moved across Dutch creek to Summit schoolhouse. It has built up and been very prosperous at Richland, and now has sufficient numbers to lop off and form a separate church, which is about to be done. May her future be as prosperous as the past has been.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1880.

We are informed that Maj. Shreeve, of Gov. St. John's staff, has been solicited to teach the nimbletoes in this city how to dance, and we hope his services will be secured as he ranks high as a professor of the art.

Excerpt...

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1880.

From Maple Township.

Health is good; however, some few cases of scarlet fever are reported over near the Walnut river, which has somewhat retarded the attendance at the schools in the vicinity.

MAPLE. Red Bud, Feb. 8, 1880.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 11, 1880.

School Report.

The following Report of the Public Schools of the city for the school month ending February 6th.

ROLL OF HONOR.

The best scholar of each grade is determined by examination and recitations.

HIGH SCHOOL.

A. Class: Jerry Adams (one examination) 100.

B. Class: Charlie Chapel 97.

C. Class: Sam Swarts 93; nearly equaled by Mary McClung and Ella Bowers.

INTERMEDIATE.

A. Class: Frank Theaker 90.

B. Class: Iddie Shields 88; nearly equaled by Maggie Ford and Hattie Hand.

C. Class: Wyatt Hutchison 80.

SECOND PRIMARY.

A. Class: Frank Peek.

B. Class: Grace Houghton.

C. Class: Newton Lancaster.

FIRST PRIMARY.

A. Class: Alvan Ray.

B. Class: Willie Kellogg.

C. Class: Marion Gilbert.

D. Class: Hattie Sipes.

Perfect attendance and punctuality.

HIGH SCHOOL.

Jerry Adams, S. B. Reed, Henry Smith, Sadie Pickering, Fred McLaughlin, Charlie Randall, Mollie Christian, Alice Knight, Alice Warren, Robert Hutchison, George Endicott, Jacob Endicott, Martin Warren, Frank Randall, May Hughes, Jessey Finley, Ella Bowers, Mary McClung.

INTERMEDIATE.

Frank Shearer, Jay Fairclo, Maggie Ford, Hattie Hand, Perley McCutere, Wyatt Hutchison, Perry Fullerlove, Schuyler Hand.

SECOND PRIMARY.

Grace McClung, Nina Pickering, Charlie Rarick, Walter Wintin, Phillip Huff, Frank Peek, Otis Endicott, Clara Ford, Lizzie Garris, Susie Fullerlove, Frank Leonard, Willie Peek, Newton Lancaster, Howard Warren, Etta McMahon, Frank Noe.

FIRST PRIMARY.

Ida Wagstaff, Lillie Rarick, Ross Garris, Charlie Peek, Frank Parsons, Willie Fullerlove, Clifford Rife, Howard McIntire.

The number of pupils enrolled in each department is as follows:

High School, 49.

Intermediate, 42.

Second Primary, 43.

First Primary, 50.

Total: 184.

C. H. SYLVESTER, Principal.

[WARD SCHOOLS]

Winfield Courier, February 12, 1880.

There is seemingly a very undecided feeling regarding the duty of citizens in reference to the pending election for school bonds, and we do not wish to influence the action of anyone against what he may conceive to be right in the matter.

Before the election was called a member of the school board was scarcely safe on the streets. Enraged parents, whose children were excluded from school privileges altogether, or were huddled, with a hundred others, in the cellar under the church, would attack them on every corner. There was a unanimous cry for more room. The board had no alternative but to take some steps, and so, after calmly and deliberately canvassing the subject, they decided on the present proposition, supposing that now when the need was so apparent, the opposition to a fair and reasonable proposition would be but slight.

But alas for human hopes! Although the Board had called meetings--had invited the citizens to be present and decide upon some plan, and had personally requested many to express their opinions on the matter, no one suggested anything.

But as soon as the proposition was before the people, there have been series of plans offered the Board by parties who did not know what was best before. Some even go so far as to condemn the Board for calling an election at all and deplore it as an unnecessary expense.

Whatever may be the result of this election, it cannot be denied that the Board has made an honest endeavor to better the present condition of our schools. It is with the people now to say what shall be done. We must not expect as a city to get a proposition that will exactly suit all, and the most we can expect is something that will suit the majority.

The amount of bonds asked, we think, is reasonable, when it is considered what is to be done. The interest is certainly low at 6 percent. The bonds can be paid at any time the district may be able. The buildings will be centrally located, neat, substantial, and comfortable. Now, what more can we expect in any proposition?

All we hope is that it will be fairly and intelligently considered, and if it is not worthy of support, let it be voted down.

Winfield Courier, February 12, 1880.

The meeting to consider the school-bond proposition, on Tuesday evening, was well attended, and a lively discussion was maintained for some time. The general feeling of the meeting seemed to be that we must have more school room at all hazards, and that the present proposition, although not suiting many, is the best that can be done.

[SCHOOL REPORT: DISTRICT NO. 81.]

Winfield Courier, February 12, 1880.

School report of district No. 81 for the month ending Jan. 30, 1880.

No. days school in session: 90

No. pupils enrolled: 33

Average daily attendance: 29

The following pupils deserve mention as being neither absent nor tardy: Chas. Hill, James Wiggins, Kate Hopkins, Esther Hopkins, Myrtle Martin, Kate Martin, Maggie Martin, and Nellie Silverthorn.

The following are the names of those whose average standing at our last examination was 90 and upwards.

Maggie Martin: 93

Kate Martin: 95

Esther Hopkins: 90

Myrtle Hopkins: 92

Belle Martin: 94

Izora Wentz: 94

John Olmstead: 98

James Silverthorn: 90

May Stanley: 90

During the past month we have had several visitors but no patrons to visit us.

P. W. SMITH, Teacher.

[REPORT FROM TISDALE SCHOOL.]

Winfield Courier, February 12, 1880.

TISDALE, KS., Jan. 2, 1880.

ED. COURIER. The following is a report of the Tisdale school for the month ending Jan. 30.

No. pupils enrolled: 62

Average daily attendance: 54

The following named pupils have attained 100 in deportment.

GRADE A. Frank McKibben, Glen Moore, George Newton, C. P. Conrad, Nettie Handy, Lula Handy, Connie Gay, Stella Boatman, Jessie Goodrich, Ella Whistler, Effie Bartlow, Hattie Young, George Davis, Edna Davis.

GRADE B. Jay Gains, James Harris, Lula McGuire, Alice McKibben.

The pupils who have attained 90 percent and upwards in lessons and attendance.

GRADE A.

Effie Bartlow: 93

Ella Whistler: 94

Ella Bradley: 91

Jessie Goodrich: 94

Stella Boatman: 91

Connie Gay: 90

Lula Handy: 93

Frank McKibben: 93

Edward Young: 93

John Bradley: 90

Nettie Handy: 95

Hattie Young: 95

George Davis: 94

Edna Davis: 93

GRADE B

Alice McKibben: 90

Ida Whistler: 90

Ida Divelbliss: 91

Lula McGuire: 90

James Conrad: 90

MRS. J. E. BROWN, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 18, 1880.

Go to the schoolhouse and hear the Pardey troupe Thursday night, for the benefit of the library.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 18, 1880

The Literary at the Stony Point schoolhouse in Bolton Township enjoys the reputation of being the best south of the Arkansas River.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 18, 1880.

The concert for the benefit of Judge Christian, that was given through the kindness of Prof. Wilkinson and Mrs. DeGrasse, took place at the schoolhouse last Friday and Saturday evenings. A fusion was formed with a comedy troupe that arrived on Thursday, as it was the opinion of the committee that one house well filled would be better than to risk the chance of a slim audience at the church.

[SCHOOL BONDS READ.]

Winfield Courier, February 19, 1880.

When Mr. Millington reached Topeka last week, he consulted the State Superintendent on the question of bonds and registration, and the following is the opinion of the State officers on this question.

"It is Lemmon's opinion that there is no need of registration for the school-bond election. He says that the board of commissioners for the investment of the Permanent School Fund examined the matter thoroughly and carefully in connection with the Wichita school-bonds, voted without registration, and the commissioners decided to buy the bonds, and held that they were better without than with registration. The Attorney General is a member of the board, and he held to that opinion.

"Lemmon also says that the voters in the district outside the city have a right to vote at either of the polls, and that if they were not permitted, it would invalidate the bonds, and they would be refused by the board."

This, it seems to me, is a solution of the difficulty. Do not register at all, but permit all in the district to vote who are qualified electors. Yours, D. A. MILLINGTON.

Winfield Courier, February 19, 1880.

I. N. Lemmon's school, district No. 108, is out.

Winfield Courier, February 19, 1880.

District 113, near Baltimore, has erected a schoolhouse and will soon have school.

Winfield Courier, February 19, 1880.

Miss Fannie Pontious has completed her first term of school in 22, Richland township.

Winfield Courier, February 19, 1880.

If the school bonds are voted, many are in favor of moving the frame building, now being used to the southeast part of the district, to accommodate the children in the Loomis and Howland addition. This would be a wise move.

[J. M. ALEXANDER: THE TITLE TO THE SCHOOLHOUSE BLOCK.]

Winfield Courier, February 19, 1880.

ED. COURIER: I have been asked by several parties to give a legal opinion concerning the title to the school district, in what is known as the schoolhouse block, and whether the Winfield Town Association, in which the legal title rests, could convey the fee in said block to any other party, while the school district remains in possession of it?

Without designing any ostentatious display of legal ability, I will, with your permission, make my answer public through your columns, as many others undoubtedly feel an interest in the question.

The townsite of Winfield, as is well known, was entered by the Probate Judge of the county, under, and by virtue of, an act of Congress, and by an act of the Legislature of Kansas, "for the use and benefit of the occupants thereof." Every actual occupant of the town, owning an improvement at the time of the entry, was a tenant in common with every other such occupant, in all of the unimproved portion of the town. It is true, in this case, all such unimproved lands were conveyed by the Judge to the said Town Association, but that did not affect, really, the rights of the occupants in the same. The law would say, that the Town Association held the land as trustee, in trust for the occupants.

But, suppose the Town Association, under these circumstances, had "set apart" for public use, certain squares, or blocks of ground, say for churches, schools, or public parks; or proposed to donate grounds for such purposes, and the town, or city, authorities had accepted the offer and improved the same for park purposes; or the respective churches had received the donation and erected their buildings thereon; or the school district the same; and whether the proposed gifts were by written instrument or by parol, what lawyer would say that the Town Association could afterward lay claim to such donated and occupied lands and convey them to other parties? Certainly none of respectable qualifications.

And I may go further and say, that if the Town Association possessed an unqualified title in fee simple to the lands, and should propose, verbally, to donate a portion of them to a school district for school purposes, and the district should accept the gift, take possession and improve the same as agreed upon, it would be impossible for the Association to convey the land in fee to any other party, even if no record existed showing the transaction between the Association and the district. Because the actual possession of the district, with its improvements, imparts legally, as good notice to the world of its equitable title, as if such title had been conveyed by deed and duly recorded in the Register's office of the proper county. And such is the situation of our present schoolhouse site in Winfield.

But the Winfield Town Association proposes to grant such title as it possesses to the school district by deed absolute, and without any reservations; and has already placed such conveyance, as an escrow, in responsible hands, to be delivered when the present school building shall have been completed, as originally required, and agreed upon. When this is done, the school district will possess an unqualified title, both legal and equitable, and can sell and convey the same if deemed best, although it would puzzle one to invent a valid reason for ever wishing to change the public school from the present locality to another one. In my view, it is not in the nature of things, that the present school site will ever be too valuable to be used for school purposes. J. M. ALEXANDER.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 25, 1880.

Miss Mattie Mitchell will close her school in Bolton Township this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 25, 1880.

The regular meeting of the S. P. U. will be held at the Bland schoolhouse in Bolton Township the first Thursday in March next, at early candle light, and every member is expected to be present. R. HOFFMASTER, Captain.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 25, 1880.

Quite a disgraceful affair occurred out east on Grouse Creek one day last week. Religious services were being held in a schoolhouse when some of the participants became involved in a quarrel, which resulted in a rough and tumble fight. The belligerents were finally ejected from the house of worship. They continued the fray outside until exhausted at which time hostilities ceased. It would be better for the good name of the township to have the parties engaged in this shameful and disgraceful affair prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 25, 1880.

There will be a meeting of the teachers of the Fifth Association District, at the schoolhouse, Arkansas City, March 6th, at 1 o'clock p.m. Programme as follows:

ARITHMETIC.

Q. C. D. and L. C. M.: Miss Wright, H. Blount, and C. H. Sylvester.

Common Fractions: Miss Norton, R. Gilstrap, and C. L. Swarts.

GRAMMAR.

Principles and Infinitives: Charles Hutchins, T. B. Hall, and Mr. Marshall.

Practical Exercises: Miss Maxwell, L. E. Norton, and Mr. Perisho.

General Discussion.

A full attendance requested.

By order of Committee.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "NASBY" - OMNIA.]

Winfield Courier, February 26, 1880.

The school in district No. 100 closes in two weeks and our teacher, Miss Mamie Rankin, will return to Winfield.

[STATE FUND DECREASED FOR TEACHERS.]

Winfield Courier, February 26, 1880.

The State fund for 1880 and 1881 will be about one-half what it has been in years past. Instead of 70 cents per capita of school population the apportionment will be 30 or 35 cents. This will make considerable difference in the teacher's fund in many districts. This is attributable to the wise (!) spirit of economy that the last legislature manifested. Teacher.

[SCHOOL BOND ELECTION.]

Winfield Courier, February 26, 1880.

The election for school bonds Tuesday passed off very quietly, and seemed to be all one sided. The majority for the bonds was 223. The vote in the first ward was for the bonds, 139; against the bonds, 15. Second ward, for the bonds, 116; against, 17. With the buildings which the proceeds of these bonds will erect, Winfield will no longer need to be ashamed of her schools.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 3, 1880.

After paying the railroad company for the excursion to Winfield, there remains in the hands of the committee a surplus of eight dollars, which was paid over to Mr. Sylvester for the benefit of the School Library.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 3, 1880.

The School Library Association acknowledges the receipt from Messrs. Bonsall and Hughes of $8, the excess of fares collected on the excursion to Winfield.

C. H. SYLVESTER.

Winfield Courier, March 4, 1880.

The school board has purchased the quarter block of Henry Brown, on 10th avenue, Manning's addition, on which to erect the second ward schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, March 4, 1880.

Messrs. Jas. McDermott and A. P. Johnson have formed a co-partnership in the practice of law under the firm name of McDermott & Johnson. This will make a strong team. Mr. McDermott is an old resident of Cowley, has occupied many prominent positions in gift of the people, and is a man of acknowledged ability. Mr. Johnson is tolerably well known here, is a graduate of Ann Arbor law school, and ranks well in his profession. We wish the new firm abundant success.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, March 4, 1880.

The Literary at Omnia schoolhouse is in good running order. They have a good paper, with Harry Hall as editor, and Mrs. F. E. Williamson, assistant. NARBY.

Excerpt...

[COMMUNICATION FROM "MAPLE" - TRAVELER CORRESPONDENT.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 10, 1880.

FROM MAPLE.

Farmers busy plowing. Oats about all sown. Health good. Simon S. Martin closed his schoolhouse last Friday. Mr. Martin has taught several terms in this district, all of which have given general satisfaction. As he now signs J. P. to the other end of his name, it is more than probable that he will abandon the arduous task of learning the young ideas how to shoot, and devote his time to the cultivation of his farm and to the duties of his office.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 10, 1880.

Last Monday the School Library Association were the recipients of a number of beautiful little fish taken from the Walnut and presented to the association for their aquarium.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 10, 1880.

 

Prof. Fero, of Topeka, has organized a dancing class in this city, and is now teaching the young folks how "to trip the light fantastic."

Arkansas City Traveler, March 10, 1880.

On Monday evening Prof. Fero opened his dancing school at the Central Avenue in this city with fifteen or sixteen couples in attendance. This is the first of a series of like entertainments which will be given weekly until the close of the term. The evening entertainment over, all returned home delighted with the amusement. His next instructions will be given on Wednesday evening of next week. The absence of a suitable hall that could be had during the afternoon will prevent many of the more youthful from attending, as the hours under the present arrangement are too late for their health and comfort.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 10, 1880.

SCHOOL REPORT. For the month ending March 5, 1880.

LISTING NAMES ONLY.

RANKING SCHOLARS --

HIGH SCHOOL: Charlie Chapel and Sam Swarts.

INTERMEDIATE: Frank Theaker, Harvey Roberson, Perry Fullerlove.

SECOND PRIMARY: Grace McClung, Lizzie Garris, Newton Lancaster.

FIRST PRIMARY: Jennie DeBruce, Willie Kellogg, Howard McIntire, Eva Anderson.

NEITHER ABSENT NOR TARDY--

HIGH SCHOOL: Jerry Adams, Henry Smith, Mary Theaker, Charlie Chapel, Charlie Randall, Sarah Randall, Emma Theaker, Jacob Endicott, Frank Randall, Sam Swarts, Martin Warren, Jessie Finley, Minnie McIntire.

INTERMEDIATE: Frank Theaker, Walter Pickering, Maggie Ford, Hattie Hand, John Garris, Wyatt Hutchison, Schuyler Hand.

SECOND PRIMARY: Bert Hughes, Howard Warren, Newton Lancaster, Charlie Nelson, Annie Wagstaff, Nina Pickering, Grace McClung, Lizzie Garris, Clara Ford, Otis Endicott, Belle Johnson.

FIRST PRIMARY: Willie Stanton, Geo. Hoffmaster, Frank Noll, Hettie Milks, Rosie Garris, Arthur Howey, Fred Evans, Frank Parsons, Clifford Rife, Alvin Bowers, Willie Fullerlove, Ottie Bowers. C. H. SYLVESTER, Principal.

Winfield Courier, March 11, 1880.

The first semi-annual dividend of the state annual school fund, amounting to $158,562.28, is being disbursed by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. The amount of this fund is less than in previous years, owing to the repeal by the last Legislature of a one-mill tax that heretofore went to that fund. This year the apportionment is made on a basis of fifty cents per each pupil in the state entitled to the benefit of this fund, against sixty-five cents per capita for the first semi-annual disbursement last year. Industrialist.

[FARMER'S STOCK PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION.]

Winfield Courier, March 11, 1880.

Notice.

A meeting of the citizens of Walnut will be held in the schoolhouse near the brewery on the evening of the 17th inst., at early candle-light, for the purpose of organizing a farmer's stock protective association. Everybody interested in the matter are requested to be present.

A. S. BLANCHARD, B. E. MURPHY, W. W. LIMBOCKER, WM. BARKER, J. L. KING,

W. COWEN, S. CURE, A. B. GRAHAM, JOEL MACK. March 8, 1880.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 17, 1880

Elder Cartwright, of the Christian Church, is holding a series of meetings at the Parker schoolhouse.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 17, 1880.

Prof. Andress, the wonderful Magician and slight of hand performer, will give a series of interesting and marvelous entertainments at the schoolhouse in this place on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings, March 18th, 19th, and 20th. There will be a change of programme for each evening. The performances of the Professor's trained birds are truly wonderful. The lady floating in mid air challenges the wonder and admiration of the audience. Upon the whole Prof. Andress' programme of mirth, magic, and mystery is unexcelled and should be seen to be appreciated.

Winfield Courier, March 18, 1880.

The state school fund for March was received some time ago, and is now ready for distribution. It gave this county $3,389.50, and the county fund, apportioned this month, increased the amount by $604.71, the two funds giving to districts 62 cents per pupil.

Winfield Courier, March 18, 1880.

Tuesday morning county attorney Torrance and L. J. Webb returned from Rock township where they have been trying the parties engaged in the schoolhouse riot which occurred in district 72 last January. Five of the parties, Jno. Bailey, Abram Brown, Jno. Chitwood, Dero Meader, and Ithinor Saunders were convicted and fined one cent and costs, amounting in all to fifty dollars. The trouble occurred over the division of the district and the attempt of the above named parties to move the schoolhouse against the wishes of the directors.

Excerpt...

[NEW CHURCH AT FLORAL - RICHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH.]

Winfield Courier, March 18, 1880.

A council convened on Sunday last at the Summit schoolhouse for the purpose of organizing an independent regular missionary Baptist church, what has been known as the Richland arm of the Floral church.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 24, 1880. Editorial Page.

The following report of the Annual Love Feast of some of the Boltonites has found its way to the TRAVELER. We think it was written by some Peace of a Justice, as the first line gives evidence of legal lore.

"Know all men by these presents: Whereas, on the 14th day of February last, the citizens of Bolton Township met in mass, at the Bland schoolhouse in the open air, for the purpose of reviewing their past lives and preparing for the future. So after bustling around a while, W. C. Skinner was chosen chairman of the meeting. The chair arose and announced that the proceedings must be opened with prayer. So S. H. Deweese with the assistance of W. Mercer implored divine forgiveness for the folly of those who had spent many months in molding paper wads to be fired at the cattle drive and the wickedness of others who had buried, on the "trail," the dreadful torpedoes of sulphur and snuff to hurl into the clouds the last hope of long horns. But Hank Hollowell who sat near, with an ear that lopped like a limp leaf of Kraut, declared that the prayer did not go as high as the third plank on the fence.

"After reading the statute by John Linton, the Chair announced a recess of fifteen minutes. Whistling by Frank Lorry; tune Patsy won't you drink some. The Chair then called the meeting from refreshments to labor.

"Now the various characters arose into prominence. The old Polar Bear, James McGuire, with that same old bed blanket on old Bob, rode up. Then came A. P. Lorry leading brother Frank while they stepped to the marshal music of old hundred. In fact, the drill was handsome.

"George Hagar made a speech on the wreck of man. Frank Reed, on the smart young man. G. Schnee presented facts to prove that the ground hog should be captured and cut into pork for spoiling a great deal of fine weather.

"Frank Lorry opened an argument in favor of the self made man, but his remarks were short, as the meeting gave him a unanimous vote for having more self-made worthlessness in one body than had ever before been found in Bolton Township.

"The chair announced that the hour had arrived for preparing ballots to elect some person of the township to the honorable position of attending to other people's business. This called out a full and harmonious vote without distinction of race, color, or previous condition, and the judges of election, appointed and sworn in due form of law, consisting of Uncle Berry Banks and Peter Andrews, proceeded to count the ballots, resulting as follows: Frank Lorry received 69 votes, S. H. Deweese 19 votes, scattering 3 votes. The chair arose and amid the stillness of death announced that Lieut. Lorry having received a majority of the votes cast was duly elected.

"Hick Deweese now arose with cussedness in his eye, and charged the judges of election with fraud and favor; they grew pale as the speaker, warm with the smart of disappointment, accused them of stuffing the box in favor of another.

"John Brown called, order, and said that a blind man could see that the best thing to do was to adjourn. So the Chair said the meeting was adjourned to meet St. Valentine one year from that date. "EAST BOLTON."

Excerpt...

[COMMUNICATION--"M. S. R."/SILVERDALE, LOWER GROUSE CREEK.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 24, 1880.

There was a Sabbath School organized last Sabbath at the Coburn Schoolhouse, John Badley, Superintendent, R. S. McGredy, Assistant. We have Rev. Herbert back on the M. E. work again.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 24, 1880.

The Silver Dale S. P. U. company will meet at the Silver Dale schoolhouse on Saturday evening 27th at 7 o'clock p.m. Every member expected to come out, important business.

By order of Cap. P. F. Haynes.

Winfield Courier, March 25, 1880.

Judge H. D. Gans preached Sabbath last in the Parker schoolhouse east of Arkansas City.

Winfield Courier, March 25, 1880.

On Saturday Rock township turned out en masse to discuss, in the county superintendent's office, the question of forming a new school district in the neighborhood of the new stone church, out of portions of the Darien and Little Dutch districts.

Excerpt...

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, March 31, 1880. Front Page.

KANSAS IN 1880.

Five counties now have as many school districts as the State contained in 1865. The school fund, one of "the things" that make Kansas proud, has increased to $1,700,000; and when the school lands are all sold, this sum will amount to $13,000,000. Kansas Monthly.

Cowley County Teacher, April, 1880. [Vol. I, No. 6.]

DEXTER SCHOOLS.

My school is running delightfully, not a single case of tardiness this month; the concentration of mind to business is excellent, the daily results very gratifying. We have a young class in bookkeeping, full of promise, one in physiology, one in botany, and rigid and exacting reviews. The work in defining words and using them has grown fascinating, and the buying of dictionaries is becoming lively. I am much encouraged by the enthusiasm that has arisen to dig to the bottom, to the very root. The large boys have left for work, but I am surprised and pleased that our best classes go on climbing, with plenty of good scholars.

O. PHELPS.

Cowley County Teacher, April, 1880.

Duties of Teachers.

ART. VI., SEC. 1, School Law: It shall be the duty of the teachers of every district or graded school to keep, in a register for this purpose, a daily record of the attendance, and the deportment of each pupil, and of the recitation of each pupil in the several branches pursued in such school, and to make out and file with the district clerk, at the expiration of each term of the school, a full report of the whole number of scholars admitted to school during such term, distinguishing between male and female, the text books used, the branches taught, and the number of pupils engaged in the study of said branches, and any other information the district board or county superintendent may require. Teachers: how many of you kept the records required in the foregoing law? How many of you made such a record of the standing of each pupil in your schools that your successors can follow you without any loss of time, or trouble in organizing their schools?

Cowley County Teacher, April, 1880.

District 124 was organized last week.

Cowley County Teacher, April, 1880.

One hundred and seventeen schools were in session in Cowley County during the last fall and winter.

Cowley County Teacher, April, 1880.

About fifty percent of the applicants at the February and March examinations failed to get certificates.

Cowley County Teacher, April, 1880.

District 116 had an arbor day this spring and put out 81 forest trees about the school-house. Good! Who else can say as much?

Cowley County Teacher, April, 1880.

C. C. Holland, formerly a teacher in this county, returned recently from Ann Arbor, Michigan. He comes back with a sheepskin marked LL. B.

Cowley County Teacher, April, 1880.

NOTE: There was a breakdown of taxes and state fund [1873 to 1879]. The figures showed money drawn by district treasurers from taxes, State and county fund from August 1872 to August 1879. Only dollars were given.

EXAMPLE:

District 1:

1878-1879 $5,910

1877-1878 $3,069

1876-1877 $2,358

1875-1876 $ 853

1874-1875 $1,540

1873-1874 $ 867

[THESE FIGURES WERE SHOWN FOR 114 DISTRICTS.]

Winfield Courier, April 8, 1880.

Mr. J. VanDoren is putting up a "green house" on Ninth avenue opposite the schoolhouse. We have not learned what variety of greens he intends to propagate.

Excerpts...

[THE CITY ELECTION.]

Winfield Courier, April 8, 1880.

Tuesday passed off very quietly. There was considerable "scratching" on both tickets resulting in the election of a mixed ticket. The following are the official returns.

FIRST WARD.

Member of School Board.

T. R. Bryan. 157 votes.

SECOND WARD.

Member of School Board.

G. W. Robinson: 105 votes.

J. L. Horning: 94

[THE SUNDAY SCHOOL BUSINESS.]

Winfield Courier, April 8, 1880.

There will be a meeting of those interested in the Sunday school cause at the Fitzgerald schoolhouse, one mile north of Burden, on Saturday, the 10th inst., at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of organizing a Sunday school convention for Silver Creek and Sheridan townships.

By order of Vice-Presidents T. P. CARTER and L. WATKINS.

Winfield Courier, April 8, 1880.

A meeting will be held on the evening of the 9th and the morning of the 10th of April, at the Armstrong schoolhouse in Harvey township, for the purpose of organizing a Sunday School Association. H. F. ALBERT, Vice President.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 14, 1880.

Miss Maggie Mitchell is teaching the school in the Holland District.

Winfield Courier, April 15, 1880.

The fatality attending the teachers' profession is truly alarming. There were Miss Buck, Miss Johnson, Miss King, Scott, who bravely began work last fall! Now where and who are they? Go ask Judge Gans. "And still there's more to follow."

Winfield Courier, April 15, 1880.

In the statement of moneys drawn from the county treasury by school district treasurers, made in the Teacher for April and printed in the COURIER of last week, the first line of figures given with each district shows the taxes, the second line the State fund drawn each school year since 1872. Supt. R. C. STORY.

[NEW SCHOOLHOUSES: WINFIELD.]

Winfield Courier, April 15, 1880.

The School Board adopted the plans of Benjamin J. Bartlett, of Des Moines, Iowa, for the new schoolhouses to be erected in this city. The new building in the second ward will be two stories high with four rooms. An addition to the old building in the first ward, of two stories, with four rooms, halls, and anterooms, will be built. The architect guarantees the buildings to cost less than $10,000, with the heating and ventilating apparatus all complete. Mr. Bartlett is an architect of acknowledged ability and has furnished the plans for some of our best buildings. He is the architect for Mr. Rigby's new dwelling.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 21, 1880.

The District School treasurers of this County drew from taxes, State and County fund for the School year ending August, 1879, the sum of $27,984.

Winfield Courier, April 22, 1880.

Fifty-six signatures were obtained in Vernon township, Monday night, to the prohibition pledge. The meeting at the Vernon schoolhouse was well attended, Capt. McDermott, Superintendent Story, and Mr. Millspaugh speaking on the temperance issues. A strong resolution was passed by the meeting. Said resolution calls on candidates for office to clearly and positively define their position on the amendment question. The workers in Vernon are thoroughly organizing and are determined on thorough work.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 28, 1880.

The school library at this place now numbers about 120 volumes, and is steadily increasing. The selections and donations have been uniformly interesting and valuable works, whose wholesome food will strengthen the minds of our school-going population for many years to come. This library is the result of the labors of Mr. Sylvester and the pupils under his immediate care, and speaks highly of their enterprise and perseverance. It is open to the public one hour every Friday afternoon, the small sum of ten cents securing a book for one week. If any of our readers have a good book, and wish to do a lasting good deed, let them donate what they can to the Arkansas City High School.

Winfield Courier, April 29, 1880.

Mr. A. H. Stone, agent of Ramsey, Millet & Hudson, of Kansas City, is in this city and is getting up a map of Cowley County, which will give the location of the railroads, stations, township lines, post-offices, towns, creeks, rivers, vacant school and unsold lands, etc. It will be in every way particular and complete, and will be in size 22 by 28 inches. Mr. Stone will remain in the city several days, and can be found at the Williams House.

Winfield Courier, April 29, 1880.

The appointment at Odessa has been changed to Victor schoolhouse, where will be public service Sunday, May 2nd, at 10:30 a.m. REV. J. A. RUPP.

[REPORT FROM "I KNOW" - CEDAR ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, April 29, 1880.

OTTO, Ks., 4, 15, 1880.

We are determined you should know that the good people of Cedar still live, prosper, and enjoy life, notwithstanding their remoteness from the railroad city, Winfield.

Elder Hunt, of Wellington, Sumner County, the noted Adventist revivalist, having recently held a series of meetings at Virgil schoolhouse, seems to have made a profound impression. Some ten or twelve of the best citizens joined with him in looking for the near coming of our Savior.

I have not noticed the name of Prof. Story among the names of eligible citizens for county and state officers. It may, in some cases, be well enough to object to the third term, but it would surely be doing ourselves a great injustice to drop Mr. Story at this time. He has certainly labored with indefatigable industry in every department of his office which has required his attention. The sleet, the mud, and the coldest weather has found him in remote parts of the county, patiently visiting schools and inquiring into their wants and needs. His experience in the great law school at Ann Arbor, Michigan, makes him master of all the law required. One term is needed to acquaint him with the duties of his office; a second to acquire a thorough knowledge of his 130 districts, their various wants, their citizens, and school officers, the teachers of the county, etc. Verily we say Mr. Story is just now prepared to make an efficient Superintendent. We are informed by one who doubtless knows that Mr. Story, so far from making anything, has actually sunk money since his induction into office. Cedar township will go solid for him, and my acquaintance with Dexter, Spring Creek, and Otter townships confirms me in the belief that they both look for and expect Mr. Story to be their next County Superintendent.

The above remarks will apply in large degree to the Hon. A. B. Lemmon. We, in southeastern Cowley, expect nothing else, and will accept nothing short of Mr. Lemmon as our next State Superintendent, but as the entire State is of the same mind, few words will suffice. Tediously, but earnestly, I. KNOW.

Cowley County Teacher, May, 1880.

Purchasers of school lands should carefully comply with the provisions of the law regarding these lands. Several purchasers in the county have forfeited their lands by failure to pay interest when due.

Cowley County Teacher, May, 1880.

Miss Carrie Morris and Miss Ella Davis, determined not to be behind Misses Strong, King, Buck, Johnson, and Scott, and Messrs. Floyd and Robinson, have taken life certificates. A few other teachers are quietly moving in the same direction, but we won't mention their names at this time. Send us some of the cake.

Cowley County Teacher, May, 1880.

An examination of applicants for teachers' certificates will take place the first week in August.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 5, 1880.

Miss Fannie Skinner commenced teaching a term of school in the Springdale schoolhouse in East Bolton last Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 5, 1880.

J. P. Musselman, of Lower Grouse, paid us a visit yesterday. From him we learned that the crops in that vicinity with the exception of wheat, which will be thin, are looking well, but the fruit is mostly killed. Cattle are doing well. Preaching and Sabbath school are held every Sunday in the Coburn schoolhouse, dist. 62. The Sabbath school under the superintendence of J. Bradley with Reuben Mackley, as assistant superintendent, is well attended. James Perisho is now teaching a term of school in this district with much profit to the scholars and credit to himself.

Excerpt...

[NEWS FROM "CAESAR" - BALTIMORE.]

Winfield Courier, May 6, 1880.

Our schoolhouse was pretty badly damaged by the wind of April 18th, the west side giving way at the bottom and letting the floor down. It will be repaired this week.

Winfield Courier, May 6, 1880.

At the meeting of the new school board, Monday evening, it was agreed to consider applications for teachers in the public schools at their next regular meeting. The applications must be in before June 1st.

Winfield Courier, May 6, 1880.

Wirt Walton, of the Clay Center Dispatch, in speaking of Miss Clara Lemmon, the assistant State Superintendent of Public Instructions, says: "We cheerfully bear testimony of her competency to discharge the duties of the office; and can safely add that what she accomplishes will be done in the most agreeable and satisfactory manner. The county superintendents and school principals of this part of the State, would almost be willing to favor the 'State-House Ring,'--if there is such a ring,--if by so doing Miss Lemmon could have another term."

Arkansas City Traveler, May 12, 1880. Editorial Page.

THE BOLTON DEBATE.

DISTRICT 96, May 8, 1880.

The challenge debate, as per previous announcement, took place in the Guthrie schoolhouse in Bolton township, Friday evening, May 7, 1880, with J. D. Guthrie as chairman. The question for discussion was: "Resolved, That the existence of vigilance committees is morally wrong and should be abolished." The affirmative was opened by J. W. Brown, assisted by Mr. Clark. The opposing orators were Messrs. D. P. Marshall and W. J. Conaway. The honorable judges, S. J. Gilbert and P. H. Somers, after patiently listening to the able arguments on both sides, and witnessing many gymnastic feats in the way of gestures--not to mention the fact of the speakers, which tied themselves into all imaginable knots--decided that the knights of the affirmative had wrestled and twisted rather neatly, and gave their verdict accordingly. It will be remembered that this same question was argued about four weeks ago by the same parties, at which time the judges, Messrs. Linton, Watts, and Berkey, decided in favor of the negative. The debate was replete with rich and racy incidents, and those who were not present missed a rare treat. J. R. C.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 12, 1880.

At the services held by the Baptists in the Mercer schoolhouse last Sunday, Mrs. Voris was received into the communion of the church. The rite of baptism took place in the Territory on that day, and was witnessed by a large concourse of worshipers. The services, which were conducted by Elder Hopkins, concluded in the evening by the celebration of the Lord's supper.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 12, 1880.

From the vicinity of Dist. 96 comes the following with respect to crops and the general aspect of the country. The wheat crop will, in almost all cases, make from 1/3 to ½ of a crop, but some few pieces are totally destroyed. Corn is looking pretty good so far, but rain is beginning to be needed by that as well as everything else. Gardens are the exception, and not the rule. Miss Conaway is teaching a subscription summer school in this district. Sabbath school is held in the schoolhouse every Sunday at 4 p.m., and occasionally preaching is held there. Mr. D. P. Marshall is talking of building a new residence on his place this summer. Take everything into consideration, Bolton Township is a good place to live in, drouth or no drouth.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 12, 1880.

LIST OF TARDY STUDENTS IN HIGH SCHOOL FOR THE MONTH ENDING MAY 1, 1880: Peter Hollenbeck, Elva Pickering, Leah Rife, Stella Swarts, and Will Patterson.

Winfield Courier, May 13, 1880.

The plans for the school buildings have been received. They are elegantly finished, and if the buildings can be completed at the architect's estimates, they will be the best ventilated, most commodious, as well as the cheapest schoolhouses in the country.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 19, 1880.

Prof. Trimble, of the Winfield schools, will conduct the Normal Institute in Labette County this fall. He is spoken of by the Winfield papers as an instructor of high ability.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 19, 1880.

The commencement exercises of the Arkansas City High School will be held at the schoolhouse two weeks from next Friday. This is something new for our school. There are five in the graduating class, who have worked hard during the past few weeks in order that they might acquit themselves in good style and reflect credit upon the labors of Mr. Sylvester. The parents and friends of the pupils should not fail to attend these exercises, and thus evince their appreciation of our prosperous school. We shall speak of this more fully in our next issue.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "LORD HAILES" - BALTIMORE.]

Winfield Courier, May 20, 1880.

Dr. Cadwallader began a school at the Baltimore schoolhouse, on the 3rd inst., with a pretty fair attendance.

School began at Omnia schoolhouse on the 3rd inst., with Mrs. Williamson, teacher.

[A. J. WORDEN, VERNON TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, May 20, 1880.

Mr. A. J. Worden, of Vernon township, is talked of as a candidate for Superintendent of Public Instruction. Mr. Worden is an early resident of this county, a bright young man, and a fine scholar. He has had experience in some of the best Ohio schools and in this state, and is a graduate of the New York State Normal School at Buffalo. He would no doubt make an excellent officer in that capacity.

[A CARD: J. M. BARRICK.]

Winfield Courier, May 20, 1880.

Any man or set of men who say that I was employed, or in any way influenced, by T. S. Green to help defeat the bonds for building a schoolhouse in District No. 26, are guilty of falsehood told for the purpose of carrying the bonds by false representation.

J. M. BARRICK.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 26, 1880

Andrew Berry, of Pawnee Agency, made his semi-annual visit to this city last week. He came up to meet his sisters and brothers, who came down from Lawrence, where they have been attending school.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 26, 1880.

CAMP MEETING. There will be a camp meeting held on the Arkansas City circuit in Silver-dale Township on lower Grouse near the Coburn schoolhouse, commencing on Friday, June the 18th, at 11 o'clock a.m. Those living within the bounds of adjoining charges are invited to attend. A number of ministers are expected to be present and assist in the services, viz: C. A. King, presiding elder of the Wichita district, J. A. Hyden, and L. F. Laverty. J. B. HERBERT, Pastor.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 26, 1880

We notice our friend Charles Hutchins in town the last few days. Charles has just finished teaching an eight months' term of school in the Stony point schoolhouse, district 89, East Bolton, and is now looking around for a change. This is the second term he has taught in that district, and all express esteem for him both as a teacher and a gentleman.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 26, 1880.

Col. C. N. Goulding will deliver three lectures in this city on Friday, Saturday, and Sabbath evenings of this week in the M. E. Church, commencing at 7:30 o'clock. Two of the lectures will be on the subject of temperance, for which no charges will be made, but on Saturday evening an admission fee of 25 cents will be charged to the lecture on "That heathen Chinee." Public school scholars of all ages will be admitted for 10 cents each.

Winfield Courier, May 27, 1880.

The bids for the construction of the schoolhouses were opened by the board last week, but as none of them came within the estimate of the architect, the contract was not let. Mr. Bartlett was wired in regard to the matter, and says that if our home builders will not take the work at his estimates, he will build the houses himself.

Excerpt...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 2, 1880.

 

OUR STATE SENATOR.

Mr. Hackney has had more experience in legislative matters, probably, than any other man in the county, at least he has done more for his constituents than any other legislator we ever had. He was found at his post at all times working for the interest of the people. He is energetic, wide awake, and always knows what to do, and when to do it, to protect the rights of his constituents. He compelled the repeal of the attorneys' fee bill, which was very oppressive to half of the people in this county. He prevented the appropriation of a large sum of money that was intended to have been uselessly and foolishly spent to let a few Kansas politicians go to the Centennial on a lark and have their expenses paid; defeated the appropriations to the local schools called State Normals at Leavenworth and Concordia, which were only attended by scholars from their immediate vicinity and were of no direct benefit to the State; was chairman of the committee on claims, and prevented the allowance of claims against the State, thereby saving thousands of dollars to the State that otherwise would been paid out on spurious claims. He obtained a Senator and two representatives for this county on the apportionment, a thing as unexpected as it is important to our people. He is the peer of any man in the State as a parliamentarian and legislator, an untiring worker, and a man whom any of his constituents can ask to look after their interests and know they will be attended to.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 2, 1880.

W. T. Haley, of Galesburg, Illinois, is staying in the city for a few days. He is traveling with the hope of benefitting his wife's health, and should this climate prove salubrious he may perhaps be induced to make his home with us. Mr. Haley has for many years followed the profession of teaching, and is engaged to take part in the normal institute to be held at Wichita next July.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 2, 1880.

Attend the commencement exercises of our high school at the M. E. Church next Friday evening at 7-1/2 o'clock.

[HIGH SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT AT METHODIST CHURCH.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 2, 1880.

The following is the programme of the commencement exercises to be held in the Methodist church next Friday evening at half past seven o'clock. The graduates are Jerry Adams, Henry Smith, Linnie Peed, Blanche Marshall, and Mary Theaker. The exercises will last about one hour and thirty minutes, and the care and attention given to them by Prof. Sylvester and the students are a sufficient guarantee that those who attend will enjoy themselves. Do not let any kind of weather, or anything else, keep you away, but give our school population a rousing testimonial of your appreciation of their efforts.

PROGRAMME.

Music.

Prayer: Rev. Fleming.

Music.

ADDRESS.

Essay: Linnie Peed - "Some Beauties of Nature."

Oration: Jerry Adams - "War."

Music.

Essay: Blanche Marshall - "Life's Voyage."

Essay: Mary Theaker - "Liberty and Revolution."

Oration: Henry Smith - "Our Country."

Music.

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS.

Music.

We will publish these essays and orations in full next week.

[NOTE: I AM GOING TO SKIP ESSAYS AND ORATIONS.]

Winfield Courier, June 3, 1880.

The Arkansas City schools have graduating exercises Friday evening, a class of five receiving their diplomas.

Winfield Courier, June 3, 1880.

Married at the Hall schoolhouse, Harvey township, on Sunday, May 30th, 1880, by the Rev. J. Cairns, the Rev. David Thomas, of Winfield, and Mrs. Mary A. Armstrong, of Harvey township.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 9, 1880.

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES.

The first annual commencement of our high school passed off to the satisfaction of all who were present last Friday evening at the Methodist Church. The house was crowded to its utmost capacity with the elite of the city. Rev. Fleming opened the exercises by offering a fervent prayer for the young graduates, after which some excellent music was rendered by our Polymelian [?] ladies and gentlemen, when Mr. S. B. Adams delivered an address replete with good advice and wise counsel. The scholars who with last Friday night's entertainment completed the course prescribed for this school did themselves proud in every particular.

ARTICLE CONTINUES, INCLUDING SPEECH BY MR. SYLVESTER TO THE MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1880...MENTIONS WORKING WITH THEM FOR TWO YEARS. SKIPPED ALL THE REST OF ARTICLE.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 9, 1880.

An accident of quite a serious nature befell a daughter of Reuben Mackley, of lower Grouse, as she was returning from attending church service held in the Coburn schoolhouse last Saturday night. It would seem that she was walking towards home when she was knocked down and run over by some horsemen, who, owing to the darkness, and perhaps want of care, did not perceive her. At this writing we are not able to state precisely what injuries she received, but our informant gave us to understand that they were of a serious nature. There is too much reckless running indulged in by our young men as they leave meetings of this nature, not only on Grouse creek, but generally, which should be stopped. for though they may be willing to risk their own lives and limbs, they have no right to endanger the lives of other people.

Winfield Courier, June 10, 1880.

There will be an ice cream festival at Excelsior schoolhouse, Thursday evening. The proceeds are for the benefit of the Sunday school.

[COMMENCEMENT.]

Winfield Courier, June 10, 1880.

The Winfield public school closed last Friday, and commencement exercises were held in Manning's hall Friday evening. The valedictory address by McClellan Klingman was very fine, and the original oration of James Lorton is spoken of in the highest terms. The following was the order of exercises.

Prayer. Music. Original Oration, Jas. Lorton, "Improvements of Time." Recitation, Lou Morris, "All the World." Declamation, George Black, "Allow for the Crawl." Recitation, Hattie Andrews, "We Measured the Baby."

Music. Essay, Rosa Frederick, "Life of Cowper." Recitation, Cora Shreves, "My Good Old-Fashioned Mother." Declamation, Charles Beck, "Pyramids not all Egyptian." Recitation, Sarah Hudson, "Thoughts During Church Service."

Music. Original Oration, Lee C. Brown, "Wards of the Government." Recitation, Leota Gary, "The Minister's Door-Bell." Recitation, Rose Rounds, "After the Battle." Valedictory Address, McClellan Klingman.

Music. Address, R. C. Story. Presentation of Diplomas.

Music. Benediction.

Messrs. McClellan Klingman and James Lorton were the graduates for 1880.

The hall was tastefully arranged and a large audience present. Through the efforts of Prof. Trimble, our schools have reached a remarkable degree of efficiency, and with more room, more teachers, and Prof. Trimble as principal, Winfield will be the equal in educational facilities of any city in Southern Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 16, 1880.

Mrs. Theaker is teaching a select school in the public school building. She has some forty children under her charge, whose tuition is paid by subscription, and she will continue the school until the convening of the Normal Institute.

Winfield Courier, June 17, 1880.

The following teachers have been hired for the nest term of the public schools: E. T. Trimble, principal; Mary A. Bryant, Allie Klingman, Alice Aldrich, Miss Belle Fitzgerald, Mattie Gibson, Jeanie Melville, Miss C. S. Cook, assistants. The salary of the principal was fixed at $90 per month, and that of the assistants at $40 per month. The grade of the teachers was left at the discretion of the principal, with the concurrence of the board.

[WINFIELD SCHOOLHOUSES: CONTRACT LET.]

Winfield Courier, June 17, 1880.

The contract for building the schoolhouses was let to John Q. Ashton, for $9,950. Mr. John H. Lee was appointed superintendent of erection. Mr. Ashton built the Arkansas City schoolhouse and the new stone buildings on north Main street for McMullen & Bryan.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 23, 1880.

Contracts have been let to Mr. Ashton for building the additions to the present Winfield schoolhouse, and also for the erection of a new schoolhouse in the second ward, to be completed by October 1, 1880.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 23, 1880.

Elder T. L. Cartwright, formerly of Forest City, Missouri, but now of Winfield, will preach in this city next Monday evening on the subject of "Christian Baptism." It is his desire to obtain the Methodist church for this purpose, but if not successful, the schoolhouse will probably be secured.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 23, 1880.

C. C. Holland has returned from his trip to Silver Cliff, Colorado, for the purpose of attending the Normal Institute to be held in this county next month. Chris has secured the teaching of a ten-months school at Silver Cliff, and will leave for that place at the termination of the institute at Winfield. C. C. Holland has lots of goaheadativeness, which will be bound to win in the long run.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "M. C. SELTER" - POLO ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, June 24, 1880.

Water is getting scarce on the upland.

There was a meeting at Summit schoolhouse on the night of the 12th instant, for the purpose of organizing a company of militia. Mr. W. C. McCormick being called to the chair, called the meeting to order and delivered a short address on the duties of citizens. Among those he named was the one most prominent, that of the protection the government owed itself. As in the past so in the future, we must depend upon the citizen soldier. He exhorted all to join, and his call was responded to by the acquisition of several names, and several dollars toward a fund to purchase musical instruments.

Winfield Courier, June 24, 1880.

Miss Nellie Cole returned from Topeka, where she has been attending school, last week.

Winfield Courier, June 24, 1880.

The contractor for the new schoolhouse is already at work, and is excavating for the one in the East ward.

Winfield Courier, June 24, 1880.

Mr. Frank Manny has fixed up near his brewery one of the finest parks in southwestern Kansas. He has laid it off into walks and drives, with beautiful beds of flowers, rustic arbors, swings, and other attractive features. His intention is to make it a place of resort where all classes can repair with their families and enjoy a pleasant afternoon, and so far he seems to be succeeding admirably. Mr. Manny allows no disreputable characters to enter the grounds, and upon our visit there we saw nothing that could be objected to by the most fastidious. The use of the grounds is offered free to the schools or Sunday schools for picnic purposes, the only proviso being that the children be accompanied by their teachers, who are expected to keep the flowers, arbors, etc., from being injured.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 30, 1880.

At a meeting of the school board yesterday, it was decided to engage Mr. O. Phelps, formerly of Dexter, as principal of our schools, with Mrs. Phelps as assistant. Mr. Phelps will be detained at Winfield during the Normal, after which he will move his family to this place.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 30, 1880.

In this issue we announce the name of Mr. R. C. Story as a candidate for reelection to the office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, and in so doing, we take pleasure in stating that during the two terms of office he has already served he has eminently proved himself to be the right man in the right place. He is an indefatigable worker, a good scholar, a practical teacher, and a thorough gentlemen. Such being the case, we trust that he may be retained in this office, the duties of which he has so long discharged with profit to the county and honor to himself.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 7, 1880.

It is the boast of our town that we have the finest schoolhouse in Southern Kansas, and so we have. A handsomer edifice could not be asked for. But did it never occur to our worthy school board that the looks of the building and grounds would be somewhat improved by the placing of a good fence around them? Would anyone of our school board ever think of building as fine a residence as we have a schoolhouse, and leave it wholly unadorned by either fence or trees? The planting of good shade trees is not in season just now, but the fence can be put there at any time--and there is no time like the present. We don't say this to fill up the paper, but we join with our best citizens in wishing this step may be taken, and hope that our school board have enough pride and enterprise to push it through to speedy completion.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 7, 1880.

BOLTON RANGERS. All members of this military company are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse one week from next Saturday, July 17, at 2 p.m., without fail. There is considerable business of utmost importance to transact. It is the intention to draw new arms for the company, also new uniforms. Don't fail to be on hand.

R. HOFFMASTER, Captain.

JOHN LEWIS, Lieutenant.

Winfield Courier, July 8, 1880.

Miss Nettie Porter, daughter of Mrs. S. B. Bruner, and sister of our young friends, Justin and Jo. D. Porter, is in the city for the summer. Miss Porter has recently graduated at the Normal school of Normal, Illinois. Her presence will be a pleasant acquisition to the society of this place.

Winfield Courier, July 8, 1880.

The Shawnee County institute opened with forty-five teachers. The Cowley County session began work with fifty-seven teachers.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 14, 1880.

Last week we spoke about putting a fence around the school grounds of Arkansas City. With reference to this proposed improvement, Mr. Findley reports that when the present board took charge of the school affairs they found an indebtedness of $500 on their hands, in addition to the bonded indebtedness. By careful and judicious management this debt has been cleared. There is money now in the district treasury, and when they make their fall drawing from the county treasury they expect to plow the grounds over, set out plenty of good shade trees, and enclose the grounds with a neat and tasty fence. This looks like business, and the TRAVELER is glad to make this statement as an evidence of the ability and enterprise of the present school board.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 14, 1880.

BOLTON RANGERS. All members of this military company are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse next Saturday, June 17, at 2 p.m., without fail. There is considerable business of utmost importance to transact. It is the intention to draw new arms for the company, also new uniforms. Don't fail to be on hand. R. HOFFMASTER, Captain.

JOHN LEWIS, Lieutenant.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM X. Y. CAESAR - BALTIMORE.]

Winfield Courier, July 15, 1880.

The Omnia Township Sunday School Convention met at the Omnia schoolhouse on Friday, July 7th. Elder Thompson and Mr. F. E. Williamson were re-elected president and vice-president; Mr. John Henry, elected treasurer. The secretary, Dr. G. V. Cadwallader, was permanently elected at the organization last April.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 21, 1880.

BOLTON RANGERS. Take notice that a meeting for drill will be held on Saturday, July 31, at 3 p.m., in the Bland schoolhouse. R. HOFFMASTER, Captain.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 21, 1880.

S. P. U. A meeting of the stock protective union will be held at early candle-light on Saturday, July 31, in the Bland schoolhouse. By order of R. HOFFMASTER.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 21, 1880.

The Republicans of Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday, July 29, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of electing three delegates and three alternates to the county convention to be held at Winfield July 31; also to elect a township chairman. Republicans, remember the day and the hour, and turn out.

J. D. GUTHRIE, Chairman.

[REPORT FROM "L. J. N." - RICHLAND.]

Winfield Courier, July 22, 1880.

This is a very good year for picnics. We have just had another on Rock creek, and I will tell you a little about it. It was on the 17th of July, in a beautiful grove, on Mr. Chitwood's farm, gotten up the Rock Valley Sunday school. We were on the ground at a little before 10 o'clock. The marshal of the day and master of ceremonies, Mr. Schofield, had everything ready and in good order.

The next to arrive on the grounds was Summit school, 19 in number. Close after came Richland school, numbering 53. Soon came Prairie View school, numbering 22. Then came Lone Tree. Soon came the Douglass M. E. school, 43 in number. The next and last to come was the Douglass Union school, numbering 24. Every school as they came in were conducted to comfortable seats near together. The program was commenced with a song by the Summit school. Then there was a prayer by Rev. Ides, followed by a song by the Richland school. The Rev. Wilson then addressed the schools in a very animated and interesting manner. The Douglass M. E. school then sang a song. The Richland school infant class then sang "God is Love," after which Minnie Groom recited a poem. Then came a temperance song by three little girls, the daughters of Mr. Thomas Jones, of Richland school. This closed the exercises of the forenoon, and we all went for our dinner as people go only at a picnic out in the timber. At half past one, we had a song by Lone Tree school After that we had an essay by Mr. White. Then a song by the Douglass Union school After that there was a children's meeting, addressed by Rev. Winsted. This was followed with a song by Prairie View school and then Bellwood school These were followed by reports of the schools. They were mainly verbal, and show a good condition. Then the congregation all joined in signing the coronation, received the benediction, and closed. There was a free swing for all, without money and without price. There was plenty of ice cream and all sorts of refreshments on the ground. It was a very enjoyable affair.

Winfield Courier, July 22, 1880.

A Republican meeting will be held at the Jarvis schoolhouse Wednesday evening July 28th, for the purpose of organizing a Garfield and Arthur club. Speeches will be made by Col. Manning and Henry E. Asp. A large turnout is expected.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 28, 1880.

The Garfield and Arthur club of Bolton Township meets regularly every Saturday evening at the Bland schoolhouse.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 28, 1880.

BOLTON RANGERS. Take notice that a meeting for drill will be held Saturday, July 31, at 3 p.m., in the Bland schoolhouse. R. HOFFMASTER, Captain.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 28, 1880.

S. P. U. The members of the stock protective union of Bolton Township will hold a meeting at the Bland schoolhouse on Saturday, July 31, at early candle-light.

By order of R. HOFFMASTER.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 28, 1880.

The annual meeting of the teachers of Cowley County will be held in the courtroom at Winfield, beginning at 8 o'clock a.m., August 2, and will continue in session two days. The programme embraces subjects of vital interest to all connected with the cause of education, and every teacher in the county, and every school officer, should attend this meeting, and help make the occasion both pleasant and profitable. Every teacher in the county is invited to be present at this time. R. C. STORY, County Superintendent.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 28, 1880.

Teachers' Examination. An examination of applicants for teachers' certificates will be held in Winfield, beginning at 8 o'clock, a.m., August 4, 1880.

R. C. STORY, County Superintendent

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "HORATIUS" - BEAVER SCINTILLATIONS.]

Winfield Courier, July 29, 1880.

The gentleman against whose clerical robes the breath of suspicion was strongly blowing, was, by trial last Saturday at the Victor schoolhouse, proclaimed innocent, and exonerated of the grave charge brought against him. Has it come to pass that one cannot act charitably, and manifest a spirit of benevolence toward the needy creatures of humanity without causing the tongue of scandal to wag.

Winfield Courier, July 29, 1880.

J. G. Bullene, of our city, is furnishing the rock for the new schoolhouse at Wichita.

Winfield Courier, July 29, 1880.

R. Harbaugh, Secretary, announces that the Pleasant Valley Sunday School Convention will meet at the Odessa schoolhouse on August 6, at 10 o'clock a.m., and proceed to the grove on Posey creek, where the business will be transacted and a picnic will be held. A general invitation is extended.

Excerpt...

[FROM "X. Y. CAESAR" - BALTIMORE.]

Winfield Courier, August 5, 1880.

Mr. H. E. Asp met with the Republicans at the Baltimore schoolhouse last Monday evening, and after a pleasant little speech, proceeded to organize a Garfield club. Mr. L. A. Daniels was elected president; John L. Parsons, vice-president; Geo. F. Thompson, secretary; Wm. Jenkins, Treasurer. X. Y. CAESAR.

Winfield Courier, August 5, 1880.

The walls of the school building are up as high as the county superintendent: one Story.

Winfield Courier, August 5, 1880.

The county commissioners met last Monday to make the tax levy. Some of the school district reports were not in and they could not finish up their work.

Winfield Courier, August 5, 1880.

Under the law as it is understood the school districts through which the railroads run get all the benefit of the railroad taxation, while the greater number of school districts in the county, though paying their proportion of interest and principal on the R. R. bond debt, get none of the benefit of the taxation. This is wrong and should be righted.

Winfield Courier, August 5, 1880.

Miss Lillian Hoxie has finished her labors here in the Institute and has returned to Fort Scott with the high respect and kindest wishes of all who know her. Would it not be a nice thing for Winfield if she could be made the head teacher of our new west schoolhouse.

[FRANK S. JENNINGS: REPUBLICAN NOMINEE FOR COUNTY ATTORNEY.]

Winfield Courier, August 5, 1880.

The Republican nominee for county attorney is a native of Delaware, Ohio. He is not to blame that President Hayes was born there too, for he could not help it. Frank was ten years old when the war commenced and was not a soldier in the war because his folks thought he was too young. However, he put in his time well in working on his father's farm and attending school. He was educated at the Ohio Wesleyan University and then went through a course of law studies at the Ann Arbor Law school. He practiced a short time with his old preceptor at Delaware and then struck out for the west to obey the injunctions of the venerable Horace Greeley. He struck Winfield between four and five years ago and went to work. With his bright scholarship, industrious habits, sound judgment, and quick perceptions, he has become one of our best lawyers and is destined to rise to eminence as a jurist. He is a gentleman, one of the kind who regard the poorest laborers as equals, and acknowledge no superior class. He has made friends with all with whom he has become acquainted, and will poll more than the full strength of his party at the coming election.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 11, 1880.

The annual school meeting of school district No. 2 will be held in the schoolhouse tomorrow afternoon. The notices required by law have been posted up for two weeks past.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 11, 1880.

Next Tuesday evening, August 17, the citizens of Bolton township are requested to meet at the Theaker schoolhouse for the purpose of organizing a township temperance society. Mr. P. B. Lee, of Vernon Township, an active worker in the cause of temperance, will be there to address the meeting. A general turnout from all parts of the township is looked for and confidently expected.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 11, 1880.

The annual meeting of the school board of district No. 2 will be held in the schoolhouse on Thursday, August 12, at 2 p.m., for the purpose of electing one director and attending to such other business as may come before the meeting, and especially to consider what steps shall be taken looking to the fencing and fitting up of our school grounds. All are expected to attend. L. FINLEY, Clerk.

Winfield Courier, August 12, 1880.

The school building is progressing well, and shows two stories of wall.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 18, 1880.

At the school meeting of this district last Thursday there was a good attendance. Rev. Fleming was elected to the vacant directorship caused by Mr. Adams declining to serve another term, and sufficient funds were voted to fence the school grounds and set out a plentiful supply of good shade trees thereon. The election of Rev. Fleming as Mr. Adams' successor will meet with as general satisfaction throughout the district as will the knowledge that our grounds are soon to be placed on an equality with the building.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "W." - UDALL.]

Winfield Courier, August 19, 1880.

Udall school district, one of the wealthiest districts in this part, voted for eight months school the coming year, to commence the first of September.

Winfield Courier, August 19, 1880.

The clerk of the Winfield school district reports 870 children of school age in this district.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 25, 1880.

Prof. Phelps is busy getting ready for the opening of school one week from next Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 25, 1880.

Our schools commence on the 6th of September. Prof. Phelps reports that some of Dexter's children will follow him up, and take a course of instruction in our schools.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 25, 1880.

Elder James E. Kane, of the Christian church, will preach at the First Presbyterian church next Saturday evening, at 8 o'clock. All are cordially invited to attend. On Sunday morning Elder Kane will hold an open-air and basket meeting in Gillis' grove east of the Walnut, and will preach at the Parker schoolhouse in the evening. An effort will be made to have him remain throughout next week, and preach each evening at the schoolhouse.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 25, 1880.

We understand a prairie fire was started last week near the Enterprise schoolhouse, which was only prevented from doing serious damage by the strenuous endeavors of the neighbors. The fire was lighted to cook dinner by a party from this city, who were putting up hay in that vicinity. We would advise a little more caution in the future, as fire makes a good servant, but the very worst kind of a boss.

Winfield Courier, August 26, 1880.

The east school building is taking its roof.

Winfield Courier, August 26, 1880.

John Q. Ashton, the contractor of the schoolhouses, has been confined to his bed for several days.

Winfield Courier, August 26, 1880.

In the late distribution of the State school fund, Cowley is the seventh county in order of those receiving the greatest sums. It gives forty-seven cents for each person of school age. The following are the leading counties in the order of amount received.

Leavenworth: $5,300.

Shawnee: $3,736.

Doniphan: $3,665.

Atchison: $3,545.

Labette: $3,418.

Bourbon: $3,294.

Cowley: $3,184.

Montgomery: $3,117.

Johnson: $3,090.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 1, 1880. Front Page.

At the close of the recent Normal Institute the teachers of Cowley County met in their annual association. Two days were spent in the consideration of topics of interest to teachers, to schools, to school boards, and to the public generally. It is probable that at no association in the state have questions of wider or deeper significance been discussed by teachers. This fact shows the advanced standing held by the teachers of Cowley County. Their resolutions were as follows.

Resolved, That it is unwise to admit children under seven years of age to our public schools, as they are too young for anything but the kindergarten work, which cannot be given in our ordinary schools, and when they are thus admitted, three hours a day should be the utmost limit of their stay, lest they be injured in health and stupefied and dwarfed in mind.

Resolved, That, in addition to the indispensable studies of reading, writing accounts, and language, including orthography, orthoepy, correspondency, business forms--we should carefully and zealously cultivate the aesthetic nature of the young, by the studies of man, literature, poetry, plants, insects, and all that is beautiful around us, as an essential condition or happiness, and a shield from vice.

Resolved, That district clerks be paid a reasonable compensation for their services.

Resolved, That the power of changing district boundaries should be transferred from the county superintendent to some other persons.

Resolved, That the law of the state should require school boards to furnish at least fifteen square yards of black board for each school room.

Resolved, That true economy would justify, and a just pride in our schools should encourage the surrounding of our schoolhouse with grateful shade, both for protection and ornament.

Resolved, That experience has proved in other states the great superiority of the township system of schools, and we ask its adoption throughout our state, including the appointment of county superintendent by the township trustees, since it has been shown to be thus less fluctuating than when an elective office, and the best men are thus retained longer in the places in which they excel.

Resolved, That successful work in the school room should entitle the teachers to a certificate recognizing such work, and that certificates of high grade should become permanent after thorough examination in the school room and before the examining board.

Resolved, That the holding of low grade certificates for two successive years should render the holder ineligible to the office of teaching.

Resolved, That general information should take prominent place in the studies and in the examination of teachers.

Resolved, That this association meet monthly, holding its sessions in Winfield, Arkansas City, and Burden.

Resolved, That monthly reports should be made by the teacher promptly at the end of each calendar month and that the same should be at once sent to the county superintendent.

Resolved, That we would rebuke and condemn as unworthy of our profession any persons, who so far disregards a decent respect for an obedience to the school law of the State as to teach in our public schools without a certificate, or after it has expired, and believe a school board deserves prosecution that is so disorderly as to expend school money for such lawless teaching.

The officers for the following year are:

President, R. C. Story.

Vice President, E. A. Millard.

Secretary, J. R. L. Adams.

Assistant Secretary, Linnie Peed.

Executive committee--Orlin Phelps, Ella Freeland, M. J. Melville, W. E. Ketcham, A. Limerick. Commonwealth.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 1, 1880.

Elder Kane is holding meetings in the Parker schoolhouse this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 1, 1880.

The Republicans of Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse tomorrow evening at 7 o'clock, to organize a Garfield club. Let there be a full turn-out.

J. D. GUTHRIE.

Winfield Courier, September 2, 1880.

Miss Mattie Tice will commence a select school in the frame schoolhouse next Monday.

Winfield Courier, September 2, 1880.

Miss Mary Bryant will open a select school in one of the rooms of the frame schoolhouse next Monday.

Winfield Courier, September 2, 1880.

Mr. Ashton, the contractor on the school building is recovering from a severe illness of typhoid fever.

Winfield Courier, September 2, 1880.

Prof. E. T. Trimble has concluded his labors in conducting the Normal at Columbus, and returned home.

Winfield Courier, September 2, 1880.

The first ward schoolhouse progresses finely. The roof is on, and the interior is nearly ready for the plasterers. It looks well in most respects, but we don't like the looks of that roof, and won't pretend to unless we are paid something handsome for it.

[COWLEY COUNTY TEACHERS.]

Winfield Courier, September 2, 1880.

The following persons hold certificates at this time and are legally qualified to contract with school boards.

WINFIELD.

GRADE A.

Mary J. Melville.

Sarah E. Davis.

P. S. Martin.

T. J. Floyd.

R. B. Corson.

Nellie M. Aldrich.

Lena Bartlett.

GRADE B.

Allie E. Dickle.

Mrs. Will B. Caton.

A. B. Taylor.

Ella Freeland.

Lena McNeil.

GRADE C.

William Wycoff.

Anna F. Cuppage.

W. B. Dickerson.

Rosa Frederick.

A. E. Hon.

Nannie McGee.

Cora F. Meech.

Ray E. Nawman.

Fannie Pontius.

Amy Robertson.

Mrs. P. B. Seibert.

Maggie Stansbury.

Mrs. Flora Ward.

J. J. Stevens.

R. S. White.

ARKANSAS CITY.

GRADE A.

Fannie B. Skinner.

Albertine Maxwell.

Mrs. Lizzie L. Standley.

Frances Phelps.

Orlin Phelps.

Mary Theaker.

Mattie G. Mitchell.

GRADE B.

J. R. L. Adams.

Chas. Hutchins.

Jas. E. Perisho.

Mrs. L. M. Theaker.

GRADE C.

Thirza Dobyns.

Flora Finley.

R. C. Gailey.

Ella Grimes.

W. N. Henderson.

Derwin Hunter.

Susie L. Hunt.

Blanche Marshall.

S. C. Murphy.

Linnie Peed.

Sada Pickering.

Jessie Sankey.

DEXTER.

S. F. Overmann. - B.

R. B. Overmann. - B.

Ada Overmann. - C.

A. P. Cochran. - C.

CAMBRIDGE.

H. T. Albert. - B.

H. F. Albert. - B.

M. Hemenway. - B.

R. O. Stearns. - C.

BURDEN.

Mary A. Tucker. - A.

E. A. Millard. - A.

Arvilla Elliott. - B.

S. Chandler. - C.

CEDARVALE.

T. H. Aley. - B.

Martha Thompson. - B.

J. H. Bartgis. - C.

S. T. Hockett. - C.

TISDALE.

Sadie E. Davis. - C.

Rosa Rounds. - C.

Mattie West. - B.

MAPLE CITY.

W. E. Ketcham. - B.

UDALL.

Porter Wilson. B.

P. W. Smith. - B.

SEELEY.

L. McKinley. - B.

FLORAL.

Mrs. H. Knickerbocker. B.

Mrs. A. M. Gillespie. - C.

W. H. Funk. - C.

NEW SALEM.

L. C. Brown. - C.

MILTON.

Nettie D. Handy. - C.

CONSTANT.

F. A. Chapin. - C.

ROCK.

A. Limerick. - B.

An examination will be held in October sometime, which will afford another opportunity to those who failed at the above session of the institute. There are one hundred and twenty-two districts in the county, and but eighty certificates granted so far.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 8, 1880.

Will McConn returned to school at Crawfordsville, Indiana, today.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 8, 1880.

School commenced last Monday, with Prof. Phelps and wife, Miss Flora Finley, and Mrs. Theaker as instructors.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 8, 1880.

LIBRARY MEETING. The next meeting of the library association will be held at the schoolhouse on Monday, September 13, at 4 p.m. Every member is requested to be present, as the annual election of officers takes place at that time. JERRY ADAMS, President.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 8, 1880.

Our school opened last Monday morning with an attendance of over 170 pupils. The school laws render it compulsory for children to attend and we trust that parents and guardians will see that the law in this respect is complied with.

By order of the SCHOOL BOARD.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 8, 1880.

Last Thursday night a Garfield and Arthur club was organized at the Bland schoolhouse with D. P. Marshall, chairman, and August Lorry, secretary. The club will meet at the same place tomorrow evening and complete the organization. Speakers will be in attendance, and all Republicans are expected to be on hand.

Winfield Courier, September 9, 1880.

Messrs. Hackney and Gans will address the people at Rose Valley schoolhouse in Liberty township on Saturday evening, Sept. 18th, 1880.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 15, 1880.

Ridenour & Thompson have just received a fine clock, which will shortly grace the schoolhouse.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 15, 1880.

Hon. W. P. Hackney and C. R. Mitchell will speak at Enterprise schoolhouse in Beaver Township on Thursday, September 23.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 15, 1880.

The Garfield and Arthur club of Bolton Township meets every second and fourth Thursday of each month, at the Bland schoolhouse. H. S. Buckner is president and P. A. Lorry secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 15, 1880.

MERCER SCHOOLHOUSE, Sept. 7.

The Bolton Township temperance organization met, and in the absence of the president, Rev. Broadbent, was called to order by the secretary. Rev. Fleming delivered an eloquent address of an hour's length, and commanded the very closest attention throughout. The pledge was passed around, and nearly all gave their names. A unanimous vote of thanks was given the speaker, and the meeting adjourned to Tuesday evening, September 14, at the Guthrie schoolhouse. D. P. MARSHALL, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 15, 1880.

FROM BOLTON TOWNSHIP.

BOLTON, September 11, 1880.

Editor Traveler: According to call, the Republicans of Bolton met at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday evening, September 9, and organized a rousing Garfield and Arthur club.

After the organization, in absence of expected speakers from abroad, the president, Mr. Buckner, asked some of the members to state their reasons for being Republicans. Mr. Marshall first responded, and concluded by quoting the forcible reasons given by Col. Ingersoll, which elicited great applause. Amos Walton, being present, was called on. He gave his reasons for having been such a consistent and life-long (?) Democrat, which was a weak argument, to say the least. Then followed Mr. John Brown, who gave us such a rousing speech as we seldom hear. He bled the gentleman (Mr. Walton) and the Democratic party at every thrust. In the course of his remarks he asked if anyone present ever knew a colored man to vote with the Democrats. Mr. Andrews being present said if any such had existed, they were dead.

Mr. Walton tried to reply, but his mind (or whatever he calls it) was so muddled that he could not say anything.

The next speaker was Mr. Clark, a Greenbacker, who scolded the Republicans and Democrats on the financial question about alike. Then referring to the Alabama election, and the manner in which they treated Messrs. Weaver and Randall down there, he came out in such bitter denunciation for the Democrats that those present--Walton, Turner, Gilbert, and Eaton--could not raise their heads "or sit low enough in their seats." It was the most laughable sight I have witnessed for a long time. I venture they will not sigh for a similar experience in this campaign.

We had a good meeting, and when we come to the polls you can count on Bolton for a good Republican majority. The club meets again at the same place on Thursday evening, September 23, when we will have able speakers from abroad. ONE OF THE CLUB.

Winfield Courier, September 16, 1880.

The second ward schoolhouse walls have risen to the height of two stories.

Winfield Courier, September 16, 1880.

Mrs. Col. Manning has gone to Topeka with Miss May Manning, who will be placed at school in the College of the Sisters of Bethany.

Winfield Courier, September 16, 1880.

The Arkansas City schools commenced on the 6th with Prof. Phelps and wife, Miss Finley, and Mrs. Theaker as instructors, and 170 pupils.

Winfield Courier, September 16, 1880.

Father Kelley opened a select school in the Catholic church Monday morning. All are admitted to this school without regard to religious beliefs. All the common school branches will be taught, and also the languages to those who desire. Terms reasonable.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 22, 1880.

Hon. W. P. Hackney will address the citizens of Bolton next Monday in Theaker schoolhouse at 2 p.m., and in the Bland schoolhouse at 7:30 p.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 22, 1880.

Frank Jennings and Hon. C. R. Mitchell will address the Garfield and Arthur club of Bolton township at the Bland schoolhouse tomorrow at 7 o'clock p.m. Let all good Republicans turn out and see that a rousing meeting is held.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "REAL" - FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, September 23, 1880.

Michael Maher has gone away to school. He will be very much missed in our school, as he is a very worthy young man.

Winfield Courier, September 23, 1880.

The first ward schoolhouse is nearly ready for occupation. The second ward building has its roof on.

Winfield Courier, September 23, 1880.

George Thompson, of Omnia, has gone back to Manhattan to attend school. George is one of Cowley's promising young men.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 29, 1880.

W. P. Hackney will address the people of Beaver Township at Holland schoolhouse next Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 29, 1880.

There will be a temperance meeting held in the Parker schoolhouse tomorrow evening. Speakers from abroad will address the meeting.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 29, 1880.

Hon. C. R. Mitchell will address a meeting of the Republicans of Silverdale in the Estus schoolhouse on Monday, October 4. Turn out and hear the straight doctrine.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 29, 1880.

There will be a Republican meeting held in Centennial schoolhouse, Beaver Township, Thursday evening, October 7, and it is hoped that all Republicans will turn out. Hon. Robert Mitchell and others will address the meeting.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 29, 1880.

The semi-annual meeting of the Prairie View cemetery association will meet at the Parker schoolhouse on Thursday, October 7, at 9 o'clock a.m., for the purpose of cutting the grass and protecting the grounds against fire. By order of the committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 29, 1880.

There will be a temperance lecture at the Silverdale schoolhouse in that township on Tuesday night, October 5. L. F. LAVERTY.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 29, 1880.

There will be a temperance meeting at Salt City Tuesday night, October 5, and at Stony Point the next night. T. H. Soward, of Winfield, will address the people. J. J. BROADBENT.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 29, 1880.

The farmers of Beaver Township deserve great credit. Enterprise schoolhouse was literally crowded last Thursday night, some farmers coming as far as five miles to hear Mr. Hackney speak--and this after a hard day's work.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 6, 1880.

In another column will be found the advertisement of the school board calling for plans and specifications for a fence for the school grounds. The cost of construction is not expected with these plans, but simply the plans, or styles, themselves, from which a selection will be made, when all who wish will have a chance to bid on the one selected. Let the plans and bids be rushed along, as all are anxious to see the fence built.

NOTICE.

The school board for district No. 2 desire plans and specifications for a neat and durable wooden fence for the grounds to the schoolhouse at Arkansas City, from which they will make a selection and then receive sealed bids for construction of the same. Plans requested before November 1, 1880. L. FINLEY, Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 6, 1880.

Messrs. Jennings and Mitchell addressed the citizens of Silverdale Township last Monday night at Estus' schoolhouse. The house was crowded to its utmost capacity, showing the interest manifested by the farmers in the coming election. Frank woke us up at 2 a.m. to tell us that Mitchell made the best speech of the campaign, and would carry Silverdale almost to a unit. We then rolled over and slept the sleep of innocence.

[REPORT FROM "VOLUNTEER" - SILVERDALE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 6, 1880.

The Democrats of Lower Grouse had quite an interesting time at Coburn's schoolhouse on Thursday last, at 7:30 p.m. After some little trouble in securing a chairman (none of the party desiring office), Mr. Hill was induced to act. I never saw either of the speakers before, but was told their names were General Amos Walton and Hon. Dr. Leonard. The General made a great impression on his Democratic audience of nine by a fine oratorical display, who cheered him as if they were afraid of hurting the floor. The impression he made on us Republicans was that he hadn't his lesson well learned. It may not be improper to notice some of the General's "p'ints," as he termed them.

He said he could explain what had become of the Republican votes of the South, which he did to the satisfaction of his nine. He said the negroes were persecuted by their old masters to vote the Democratic ticket. The General ought to know that every school boy in Silverdale township knows how the negroes were persuaded. The "old masters" persuaded Judge Chisholm and his innocent children to cease voting the Republican ticket.

Dixon was persuaded not to oppose the nominee of the party the General represents with the good loyal Southerners whom the General said had now come back under the flag; but he did not tell us these same loyal persuaders gave Dixon's murderer the best office in the county, and sent him to Cincinnati to nominate the candidate whom General Walton will support.

The spirits of those murdered children will appear as witnesses against any party who will wilfully make such false representations.

In 1876, in the State of Alabama, there were 68,230 Republican votes counted; in 1878 there were 213. Alabama is only a fair sample of the Solid South, and in a free North the editor of a newspaper gets up and attempts to make an audience believe that 68,017 men in one State were persuaded in two years to leave the party that was instrumental in securing their freedom. "The right preservative of all rights must and shall be maintained in every part of the United States," says the sixth plank in the Democratic national platform, 1880. What does it mean?

He charged General Garfield with desertion at Chickamauga, which he did not do.

He charged him with being implicated in the Credit Mobilier, which he was not.

He eulogized Hancock as a soldier and military man, but forgot how his party condemned General Grant for being one four years ago.

He told how the Republicans under Gen. Grant had defrauded the Government, but did not say anything about the Democrats of the South, who make war on the United States Marshals that a Democratic Congress refused to pay.

He closed by appealing to Republicans not to support a Winfield ring, speaking of Mr. Hackney in a light manner; but don't you forget it, General, the soldier boys will send W. P. Hackney to the State Senate. He is the volunteer's brother and friend. That scar on his face will admit him to the Senate chamber. He marched, fought, and starved with us, and we will honor him again. He wore the bloody shirt you harp so much about. The thirteen thousand dead who sleep in the pine woods of Georgia near Andersonville, whom your party starved to death, cry out from their neglected graves for us to stand by our comrade and vote for the principles for which they died--only to have their widows and orphans refused an increase of pension by a Democratic Congress, 68 out of 109 voting against it.

It is recorded against your party. VOLUNTEER.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "RUSTICUS" - MAPLE CITY.]

Winfield Courier, October 7, 1880.

The world should know that Spring Creek township and Maple City, its metropolis, still moves on.

Recently I took a trip from Otter township to Salt City, passing through Arkansas City, and took the pains to interview the people pretty thoroughly both ways; and I find them a "Solid South" for Story and Jennings. If the north part of the county does as well, these men will appreciate the position they occupy in the hearts of the people. Prof. Story, they say, is such a wonderful pacificator--using such wisdom and judgment in adjusting troubles of whatever kind in the school districts with which he has to do. And "Jennings," they remark, "is a Solon in law--gentlemanly and affable--just the man for the position he is soon to occupy."

Winfield Courier, October 7, 1880.

The Floral schools opened Monday. T. J. Floyd and Mrs. Knickerbocker are in charge of the two departments.

Excerpts...

[OBITUARY: A. E. MILLSPAUGH.]

Winfield Courier, October 7, 1880.

Albert Edwin Millspaugh was the son of J. W. and Harriet Millspaugh, and was born in Clermont County, Ohio, April 7, 1840. His youth was mostly spent in Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. He pursued a complete course of study in the Academy and a partial course in the Wesleyan College in that town. He taught in Burlington, Iowa, for over four years, occupying the position of principal of one of the public schools. After being compelled to relinquish that position on account of ill health, he traveled two years. At the end of this time he completed his study of the law, which he had been privately pursuing for some years previous. About four years ago he entered upon the practice of his profession as a lawyer in Burlington, Iowa. A few months ago he removed to Winfield and began the practice of law. Before he was fairly settled in his new home he was taken suddenly ill, and after a few week's sickness, died at his father's residence in Vernon township. He was married to Miss Irene Shelby in August, 1868. He leaves a widow and four children, the oldest eleven years of age.

Soon after he came to Winfield, he took charge of a class of the larger girls in the Presbyterian Sunday school, and although he had charge of it only a few months and was hindered in this work by poor health, and the many cares incident to settling his family in their new home, he made his influence so felt in the school, and especially in his class, that when his death was announced, all seemed to realize that this event had robbed them of a near friend.

At his funeral his class attended in a body, and each member cast into his grave, as a tribute of affection, a bouquet of flowers.

A large delegation of the bar, of which he was a member, attended his funeral, as well as a great number of personal friends from Winfield and surrounding country. J. E. P.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 13, 1880. Editorial Column.

With reference to Mr. Hackney and the Emporia normal school, which Amos would have the people think was a terrible affair, we will state that Mr. Hackney simply took from the school the public treasury and forced it to look to its land grants and good works for success. Every legislature since then has endorsed his action, and the schools were never in a more prosperous condition than now.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 13, 1880.

There are 210 pupils in attendance in our public school, seven of whom came in from Dexter.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 13, 1880.

The Dexter school, taught by Prof. Phelps last season, has received one of the educational prizes of the Western Fair Association, just held at Bismarck Grove, Lawrence, Kansas, for superior excellence in its work last year.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 13, 1880.

SCHOOL REPORT.

Report of attendance at the Arkansas City school for the month ending September 29, 1880.

No. in Primary Department: 71

No in Secondary Department: 41

No. in Intermediate Department: 51

No. in Advanced Department: 47

Total: 210

Daily average attendance: 171

Daily average absence: 39

No. pupils neither absent nor tardy: 48

The irregularity is much greater in the primary and secondary departments, showing that the pupils are not probably kept out for help or business. If the bad habits of irregularity and want of punctuality begin and are permitted to grow strong in early years, the effect will be felt in after life. The ratio of pupils neither absent nor tardy to the total number is 48 to 210. Should this be satisfactory? Does this way of managing the educational interests seem to be wise? The figures here presented are copied from the school report for September, 1880, which are sent to the county superintendent and compared with reports from other parts of the county. These in turn are compared with county statistics throughout the State. In view of this, would it not be well to exert ourselves somewhat to maintain a high standard for our schools?

Arkansas City Traveler, October 13, 1880.

Improvement being the order of the day with our school board, let us suggest something that will go very nicely with the new fence soon to be put around the grounds, and which we are sure will meet the approval of every tax-payer. It is this--that a stone sidewalk be laid along that portion of the block fronting on High street, and from the gate to the building.

A neat fence will improve the appearance of our fine school building very much; a four-foot walk along High street, and a six or eight-foot walk from the street to the building, circling from a point in front to either entrance door, would not only add to the beauty of the grounds, but would come nearer placing them on an equality with the building. The tax on each tax-payer would be little or nothing, which would be more than offset by the pride all of us would take in the improved appearance.

Winfield Courier, October 14, 1880.

Ira McCommon needed more help on his farm. He secured a young apprentice of twenty-one years for his board, clothes, and schooling. Ira is well pleased with his bargain and says the boy is the best one he ever had.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 20, 1880.

ADVERTISEMENTS WITHDRAWN.

The advertised meetings for Hon. W. P. Hackney at Shriver's schoolhouse in Sheridan Township, Moscow in Silver Creek, Churchill's in Ninnescah, Star Valley, and Harmon's in Rock, Woolley's Crooked Creek, and Bonnewell's in Vernon, Arkansas City, Dexter, and Winfield are withdrawn. He will speak at Dexter on Friday, Oct. 29th, at 7:30 p.m.

O. M. SEWARD, Chairman Rep. Cen. Com.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "SIMON" - FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, October 21, 1880.

School at this place commenced Monday, with Mr. T. J. Floyd as principal and Mrs. Dr. Knickerbocker as primary teacher. I understand the attendance is good.

We have a new well at our schoolhouse. SIMON.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "M. QUAD." - GRANDVIEW.]

Winfield Courier, October 21, 1880.

The contract for the building of the new schoolhouse at this place was given to Mr. Welch, of Grouse Creek. Work will begin a short time.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 27, 1880.

Hon. W. P. Hackney and Hon. C. R. Mitchell will hold a meeting at Odessa schoolhouse, Pleasant Valley Township, this evening at 7:30 o'clock. Mr. Mitchell will address the Republicans of East Creswell in the Baldwin schoolhouse next Saturday night at the same hour.

Excerpt...

[WINFIELD WELLS.]

Winfield Courier, October 28, 1880.

The city authorities would do a thing that would commend their wisdom and philanthropy to the intelligence and gratitude of the people would they have a large cistern constructed at each school building, that the children and people in the vicinity who are not owners of property might have the benefit of pure drinking water. W. T. W.

Winfield Courier, October 28, 1880.

Quincy A. Glass has added a splendid line of school books to his stock.

Winfield Courier, October 28, 1880.

The professional card of Dr. Green appears in this issue. The Doctor is a brother-in-law of Mr. Blair, city editor of the Telegram, and comes well recommended. He is a graduate of one of the best medical schools in the country.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 10, 1880.

Miss Linnie Peed is teaching school at Udall, in the northeastern part of the county.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 10, 1880.

Somebody started a rumor Monday afternoon in the neighborhood of the schoolhouse to the effect that one of the horses belonging to the Wizard Oil troupe was to walk a rope uptown. So excited became the children over the prospect of such a show that it is said the teachers dismissed school in honor of the event. Good enough for the children.

Winfield Courier, November 11, 1880.

It is probable that Professor Gridley, of Oxford, will take care of the grammar department of our schools.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "SIMON" - FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, November 18, 1880 - Front Page.

The Methodist are holding a protracted meeting at the Richland schoolhouse. The services are conducted by Rev. Wilson, of Douglass.

Dr. Woodruff has contracted to teach a second term of singing school at this place, and has also organized one at Queen Village. He is a number one teacher.

Our schools have an enrollment of about seventy-five pupils.

[REPORT FROM "STELLA" - STATE UNIVERSITY AND VICINITY.]

Winfield Courier, November 18, 1880.

Quite a number of new students are enrolled this year. There are now about 400 in attendance.

Mr. S. C. Higgins, one of Cowley County's citizens, has moved with his family to this city.

Winfield Courier, November 18, 1880.

The city schools will commence on Monday, Nov. 22nd. The completion of the new buildings will give a First and Second Primary and First and Second Intermediate in each ward. The High School and Grammar Room will be located in the East ward.

CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS.]

Winfield Courier, November 25, 1880.

The Winfield schools are underway with ten rooms occupied and ten teachers, viz:

Mrs. Will B. Caton, first primary, first ward, north room, first floor.

Miss Mary A. Bryant, first primary, second ward, south room, first floor.

Miss Laura Bartlett, second primary, first ward, east room, first floor.

Miss Jennie Melville, second primary, second ward, north room, first floor.

Miss Alice Aldrich, first intermediate, first ward, west room, first floor.

Miss Allie Klingman, first intermediate, second ward, south room, second floor.

Miss Cook, second intermediate, first ward, north room, second floor.

Miss Sarah Hodges, second intermediate, second ward, north room, second floor.

Prof. A. Gridley, Jr., grammar, first ward, east room, second floor.

Prof. E. T. Trimble, high school, first ward, west room, second floor.

The schools will soon be perfectly organized, graded, and in the best working order.

Prof. Trimble is the principal and Prof. Gridley, assistant. Their departments receive pupils from both wards, in the other departments the pupils will attend the schools in their own wards.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 1, 1880.

MARRIED. On Sunday, Nov. 28, 1880, at the Parker schoolhouse, by Judge Gans, Mr. Isaac Fitzpatrick to Mrs. Lizzie Monroe.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 1, 1880.

Mr. Charles Hutchins, teacher at the Stony Point schoolhouse, district 89, furnishes us with the following report of his school for the month of November.

LISTING NAMES ONLY.

Mary Buzzi, Hattie Harkins, Isabelle Buzzi, Clarence Thompson, Alpha Moore, Dora Bartonia, Bert Moore, Battie Parvin, Maggie Patterson, Geo. Harkins, Fred Harkins, Mary Stevens, John Harkins, Jacob Buzzi, Antonia Buzzi.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "SIMON" - FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, December 2, 1880.

Mr. I. N. Lemmon rides seven miles to school. He is teaching at Queen Village.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "PLANTUS" - BURDEN.]

Winfield Courier, December 2, 1880.

Prof. Rounds, of Tisdale, has organized a singing school here. The Prof. is an experienced and efficient teacher.

Winfield Courier, December 2, 1880.

The county superintendent is trying to locate and distribute the state fund, some twenty-two hundred dollars, now in the county treasury, but uncalled for by school districts.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 8, 1880.

DIED. A small child, daughter of Mrs. Harris, dress-maker, of Winfield, while going to school last Monday morning, became badly chilled, and though a doctor was summoned, she died during the afternoon.

Winfield Courier, December 9, 1880.

Our city schools are too full for comfort in some departments.

Winfield Courier, December 9, 1880.

A little child of Mr. T. J. Harris was considerably chilled while on the way to school Monday morning. We have been told that there is a rule keeping the doors of the schoolhouse locked until a short time before the opening of school. If there is such a rule, we think it should be suspended during the cold weather, so that the little ones who come early may not have to stand outside until the doors are opened. It might be a serious inconvenience in the discipline of the school, but is one that should be put up with when the health of the children is at stake.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 15, 1880.

SANTA CLAUS.

Editor Traveler: Father Santa Claus has promised and will positively be present at the Christmas tree to be given at the Parker schoolhouse on Christmas eve, in honor of his presence, in consequence of which the following committees have been appointed.

On Procuring a Tree: Thomas Wright and Albert Beason.

On Arranging the House and Putting Up the Tree: F. M. Vaughn, Jasper Hartsock, Aaron Purdy, Isaac Fitzpatrick.

Receiving Committee: Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Hollister, Mrs. Isaac Fitzpatrick, Mrs. Anna Coryell, Misses Etta Barnett, and Ella Kirkpatrick, Albion Goff, Jerry Tucker, and Martin Maxwell.

Music: Mrs. Emma Murphy, Jennie Gillis, Zadie Parker, D. M. Hunter.

Committee on Arrangements: Mrs. Murphy, Mrs. Phama Perry, Zadie Parker, John Purdy, D. M. Hunter.

Let everybody turn out and lend a hand. D. M. HUNTER, Secretary.

Excerpts...

[KANSAS.]

Winfield Courier, December 16, 1880.

Fowler, (Ind.) Era, P. D. Corkins, Editor.

From Humboldt to Winfield we traveled in the night. The latter place is the county seat of Cowley County, 80 miles west of Independence, and about 250 miles southwest of Kansas City. The town was organized in 1870. Its nearest railroad point then was Emporia, 100 miles to the north, but now two railroads cross here, and it has a population of 3,500, well supplied with churches and other public buildings. The second school building is just completed at a cost of $9,000; the two costing $15,000. There is now in progress of erection a hotel at a cost of $25,000.

The county has a population of 22,000. There are six flourishing little towns within its borders. There are splendid water facilities for manufacturing. Sheep raising is proving remunerative. There are already 80,000 sheep in the county, a woolen mill is being talked of at Winfield, and at no distant day will be in operation. There are 116 school districts in the county and a good schoolhouse in each, beside each town has one or two, making at least 125 schoolhouses. The streams are spanned in many places by good iron bridges, public improvement is well advanced, so that taxes in the future will not be high.

Winfield Courier, December 16, 1880.

The school board is making arrangements to fit up the old frame schoolhouse and will employ two more teachers. It seems almost impossible to get school room enough for all the children in Winfield. Two of the school rooms have enrolled over one hundred scholars each and all the others are crowded.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 22, 1880.

School closed last Friday for a vacation of two weeks. A Christmas tree was given for the children's benefit, and a very enjoyable time was had.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 22, 1880.

DIED. On Saturday last, at the residence of her husband, Mrs. T. J. Rude. Mr. Rude is teaching school in East Centennial district, Silverdale Township, where the sad occurrence

transpired.

Winfield Courier, December 23, 1880.

Paris Hittle, a boy 15 years old, attending the first ward school, was thrown down in a crowd of scholars one day last week and one of the bones of his arm was broken.

[TEACHERS' MEETING.]

Winfield Courier, December 23, 1880.

The meeting of teachers, Saturday, was well attended. Professor Trimble had charge of the class in algebra and physiology. Superintendent Story had the class in geometry. The exercises were in every way commendable. The opportunity of "going higher" in these studies will be improved by many of our teachers. The query is, why don't all of them join in this work? Without question physiology will be added to the list of subjects for the examination of teachers, while algebra may become one of those necessary for a first grade certificate. Be this as it may, the teachers who have gone into this course of study and work will grow, while many who do not will get the dry rot. The recitation in primary reading, conducted by Miss Mary Bryant, gave the teachers a clear idea of the best method of beginning reading. The word, the phonic, the sentence, and the alphabet methods can be combined and followed with success. The debate on the compulsory educational law was conducted by Messrs. Hickok and Trimble. The fact was brought out that this law is occasionally the means of getting boys and girls into school who would otherwise be out all the time. The next meeting will be January 15, 1881.

Teachers present: Messrs. Trimble, Gridley, Hickok, Corson, Hutchins, Thompson, Wilson, Beaumont, Armstrong, McKinley and Dickinson; Mrs. Will B. Caton, Misses Bryant, Klingman, Cook, Aldrich, Melville, Dickie, Freeland, Davis, Hunt, Bowman, Kelly, Rounds, Frederick, Dobyns, and McKinley. Several other teachers were in town, but were too busy to attend the meeting. The program for the January session will be review and multiplication in algebra, the first book in geometry, and circulation in physiology. Teachers take hold of this work now.

Excerpt...

[THE MONITOR'S LOCALS.]

Winfield Courier, December 23, 1880.

Cambridge is building a new schoolhouse which is a credit to the enterprising citizens of that town.

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

A. L. Crow is teaching school at 109, his first school in Kansas, and both parents and children are well pleased.

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

Reb. Alrum Haycraft has arrived from Minnesota, a graduate from college.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "AMY H." - CEDAR.]

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

On last Friday night there was a festival at the new Valley schoolhouse for the purpose of procuring lights and other necessary things. $15.80 was taken in. Later a number went to the residence of G. W. Childers to trip to the music of the violin till the wee, small hours.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "A. TEACHER, JR." - NEW CANTON.]

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

Mr. and Mrs. Heath paid the New Canton school a pleasant visit on the 17th inst. Also Miss Lottie Walck. Rev. Mr. Snow preaches once each month at the school.

Mr. George Litzenberg (Farmer Doolittle), will lecture at the schoolhouse in the future.

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

Owing to the unfinished state of the blackboards in the east ward school building, the city schools get this week added to their vacation.

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

Mr. James Lorton returned from attending commercial college in St. Louis last week. James is one of last years graduating class from our high school. He will take a position as assistant book-keeper in the Winfield Bank.

Winfield Courier, December 30, 1880.

Vernon township has in successful operation a circulating library. The membership is the payment of slight yearly dues, and all who can contribute a volume. In this way, they have accumulated a nice little library, accessible to any of the members. This is a most commendable enterprise and one that will be of immense good to the community. Every school district in the county might, with little expense, have such a library.



1881

Arkansas City Traveler, January 5, 1881.

A GRAND MASS MEETING

Of the citizens of Arkansas City on Thursday night, January 6, 1881, at the schoolhouse, for the purpose of talking over the projected canal and the subject of bonds. Come one, come all, and let us have a general exchange of views. By Order of the Council.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 5, 1881.

From the Burden Enterprise, we learn that Wendell Williston, once a resident of Silver Creek Township, this county, graduated this year from Yale College, the highest of American colleges, with high honors. He was immediately employed as teacher in that institution with a salary for the first year of $1,500, to be increased to $2,000 the second year. Considering the difficulty of graduating from that institution, this is an honor to the State as well as to himself.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 5, 1881.

"A public meeting will be held in the schoolhouse tomorrow (Thursday) evening, at 7 o'clock sharp, the object of which is the discussion of the canal project now pending before the people. Every voter and tax-payer should be on hand, and hear the subject discussed in all its bearings. Already are the papers throughout the State noticing this proposed scheme, and it is everywhere regarded as a step in the right direction. If you have any suggestions or objections to offer on this question, do not fail to attend and give the meeting the benefit of your opinion.

Excerpt...

["OBSERVER" FROM SILVERDALE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 5, 1881.

SILVERDALE, DEC. 23, 1881.

Christmas has come and gone once more, with the anticipations and pleasures that bring glad hearts to the aged as well as the young. The Christmas tree at the Silverdale schoolhouse was a success in every respect. It was a beautiful cedar, festooned with an almost endless array of popcorn, and was well loaded with presents of every description. One present particularly worth mentioning was the suit of clothes presented to Rev. Phillips by the neighborhood. Rev. Phillips devotes a great deal of his time to the ministry without salary, and it is right that he should be remembered on such occasions.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 5, 1881.

A TOKEN OF FRIENDSHIP.

With Christmas and its festivities come thoughts of friends, present and absent; and the most natural desire is to offer some token of true friendship to those whose memory is cherished. Following the promptings of this desire with a cheerfulness and eagerness which showed how warm and lasting was their friendship for the far-away recipient, a few of the school children of this city raised the necessary sum and purchased that magnificent copy of "The Ancient Mariner," which was forthwith sent by express to their former tutor, C. H. Sylvester, at Boscobel, Wisconsin. Our friend, Mr. Sylvester, did effective work in his chosen field, educating both heart and mind. While we would much prefer hearing his acknowledgment "by word of mouth," we take pleasure in publishing the following.

BOSCOBEL, WISCONSIN, Dec. 27, 1880.

Editor Traveler:

Through the columns of your paper I desire to express my sincere thanks for the elegant edition of "The Ancient Mariner" received from Arkansas City friends. I ardently wish that their lives may be as happy as they have made my Christmas. Respectfully yours,

C. H. SYLVESTER.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "OCCASIONAL" - BEAVER.]

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881

Elder Henninger, Revs. Brown, Lee, and Rupp have conducted services at Beaver Center and the Easterly schoolhouse.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "C. A. P." - UDALL UTTERANCES.]

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881

An immense crowd was at the Christmas tree at Udall schoolhouse. Smith & Green, of this place, furnished the candy for the occasion, their bid being 2-1/2 pounds less than any other. They are both energetic, enterprising young men, and deserve a large share of the patronage in and around Udall.

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881.

Miss Grace Scovill left Monday to attend school at the Sisters of Bethany College in Topeka.

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881.

Miss May Manning has been a pupil in the Sisters of Bethany College, Topeka, since last September.

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881.

Sam E. Davis has left to attend school at the Columbia College, Missouri. He is one of Winfield's brightest young men, and takes in learning with little effort.

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881.

The commissioners had several tough school district cases this term. In the cases of districts 6 and 63 the action of the county superintendent was sustained. The matter of districts 1 and 37 was laid over.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881.

The following is a summary of the tax levy for the year 1880, as taken from the Clerk's books, showing the different purposes for which taxes are raised in the county.

School Tax: $27,414.44

School Bond: $11,645.03

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881.

Christmas Day was a disastrous one for Peter Lipe and family, who live six miles north of Winfield. They went to a neighbor's to eat their Christmas dinner, and he saw a house on fire which he supposed was the schoolhouse, but on approaching it he found it to be his own house. The building, furniture, and quite an amount of wheat was burned, making a total loss of the property destroyed about $800, on which there was an insurance, with Gilbert, Jarvis & Co., for $200.

Excerpt...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 12, 1881.

THE CANAL.

A mass meeting of our citizens was held in the schoolhouse last Thursday night for the purpose of discussing the merits and demerits of constructing a canal from the Arkansas to the Walnut river. Despite the stinging cold weather, the house was crowded, showing the interest manifested by our people in this import project.

FLORAL SCHOOLS.]

Winfield Courier, January 13, 1881.

The following is a report of the Floral schools for the months ending December 24th, 1880.

ADVANCED GRADES.

Number enrolled, 35; number of days of attendance, 607; average daily attendance, 30.85. Those having an average of 90 percent, and upwards, in scholarship and deportment were:

Brilla Read, 91

Mary Dalgram, 97

Oliver Craig, 90

Curtis Wright, 91

Etna Dalgram, 99

Helen Wright, 97

James Cottingham, 97

Harry Blair, 93

Mary Mount, 91

Maggie Wright, 96

Johnnie Thirsk, 91

Lewis Dalgram, 92.

Those perfect in deportment were Brilla Read, Mary Dalgram, Etna Dalgram, Helen Wright, James Cottingham, Mary Mount, Harry Blair, Maggie Wright, Willie Holloway, Frank Miller, and Lewis Dalgram.

T. J. FLOYD, TEACHER.

PRIMARY GRADE.

Number enrolled, 43, number of days of attendance, 604, average daily attendance, 33.2.

Those having an average of 80 percent, and upwards, in scholarship and deportment were:

Carrie Wright

Mattie Howard

Willie Dalgram

Luther Read

Edith Stone

Those perfect in deportment: Cathie Anderson, Willie Holloway, Rollie Dicken, David Stone, Robert Holloway, and Edith Stone.

HATTIE KNICKERBOCKER, TEACHER.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "HAPPY DICK" - CONSTANT.]

Winfield Courier, January 13, 1881.

The Holland schoolhouse of district number 10 is located one half mile south of this place and Miss Mattie Mitchell is teaching the young idea how to shoot.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 19, 1881.

OUR PUBLIC SCHOOL.

Quite an undercurrent of feeling with reference to the public school at this place has been making itself felt for some time past. A number of our citizens are under the impression that the school is not up to so high a standard as they could wish, claiming--and truly--that, with the fine school building, salaries paid, and number of teachers employed, something more than an average district school should result.

In this view we entirely concur, and while we would like to see our school as good as any, if not the best in the county, the fact must not be lost sight of that the proper steps to grade the school, and thus raise it above an ordinary school, have not been taken. However much we may desire improvement and a high grade of studies, as the matter now stands we have just the school we are entitled to. That the late Professor, Mr. Sylvester, maintained a higher standard, was entirely due to the interest he felt in the work, and a like course pursued by the present incumbent would give universal satisfaction and redound to his advantage, yet we cannot legally claim anything more than we now have--an average district school.

We would suggest that the necessary steps be taken to grade our school in due form without delay, thus enabling our school board to demand a grade of studies that will benefit more advanced students and be more in accordance with other educational facilities afforded by the district.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 19, 1881.

Editor Traveler: In the alley just east of the Central Avenue hotel, which is a thoroughfare for those residing in the northeast portion of the city, and also for the school children, are two dead pigs left to the action of the elements. If in the course of human events the present cold weather should give place to our old-time Italian zephyrs, the offal condition of these defunct porcines, when mortification shall have set in, is anything but cheerful to contemplate. Without touching upon the eminent taste displayed in throwing these pigs in this place, or upon the particularly gratifying spectacle they present to passersby, I would suggest to the unfortunate possessor thereof that he could cover himself all over with glory by simply removing this inanimate pork to "some boundless contiguity of shade" and covering it all over with dirt. Respectfully, READER.

Winfield Courier, January 20, 1881.

A STATE INSTITUTION. In his message to the legislature, the Governor states that there are, according to the census returns, 134 feeble minded or idiotic persons in the State, of whom 66 are under 21 years old; that thus far the State has made no provision for this class of unfortunates; that a school for such is no longer an experiment, but that in other States thousands of such have been brought from this almost hopeless state to a condition that enables them to care for themselves; that they cannot be educated except in an institution especially fitted for the purpose; and that it is the duty of the State to provide such an institution. Seizing upon this recommendation, Senator Hackney has prepared a bill to organize and establish such an institution at Winfield, which provides 1st, that $50,000 be appropriated for the purpose; 2nd, that it shall be located on a healthy site within two miles of the Winfield courthouse, the site to embrace at least twenty acres, with a clear title without expense to the State; 3rd, five commissioners to select the site; and 4th, cause to be prepared full plans and specifications for the building, which shall be three stories high and have capacity to accommodate two hundred persons; 5th, Cowley stone to be used in the construction.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 26, 1881.

DEBATING SOCIETY.

There will be a meeting at the schoolhouse in this city tomorrow evening, January 27, for the purpose of organizing a debating and literary society. The question for debate will be "Resolved, That the complete triumph of the temperance cause must depend on moral rather than legal suasion." All who are interested in such an organization are requested to be present. O. PHELPS, C. L. SWARTS, CHAS. HUTCHINS, D. E. ANDERSON.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 26, 1881.

There will be a gathering at the schoolhouse tomorrow evening, to complete the organization of a debating society. There is talent enough in this community to ensure the formation of a most interesting and instructive society, and we hope to see this movement succeed. Ladies are requested to attend and take part in the exercises.

[ARKANSAS CITY.]

Winfield Courier, January 27, 1881.

BY A NEWCOMER.

The stranger, when he first arrives at Arkansas City, is attracted by two very marked contrasts which at once challenge his thought and sharpen his curiosity. One of these is the school. As matters of general interest to all communities are involved, your correspondent proposes to devote his attention first to this particular view of one of the frontier cities of Kansas.

That wonderful inland city and "metropolis of all the Hoosiers," Indianapolis, had a citizen who was pre-eminent in all the years of its early growth, in his zeal and success in developing the excellence of its schools. It was Calvin Fletcher, the self-made and astute millionaire of that town, and he used to say that "extra results could only be expected from extra efforts," and insisted that "no taxation and no toil should be spared to make the public schools of their beloved city excellent and superior, so that intelligent families would rejoicingly make it a home in which to educate their children, in the most thorough manner.

As the newcomer approaches Arkansas City, the existence of some such spirit among its inhabitants is at once suggested. High and commanding stands a spacious building of elegant structure, which the American citizen at once recognizes by its form and location as a graded public schoolhouse. It stands on a gentle elevation overlooking the railway and the river valleys of the Walnut and Arkansas, and although the yard and noble grounds are bare of trees at present, or of a fence, yet the stranger learns with delight that provision was made at the last annual school meeting for an abundant supply of trees for a grove, and a fence to protect it; and that the Arkansas City Traveler warmly advocated this very judicious and benign measure, so that the enlightened spirit of the town press may be counted on in support of the next step of educational progress.

He is gratified too with hearing that within is a choice new library already underway; and a cabinet of natural curiosities and specimens (geological, botanical, and entomological) commenced; also that there is a part already secured of such school apparatus as is used in the favored city schools at the great centers of wealth, population, and culture.

The school is supported, he learns, nine months in the year. The stranger begins to think he will love this people who are so appreciative of the educational needs of the rising generation. Here seems to be the right forces at work. But the inner life and character of all this he has yet to learn. He pauses and ponders. He is not unmindful that there has been and is a great struggle going on in the older states for better methods of instruction; for such training as will best fit for the actual duties of life. For such thoroughness mental discipline as will enable the pupils to be independent thinkers, self-helpful, self-reliant, self-governing.

But the attainment of this excellence in the internal working of the system of instruction is always hindered or delayed by the bitter opposition of those who dislike to be partakers in the necessary toil; by those who prefer ease to progress; by those who crave for flattery and amusement; and white washing, rather than for substantial acquisition.

Which spirit will the newcomer find to be dominant in Arkansas City? He hopes that the external evidences of superiority are an index of an enlightened and just understanding of what the internal working should be. But, in this enterprising city, with its evidences of advanced culture, then, that wild-town of fame, far away on the frontier adjoining the Indian Territory, the newcomer asks the following questions.

Is this that outpost of civilization where the red men gather at will from the agencies, and throng upon the streets in their fantastic garments of the savage, and many of whom were recently upon the warpath? Where, sometimes at night, they re-enact their wild revelry of the war dance, and make the darkness resound with such fierce songs as have often been heard by the poor captive awaiting torture and death?

The memories of the bloody past are indeed renewed, by these grim aborigines who have acted their part in the dismal tragedies of border warfare; but it is sublime to see the citizens of Arkansas City serene in conscious safety, and dependent on no army, but secure in the silent strength and majesty of that power of civilization, which surrounds the savage like an atmosphere, and awes the fire in his heart.

The cloud has been lifted, and their chiefs, like the famous Black Hawk, have returned from their visit to their "Great Father" at Washington, impressed and overwhelmed with the vastness and resources of our republic and convinced that to rush upon destruction, and to fight it, they might "as well fight with the ocean."

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "C. A. P." - UDALL.]

Winfield Courier, January 27, 1881.

Our friend Enos Harlan is fearful lest the school ma'am's school expires and she returns to her home before he gets the long studied question asked. C. A. P.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "JULIUS" - BALTIMORE.]

Winfield Courier, January 27, 1881.

Mr. A. L. Crow is teaching the Omnia school.

Winfield Courier, January 27, 1881.

Charles Clayton's school is still booming.

Winfield Courier, January 27, 1881.

President Welch, of the Emporia Normal School, will lecture on Friday evening, Feb. 4th, at Manning's Hall. The proceeds of the lecture will be given to the public schools of Winfield for the purchase of apparatus.

[DON'T BURN THE PRAIRIES.]

Winfield Courier, January 27, 1881.

We would call attention to the statement of A. A. Wiley, and many others state the same, that in the fall of 1879 the whole country of the Indian Territory south of us was burned over. It is well known that the greater part of the prairies of this county were also burned over. The same thing happened in the fall of 1873. Since then there has been no year in which these fires were general in the country about us and southwest of us except the fall of 1879.

The summer of 1874 was our dry season when most of our crops failed and we were surrounded by distress and want. The editor of this paper spent a great deal of time during the fall of 1874 obtaining and comparing information, statistical and otherwise, with regard to all countries which have suffered for want of rain, so far as such information was in his reach. He examined the theories of the writers on physical geography carefully, examined and compiled the facts, and gave the general conclusions to which he arrived in a lecture which he subsequently delivered to the teachers association in this city; to the affect that always in those countries where the ground is well covered with forest or vegetation, whether dry or green, there is always plenty of rainfall, and in countries where dry ground, whether rock, sand, or clay prevails, there is little or no rain; that in a country which is bare one year and covered the next, will be drouth one year and plenty of rainfall the next; and he predicted that for the future of our country in those years following the widest range of prairie fires, there would be the greatest drought; and in those years following least prairie fires, would be most rain.

He reasoned that as there is always during the spring and summer months enough moisture in the vapor of the upper currents, which are always passing over us in a northeast direction from the equatorial seas, to deluge the whole country if rapidly condensed; that as this is the source of nearly all our rainfall, that all other sources are "but as a drop in the bucket!" The vapor in these upper currents must be more or less condensed while passing over us or we can have no rain.

He called attention to the facts that on account of electrical and other changes in the atmosphere, there condensations would frequently take place if not prevented by warm air rising into them or the radiation of heat from the earth; that the direct rays of the sun do not heat the atmosphere, nor to any considerable extent ground covered by forests or vegetable matter, but that they do heat bare ground to a very important extent; that the air is only heated by coming in contact with something hot, as heated earth; that hot air rises and warms the vapor laden currents, preventing the chill which condenses the vapors; and that therefore it cannot rain on wide tracts of bare earth except in times of rare and violent convulsions. The predictions he made that year have been verified every year since.

In the fall of 1879, the prairies around us and southwest of us were generally burnt over and the result was very little rain and failure of crops in 1880 following. Since 1879 he has frequently repeated these views in the COURIER.

The outlook is now bright for 1881. The prairies are not yet burned over. Do not let any fire get out this winter and spring if it can possibly be prevented. Do not say it is a mere hobby but act on it if possible this year and see the result.

Winfield Courier, February 3, 1881.

J. E. Perisho has closed his school in district 35.

Winfield Courier, February 3, 1881.

We have just heard that a school teacher was fined by a justice for whipping an unruly and disobedient pupil. The teacher was right, and the J. P. was wrong. The law does allow a reasonable amount of punishment by teachers in order to secure obedience, respect, and diligence. Only when the punishment becomes cruel, does the law interfere.

[RICHLAND TOWNSHIP PRIMARY.]

Winfield Courier, February 3, 1881.

The Richland primary was held at the Richland schoolhouse on Tuesday, January 25th, at 2 o'clock p.m.

Mr. D. C. Stephens was chosen chairman, and L. C. Brown, secretary. After which the following township officers were nominated.

Trustee: H. J. Sanford.

Clerk: J. W. Miller.

Treasurer: L. B. Stone.

Justice of the Peace, North Richland: N. J. Larkin.

Justice of the Peace, South Richland: D. C. Stephens.

Constables: T. D. Givler and S. H. Holloway.

ROAD OVERSEERS.

1st district: Phillip Stuber.

2nd district: G. G. Barnum.

3rd district: Daniel Maher.

4th district: J. R. Cottingham.

On motion Capt. Stephens was chosen a member of the township committee in place of I. N. Lemmon.

On motion N. J. Larkin and H. J. Sanford were appointed to draft the following resolutions.

Resolved, That our Representative and Senator be instructed to use their influence to cause the repeal of the township election in February, and fix the time for the election of township officers at the general election in November.

Resolved, That we are in favor of taxing dogs, males $1, and females $2.50; and that the proceeds be applied to the county school fund.

Resolved, That the county commissioners should bear in mind that they are the servants of the people, and not the servants of the printer, in awarding the county printing.

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to A. B. Lemmon and W. P. Hackney, and also to the Winfield COURIER for publication.

D. C. STEPHENS, Chairman.

L. C. BROWN, Secretary.

[COUNTY TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION.]

Winfield Courier, February 3, 1881.

The Teachers's Association met in the high school building Saturday week. Present: Trimble, Hickok, Jewett, Limerick, Bower, Carson, Story; Mrs. W. B. Caton, Misses Melville, Dickie, Bartlett, Kelly, Davis, Cook, West, Frederick, and Bowman.

The work in algebra and physiology was very satisfactory. The time for geometry was too limited for much work.

The next meeting will be held February 12th, when the subjects of division in algebra, respiration in physiology, and the second book in geometry will be reviewed.

Messrs. Trimble, Hickok and Story, and Misses Cook and Melville, reported the following petition and resolutions.

To the honorable members of the Kansas Legislature:

Gentlemen: The undersigned citizens of Cowley County, Kansas, most respectfully ask your attention to the following suggested changes in the school law. We respectfully ask that such changes be made, should they seem in your judgment desirable for the good of the public schools of the state.

1st: That a state certificate and no less than three years work in the public schools be made prerequisite qualifications to the county superintendency.

2nd: That the county superintendent be required to give his entire time to the schools of the county.

3rd: That the township system of schools be substituted for our present district system.

4th: That high grade certificates be clothed with a degree of permanency attainable upon successful work in the school room.

5th: That the annual school meeting be changed from August to June, or to an early day in July.

The third and fifth recommendations drew out considerable debate, but were approved by a majority of the teachers present.

Petitions with these recommendations will be circulated for signatures and then will be sent to the Solons at Topeka.

[RECAP: CLOSING OF FAIRVIEW SCHOOL EXERCISES.]

Winfield Courier, February 3, 1881.

RECAP OF REPORT FROM "X" CONCERNING CLOSING FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 1881, WHERE STUDENTS GAVE ADDRESSES.

STUDENTS WHO GAVE ADDRESSES.

Anna Orr, Isaac Curfman, Cora Morgan, Ver. David, Rosa Isom, Carrie Orr, Viola McKee, Laura David, George Isom, Albert Curfman, Fred Limbocker, Will Volmer, Harry Limbocker, Fred Volmer, Charley Baird, John Wilson, John Baird, Anna McIntire, Oscar Curfman, Jennie Baird, Mr. Volmer, Ernie McKee, Mary Curfman, Maggie Limbocker.

Excerpt...

[THE MONITOR'S LOCALS.]

Winfield Courier, February 3, 1881.

Quite an incident occurred yesterday in one of the rooms of the west side schoolhouse. Miss Melville, one of the teachers, attempted to punish a boy about 14 years of age, when the young offender drew a revolver to defend himself with. The plucky teacher relieved the boy of his weapon on very short notice, and gave him a threshing he probably won't forget very soon.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 9, 1881

SKIPPED BY ME:

A long article concerning article in Courier relative to Arkansas City School, in which Mr. Phelps attacked Prof. Sylvester and Arkansas City Citizens re A. C. school.

"Mr. Phelps knows the people are dissatisfied with him, and in attempting to defend himself, he seems to slur Prof. Sylvester, our former principal, and the entire community."

Article goes on to say that many children have left school, and those old enough to know anything, attend under protest.

Winfield Courier, February 10, 1881.

The school board met Monday evening and appointed J. L. Horning as a member of the school board to fill the vacancy caused by the removal of Frank Jennings out of the city.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "OCCASIONAL" AT BEAVER.]

Winfield Courier, February 10, 1881.

Spelling-schools, Literaries, prayer-meetings, and church services are flourishing at Beaver Centre and Pleasant Grove.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "M. LEWIS" - VERNON.]

Winfield Courier, February 10, 1881.

ORCHARD COTTAGE, VERNON, Ks., Feb. 2.

One of the most important subjects of conversation of election day was in regard to the erection of a suitable building by the township for the education of the more advanced scholars in the higher branches. It will probably cost not less than $5,000 or $6,000, which will require a tax of .01 to .015 percent on the dollar for three years to build such a house, for a high school would not make our taxes burdensome, being supported by the township. The project has many warm supporters, and really, with a population of 1,600 and many of our schoolhouses too small to accommodate all the scholars, it is a real necessity and we believe will be built.

Before the election board were done with the count, the members of the Vernon Library Association began to gather. This organization is progressing very rapidly. In about two weeks the members of this society will be prepared to give several exhibitions for the benefit of the library.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 16, 1881.

DIED. On Tuesday, February 8, in East Creswell Township, Mrs. Alice Waltman, aged 21 years, 5 months, and 27 days. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Laverty at the Parker schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, February 17, 1881.

The next meeting of the county teachers' association will be March 12. The storm interfered with the meeting Saturday.

Winfield Courier, February 17, 1881.

The Chicago Lumber Company should bring suit against the city of Winfield to recover damages for the injury done the frame building on the corner of Ninth avenue and Fuller street. The windows have been smashed into pieces, while holes here and there have been made in the ends of the house. This work can be traced to the boys who attend school in the east ward, to their shame be it said.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "SIMON" - FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, February 17, 1881.

Married last Sunday, at the schoolhouse, immediately after service, by Elder Thomas, Mr. T. L. Dicken and Miss Laura Barrister.

Our schools enrolled only 15 pupils last Friday. SIMON.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 23, 1881.

DIED. The funeral sermon of Sarah, wife of W. H. Brown, of Creswell Township, will be preached in the Enterprise schoolhouse on Thursday, March 6, 1881, by Elder Parks.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 23, 1881.

NOTICE. A special meeting of the Library Association will be held at the schoolhouse on Monday, February 28, at 4 o'clock p.m. Those having books belonging to the library will please return them on or before next Friday, so that the librarian can make his report.

JERRY ADAMS, President.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 23, 1881.

LOWER GROUSE.

The patrons of school district No. 62 desire to express their thanks to Miss Susie Hunt for the faithful and efficient manner in which she conducted the term of school just closed in the district. We feel amply repaid for the outlay in our school work this winter, are gratified at our teacher's success, and feel gratified in recommending her to school boards wishing teachers hereafter. J. P. MUSSELMAN.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 23, 1881.

NOTICE OF SPECIAL SCHOOL MEETING.

There will be held a special meeting of the qualified voters of the school district No. 2, Cowley County, Kansas, at the schoolhouse on Saturday, March 5, 1881, at 2 p.m. to decide by vote as to whether a graded school shall be established according to law in said district; and if said vote shall be for the establishing of such a school, at the same time and place to elect a director, clerk, and treasurer to act in behalf of the district until the annual school meeting for graded schools, which is held the last Wednesday of June.

By order of the Board. LEANDER FINLEY, Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 23, 1881.

Portion of letter from "Fair Play" re Mr. Phelps, head teacher at the Arkansas City Public School: "There is something terribly rotten in the state of Denmark, nor can it be argued away. Mr. Phelps cannot control the pupils by telling them that he taught school before some other teacher was born. He is not to blame, nor can he take unto himself much credit, for the very unfortunate accident of his birth at a date remote from this generation, and such a statement is as devoid of sense as was his charming scheme of presenting hair-ribbons to the girls and chromos to the boys to obtain their signatures to a paper setting forth that they were perfectly satisfied with the school. . . ."

IT IS APPARENT "FAIR PLAY" WANTS TO GET RID OF PHELPS!

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "JULIUS" - BALTIMORE.]

Winfield Courier, February 24, 1881.

The school board have adopted a rule to prohibit the use of tobacco in the schoolhouse at all times.

[DEXTER GRAMMAR STUDENTS.]

Winfield Courier, February 24, 1881.

LISTING NAMES ONLY.

Jackson Burdette, Howard Fawcett, Elmer Million, Florence Goodwin, Hattie Laplin, Lucy Hite, Frank Gamel, Charlie Truesdell, Lewis Whiteside, Ida Black, Lennie Laplin, Geo. Million, Mattie Truesdell, Robert Alfont, Arthur Hockett, Willie Bryan, Alma Elliott, Willie Darst, Libbie Hutchinson, Metta Merydith, John Hite, Fannie McDorman, Belle Nichols, L. J. Bibler, Kinney Hines, D. Allison, Marshal Million, Oliver Nichols, Clara Church, Nellie Merydith, Augusta Bibler. NELLIE M. ALDRICH, Teacher.

[APPORTIONMENT OF STATE SCHOOL FUND.]

Winfield Courier, March 3, 1881.

Leavenworth Times: The apportionment of the state school fund to the various counties of the state has just been made, the amount paid out being 35 cents per capita; i.e., 35 cents per child. Cowley County, with 7,454 children, receives $2,608.

Winfield Courier, March 3, 1881.

The county treasurer received the State school fund for Cowley County Tuesday, amounting to $2,608.90, being 35 cents per scholar. The superintendent will have the fund ready for distribution in a few days.

Winfield Courier, March 3, 1881.

Cambridge is building a new schoolhouse.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 9, 1881.

At the school meeting last Saturday, the vote on establishing a graded school in this city was almost unanimous. The new board elected are Messrs. A. C. Williams, director; William Benedict, clerk; and P. F. Endicott, treasurer--all thorough gentlemen and upright men. It is not the board we advocated, but if they will bring our school up to the standard desired and required, we will rest content.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 9, 1881.

On next Tuesday evening there will be an oyster supper at the residence of Mr. John W. Brown, directly west of town, in Bolton Township. The supper is given for the benefit of the music class at Guthrie's schoolhouse, who desire another term of instruction and take this means of realizing a few dollars toward paying the necessary expenses. A good time is guaranteed, and at the remarkably low price of admission (fifty cents per couple), they should be favored with a liberal patronage.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 9, 1881.

In the list of Cowley County school teachers, we do not notice the name of Miss May Benedict. This young lady passed a very creditable examination, and received a "C" grade certificate, which she now has in her possession, and has already partially engaged to teach the Estus school, in Silverdale Township. [List was published in the Democrat.]

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "D. F." - BEAVER ITEMS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 9, 1881.

Our school at Enterprise, governed by Miss Maxwell, closed last Friday.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 9, 1881.

Notice is hereby given that the school board of District No. 2, Arkansas City, have designated Saturday, March 19, as a day for the assembling of all persons interested in ornamenting our school grounds by planting forest trees and such other shrubbery therein as may be suitable. WM. F. BENEDICT, Clerk.

Winfield Courier, March 10, 1881.

There have been 122 schools in session in Cowley County this winter.

Winfield Courier, March 10, 1881.

The Arkansas City schoolhouse is to have a new fence and to be surrounded with trees. There are several verdant sprouts in that vicinity which need planting, and who would flourish under the shadow of an institution of learning.

Winfield Courier, March 10, 1881.

Recently a gentleman contributed several excellent articles to the COURIER from Arkansas City. They were of a local character, but were sound, sensible, and tended to harmonize and allay the factional feeling which exists in that community in regard to school matters. Upon their publication, a correspondent of the Traveler made a fierce onslaught on Prof. Phelps, the principal of their schools, as being the author. The correspondent jumped at his conclusion, but the authorship of those articles would have been creditable even to that classical (and apparently Biblical) Traveler correspondent.

We do not know the correspondent, but we do know and esteem Mr. Phelps. We know him to be a gentleman of rare natural gifts, a thorough scholar, and a faithful worker. He has had years of experience in school matters, and has the hearty endorsement of our county superintendent: more, perhaps, than the Traveler correspondent can boast of. The criticism was evidently written in a petty spirit of vindictiveness, without any real desire for the advancement of the school, and by one who apparently knew nothing of how a school should be conducted. It appears that the people sustain Mr. Phelps. . . .

Excerpt...

[CAMBRIDGE COMMERCIAL ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, March 10, 1881.

This school district is the third in wealth in Cowley. There is over twenty-five thousand dollars worth of taxable railroad property in the district, besides a few of the wealthiest men in Southern Kansas. If you desire to locate in a town to educate your children, you can find no better inducements than are offered at this place.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 16, 1881.

The Stock Protective Union will meet in Bland's schoolhouse, in Bolton township, on the last Saturday in March, at early candle light, for the transaction of important business.

AL. MOWRY, Captain.

Excerpt...

[OUR KANSAS LEGISLATORS.]

Winfield Courier, March 17, 1881.

"Hon. Allen B. Lemmon, of Cowley County, representing the eighty-eighth district, is one of the many bright young men Cowley County has given to the state, and one, too, who has made his way upward by his own efforts. Mr. Lemmon was twice elected to the superintendency of the state schools and as such officer made a record which do him good service in after life. The school system of the state was benefitted by his supervision and stands higher in the estimation of the country than ever before. As a legislator Mr. Lemmon did good service, being familiar with the rules of parliamentary practice, a good talker, and a clear headed thinker; earnest in his advocacy of any measure or determined in his opposition to it, he wins respect for the honesty of his convictions and singleness of purpose."

[TO THE REPUBLICANS OF THE FIRST WARD, WINFIELD.]

Winfield Courier, March 17, 1881.

The Republicans of the First Ward of the city of Winfield will meet in convention at the Courthouse, on Saturday evening, March 19th, 1881, at 7 o'clock sharp, for the purpose of nominating a candidate for member of the School Board and of Councilman, and a Republican Committee of three for said ward and thirteen delegates to attend a City Convention on the 27th of March, 1881, to place a full Republican city ticket in the field.

W. J. WILSON, R. R. CONKLIN, For Committee.

Excerpts...

[ARKANSAS CITY TRAVELER ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, March 17, 1881.

Misses Mattie Mitchell and Linnie Peed are at home now, enjoying a season of holidays, their schools having closed.

At the school meeting last Saturday, the vote on establishing a graded school in this city was almost unanimous. The new board elected are Messrs. A. C. Williams, director; Wm. Benedict, clerk; and P. F. Endicott, treasurer.

Winfield Courier, March 17, 1881.

Miss Dickie, teacher in district No. 9, lost $45 Monday night. She left her pocketbook in the desk and in the night a couple of tramps entered the house and rifled it of its contents. The loss was not discovered until nearly noon the next day, when the thieves were far beyond reach.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 23, 1881.

The last term of the school year commenced last Monday, and will continue three months.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 23, 1881.

In this issue we give the new school law regulating examinations and certificates.

[I SKIPPED THIS...VERY LONG!]

The grades now are first, second, and third, and are for two years, twelve months, and six months respectively. Botany, entomology, drawing, and geology have been dropped from, while physiology and natural philosophy have been placed among the studies necessary for a first-grade certificate. In the other grades but little change was made in the branches upon which examination is required. The law gives the third-grade teacher but one chance, requiring the holder of a third-grade certificate to advance or make an ignominious failure. No teacher can get a certificate of this grade a second time. While this law is intended to stimulate teachers to more constant and ambitious labor, hardships will follow in many cases.

To secure a first-grade certificate the applicant must make a general average of not less than 90, and must fall below 70 in no study. The second grade calls for an average of 80, with no study below 60; third grade, general average of 70, with a standing of not less than 60 in any branch. All interested parties should get this law in full, and make a careful study of its provisions.

Winfield Courier, March 24, 1881.

District No. 13, at Seeley, want a $1,200 schoolhouse built and desire bids for the erecting thereof.

Excerpts...

[REPUBLICAN WARD MEETINGS.]

Winfield Courier, March 24, 1881.

The Republicans of the First Ward of the city met at the courthouse on Saturday evening, the 19th. Called to order by W. J. Wilson of the Ward committee: D. A. Millington was chosen chairman and S. M. Jarvis secretary. J. E. Platter was nominated for member of the school board by acclamation.

The Second Ward Meeting was held at the opera house. G. H. Buckman called the meeting to order. James Kelly was chosen chairman and J. P. Short secretary. J. L. Horning was nominated for member of the school board.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "M. C. SELTER" - POLO, KANSAS.]

Winfield Courier, March 24, 1881.

Mr. Charles W. Doty is attending the Iowa City Law school this winter. He will be with us again soon.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "JULIUS" - BALTIMORE ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, March 24, 1881.

Miss Alice Stolp is talking of teaching a subscription school this summer. If she does, we hope she will teach a better school than was taught the past winter. JULIUS.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "SIMON" - FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, March 24, 1881.

I. N. Lemmon will teach the spring term of the Queen Village school and T. J. Floyd the Pleasant Hill, beginning the 11th of next month.

Miss Ray Nawman closed her school at Wilmot last Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 30, 1881.

Don't forget the tree planting in the schoolhouse grounds next Saturday.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 30, 1881.

TO TEACHERS!

The Cowley County Normal will be held in August; and Prof. P. J. Williams, of Ottawa, Kansas, will act as conductor. R. C. STORY, County Superintendent.

[TEACHERS IN ATTENDANCE AT LAST EXAMINATION.]

Winfield Courier, March 31, 1881.

WINFIELD: Misses Loy Pyburn, Maggie Stansbury, Ella Hittle, Jennie Carey, Caro F. Meech, Maggie Seabridge, Ella S. Kelly, Messrs. I. N. Lemmon, and W. B. Dickerson.

BURDEN: George Wright.

CAMBRIDGE: Miss Sue Weaverly.

NEW SALEM: Miss Jane Whetstone.

DEXTER: Thomas J. Rude, H. H. Fawcet, E. C. Million, Misses Ida M. Black and Florence Goodwin.

FLORAL: Mrs. A. M. Gillespie.

TISDALE: Miss Sadie Cains.

GLEN GROUSE: Mrs. D. M. Pomeroy.

CEDARVALE: J. H. Bartgis.

OXFORD: Mrs. P. B. Seibert.

UDALL: Mrs. L. C. Turner. Telegram.

Excerpt...

[REPUBLICAN CITY CONVENTION.]

Winfield Courier, March 31, 1881.

T. R. Bryan received the nomination for city treasurer, and S. C. Smith for treasurer of the school board by acclamation.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "ELSTON" - EXCELSIOR - DISTRICT NO. 6.]

Winfield Courier, March 31, 1881.

Miss Ray Nauman has closed her winter term of school and is at home again.

Literary at Odessa closed last Friday evening.

Dave Lamb is preparing to attend Normal school.

Victor school will close in a few weeks with an exhibition.

Miss Dickie is teaching her second term of school in our district. Her pupils think she is one of the best teachers we have ever had. ELSTON.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 6, 1881.

SCHOOL REPORT DIST. 31.

Report of the Parker school for the month ending March 25, 1881. No. of days in session: 20. No. of pupils enrolled: 29.

Names of pupils perfect in deportment: Rosetta Shearer, Etta Barnett, F. Barnett, Horace Vaughn, Fanny Vaughn, W. E. Edwards, Lena Christian, Hattie Lewis, Chas. Lewis, Cora Monroe, Sarah Monroe, Arthur Parker, Belle Jones, R. Jones, D. Jones, Cora French, George Lewis, Jessie Sankey.

Names of pupils present each day at school session: Hattie Barker, Willie Vaughn, Ed. Marshall, Willie Kimmel. C. F. ATKINSON, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 6, 1881.

Miss Linnie Peed, one of the city's most intelligent and popular young ladies, we are informed, has been engaged to teach the next term of school in the North Centennial Schoolhouse near the north line of the county, and will commence the term on next Monday.

Excerpt...

[PUFFING WINFIELD: VINNIE BECKETT.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 7, 1881 - Front Page.

The following is what Vinnie Beckett writes of Winfield to his paper, the Norton County Advance.

It brags on its fine and expensive residence buildings which are exceedingly numerous when the size of the town is considered. It has two magnificent churches, Presbyterian and Methodist; Episcopal and a Baptist, equally fine, in course of erection. These with the two schoolhouses, the east and the west, are all that would be expected of a city of fifteen or twenty thousand inhabitants.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "DOT" - CRABCREEK ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

School commenced in district No. 124 Monday. Miss Florence Goodwin is teacher. School is held in the house on Mr. David Hite's place. Attendance good from the first.

We meet to organize a Sunday School at Fairview next Sabbath. All are invited to come.

Excerpts...

[CITY POLITICS.]

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

A great many Republicans were not satisfied with the Republican nominations for city officers, and joined with the Democrats to nominate a citizens' ticket. They met at the opera house on last Saturday evening and put in nomination J. D. Pryor for Treasurer of the board of education, N. L. Rigby and E. P. Kinne for members of the school board.

E. P. Kinne was not present at the time of the Citizens meeting nor on the day of the election, but we understood him before he went that he would not accept a nomination on the Citizens ticket. N. L. Rigby positively declined to be a candidate.

Excerpts...

[THE ELECTION.]

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

The election of last Tuesday was one of the hottest little elections we ever had.

There are some things that might be learned from this election. First, that in our local matters it is very difficult to run an election on party lines.

There must necessarily be conflicting interests of north end and south end, or some other end; or differences of opinion in the management of schools, or business rivalries and jealousies, or differences of opinion on particular matters of policy for local government, either of which may be strong enough to override party lines, and no amount of bulldozing or party coercion will keep a man within his party when its candidates do not suit him in the particular matters in which he is most interested. There is only one possible way to make a party ticket succeed in these elections, and that is to make a fair division of the offices among the leading conflicting interests. If that cannot be done, then the only way is to let the voters divide on the local issues most prominent at the time being, as they will be sure to do. There must be mutual concessions, and a general understanding, or men will not "take their medicine."

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

E. F. Shinn, the Fort Scott nursery man, is on hand with a stock of trees. His splendid present of fifty shade trees to our school grounds is appreciated.

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

The teachers' meeting Saturday was especially interesting. Professor Phelps, of Arkansas City, conducted the exercises in physiology, and Professor Trimble in algebra. Work in botany was mapped out, the lesson for the next meeting, April 30, being "leaves." As the new school law classes physiology in the first grade studies, those teachers who have followed the county work have done well. Botany is a delightful study and teachers can succeed well with this science in the spring. As a means of furnishing teachers with object lessons, botany has no equal. Teachers present: Professors Trimble, Phelps, Gridley, Hickok, and Mrs. Caton, Misses Cook, Melville, Bartlett, Aldrich, Kelly, Frederick, and Nawman.

Excerpts...

[ELECTION RETURNS.]

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

The result of the city election of last Tuesday is given in the table below. Names of candidates on the Republican ticket are in Roman, Citizens ticket in small caps, and on both in caps.

FOR TREASURER, SCHOOL BOARD: S. C. SMITH, J. D. PRYOR.

PRYOR WON: MAJORITY 17.

FOR SCHOOL BOARD: J. E. PLATTER, N. L. RIGBY, J. L. HORNING, AND E. P. KINNE. N. L. RIGBY WON: MAJORITY 3; AND E. P. KINNE WON: MAJORITY 4.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "S. C." - LIBERTY TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, April 7, 1881.

The United Brethren are holding a protracted meeting in Red Valley schoolhouse. A good deal of interest is taken.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 13, 1881.

In looking over a list of Cowley County's school teachers, the other day, we failed to find the name of Miss Blanche Marshall, of West Bolton, who we believe has a first grade certificate as a teacher. The young lady has taught and given satisfaction during some three terms of school in this vicinity, and her name should, in common justice, not be omitted by a list of this kind.

Winfield Courier, April 14, 1881.

The amount of funds on hand for school purposes will be exhausted this month, but several teachers are organizing private schools, so that all who are able to pay the tuition fees can have schooling for their children.

Winfield Courier, April 14, 1881.

ARBOR DAY. Friday afternoon of this week will be observed in the east ward as arbor day. All citizens are cordially invited to assist the teachers and pupils in making the school grounds attractive and pleasant. If any can donate trees, they will inform the principal, who will see that they are properly planted. All who can plant a tree will please be on the grounds early Friday afternoon.

Winfield Courier, April 14, 1881.

The commissioners on Monday appointed Profs. Phelps, of Arkansas City, and Trimble, of Winfield, as examiners for the coming year. The appointees are closely identified with school interests, and will conduct examinations thoroughly and in a way that will be felt by the schools.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 20, 1881.

Mr. W. E. Chenoweth has been appointed a member of the School Board in place of Mr. Williams, who has removed from the district.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 20, 1881.

Last Friday completed the first month of the spring term of school. The following particulars, with reference to the first and second primary departments were handed to us.

In the primary department, in charge of Mrs. Theaker, the number of pupils enrolled was 68; in the second, under the charge of Miss Findley, 40 were enrolled. A class of 16 were sent from the first to the second primary department, and a class of 10 from the second primary to the intermediate department.

Excerpt...

[MONITOR NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 20, 1881.

The west warders have put out 28 trees around their school building, and a few more trees to be put in. Now give the yard a good fence and the work will be well done.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "P. B." - FAIRVIEW.]

Winfield Courier, April 21, 1881.

There is preaching and Sunday School at the Walnut Valley Church every Sunday and all are invited to come. There will be a meeting at Little Dutch schoolhouse next Sunday to organize a Sunday school. P. B.

Winfield Courier, April 21, 1881.

The Rev. D. Thomas, of Winfield, will preach at the schoolhouse near Salem on next Sabbath at 11 o'clock a.m., and also in the after part of the day.

Winfield Courier, April 21, 1881.

Friday was "arbor day" in the schools. Each of the children appeared on the grounds in the afternoon with a tree, which was set out. City Engineer Smith surveyed the grounds, and the work was done systematically. If the trees grow, and the board takes steps toward protecting them, our school grounds will in a few years be very attractive.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 27, 1881.

Our county superintendent, R. C. Story, was in town Thursday and Friday, of last week, inspecting the schools and attending the Sabbath School Convention held at the U. P. Church.

Excerpt...

[TRIAL DOCKET, DISTRICT COURT - MAY TERM, 1881.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 4, 1881. Front Page.

CIVIL DOCKET.

Quincy A. Glass vs. School District 125.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 4, 1881.

TO TEACHERS: H. C. Speer, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, in a recent letter referring to the new law governing the granting of certificates, says:

"It is true that no third grade certificate can be issued a second time to the same person in one county, but there is nothing in the school laws that can be constructed to debar a person from getting a 3rd grade certificate once in every county in the State, if desired. To avoid this annoyance, however, it is suggested that applicants for certificates request simply a statement of their standing in examination, showing that certificates will be given them in case of engagement for schools with district boards."

Excerpt...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 4, 1881.

COURIER CLIPPINGS.

The county superintendent is considering the propriety of holding Normal during July and August. The new law adds much to the teachers' labors, and a Normal for eight weeks would aid many to prepare for the examination and drill them in methods far more successfully than a four weeks' term.

Excerpts from very long article...

[FRANK MANNY'S LETTER: PROHIBITION IN KANSAS.]

Winfield Courier, May 5, 1881.

PROF. M. T. TRIMBLE,

Principal of the public schools of Winfield. The attendance and interest in the schools of this city are much greater than they were a year ago. For the last three months the enrollment of pupils was 402 and the average daily attendance was 386. The corresponding three months of last year the enrollment was 236 and average daily attendance 226.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "SALEMITE" - NEW SALEM.]

Winfield Courier, May 5, 1881.

Services were held by Rev. Thomas last Sabbath at the Pleasant Hill schoolhouse, one-half mile north of New Salem.

Union Sabbath school at the Pleasant Hill schoolhouse every Sabbath at three o'clock p.m.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "X. Y. CAESAR" - MANHATTAN.]

Winfield Courier, May 12, 1881.

CAESAR mentions Dr. S. W. Williston, of whom Cowley people will be glad to learn.

Dr. Williston and folks lived on Silver Creek for a few years, a few miles below where Burden now stands; but the dry weather of 1874 drove them to Manhattan, where Williston was born and raised. He graduated at Kansas State College in 1872 with high honors. After devoting a few years with the late Prof. Mudge in the study of science, he concluded to go to Yale College, where he graduated about a year ago. Immediately after graduation, he was employed as lecturer on anatomy and teacher of paleontology. Dr. Williston has worked his way up to this position by his own exertions, and will teach in Yale the coming year at a very good salary. He has been in Manhattan about a week visiting parents and friends. While here he delivered a fine lecture upon "Fossil wonders of America," under the auspices of the Webster Society, of which he was an organizing member. Everyone was well pleased with the lecture and wish him future success. X. Y. CAESAR.

[THE IMPROVEMENT OF SCHOOL GROUNDS.]

Winfield Courier, May 12, 1881.

F. P. NICHOLS, SUPT., MORRIS COUNTY.

(From Supt. Lemmon's Report)

I see more difficulties in the way of inducing school boards to do anything in this direction than in presenting the details of some plan to be followed.

School grounds should be rectangular in shape, and should not contain less than one acre. A south slope is desirable, and the school house should front south. It should be in the middle of the grounds east and west, and only half as far from the front as the rear of the lot. A good well, capable of furnishing abundance of pure water for all purposes, should be provided, and the grounds should be surrounded by a good fence.

The first steps in the improvement of school grounds are grading and drainage. Thorough cultivation is necessary. It is a fact that most school boards have yet to learn, that trees planted in a school yard need as much attention, and as thorough cultivation, as if planted elsewhere.

Along the north side of the lot a thick grove should be grown for protection. The remainder of the front yard should be devoted to small trees and shrubs, the back yard being left for a play-ground. Large trees should not be planted near the house. Never shut out the sunlight, nor the south breeze. To do this, is to make a serious mistake.

How such a trifling expenditure of time and labor will do in this direction. It would transform our cheerless, uninviting school grounds into places of real beauty, and make them attractive to the children. Such grounds would be of themselves valuable educators. Shall we not have more of them?

[Note: Microfilm in bad shape for part of the May 12, 1881, issue. Had to skip some stories. I believe that the following pertained to school graduates at Winfield...MAW]

Winfield Courier, May 12, 1881.

Miss Ella Kelly, Miss Etta [? Elta ?] Johnson, Miss Anna Hunt, Miss Jennie Lowry, Addison Brown.

Brown delivered the valedictory; Miss Kelly the salutatory. Messrs. James Lorton and McClellan Klingman, graduates of last year, occupied positions on the platform.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 18, 1881.

Miss Linnie Peed is teaching school in the northwest part of the county.

Excerpts...

Arkansas City Traveler, May 18, 1881.

The following table was handed to us with a request to publish. It is claimed to be a correct copy from the books of the County Clerk, and will explain itself.

School, and School bond tax: $3,854.41.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "JULIUS" - BALTIMORE.]

Winfield Courier, May 19, 1881.

A nice large house is being put up on the school section in the southeast part of this township.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "NOVUS HOMO" -NORTH WEST CRESSWELL.]

Winfield Courier, May 19, 1881.

Mr. Hon is teaching our two months summer school. One month is already gone.

Winfield Courier, May 19, 1881.

District 127 proposes to vote bonds and build a schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, May 19, 1881.

The trees set out on the east school grounds do not appear to be doing well. Some one should be detailed to look after them.

[THE CIRCULATING LIBRARY: R. E. GRUBBS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 25, 1881.

THE LIBRARY.

You can get to read any or all of the following books at a cost of ten cents each at the Circulating Library:

The Monastery. The Abbot. Quentin, Durward, Anne of Genstein. Waverly. The Antiquary. Rob Roy. Old Mortality. Ivanhoe. The Talisman. Fortunes of Nigel. The Pirate. Heart of Mid Lothian. Woodstock. Tales of a Grandfather. Guy Mannering. Red Gauntlet. St. Ronan's Well. Black Dwarf. Poverill of the Peak. Bride of Lammermoor. The Surgeon's Daughter. Kenilworth. Fair Maid of Perth. Count Robert of Paris. The Betrothed. The Highland Widow. Marana or Altar of Sacrifice. Beulah. Inez Vashti. Infelice. A Hidden Life. Vagabond's Adventures. Girl of the Period. Record of Five Years. Jocelyn's Mistake. Old Probabilities. Wandering Jew. Matrimonial Infelicities. Married life at Hillside. Pinkerton's Detective. School Master of Abbacy. Carried by Storm. Odd or Even. Artemus Ward. Country Merchants. The Arabian Nights. Don Quixote. Bricks without Straw. A Fool's Errand, by one of the Fools. A Terrible Secret. Woman's Love and Marriage. Guy Earlcourt's Wife, Shirley. Thaddeus of Warsaw. Swiss Family Robinson. Figs and thistles. By one of the Fools. Life of the James Boys. Woman to the Rescue.

POEMS.

Shakespeare. Byron. Tennyson. Browning. Scott. Pope. Mrs. Hemans. Bret Harte.

In addition to this we keep a good assortment of Papers, Magazines, Illustrated Papers, five, ten, fifteen, and twenty cent Libraries, Novels, and Song Books.

The best assortment of Stationery, Notions, and Novelties, Confectionery, Cigars, Oranges, Lemons, Fruits, etc. Last, but not the least, are those Schooners of Lemonade.

Come and see me, at the Post-office. R. E. GRUBBS.

[Book Titles Very Hard to Read. Probably have some wrong!]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 25, 1881.

Prof. J. B. Corry is organizing a "wrighting" school in our city. So says the Democrat.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 25, 1881.

Our friend, Charley Hutchins, closed his term of school, in District 89, East Bolton, last Friday. Charley is a No. 1 teacher, and is well appreciated wherever he has taught.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 25, 1881.

The S. P. U.'s will hold a meeting at the Bland schoolhouse next Saturday evening, at early candle light. All members are requested to be present. AL MOWRY, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 25, 1881.

Mr. E. C. Condit, representing the Rutan System of heating public buildings, was in town yesterday, and submitted the advantages of his system to a meeting of several of our citizens. We understand the question of putting in a new heating apparatus in the schoolhouse building will be submitted at the next annual school meeting.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 25, 1881.

The new fence around the schoolhouse grounds, under the skillful manipulation of Beecher & Son, to whom the contract was awarded, is rapidly making a show. It is all of pine, and when completed it will add greatly to the appearance of our school property, and be one more added to the list of our city's public improvements.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "M. LEWIS" - ORCHARD COTTAGE.]

Winfield Courier, May 26, 1881.

Joseph E. Cain, a Christian minister, preached at Vernon Center Saturday night and Sunday morning at eleven, and at four o'clock in the afternoon, and at Mount Zion schoolhouse at lamp lighting; and such will be his appointment once a month. He has been laboring for the Church of Christ at Vernon Center for over two years, and he is much esteemed by this congregation. His wife and family have been visiting friends here the past week, and on last evening there was a social given in their honor at the residence of Henry Hawkins. It is estimated that there were seventy-five or eighty persons present.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "NASBY" - OMNIA.]

Winfield Courier, May 26, 1881.

Mr. George Wright, of Burden, is making a success in teaching school in North Omnia.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 1, 1881.

SPECIAL NOTICE.

The next regular meeting of the Pleasant Valley S. P. U.'s will be held at the Odessa schoolhouse, on June 7th. All members are requested to be present, as business of importance will be transacted. C. J. BRANE, O. S. A. DeTurk, Capt.

Excerpts...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 1, 1881.

FROM THE MONITOR.

'Squire W. E. Ketcham closed his school on the 13th inst. Many of the patrons of the district No. 58 assembled and gave a dinner on the last day. Of course a good time was had by all.

The people of the Coburn school, district No. 2, in Silverdale Township, made up a purse recently and had a well dug for the use of the school. Excellent water was found at a depth of twenty feet.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "U. L. SEE" - ROCK.]

Winfield Courier, June 2, 1881.

Rock supports a good Sunday school under the Superintendency of Thomas Harp, our village blacksmith. Our day school is being taught by Alex Limerick, one of Cowley's best teachers.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "NOVUS HOMO" - NORTH WEST CRESSWELL]

Winfield Courier, June 2, 1881.

This week closes the term of A. E. Hon's school.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, June 2, 1881.

School, and school bond tax: $ 3,584.41

Winfield Courier, June 2, 1881.

Miss Mary Tucker finished, Friday last, her school in District No. 30, Silver Creek township. The mumps nearly depopulated her classes.

Winfield Courier, June 9, 1881.

Last Thursday Saml. E. Davis returned from Columbia, Mo., where he has been attending school for the last six months.

Winfield Courier, June 9, 1881.

A meeting of the Walnut township Stock Protection Union will be held June 18th at Black Crook schoolhouse at 7 o'clock p.m. All members are requested to attend as there will be important business to attend to. G. W. PRATER, Captain.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 15, 1881.

The new fence around the schoolhouse grounds is now completed, and has received a thorough painting. It is a substantial and not inelegant affair, and adds much to the appearance of our temple of learning.

[REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY SCHOOLS FOR 1880-81.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 16, 1881. Front Page.

The year just closed has been very unsatisfactory to all concerned. Last year the schools were so crowded that the teachers could do but imperfect work, but with the increase of room afforded by the new buildings, it was thought that there would be sufficient accommodations for all.

With the increase of room has come an increased attendance, and the various departments have been as crowded and the teachers as much overworked as the year before. Then, too, the short term has given but a poor opportunity for advancement or satisfactory work.

Yet comparing the work of this year with that of last, we find the result shows great advancement considering the difficulties under which we have labored. I give a comparable table showing the important statistics of the two years.

1879-1880 1880-1881 GAIN

Whole No. enrolled: 621 726 105

No. that attended 6 mos.: 422 546 124

Average attendance: 247 452 205

Percent of attendance: 84 92 8

I would call attention especially to the gain shown by the above table. While the gain in enrollment is only 105, the gain of average attendance is 205, thus showing that there is a strong tendency on the part of teachers and parents to secure a regular attendance. There is also a gain of 8 percent in attendance.

These results have been reached under very difficult circumstances as you are all aware that the Scarlet Fever scare was a great drawback to regular attendance, some of the departments during that time were reduced one half. While the crowded condition has served as an excuse for many children to remain at home yet it must be confessed that many have remained away who should have been in school and it would be well if some means could be devised by which parents would be obliged to comply with the law in this respect and send their children to school at least 3 months in the year.

There are so many things which seem to me to be absolutely necessary for the future success of the schools and to these I beg leave to direct your attention.

And first I notice a need for more teachers. Next year it will be necessary to open another grammar room and employ a teacher for that grade.

There should be two more primary teachers employed if it is desired that the pupils of that grade should attend all day. However, I consider it more necessary to provide for the higher grades first, and do not think a child between 5 and 7 should attend more than three hours a day.

An assistant teacher in the high school is necessary for the successful operation of the schools.

With the present magnitude of the schools and the increased number of teachers, it is impossible for the principal to provide for the success of the schools without giving the several departments his personal supervision. It is impossible for him to teach all the time and do what is necessary as a superintendent. He may plan and give directions, but his plans and directions may never be carried into effect unless he can personally inspect every department. And he can only do this by having an assistant teacher at least one half of each day.

A want of apparatus is another serious drawback to the progress of the schools. In this age when appliances are so convenient and cheap that every country district can procure what is necessary, it is certainly a mistake for a city to attempt to conduct her schools without these auxiliaries. A small sum invested in this way will be a paying investment in interest and profit to the schools. All experience shows that the best teaching is that which presents to the child something which it can grasp and investigate. One experiment in Philosophy is worth pages of text book illustrations and to the beginner one lesson from a globe is worth weeks of study in geography.

I would also recommend that the teachers of the different departments be not employed until after a competitive examination. The positions in the city schools can command the best talent the county affords and the readiest way to discover that is by a competitive examination. Of course, this would not apply to those already employed in the schools. I would recommend that all who have given satisfaction be retained as it is always better to continue a tried teacher than to try the experience of a new one.

Two years ago the grade was first established and was in advance of the school; now the departments have not only advanced up to but have gone beyond the grade, so that a revision of the grade is necessary. In order to meet the present demands, an extension of the course of study is necessary.

Hoping that the above recommendations may meet with your approval and support, I am very respectfully yours, E. T. TRIMBLE.

Winfield Courier, June 16, 1881.

District 78, Burden, has an enrollment of 70 pupils, and in May had an average attendance of 74. E. A. Millard is the teacher.

Excerpt...

[REPORT BY "LADY CLACK" - UDALL.]

Winfield Courier, June 16, 1881.

The Prairie Home schoolhouse was moved to Udall last Saturday.

Winfield Courier, June 16, 1881.

We have recently heard of the death of Harry Blount, formerly a teacher in this county.

He went to Colorado a year or two ago where he died.

Excerpts...

A FEARFUL CYCLONE. FLORAL HIT HARD!

Winfield Courier, June 16, 1881.

The school building, that was in size 36 x 70 feet, was the next building struck, and had a value of $1,200. It was swept out of existence.

This property is part of Floral.

The Telegram estimates losses as follows.

School House $1,800.

Winfield Courier, June 16, 1881.

The schools at Arkansas City closed Friday last. Pleasant exercises were given in the high school room by the pupils. Quite a number of visitors were in attendance. Professor Phelps has done a noble work for the pupils of his schools.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 22, 1881.

SKIPPED A COMMUNICATION FROM "ONE CITIZEN" CRITICIZING THE COURIER FOR STATING THAT PROF. PHELPS HAD DONE NOBLE WORK FOR THE PUPILS OF THE A. C. SCHOOLS...THIS MAN WAS MAD AND REALLY LASHED OUT AT THE COURIER AS WELL AS PHELPS.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 22, 1881.

A singular feature about the cyclone at Floral was the lifting into the air of the large schoolhouse and Christian church, a distance of fifty feet, and while these buildings were thus elevated they were turned around and around in the air, and completely torn to pieces before ever falling to the earth. A person out of the storm noticed this singular freak of the cyclone, and we give it as reported to us. Enterprise.

Winfield Courier, June 23, 1881.

On the 15th inst. Superintendent Story changed the boundaries of eleven school districts, and it was not a good day for changes either.

Excerpt...

[CAMBRIDGE COMMERCIAL ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, June 23, 1881.

The festival that was given by the citizens of Cambridge in the schoolhouse, Tuesday night, proved to be a grand success in every particular. There were about one hundred ladies and gentlemen, besides a number of boys and girls. The net receipts were $72.00, which is a sufficient amount to purchase the bell as desired.

[NOTICE: WALNUT TOWNSHIP SCHOOL HOUSE ERECTION BIDS.]

Winfield Courier, June 23, 1881.

The school board of district number 127, Walnut township, Cowley County, Kansas, will receive sealed bids until June 25th for the erection of a stone school house, in said district, either for the house complete or for the stone work, carpentry work, plastering, and painting separately. Specifications can be had by calling on the clerk of said district.

T. POULE, Clerk.

Excerpt...

[ARKANSAS CITY DEMOCRAT ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, June 23, 1881.

Miss Susie and Willie Berry, who have been in Lawrence the past year attending school, passed through the city last week en route for Pawnee Agency, where they will spend the summer vacation with their mother and brothers.

[EDITORIAL COLUMN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

There will be an M. E. basket meeting held in the grove, near Springdale schoolhouse, in East Bolton, on next Saturday and Sunday. Rev. Laverty will preside.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

SCHOOL ELECTION.

Today the voters of district No. 2 will meet together for the purpose of transacting the usual business that comes before the annual school meeting. One of the chief matters to be disposed of at such meetings is the electing of a board of directors for the ensuing year. The present state of affairs in this district is decidedly discouraging. There is a feeling of dissension in this district, caused mainly by the questionable proceedings of the teacher, Mr. Phelps. Over thirty of the more advanced scholars have withdrawn from the school, and where a year since we had a tranquil district, a large and prosperous school, and a good reputation abroad, we now have the opposite.

The object to be kept: restoration of harmony and the efficient working of the school system. That this cannot be done under the present management, we think, has been plainly demonstrated. The remedy proposed is a new board. At this writing the contest lies between the present board and the ticket put in nomination at the school meeting last Saturday evening. The former board was elected in the interest of Mr. Phelps, and one of them admits himself pledged to Mr. Phelps, in the event of the board being reelected. This being the case, the only hope of a change for the better, is in the election of a board of school officers who are in favor of a new teacher.

The board nominated at the preliminary school meeting, last Saturday, consisting of Dr. H. D. Kellogg, for director, O. Ingersoll, for clerk, and O. S. Rarick, for trustee, is one that we feel satisfied will meet the requirements of the case, and tend to a restoration of our school to its former prosperous condition. In this belief, we leave the matter in the hands of the qualified voters for settlement.

SCHOOL MEETING.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

A meeting of the citizens of School District No. 2 was held in the schoolhouse on last Saturday evening, and was largely attended--about one hundred persons being present. Dr. A. J. Chapel was called to the chair and J. C. Topliff elected secretary. After a few remarks the business of the evening commenced.

C. R. Mitchell arose and succinctly stated the objects of the meeting which were briefly as follows.

That this meeting was called for the purpose of talking over school matters, and taking action with a view to the election of a board of directors for the coming year. The main object to be gained was the restoration of harmony in the district, and the consequent working of our school to the best advantage for all.

Remarks were offered by Messrs. Hill, Findley, Adams, and Rev. S. B. Fleming, endorsing the views of Mr. Mitchell, expressed at the opening of the meeting, and stating other particulars of which they were cognizant relative to the present condition of our schools.

Mr. Mitchell, at the call of the meeting, arose again, and stated at length, the deplorable state of the schools, the dissension in the district, and other matters bearing on the question in hand.

He said that in view of the fact that Mr. Phelps, the late teacher, was very busily canvassing the district, and using means which were decidedly questionable, to further his object of being re-engaged, and furthermore, that one of the present board had admitted himself pledged to Mr. Phelps under all circumstances if elected, and the other members having been elected in the Phelps interest, he deemed it best that a new board be put in nomination to come before the annual meeting, on Wednesday next, for election.

Mr. Cramer then replied somewhat at length in the interest of the old board, and propounded the conundrum as to "how was it possible for them to support Phelps unless they were as bad as he." No one being able to solve the question, however, we presume he is yet chewing the cud of reflection on the same.

The following gentlemen were then put in nomination for the School Board of District No. 2 for the coming year: For Director, DR. H. D. KELLOGG. For Clerk, O. INGERSOLL.

For Treasurer, O. S. RARICK.

A motion was then made and seconded that this meeting respectfully request that at the annual meeting, on Wednesday, June 29th, the voting be by ballot, and the polls be kept open between the hours of 2 and 4 p.m., which would give all qualified voters a chance to attend. This was passed unanimously, after which the meeting adjourned.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

Vote for Dr. Kellogg, O. Ingersoll, and O. S. Rarick, at the school meeting, next Wednesday.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

Mrs. Theaker is now teaching a subscription school, which is attended by over thirty pupils. She has had many years of experience as a teacher, and in her special department has but few superiors.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

In order to vote at the school-meeting today it is necessary that the would-be voter shall have resided in the State six months, been a bona fide resident of the district for thirty days, and be over twenty-one years of age.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

Miss Flora Finley, who has been teaching in our public schools for the past year, will spend the ensuing year at Monmouth, Illinois, whither she goes for the purpose of graduating at the Monmouth College.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

The S. P. U. of Southwest Bolton will hold a meeting at the Mercer schoolhouse on Saturday, July 2nd, 1881, at early candle-light. All members are requested to be on hand, as also are the residents of Southwest Bolton generally. F. LORRY, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 29, 1881.

Miss Susie Hunt and Miss Mary Theaker, two of our city's young ladies, have returned to town; the one has just conducted a term of school in the Mercer district and the other a term in the Theaker district, both in West Bolton. In their chosen avocation they are earnest and efficient workers, and leave their several districts the better for their stay. Would we could say the same for a certain other district, a little nearer home.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "S. P. S. - ROCK.]

Winfield Courier, June 30, 1881.

There was held at Rock schoolhouse on Sunday the 19th inst. a conference of Sunday school workers to make arrangements for holding a Sunday school picnic. It was resolved to hold a picnic on Bailey's Island on the 16th day of July. Said island is situated one mile west of Rock store in the Walnut river.

We had the following delegates from the following schools at our conference on last Sunday. From Centennial, George Norman and Wm. Atkinson; from Star Valley, Mr. Martindale and Simeon Martin; from New Canton, W. P. Heath; from Rock Valley, Archibald Smith. S. P. S.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 6, 1881.

Miss May Benedict completed a two month's term of school in Silverdale district on Friday last, and we learn from one of the directors that universal satisfaction is felt with her work as a teacher. This was her first term of teaching school.

Winfield Courier, July 7, 1881.

Mr. C. C. Holland returned Tuesday from Silver Cliff, Colorado, where he has been servicing as principal of the schools.

[REV. C. F. GRAHAM'S REPORT: CONTRIBUTIONS TO FLORAL PEOPLE.]

Winfield Courier, July 7, 1881.

The following contributions have been made for the benefit of the cyclone sufferers of Floral.

New Salem $60.45; Burdenville $59.05; Little Dutch and Rock $43.70; Star School House $7.10. Total: $170.30.

This amount has been deposited in M. L. Read's bank by Rev. C. P. Graham and a check given by the same to the treasurer appointed at the Winfield meeting in the interest of the Floral sufferers. On behalf of Mr. Graham, who received the contributions, we hereby extend our many thanks to the good people of the several localities for their marked liberality toward the needy and suffering.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 13, 1881.

Miss Linnie Peed has concluded her term of school in the northwest part of the county, and is now staying in this city.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 13, 1881.

Mr. C. C. Holland just returned from Silver Cliff, Colorado, and gave us a call last Saturday. He has been engaged as principal in the Silver Cliff schools during the past year.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 13, 1881.

Miss Fannie Skinner, school teacher at Ponca Agency, is visiting her home in East Bolton, on a furlough of sixty days.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 13, 1881.

One of our prominent businessmen called our attention to the following complimentary notice, which appeared in the Zanesville (Ohio) Courier, of June 10th, 1881, and has reference to Mr. C. T. Atkinson, who is now making his home with us. Mr. Atkinson has, we believe, made an application for the principalship of our schools for the coming year, and if successful in obtaining the appointment, will make an efficient teacher.

"A few years ago one of the talented boys of Zanesville, C. T. Atkinson, made his way to the old Bourbon State of Kentucky. Just why he took the notion in his head of burying himself among people without energy, enterprise, or public spirit, was a great mystery. He was a young man, energetic, enterprising, better suited for the fast growing West than poor old Bourbon Kentucky. The secret is out at last. There was a pretty, little, bright-eyed girl down there. The young man captured her, and now he will depart forever with his prize from a State where there is no enterprise, no public spirit, only a very small amount of education among the people, and in consequence very little patriotism. The Etown (Kentucky) News in speaking of the marriage of this former Zanesvillian, says:

'Miss Nona McClure, sister of Judge McClure, and our leading society belle, was married on the 13th inst., at the residence of the bride's father, J. M. McClure, Sr., to Prof. C. T. Atkinson, of Zanesville, Ohio. The wedding was strictly private, only a few of the most intimate friends of the bride and groom being present. Prof. Arnold, principal of the Litchfield Academy, performed the ceremony. Prof. Atkinson is a young man of rare attainments, having graduated with distinguished honors at Mt. Union (Ohio) College. The bride is also young, beautiful, and thoroughly educated. With such a brilliant future before them, the happy couple should not loth to grasp it. They have selected Kansas as their future home.'

"Mr. Atkinson is the gentlemen who rendered the Republicans of Muskingum such efficient assistance in the Presidential canvass last fall."

[COMMUNICATION FROM "PHILOPOLITUS".]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 13, 1881.

AFTER THE SCHOOL ELECTION.

ARKANSAS CITY, June 28, 1881.

Ed. Traveler: We presume that most of our citizens are fully informed as to the excited school meeting we had on last Wednesday afternoon. We may safely assume that few would wish to see another annual meeting similar to that one. However well it may be to have a large attendance of voters, male and female, on such occasions, it is also true that we cannot afford to have such a bitter strife when our public schools are under consideration.

We assume, though, that all were honest in their opinions, though differing, and that all unkindness which may have been manifested in the heat of the meeting is deeply regretted now that the matter has passed. None can better seek to repair the breach that was then apparent between our citizens than those who had matters decided to their minds. There must be unanimity in school matters if in nothing else, for division tends in every way to render our school inefficient, thus working a great hardship upon children, the most valuable part of whose inheritance are the advantages to be gained from a common school education.

We now have a new school board throughout and we think no one can deny that the election was fairly conducted, and that the result expresses the wishes of a great round majority (about 2 to 1) of the legal voters of this district. We can all agree that the board is composed of honorable, upright men who will do their best to further the interests of the schools.

Remembering that a clear start is to be made on a new year, with the entire corps of teachers to employ, we feel sanguine of good results in this the first year as a graded school. Let us as citizens rub out all old scores and ill feeling, and work together with a new life and determination that the coming year shall witness the best school ever held in the district.

PHILOPOLITUS.

[EDITORIAL: INVESTIGATION DEMANDED RELATIVE COUNTY TREASURY.]

Winfield Courier, July 14, 1881.

A Bad Looking Affair.

Possibly $3,000 Drawn From the County Treasury Wrongfully.

INVESTIGATION DEMANDED.

A short time since it was suggested to us that the records of the County clerk's office, showing the census of 1878, had been manipulated. We scouted the idea as absurd, but finally went to the records and examined them for ourselves. We carefully examined the census returns of the several township assessors for the year 1878, carefully footed the columns, and examined the summary of footings of the various townships made by the clerk on the regular record for such purpose. We found large discrepancies. The summary shows the total population of the county to have been 15,390, while a careful footing of the assessors' returns shows the population to have been 14,555: a difference of 835.

It appeared to us that most of the township assessors had reported without footing their returns; but all had been footed correctly by someone in the clerk's office, with the possible exception of Bolton. But over the correct footings for Cedar, 343; Rock Creek, 833; Tisdale, 621; had been written other figures making them read "Cedar, 443; Rock Creek, 933; and Tisdale, 721." The footing of Silverdale had been changed from 494 to 547; and there appeared two footings for Bolton: 756 and 868. We think the correct footing for Bolton is 766.

In the general summary the largest of the above numbers were transcribed; and Beaver 584 was transcribed 684, Omnia 229 was transcribed 279, Otter 575 was transcribed 675, Vernon 655 was transcribed 755, and Windsor 648 was transcribed 678, making changes altogether to the amount of 835.

All this work was evidently done before May 30, 1878, for on that date the COURIER published a copy of the above summary just as it now appears with the exception that in the COURIER one "9" is turned wrong end up and makes it a "6".

Considering that we understood the law to be that if the census of the county for 1878 amounted to over 15,000, it would raise the clerk's salary $500 for one year, the treasurer's salary $1,000 a year for two years, the County attorney's salary $250 for one year, and the School Superintendent's salary $250 for one year, we were amazed, excited, and grieved at the appearance of things.

We went to the ex-treasurer with it and he was evidently really shocked. He had been told that Cedar township was summarized 100 too much and had ascertained it to be true; but it did not affect anything, and appeared to be an accidental error. He says: "If he has any money from the county which does not rightfully and legally belong to him, he don't want it and will not keep it."

After having carefully examined the matter, we concluded it was our duty to demand an investigation, however much it might damage even our best friends. It will give all a chance to explain what they know about it, get at the facts, and the interests of the county therein.

We called the attention of the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners to this matter last Saturday. He was astonished and excited, and determined to investigate at once. He examined the matter at the clerk's office and sent the County Attorney to do so too. He has called a meeting of the commissioners to investigate and determine what to do in the premises.

We are aware that the township trustees, or at least some of them, have been quite lax in taking these statistics each year. We do not doubt that there were more than 15,000 inhabitants in the county in 1878; but that fact does not seem to have been ascertained in a legal way. We know of no authority to doctor the census returns of the trustees.

We have not the slightest doubt that the neglect of the Census takers this year has cut down the salary of the County clerk $500; but he stands it, for he has already made up and published a summary made in exact accord with the trustees' returns.

We are aware that the above will create excitement and indignation; but we would caution our readers to patiently await developments, to prejudge no one, and not to assume that there was a conspiracy. We feel very confident that there was none.

Excerpt...

[COUNTY BOARD.]

Winfield Courier, July 14, 1881.

They remitted taxes for M. J. Gilkey and J. D. Pryor, and corrected several erroneous tax sales of school lands.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 20, 1881.

We received a pleasant call yesterday from Mr. Ansel Gridley, Jr., of Winfield. Mr. Gridley has made an application for the principalship of our schools, having just concluded a term of teaching in the Winfield City Schools. In this, his chosen calling, we consider Mr. Gridley one of the most promising young men with whom it has been our good fortune to become acquainted.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 27, 1881.

Mrs. Mitchell, wife of Hon. C. R. Mitchell, of Arkansas City, stopped here a few days ago, on her way from the East, to visit her aunt, Mrs. J. W. Tatham. She was accompanied by her sister, Miss Nellie Swarts, who has been in Illinois attending school for the past year. Emporia News.

Winfield Courier, July 28, 1881.

AD.

THE OLD ESTABLISHED HOUSE

-OF-

HENRY BROWN!

Has the most complete and freshest stock of DRUGS in the city. A Large Stock of White Lead and Prepared Paints. We have in stock all the latest School Books Adopted by the various Boards of the county. My stock of NOTIONS and STATIONERY is Complete.

We have complied with the provisions of the existing temperance laws and are the ONLY LICENSED DRUGGISTS in Winfield. My customers can be assured of the best goods at the Lowest Prices.

HENRY BROWN.

Winfield Courier, July 28, 1881.

Mrs. F. M. Rains will open her select school about September 5th. Mrs. Rains is a lady of rare culture and accomplishments.

[STUDENTS WANT PROF. TRIMBLE REAPPOINTED.]

Winfield Courier, July 28, 1881.

Prof. Trimble's class of last year consisted of 45 pupils. Forty of these earnestly petitioned the school board to reappoint him and three others have stated that they would have signed the petition had they the opportunity. The two others have not been heard from, but it is a fair presumption that the class is a unit for Trimble. It is idle to say that this petition does not amount to much. It is not only the spontaneous and warm expression of the confidence and esteem of his pupils, without which no teacher can be successful, but undoubtedly expresses the sentiments of the parents and guardians of nearly all of them. No member of the board can afford to discard such an endorsement from those best qualified to judge of the merits of the teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 3, 1881.

The corps of teachers selected by our school board, for the coming year are Prof. C. T. Atkinson, as principal, with Miss Peterson, Miss Susan Hunt, and Mrs. Theaker, as assistants. Some of the above are strangers amongst us, but all come well recommended; and, if the parents of scholars will do all they can to aid them in their arduous task, we feel sanguine that an era of prosperity will crown their efforts during the coming school year.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "RUSTICUS" - TISDALE.]

Winfield Courier, August 4, 1881.

All praise to Henry Fry, the first man to put up a hitching post at the schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, August 4, 1881.

The commissioners met Monday to levy the tax; but owing to the school boards not having reported, adjourned over four weeks.

Winfield Courier, August 4, 1881.

The "dead-lock" in the school board was broken Monday evening by the election of Prof. Trimble as principal of the Winfield city schools for the coming year.

Winfield Courier, August 4, 1881.

Mrs. E. B. Bushey is getting up a class in vocal music. She teaches reading at sight and cultivation of the voice. The class is for children.

Winfield Courier, August 4, 1881.

Mr. S. A. Cook kindly showed us the plans for the Caldwell schoolhouse Monday. The house will be a very fine one for Caldwell. The plans were as neat and perfect as any we have ever seen.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 10, 1881.

WINFIELD SCHOOLS.

The deadlock in our school board was broken Monday evening, and Prof. Trimble was elected city superintendent. Thus the agony ends, and peace and harmony prevails.

The board appointed Prof. Trimble, Mrs. F. M. Rains, and Prof. Story a board of examiners for city teachers, and named Thursday, August 11th, as examination day: exercises at the First Ward school building.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 10, 1881.

From a circular issued by R. C. Story, county superintendent, "To the patrons, officers, and teachers of the schools of Cowley County," we learn that the taxable property of district No. 2, March 1st, 1881, was $278,949.00 and the bonded indebtedness $4,000.00.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 10, 1881.

OLD SOLDIERS.

A meeting of "old soldiers," of Bolton township, will be held at the Bland schoolhouse, on Saturday evening, August 13th, for the purpose of electing delegates to attend the meeting held at Winfield on the 20th inst. This meeting will take into consideration the best means to be pursued and the making of the necessary arrangements to render the "Old Soldiers' Reunion," to take place at Winfield on October 7th and 8th, a grand success. All interested should attend this meeting and do their utmost to further the object in view. Time is on the wing, and every year death is thinning the ranks of those who fought side by side for liberty and the Union.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM SOUTH SILVER CREEK BY "G. T. H."]

Winfield Courier, August 11, 1881.

The funeral discourse of mother Hall, cousin of Hendrix Hall, was delivered at the Silver Creek schoolhouse by Rev. James Hopkins on last Sabbath.

Excerpt...

[SOME ITEMS ABOUT WINFIELD: FROM LEAVENWORTH TIMES.]

Winfield Courier, August 18, 1881.

There are two large schoolhouses in the city with twelve rooms, one having eight and the other four.

Winfield Courier, August 18, 1881.

Mr. S. A. Cook, an architect from Winfield, who prepared the plans for our new school building, was in the city yesterday with the plans. They are gotten up in a good style, and show at a glance that Mr. Cook understands his business. Caldwell Post.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "RUSTICUS" - TISDALE.]

Winfield Courier, August 18, 1881.

The farmers have an alliance organized at the Tisdale schoolhouse. They meet once a week. All are invited to attend and unite themselves with the organization, and all work together for the good of the farming community. RUSTICUS.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "MRS. RUSTIC" - FLORAL.]

Winfield Courier, August 18, 1881.

The people of Floral have decided to vote bonds for the purpose of building a schoolhouse. MRS. RUSTIC.

Excerpts...

[COWLEY COUNTY MAP AND STATISTICS FOR 1880.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 24, 1881.

No. of school districts: 126

No. of school houses: 105

Excerpt...

[FAIRVIEW TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, August 25, 1881.

David Gillick intends to go to Colorado soon and find a situation in some school. I suppose he is going to fix it up for that nine pound girl.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 31, 1881.

Our school will open the second Monday in September; or, one week from next Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 31, 1881.

SOLDIERS: ATTENTION.

The soldiers in Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Saturday evening, September 2nd, for the purpose of taking some measures in regard to attending the reunion of Cowley County soldiers at Winfield. Soldiers are requested to notify each other of the meeting, and all are requested to attend.

A. WALTON, Vice President of Bolton Township.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 7, 1881.

The apportionment of the State School Fund to Cowley County for the month of August has been made and amounts to $3,270.76, which will be distributed on the basis of the enumeration of 1880, giving 44 cents per scholar.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 7, 1881.

Our school term commences next Monday, under the management of Prof. C. T. Atkinson and an able corps of assistants. Let all who are interested in school matters, directly or indirectly, use their utmost endeavors, to make the school a success in the future.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "OLIVIA" - NEW SALEM.]

Winfield Courier, September 8, 1881.

The Salemites, or those living in the Prairie Home district, intend to build a large schoolhouse this fall.

[BIG AD: E. D. EDDY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

GOOD NEWS!

SCHOOL BOOKS AT BOTTOM PRICES.

School has commenced and Eddy's winter stock of School Books are on hand. A long experience in the school book trade has enabled me to buy my books closer than ever before, and I intend that my customers shall have the benefit of the reduced prices. Having the

Largest Stock of School Books and School Supplies

ever brought to the city I can supply all demands for the same at bottom prices.

I MEAN JUST WHAT I SAY,

Call and see for yourself, and save your money, at

EDDY'S DRUG STORE,

the oldest, most reliable, and best furnished drug house in Cowley County, established in 1870, carrying the most complete stock of drugs, paints, oils, glass, etc., ever brought to Southern Kansas. I propose to give

BOTTOM PRICES ALL THE WAY THROUGH.

If you want anything in my line come in, and see my prices is all I ask. Special attention is given to orders from a distance.

Thanking you for favors in the past, and intending, by fair and square dealing, to merit your confidence in the future, I remain most respectfully yours. E. D. EDDY.

DON'T FORGET THE PLACE--EDDY'S DRUG STORE, IN STONE BLOCK,

ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

The Arkansas City schools receive from the State $179.95.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

Tisdale is to have a schoolhouse after the plan described on pages 421 and 427 of the report of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

School District No. 53, in Bolton Township, desires to secure a male teacher for the winter term of school. Good wages will be paid to a competent teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

The State School Fund for Aug. has been received, and is now ready for disbursement. The amount due Arkansas City is $179.95; and district 2, $18.50.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

NOTICE.

Every member of the Library Association is requested to be present at the annual election of officers next Monday, Sept. 19th, at 4 o'clock p.m., in the school building.

JERRY ADAMS, President.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

TO TEACHERS.

There will be an examination of applicants for county certificates in the Winfield high school building Saturday, September 24; beginning at 8 o'clock a.m.

R. C. STORY, Co. Supt.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

A Bolton man was fined $25 and costs $40, for kicking a boy that "cussed" him in his own doorway. The fine was based on the evidence of the boy showing a large tumor on his side where he received the kick. It turns out now that the damage was done last winter in a fight with some school boys.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

The school term commenced on Monday last with an attendance of 202 scholars divided into the following rooms:

C. T. Atkinson 48

Miss Peterson 47

Miss Hunt 46

Miss Theaker 61

Arkansas City Traveler, September 14, 1881.

WANTED

20 CORD OF JACK OAK WOOD (2,560 cubic feet) cut in two feet lengths, the whole to be delivered at the Arkansas City Schoolhouse, between October 1st and November 1st, 1881. Bids for supplying the above will be received up to noon of Thursday, Sept. 20, by H. D. Kellogg. Bids should state prices for dry or green wood. By order of School Board.

Winfield Courier, September 15, 1881.

R. B. Hunter goes to Star Valley to teach.

Winfield Courier, September 15, 1881.

Miss Celina Bliss will teach this fall in district 9.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "RUSTICUS" - TISDALE.]

Winfield Courier, September 22, 1881.

S. A. Smith has made application for the Tisdale school.

Miss Mattie West is going to teach school in Burden.

Winfield Courier, September 22, 1881.

Mr. Albert Stuber, one of our Cowley County teachers, returned from Illinois Sunday with a blooming bride. Albert seems to have gone about this rather suddenly.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "RUSTICUS" - TISDALE.]

Winfield Courier, September 22, 1881.

S. A. Smith has been employed to teach the Tisdale school. He will live on G. T. Wilson's farm while teaching the school.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 28, 1881.

Miss Linda Christian has been engaged to teach the fall and winter school in Fairview district. School will open one week from next Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 28, 1881.

Frank Hutchison has returned to Cheyenne Agency, where he is engaged as industrial teacher.

[REPORT FROM "U BET." - FAIRVIEW, DISTRICT NO. 21.]

Winfield Courier, September 29, 1881.

Quite an enjoyable affair took place at our schoolhouse on last Sabbath evening. After a master sermon, Rev. Lahr married Mr. George Stalter and Miss Mattie Baird.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 5, 1881.

Miss Emma Hunt, a former pupil in our school, is in the city visiting her sister, Miss Susie. She will shortly leave for Texas, where she has accepted an engagement as a school teacher.

Winfield Courier, October 6, 1881.

There will be a necktie festival at the new stone schoolhouse north of town Thursday evening.

Winfield Courier, October 6, 1881.

Pleasant Valley township.

Old soldiers met at Odessa schoolhouse Oct. 1st and organized. On motion Henry Forges was chosen Secretary. The following comrades were named officers.

Captain: Henry Harbaugh.

Fist Lieutenant: Geo. W. Robertson.

Second Lieutenant: W. J. Keffer.

Orderly Sergeant: Francis M. Wells.

First duty Sergeant: Z. B. Meyer.

B. W. Sitter, W. J. Keffer, and J. W. Feuquay were chosen as the committee on general arrangements for the reunion. HENRY FORBES, Sec'y.

Winfield Courier, October 6, 1881.

Fairview township.

The Old Soldiers of Fairview township met at Little Dutch Monday and organized.

Captain: James Vanorsdal.

1st Lieutenant: Wm. White.

1st Sergeant: R. B. Corson.

2nd Sergeant: W. H. Butler.

Color bearer: A. J. McCollum.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 12, 1881.

Miss Pickering is teaching the school in District 34.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 12, 1881.

The position of teacher in the Pawnee Boarding School has been accepted by D. P. Marshall, of West Bolton, and that of assistant matron offered to Mrs. Marshall. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall are warmhearted Christians, and will doubtless have an elevating influence on the Pawnee children entrusted to their teaching and watchful superintendence.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 12, 1881.

Miss May Benedict and Miss Linda Christian are both teaching school east of the Walnut for the winter term. The former has charge of the Parker School and the latter the school in the Baldwin district.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 12, 1881.

Report of senior department of Arkansas City High School, for first month, of those who did not communicate without permission, and whose absences and tardiness were excused.

Charley Randall, James Robinson, Frank Theaker, Frank Barnett, Horace Vaughn, Jessie Norton, Jessie Finley, Cora French, Lula Walton, Ella Mann, Alto Maxwell, Flora Gould, Hattie Hand, George Beech, Mollie Christian, Etta Barnett.

INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT.

The following were neither absent nor tardy during the past month: Hattie Franey, Annie Speers, Archie Coombs, Ella Hoyt, Emma Redden, Sarah Hill, Arthur Coombs, Johnnie Garris, Nettie Johnson, Libbie Fouke.

JENNIE PETERSON, teacher.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "P. A. AND P. I." - SHERIDAN ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, October 13, 1881.

The Sheridan schoolhouse has been replastered, the desks freshly painted, the floor and woodwork thoroughly cleansed, and various other improvements made. School has opened with Mr. Funk as wielder of the birch.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "E. MC." - WILMOT.]

Winfield Courier, October 13, 1881.

Mr. Adam Stuber lectured on temperance at the Prairie View schoolhouse last Sunday.

[MANUFACTURING SCHOOL FURNITURE: CANAL COMPANY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 19, 1881. Editorial Page.

Mr. McKenley, at present a resident of Wellington, was in the city last week and concluded arrangements with the Canal Company for a 40 horse power to be used in manufacturing school furniture, etc. This is one more step in the direction toward making Arkansas City a manufacturing point. We will give further particulars next week.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "HORATIUS" - VERNON JOTTINGS.]

Winfield Courier, October 20, 1881.

T. J. Rude commenced sprouting ideas last Monday at the Randall schoolhouse; and Albert Stuber at the same time began peeling the birch in the Bonnewell district, on the banks of the classical Arkansas. Albert wears his matrimonial honors gracefully.

It gives ye reporter much pleasure to notice the promotion of his old college chum and roommate as temporary superintendent of the printing department of the Kansas State Agricultural College at Manhattan, successor to A. A. Stewart, resigned. X. Y. Caesar is an excellent printer, and a meritorious young man, and in all probability will be appointed by the board of regents when that August body meets, and be regularly installed in that department. HORATIUS.

Excerpt...

[REPORT - "PUBLIC ADVISER AND PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR" - SHERIDAN]

Winfield Courier, October 20, 1881.

Mr. Guimer, Sr., and family have moved onto the "Pennington" place west of Sheridan schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, October 20, 1881.

$5 REWARD. Strayed or stolen, a flea bitten gray Texas mare pony; was last seen near Liberty schoolhouse. N. C. Myers, Winfield.

Winfield Courier, October 20, 1881.

Of 148 teachers employed in public schools of the county last school year, only 59 reported to the county superintendent the terms of their contracts for teaching.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "NOVUS HOVUS" AT NORTHWEST CRESSWELL.]

Winfield Courier, October 20, 1881.

Teachers are scarce this year, and we think they will be scarcer next year as nearly all the teachers this year have third grade certificates, and the majority of the school boards prefer a teacher who has a first grade certificate. NOVUS HOVUS.

Winfield Courier, October 20, 1881.

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC.

Wishing to secure to my pupils all the advantages of a first class music school, I have leased Col. McMullen's store room opposite the Brettun House and fitted the same for a Concert Hall. Although our monthly concerts will be in reality examinations in the different branches of musical science, I shall make them as interesting as possible and hope that my patrons will encourage the enterprise by their never failing presence. The seating capacity of our hall being rather limited, we will not be able to send invitations to all of our friends at the same time but shall remember them all on the different occasions. C. Farringer.

[COWLEY COUNTY TEACHERS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 26, 1881. Editorial Page.

Cowley County Teachers.

There are ninety teachers in Cowley County holding certificates, of whom the following are teaching in the districts named.

ARKANSAS CITY.

Prof. C. T. Atkinson, city schools; Miss Jennie Peterson, city schools; Miss Susie L. Hunt, city schools; Miss Mary Theaker, city schools; Miss Rose Sample, District 80; Miss Linda Christian, district 33; Miss Jessie Sankey, district 51, Miss May Benedict, district 32; Miss Sadie Pickering, district 34, Miss H. M. Goodwin, district 93; W. M. Henderson, district 89; E. C. Brown, district 53; E. W. Coulson, district 44.

WINFIELD.

Prof. E. T. Trimble, city schools; Mrs. W. B. Caton, city schools; Miss S. J. Clute, city schools; Miss Mattie Gibson, city schools; Miss E. L. Crippen, city schools; Miss Alice Dickey, city schools; Miss Lena Bartlett, city schools; Miss May Bryant, city schools; Miss Alice Kingman, city schools; Miss M. J. Melville, city schools; Miss Alpha Harden, city schools; Miss Mary Hamitt, city schools; Miss L. M. Perrin, district 127; Miss Ella Freeland, district 12; Miss Anna Harden, district 68; Miss Celina Bliss, district 9; Miss Ella Hittle, district 42; Miss Fannie Harden, district 116; Miss Jennie Lowry, district 37; E. P. Hickok, district 43; C. J. Brothers, district 45; M. H. Marckum, district 75; F. H. Burton, district 106; J. A. Hilsabeck, district 10; L. P. King, district 4; R. S. White, district 21, A. D. Stuber, district 31.

BURDEN.

E. A. Millard, district 78; Miss M. L. West, district 78; Miss Nannie Crum, district 90; R. O. Stearns, district 76; C. W. Armstrong, district 80.

DEXTER.

Miss Nellie Aldrich, district 5; Miss Etta B. Robinson, district 5; B. P. Cochran, district 40; O. L. Keyes, district 70.

TORRANCE.

Miss Arvilla Elliott, district 14; T. A. Mercer, district 7; Miss Laura Elliott, district 95.

SEELEY.

L. McKinley, district 91; Mrs. L. C. Turner, district 13.

ROCK.

B. H. Limerick, district 24; R. B. Hunter, district 29; J. C. Martindale, district 73; Albert Brookshire, district 27.

LITTLE DUTCH.

R. B. Corson, district 125; Porter Wilson, district 26.

NEW SALEM.

Miss Etta Johnson, district 97; Miss E. L. Cook, district 39.

MAPLE CITY.

Ada Overman, district 28; W. E. Ketcham, district 85; S. F. Overman, district 102.

RED BUD.

Villa M. Coombs, district 114.

WILMOT.

Mary Tucker, district 22; Lizzie Parmer, district 105.

BALTIMORE.

Miss Maggie Seabridge, district 109.

CAMBRIDGE.

Howard E. Albert, district 16.

UDALL.

George Wright, district 16.

TISDALE.

S. B. Smith, district 47.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 26, 1881.

There will be a meeting at the Parker Schoolhouse next Saturday evening of all persons interested in the cemetery in that neighborhood. A good turn-out is desired.

[REGRET THE REMOVAL OF MISS EMMA MITCHELL.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 26, 1881.

Memorial of Regret.

ARKANSAS CITY, KANS.

October 14th, 1881.

Whereas, by the removal of the family of Mr. J. I. Mitchell, the senior department of the Arkansas City schools have been deprived of a valuable pupil and classmate, in the person of Miss Emma Mitchell; therefore, Resolved that we sincerely deplore the loss of one whom, we, as teacher and classmates, have learned, from her dignity and character, to respect, and earnestly hope that her future life will be as bright as her companionship to us, has been pleasant. Resolved, 2nd, That a copy of these resolutions be presented to the press of this city, for publication, and a copy sent to Miss Mitchell.

Mollie Christian Harry Hill

Emma Theaker E. S. Donnelly

Minnie McIntire Harry Finley

Sarah Randall Sessie Finley

Jessie Norton C. T. Atkinson, Committee.

Excerpt...

[P. A. AND P. I. - SHERIDAN ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, October 27, 1881.

R. R. Longshore has presented the Sheridan schoolhouse with a handsome coal burner.

[MOVING TO ARKANSAS CITY: McKENLEY FROM WELLINGTON.]

Winfield Courier, October 27, 1881 - Front Page.

Last week the Canal Company perfected a contract with McKenley, of Wellington, for power for a large furniture manufactory on the canal. His contract calls for forty horsepower, which, they are to furnish him for $800 a year. Mr. McKenley is now in Wellington settling up his business affairs there, preparatory to moving his machinery and worldly goods to this city, when he will commence the erection of four buildings, two to be 30 x 40, one 20 x 30, and one 16 x 20, to be used as buildings for his manufactory. He will principally manufacture school and church furniture, but will be prepared to turn out anything in the furniture line. Mr. McKenley is a man of wealth and experience, and will no doubt make this new enterprise a success, which will prove to him a paying investment, and be of lasting benefit to the city.

Excerpts...

[McINTIRE'S MADAM RUMOR SAYS: ARKANSAS CITY.]

Winfield Courier, October 27, 1881 - Front Page.

McIntire's Madam Rumor says:

That Prof. O. Phelps, formerly of this city, has gone to Texarkana, where he has been chosen principal of the public schools of that place.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "HANK" - PLEASANT VALLEY.]

Winfield Courier, October 27, 1881.

There is talk of organizing a singing school at the Victor schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, October 27, 1881.

The Walnut township polls are still traveling. This time they are to be held at Black Crook schoolhouse, one mile north and a mile east of Winfield.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM BALTIMORE.]

Winfield Courier, October 27, 1881.

Miss Seabridge is teaching the school in the Omnia schoolhouse.

The school board has been unable to secure a teacher; they would like one immediately.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 2, 1881.

G. W. Crawford has obtained the appointment as teacher in the Guthrie School district, for the winter term, at a salary of $40 per month.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 2, 1881.

NOTICE. The first regular meeting of the Linnaean Literary Society, of the Arkansas City High School, will be held Friday evening, Nov. 5th, 1881, at 6:30 o'clock, at the school building. All persons interested in literary work are cordially invited to attend and become members. By order of Society.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "FRITZ" - UDALL NOTES.]

Winfield Courier, November 3, 1881.

The Udall school, under the efficient management of Mrs. Bleakmore, is advancing rapidly.

Ex-Pedagogue P. W. Smith loaned one of the section hands his gun to go hunting, having first taken the precaution to load the weapon himself. Being satisfied that the thing would kick like a government mule, he started the fellow out. The result was more serious than was anticipated, for when the gun was fired, it splintered the stock, driving the barrel into the man's face, nearly putting out one of his eyes. "Dutchy" is on his ear, and swears he will be revenged.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "RUSTICUS" - TISDALE.]

Winfield Courier, November 3, 1881.

Miss Jennie Davis is teaching at the Conrad schoolhouse.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "OLIVIA" - NEW SALEM.]

Winfield Courier, November 3, 1881.

Schools are under headway. New Salem's school is presided over by Miss Mariam of Winfield, Pleasant Hill by Mr. Hall, Prairie Home by Miss Cook, while our Moscow neighbors are still minus a "school marm."

Arkansas City Traveler, November 9, 1881.

School Report.

Second Primary.

The following were neither tardy nor absent during the last school month:

Dean McIntire, Silva Rogers,

Etta Wilson, Rosa Garris,

Renna Grubbs, Hattie Sipes,

Mary Kitch, Emma Petit.

SUSIE HUNT, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 9, 1881.

Report of Mercer School.

The following is a report of the standing of the advanced grade of the Mercer school, Dist. 53, for the month beginning Oct. 2, and ending Oct. 28, 1881: Carrie Rice, 85; Clara Lorry, 90; Florrie Yourk, 85; Anna Coulter, 95; Chas. Weathers, 80; Al. Linscott, 84.

L. C. BROWN, Teacher.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "HORATIUS" - VERNON JOTTINGS.]

Winfield Courier, November 10, 1881.

A vacated dwelling house in the southern portion of this township, seemingly grew restless from its monotonous surroundings, and, getting itself upon trucks, undertook to follow the wild geese in their migration southward. However, it stopped to rest within a stone's throw of our schoolhouse, when Preston Alexander immediately took possession of it.

Another one of our bachelors is manifesting that peculiar restlessness of spirit which betokens a coming crisis. I allude to John Bowers, the professor of the birch at Beaver Center schoolhouse. He is making preparations to spend two weeks in Pennsylvania, during the holidays.

Poor Lo with his greasy half and filthy papooses amused the school children of district 75 by cooking his frugal meal of decomposing "hoggy-meat" over a little camp fire in their

presence.

One month of school has been taught in district No. 75, and the meritorious scholars are as follows: Highest in deportment, Millie Kerr, Joseph Kerr, Thos. Kerr, Flora Bradbury, Effie Kent, Julia King, and May Alexander.

Those who scored a hundred are: Julia King. In reading and spelling: May Alexander, and Flora Bowers; Flora Bradbury and Johnnie Orr, in arithmetic. Those who reached ninety-five are Effie Kent, Millie Kerr, Joseph and Thos. Kerr, in reading; Julia King and Joseph Kerr in geography; and Harry McCullough in arithmetic. HORATIUS.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM P. A. & P. I. - SHERIDAN.]

Winfield Courier, November 10, 1881.

Elmer Watkins is doing an excellent piece of work in painting the schoolhouse.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "OCCASIONAL" - BEAVER ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, November 10, 1881.

Beaver Center is a lucky place just now, having secured one of the best teachers, finest of young and (the ladies, let me whisper) marriageable gentlemen: Mr. Bower, and added to her citizens, the excellent family of Dr. Marsha. Already he has a large field of labor and goes where we will hear it said, "I think he is a splendid physician."

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "HANK" - PLEASANT VALLEY.]

Winfield Courier, November 10, 1881.

Carry Cronk, who is attending school in Winfield, was home on a visit last Sunday.

Excerpt...

[COUNTY SALARIES.]

Winfield Courier, November 10, 1881.

DEXTER, KANSAS, Nov. 2d, '81.

EDS. COURIER: Please state through the COURIER the salary of our county officers and oblige SAMUEL HOW.

The school superintendent gets a salary of $1,000, based upon a population of over 4,000 children of school age outside of Winfield, which is the highest grade of salary.

Winfield Courier, November 10, 1881.

Prof. Gridley has been engaged to teach the Floral schools. We congratulate the district on securing such an excellent teacher.

Winfield Courier, November 10, 1881.

D. P. Marshall and wife, formerly of Arkansas City, have been engaged to run the schools at the Pawnee Agency.

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

About ten teachers are still needed in Cowley.

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

District 73 has been struck by lightning bad. The rod agent foots up his little bill to the tune of ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEEN DOLLARS ONLY!! The schoolhouse is worth about two hundred dollars. Another rod like that would bankrupt the district.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "HANK" - PLEASANT VALLEY.

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

The township election which was held at the Odessa schoolhouse passed off quietly. Several bogus tickets were on hand.

Why can't we have a literary society at the Victor or Holland schoolhouse this winter? We would like to hear from others on this subject. HANK.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "OLIVIA" - NEW SALEM.]

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

Salem school is quite full. Mr. Beasley's children, of Moscow, attend. Mr. Cayton has been appointed clerk to fill the vacancy until the next annual meeting.

We have been informed that the Moscow district have organized a literary.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "K. U. KLUX" - WEST BOLTON ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

Mr. L. C. Brown wields the birch and manipulates the speaker in Dist. 53. We have quite a full school, fifty-three pupils enrolled. L. C. is equal to the emergency.

There is to be a festival at the Mercer schoolhouse on Thanksgiving evening, for the benefit of the M. E. Minister at this place, Mr. Kitch, I believe.

Excerpt...

[BURDEN BUNTINGS.]

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

Our school boasts of an enrollment of one hundred and seven scholars.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "HAWKEYE" - EAST FAIRVIEW.]

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

R. S. White is teaching in district 21, and is giving general satisfaction.

There is a spelling school every Monday night at Fairview. HAWKEYE.

Winfield Courier, November 17, 1881.

The following applicants were examined, Saturday, for teachers' certificates: Wm. M. Coe, C. L. Cunningham, J. B. Curry, Ansel Gridley, Anna Martin, Ray E. Nawman, Luther Nellis, Anna L. Norton, R. B. Overman, N. J. Waterbury.

Excerpts...

[ROCK ITEMS - "CHIP BASKET."]

Cowley County Courant, November 17, 1881.

Quite an accident occurred a few nights ago at Olive schoolhouse, at a spelling school. The lady teacher after calling the school to order requested the young men, very politely, if they would not abstain from spitting tobacco juice on the floor. But instead of complying with the wishes of the teacher, they spit all over the floor. Now young men, if you call that treating a lady as she ought to be treated, we do not know what good treatment is. Who could blame her for letting her angry passion rise. No gentlemen would do that trick. Next time we will tell their names.

Star Valley day school, under the instructions of R. Hunter, is prospering all right.

Alexander Limerick has the Star school of the township.

Cowley County Courant, November 24, 1881.

H. BROWN & SON -GENERAL DEALERS IN- PURE DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

School Books of every variety used in the county.

[KANSAS CLIPS.]

Winfield Courier, November 24, 1881.

Thirty youthful culprits are now housed in the State Reform school opened last June at Topeka.

Winfield Courier, November 24, 1881.

Mr. Glass against J. F. McMasters and school district 125, recovers pay for material furnished the district.

Winfield Courier, November 24, 1881.

John Burroughs and Archie Stewart, of Winfield, have taken the contract to do the stone and brick work on the Caldwell schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, November 24, 1881.

The people of District No. 9, "Excelsior" schoolhouse, are working up a fund with which to purchase an organ for the school. This is a worthy scheme and we hope to see them succeed.

[SCHOOL DISTRICT APPARATUS.]

Winfield Courier, November 24, 1881.

The Supreme Court has given a decision on the purchase of apparatus by district boards that is of interest to both buyers and sellers. The clerk and director of District 51, Sedgwick County, purchased school apparatus, and gave therefor an order on the district treasurer for $47, with interest at 10 percent. The order was sold to a third party, who brought suit for collection.

The Supreme Court held the members of the school board "had no authority from the school district to purchase said apparatus, because they had never been authorized to do so by any vote or at any meeting of the school district."

"The mistake committed by all the parties was a mistake of law, and not a mistake of fact," and the defendants did not intend to make themselves personally liable thereon. And the supreme court so ruled.

This decision should be widely published by the press and by the public, for it will restrain book-agents, map-agents, apparatus, and lightning rod peddlers as well as school district officers in doing many things unauthorized by the school law.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "P. J."--NINNESCAH TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, November 24, 1881.

Mr. Albert Brookshire is expounder of truths at the Blue schoolhouse and wields the birch so heartily that it is rumored that several of his large scholars (mostly young ladies) have turned their footsteps to the schoolhouse at Seely [Seeley] over which Mrs. L. C. Turner presides with a gentle dignity and grace that wins the hearts of all her pupils. P. J.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 30, 1881.

Mr. J. W. McCamy, now a resident of our city, who is in charge of the Salt City mission under the auspices of the United Brethren church, called upon us on Monday last. He informed us that a protracted meeting was commenced last Sabbath evening in the Theaker Schoolhouse and will be kept up for at least two weeks. Quarterly meeting will be held at that place on Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 4th and 5th, with Rev. Lee as presiding elder. An invitation is extended to all to attend and participate.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 30, 1881.

Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting of the S. P. U.'s, of Pleasant Valley Township will take place at Odessa Schoolhouse on the first Tuesday evening of December, 1881, at early lamp light. All members are requested to be present as business of great importance will come before the meeting. By order A. D. TURK, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 30, 1881.

The S. P. U.'s of South-West Bolton will meet at the Mercer Schoolhouse on the evening of December 3rd. All members are requested to be present. By order F. LORRY, Capt.

[REPORT OF MERCER SCHOOL.]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 30, 1881.

The following is a report of the Mercer school, district 53, for the month ending Nov. 25, 1881.

No. of pupils enrolled, 57; number of visits during the month, 4. The following list of pupils shows their standing on a grade of 100.

FIRST GRADE.

Anna Coulter, 93; Clara Lorry, 97; Forest Yourt, 90; Will Gamble, 97; Chas. Weathers, 93; Jennie Weathers, 98; Carrie Rice, 95; Fred De Mott, 98; Sammie Gamble, 95; Al. Linscott, 90.

SECOND GRADE.

Mamie Schnee, 87; Clara Gamble, 86; Albert Bowker, 80; Mattie Christy, 83; Sam'l Christy, 80; Ruth Voris, 82; Clarence Patton, 81; Nellie Parker, 85; Stevie Rice, 83; Tannie Weathers, 84; Geo. Christy, 80; Alvin Voris, 80; Rosetta Bowker, 80.

The only pupil neither absent or tardy was Rose Bowker.

L. C. Brown, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 30, 1881.

Mr. C. H. Luling, solicitor for a Historical County Atlas now in preparation by John P. Edwards, of Philadelphia, called upon us yesterday. The work will be 14 x 18 inches, substantially bound, and contain a detailed history of the county, as well as plats showing every city and lot, villages, churches, schoolhouses, streams, bridges, fords, farms with owner's name, roads, county and private; stone quarries, township lines, etc., forming one of the most valuable works to businessmen ever published. Subscribe for it.

Excerpt...

Cowley County Courant, December 1, 1881.

Isn't the senior editor of the Courier a little off on the politics of James D. Snoddy, when he calls him a Democrat? It has always been our understanding that Snoddy was a radical who made the night hideous in the county schoolhouses.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "X"--TISDALE ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, December 1, 1881.

Sol Smith, Jr., is giving us a first class school.

Excerpts...

[NORTH FAIRVIEW INTELLIGENCE - "LASSES TAFFY."]

Cowley County Courant, December 1, 1881.

Miss Fannie McKinley, of Seely, is instructing the urchins of Darien school, district 25.

The Valley Center school is progressing finely under the management of Prof. R. B. Corson.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 7, 1881.

Miss Jessie Sankey is teaching in the East Centennial School House in District 51. Miss Sankey is one of Cowley's progressive teachers and one of the TRAVELER's most esteemed subscribers.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 7, 1881.

The "color" question figured prominently in the Caldwell schools recently, the teacher stating that "if he was required to teach niggers, he would quit the school." Upon being informed his resignation would be accepted, he cooled somewhat, and now teaches whatever pupils are sent to him.

[SCHOOL REPORTS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, December 7, 1881.

Report of East Centennial School.

The following is the report of school Dist. No. 51, for the month ending Nov. 25th.

A GRADE.

Robert Oliver, 93; George Herbert, 67; Eugene Maris, 60; Carrie Heisinger, 92; Lizzie Gant, 95; Allie Chancey, 90; Salley Kennedy, 93.

B GRADE.

Ada Maris, 93; Charley Sturgill, 92; Laura Gant, 90; Charlie Kennedy, 94; Ruthie Gant, 93.

JESSIE SANKEY, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 7, 1881.

School Report.

The following were neither absent nor tardy during the last school month.

Silva Rogers, Etta Wilson, Lillie Rarick, Pearl Newman, Mattie Sipes, Rena Grubbs, Morse Hutchison, Dean McIntire. SUSIE HUNT, Teacher.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "LADY MADGE"--NINNESCAH TOWNSHIP.]

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

Mr. McKinley's family is pretty well scattered. Gertie is attending school in the district where her brother is teaching. Mr. McKinley has invested in 20 acres more, which makes 180 acres, and has quite a nice home.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "P. A. & P. I."--SHERIDAN.]

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

Sheridan schoolhouse boasts of a handsome large clock.

Last Friday night a mush and milk festival was held at the Liberty schoolhouse.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "FRITZ"--UDALL ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

Miss Jennie Hicks is teaching in the Ninnescah schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

Mr. Ansel Gridley has, we understand, taken charge of the Douglass public schools.

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

Owing to the fact that the lower departments of the schools are more crowded in the East Ward than in the West Ward, it has become necessary to send those children living west of Loomis St. to the West Ward schools. The Second Intermediate room in the East Ward had in attendance 48 pupils, while that in the West had 30; the First Intermediate in the East Ward had 70 pupils, while that in the West Ward had 39. It will be seen by the above comparison that the work of the teachers was very unfairly distributed and in some cases almost doubled. In addition to this was the inconvenience of crowded rooms and lack of seats. In the primary departments there are in the East Ward 132 pupils, in the West Ward 69. As there are two Primary teachers in the East Ward, a division in this department is not necessary. While the change may cause some temporary inconvenience, it was made with a view to the general welfare and advancement of the pupils.

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

The pupils of the public schools will give an entertainment Friday evening at the Opera House. A small entrance fee will be charged and the proceeds used in purchasing books and apparatus for the schools. The program will consist of songs, recitations, and tableaux, interspersed with music. We hope to see a large audience present.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "B. H."--CRAB CREEK.]

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

School has opened at Fairview with Miss Taplin as teacher. She seems to be liked.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "T. C. ANTE"--UDALL FIELD NOTES.]

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

The Udall Sunday School Choir, of which P. W. Smith is chorister, had a meeting Wednesday eve. After the inhabitants of the village and the choir had retired, a lady told her husband she heard them singing at the schoolhouse yet. Her husband replied that it was a dog barking. "Well, I don't care," said she, "it sounded just like Smith's voice." It is understood the dog on which the unjust aspersion was cast, has since gone mad. T. C. ANTE.

Excerpt...

REPORT FROM "OLIVIA"--NEW SALEM.]

Winfield Courier, December 8, 1881.

Mr. Hoag, of Moscow, calsomined the schoolhouse, and the old discolored walls are now nice and clean; and it is beautiful to what it was.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 14, 1881.

Our Schools.

On Friday of last week Superintendent Story visited our schools. He reports matters, in general, in a very satisfactory condition. Miss Norton's room is rather small and close. The addition of a few feet of blackboard and some primary charts would more thoroughly equip Miss Norton for her important work.

Miss Theaker's room was full of busy, restless little ones, whom to manage and properly instruct is one of the fine points in the teacher's profession. Here, as in all callings, the beginning is the difficult but the all important part. The highest remuneration should be given the primary teacher, because her work calls for superior tact and skill, endless resources in methods and illustrations, clear and correct views of principles and systems, and thorough preparation in the minutest details of her work. In this work the teacher's motto should be, no day without some step forward, and, like the skillful chess player, no move should be made at random. Miss Theaker and Miss Norton are well calculated to make successful primary teachers, if they will spare neither time, labor, money, nor study in perfecting themselves for their callings. For such expenditure of resources their patrons should amply compensate them.

Miss Hunt's room and Miss Peterson's room show good order and good drill.

The high school shows a large attendance, good deportment, and much interest in school studies. The harmony prevailing gives promise of excellent fruits. Under the able and skillful management of Professor Atkinson, our schools should satisfy all fair minded and reasonable patrons.

We understand that Superintendent Story intends asking Mr. Atkinson's nomination to the vacant place on the county examining board. No better selection could be made in the county.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 14, 1881.

Our Schools.

SENIOR DEPARTMENT. Pupils perfect in deportment during third month.

Charley Randall, James Robinson, Walter Pickering, Fred McLaughlin, Eddie Garris, Frank Barnett, Horace Vaughn, Mollie Christian, Jessie Finley, Stella Swarts, Zonie Hostetler, Dora Pearson, D. O. Deets, Ella Barnett, Annie Bowen, Emma Theaker, Fannie Peterson, Lula Walton, Alto Maxwell, Willie Edwards, Frank Gamel, Alice Warren, Abby Pettit, Cora Pettit, Hattie Hand, Alvin Sankey.

INTERMEDIATE GRADE. The following were neither absent nor tardy during the past month.

Clara Ford, Archie DeBruce, Nettie Franey, Sarah Hill, Maggie Ford, Flora Creamer, and Ella Pettit.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 14, 1881.

L. L. Society.

The Linnaean Literary Society met at the schoolhouse last Friday evening. The meeting was called to order by the President; the roll called; and minutes of last meeting read by the Secretary. The next thing in order was the election of officers, which were as follows.

President, E. S. Donnelly; Vice President, H. L. Finley; Secretary, Miss Etta Barnett; Treasurer, Miss Laura Gould; Critic, C. T. Atkinson; Chief Marshal, L. Carder; Asst. Marshal, George Endicott.

Then came declamations and essays, with criticism by the Critic.

The subject for debate was: "Resolved, that Chinese Immigration be prohibited by law." Prof. Atkinson and Mr. Henderson took the affirmative and Messrs. M. Capron and O. J. Gould the negative sides, resulting in the affirmative gaining the decision.

The subject decided on for next meeting was:

RESOLVED; That lying is sometimes justifiable. M. Capron taking the affirmative and Mr. Henderson the negative side of the question.

Other business was then transacted, and the meeting adjourned to meet again next Friday evening. OBSERVER.

[OUR SCHOOLS BY TOWNSHIPS.]

Winfield Courier, December 15, 1881.

We publish on the fourth page this week a tabular statement of our schools by townships, instead of school districts. It shows the number of districts in each township, the school population, percent enrolled, average number of mills levied and last, but not least, the amount of property in each township that escapes taxation for school purposes. There is annual in this county property to the amount of nearly four hundred thousand dollars which escapes taxation for school purposes.

It is directly due to the negligence of district clerks, whose duty it is to make out a list of all persons owning personal property, for use by the county clerk in making up the tax rolls. This, district clerks have in a large measure neglected, as the discrepancy between their returns and those of the township assessors plainly show. District clerks should be more careful in this matter and make an effort to get all the property in their district. Our school interests are paramount to all others, and the greatest care should be exercised by those in whose hands these interests are placed.

The township of Creswell, with the immense school interests of Arkansas City and a very heavy school tax, has ninety thousand three hundred and eighty-eight dollars worth of personal property that bears no part of the burden. The township of Vernon has forty-five thousand dollars worth of property that pays no school tax. Pleasant Valley has twenty-seven thousand of the same kind, and Windsor follows with nineteen thousand. Parents and taxpayers, examine this table and see that your district shows as much property taxed for school purposes next year as for any other. The table was prepared by Prof. Story, at a great expense of time and labor, and puts the matter in a better shape than it has ever been. This condition of affairs is not alone confined to Cowley, but is general all over the State. In fact, the law is a bad one and needs attention from our legislature.



Winfield Courier, December 15, 1881.

TOWNSHIP STATEMENT.

HARD TO READ...HARD TO SET UP!

WILL USE NUMBERS TO SHOW ITEMS...

IN PLACE OF #1 I WILL SHOW TOWNSHIPS: BEAVER, BOLTON, ETC.

#2: NO. OF DISTRICTS.

#3: SCHOOL POPULATION.

#4: PERCENT ENROLLED.

#5: PERCENT - AVERAGE ATTENDANCE.

#6: AVERAGE NO. WEEKS OF SCHOOL.

#7: AVERAGE NO. MILLS LEVIED.

#8: PROPERTY NOT TAXED FOR SCHOOL PURPOSES.

#2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8

BEAVER 6 274 87.4 57 18-2/3 12.5 $9,589

BOLTON 7 337 81.8 47.1 22-7/8 12.5 $6,948

CRESWELL 8 522 86.2 50 18-1/2 10.5 $90,388

CEDAR 5 218 91.7 46.7 12-3/4 9.3 $18,735

DEXTER 6 289 83.23 51.55 22 16.6 $10,751

FAIRVIEW 5 231 87,87 49.77 23-1/4 16 $11,290

HARVEY 4 217 75.5 41.4 11-1/4 12.5 $4,364

LIBERTY 5 267 65.9 37.4 18-3/8 12.9 $2,219

MAPLE 5 171 76.6 48.53 17-7/8 9.7 $2,940

NINNESCAH 5 219 76.25 47.48 23-1/4 9.

OMNIA 4 143 73.42 40.55 16 9.6 $5,052

OTTER 3 149 62.4 34.8 13-1/2 5 $3,319

PLEASANT V. 6 295 76.61 46.4 26 8.9 $27,667

RICHLAND 7 309 96.1 61.8 23 14.75 $5,630

ROCK 5 226 88.49 54.4 25-3/8 12.6 $8,984

SILVERDALE 5 247 88.49 24 18.2 $3,239

SILVER CR. 5 333 76.57 42.34 24 13.5

SHERIDAN 4 209 84.68 44.9 16-7/8 10.9 $1,878

SPRING CR. 4 185 74.58 38.9 18 15 $13,389

TISDALE 6 329 91.79 50.75 26 10

VERNON 5 281 77.58 44.12 28 11 $45,100

WALNUT 4 156 66.6 43.94 29-1/2 12

WINDSOR 9 388 58.5 35.3 12 9.5 $19,906

WINFIELD 1 992 68.34 44.1 24 8.

NOTES: In the statement by townships Ninnescah, Silver Creek, Tisdale, Walnut, and Winfield show no property not taxed. This arises from the fact that districts lying in part only in these townships are estimated as belonging wholly to said townships. The rule followed has been to place the school district in that township to which the greater part of its population and property belong.

The fact stands out very clearly, that, by negligence or oversight of district clerks, $383,567 escape taxation for school purposes. This should not be.

WITH REFERENCE TO ABOVE--

NOTE: RECKON SOME OF THESE FIGURES WRONG! CHART SHOWS SILVER CREEK AS NOT SHOWING PROPERTY NOT TAXED...COURIER TYPESETTER ENDED UP IN "NOTES" SHOWING SILVERDALE...I CHANGED TO SILVER CREEK TO CONFORM WITH TABULAR MATERIAL! LORD ONLY KNOWS HOW MANY MISTAKES WERE MADE!

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "OLIVIA" - NEW SALEM.]

Winfield Courier, December 15, 1881.

The last social at J. A. Shields was quite largely attended, and although the host was compelled to be absent, the genial hostess made everything pass off pleasantly and the supper was so good that some had to be choked off almost. The next social will be held at the Salem schoolhouse on Tuesday night, December 20th, and all the vicinity are invited.

Excerpts...

COUNTY EXPENDITURES.]

Winfield Courier, December 15, 1881.

The following is a statement of county expenditures for which your Honors have issued orders on the general county fund.

School examiners: $61.50

School districts tax levied: $31,016.57

School districts bond tax levied: $11,445.19

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "HORATIUS"--VERNON JOTTINGS.]

Winfield Courier, December 15, 1881.

A sumptuous feast will be given tomorrow (Sunday) at Mrs. Philo Kent's in honor of Miss Hatcher, who has been visiting relatives and friends in this vicinity, when she returns to her home in the northern part of the State. I surmise that the pedagogue who holds forth at the Beaver Center schoolhouse will heave many a doleful sign.

An effort is being made to organize a literary in district 75.

Rev. Honiger will fire the gospel gun at the Easterly schoolhouse tomorrow, the 4th inst.

An interesting singing class has been organized at Beaver Center schoolhouse, with Buck Anderson as leader.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "GRASSHOPPER"--MAPLE CITY.]

Winfield Courier, December 22, 1881.

Mr. Ketcham, our schoolteacher, boards in town; people of this vicinity think themselves fortunate in securing so good a teacher.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "JUSTICE"--FAIRVIEW GLEANINGS.]

Winfield Courier, December 22, 1881.

Our school, under the successful management of Prof. White, is progressing finely. Both teacher and pupils seem to cooperate together, and are assisted by the patrons which "is the one thing needful" for advancement of the cause of education in our common schools.

Winfield Courier, December 22, 1881.

Nearly all the districts in the county have schools in session.

Winfield Courier, December 22, 1881.

A small number of the schools of the county will enjoy vacation one week during holidays.

Winfield Courier, December 22, 1881.

The new schoolhouse in Seely [Seeley] is a model building, large, convenient, and well arranged. It is well filled with pupils, a most important factor in a good school.

Winfield Courier, December 22, 1881.

Miss Fannie McKinley, one of Cowley's charming school ma'ams, who wields the birch and ferrule at Darien schoolhouse, was in the city Saturday and called on the COURIER.

Winfield Courier, December 22, 1881.

District 50, Vernon Township, is moving in the right direction. A festival will be given by the school on the 30th inst., for the purpose of raising funds to buy library and reference books for the school. Thomas Rude is teacher, and that insures good work.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "GRANGER"--BEAVER ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, December 22, 1881.

Our schools throughout the township are running in the best of order and in good financial condition, most of the districts being out of debt.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "CAESAR"--WEST BOLTON.]

Winfield Courier, December 22, 1881.

The literary portion of this vicinity met at the Mercer schoolhouse Wednesday evening and organized a literary society with Mr. H. S. Buckner as president.

Cowley County Courant, December 22, 1881.

Rev. J. H. McKee, a minister of the Presbyterian Church, who has labored for the last two years at various points in the southern portion of this county, died suddenly, on Saturday, at his residence about thirteen miles east of Winfield. His funeral was held on Sabbath, from the Prairie Ridge Schoolhouse. Services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Platter, of this city, assisted by Rev. Mr. McKibben, of the M. E. church. The remains were buried at Dexter. A large concourse of people from that section were in attendance. Mr. McKee removed from Minnesota to this county. He was a quiet, unobtrusive gentlemen, but an earnest worker in his Master's cause.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "BLUNDER BUSS"--NORTH SILVER CREEK.]

Winfield Courier, December 29, 1881.

The Burden school has a vacation this week.

Excerpts...

[REPORT FROM "OLIVIA"--NEW SALEM.]

Winfield Courier, December 29, 1881.

The schoolhouse in Prairie Home is nearing completion.

To the relatives and friends of Mr. Richard Winn, the sad tidings of his death in Colorado came, and later his poor body in its long last sleep came back. Oh! How sad! He left his home in good health and excellent spirits a short time ago, and now, alas for the bereaved ones, he comes back, lifeless clay! His funeral sermon was preached on Sabbath morning at the Pleasant Hill schoolhouse, and the body was interred at Floral in the afternoon. I extend my sympathy, as a dear relative of mine lately closed his eyes in that land of gold to open them in Heaven.

Miss Annie Buck attended the Burden tree and cheered them with music. She is our organist and makes the echoes ring in the old schoolhouse on Sabbath mornings. She and Miss Amy were remembered at Burden with beautiful presents.

Winfield Courier, December 29, 1881.

The pupils of the high school are going to give a supper Friday evening in the Bryan building, opposite the Brettun House. The proceeds will be used to purchase appliances for the use of the school. Businessmen are invited to come at six o'clock, get their suppers, and encourage the pupils in a good cause.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "B"--SOUTH RICHLAND.]

Winfield Courier, December 29, 1881.

This school district rejoices in the fact that a substantial two-story stone schoolhouse is under roof, on the site of the one destroyed by the June cyclone; but one room will be seated for immediate use, as we are limited in funds, and the school season is so far advanced. We have an enrollment of 93 with plenty to recruit from.

Winfield Courier, December 29, 1881.

An examination of teachers will be held in the Courthouse Saturday, December 31, 1881. Work will begin at 9 o'clock a.m. R. C. STORY, Co. Supt.



1882

Arkansas City Traveler, January 4, 1882.

Miss Linda Christian, who is teaching a term of school east of the Walnut spent a weeks vacation with her parents in this city.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 4, 1882.

REPORT ON EAST CENTENNIAL SCHOOL, DIST. 51. The following is the report of pupils that received 90 and over, both in scholarship and deportment, for the third month, ending December 23rd, 1881.

George Herbert, 97; Robert Oliver, 95; Roy Herbert, 93; Bennie Fleharty, 95; Guy Maris, 92; Guy Fleharty, 95; Jessie Fleharty, 90; Maggie Sturgill, 96.

As the result of examination, seven received 90 and over, fifteen received 80 to 90, and six received 70 to 80, with no one falling below 70. JESSIE SANKEY, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 4, 1882.

Rose Valley School.

Report of school in District No. 34, for the month ending December 23rd, 1881.

Number of pupils enrolled, 45; number of visitors, 5.

The following list shows the standing of the pupils on a grade of 100.

GRADE A.

Maggie Guyer, 75; John Sankey, 85; Aaron Purdy, 85; Joe Maxwell, 85; Lillie Purdy, 97; Ollie Kirkpatrick, 93; Theo. Tucker, 80; Audley McKetrick, 85; Jimmie Hughes, 85, Howard Maxwell, 83.

GRADE B.

Hiram Tucker, 75; Hannah Drennan, 80; Willie Purdy, 100; H. T. Hamilton, 70; Nannie Maxwell, 95; Sarepta Tucker, 95; Maggie Kirkpatrick, 95.

SADIE E. PICKERING, Teacher.

Cowley County Courant, January 5, 1882.

PRAIRIE GROVE, KANSAS, Dec. 30, 1881.

Ed. COURANT: Please announce that there will be a grand circle wolf hunt in this locality Thursday, January 12th, 1882. Everybody and their dogs are invited to meet at 9 o'clock at following places.

South division will meet at Fairview schoolhouse near Limbocker's, and will be under command of Capt. George Stalter.

The west division will meet at the Walnut Valley Center schoolhouse, commanded by Uncle Jimmie Hanlen.

The north division will meet at the Green Valley schoolhouse, commanded by Capt. John Stalter.

East division, commanded by James O. Vanorsdal, will meet at Mr. Hendricks' place.

Each company will move promptly at 10 o'clock and endeavor to arrive at the center about 12 o'clock. The Prairie Grove schoolhouse is designated as the center and place for forming a complete ring. No party will be allowed to break the ring or fire any gun or revolver in the ring. Let the dogs finish the work. By order.

JAMES O. VANORSDAL, Major Commanding.

Cowley County Courant, January 5, 1882.

The teacher's circulating library, which was gotten up three years ago, now contains about two hundred volumes of standard works. Any teacher of the county can become a member of the library association by contributing one dollar in money or two dollars worth of standard books, and can secure the use of any book in the library for thirty days. The library is kept in the office of the county superintendent.

Excerpt...

[COUNTY COMMISSIONERS SESSION.]

Cowley County Courant, January 5, 1882.

John Stockdale, F. M. Bray, and Lorenzo Barnes were appointed appraisers to appraise some school land in Otter Township.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: JOE K. LITTLE.]

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

Our school is a success this winter under the above management of Mr. Hall.

Excerpts...

[SEELEY CORRESPONDENT: MINNIE MENTOR.]

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

Church and Sabbath school every Sabbath, at the Seeley schoolhouse at 10 p.m., all are invited to attend.

The scholars of district No. 27 have had a holiday for the week just past, but today have returned to books.

During the past week the M. E. Brethren have been holding a revival at Ninnescah schoolhouse with great success.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

The following is the report of the standing of scholars of Seeley School, District 31, for the month of December.

In the "A" class: Fred Lehrmann stood 100 in three branches; Bert Copple 100 in four branches; Reuben Crick 100 in five branches; Lillie Perrin, 100 in two branches; Lola Whitman and Benton Cunningham 100 in one branch.

In the "B" class: Bert Crick and Louise Lehrmann stood 100 in one branch; Isaac Senseney, Florence Barnes, and Leona Cunningham stood ninety in one branch.

The number of pupils enrolled during the month of December, 41; averaged daily attendance 36; No. Of visits from patrons of school 9. L. C. TURNER, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

INSURE Your Dwellings, Barns, Churches, Schoolhouses, Crops, and Stock against loss or damage by Tornadoes, Wind Storms, Fire, and Lightning, in First-Class Companies, represented by GILBERT & FULLER, WINFIELD, KANSAS.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

The high school supper was a success and soon the school will have their apparatus. The net proceeds were about $40.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

Messrs. D. M. Patten and N. W. Dressie, of Cedar Township, called us Thursday. They were up looking after a teacher and school fixtures, and are anxious to get the school running as soon as possible.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882. [Author unknown.]

These bright moonlight nights remind us forcibly of the old days when we used to live in Pleasant Valley Township and took some other fellow's girl to a neck-tie festival at Odessa Schoolhouse, or a spelling school at Hollands, or (in 1874) a meeting to "pray for rain" at Excelsior. As we look back over those years and think of the many friends of our boyhood days who have gone: some to Colorado, some "back east," and some to "that bourne from whence no 'traveler returns,'" we begin to feel as if we were growing as antiquated as Mother Hubbard. But few of the old landmarks of 1873 and 1874 remain --even the spring down by Bosley's is dried up, and the old schoolhouse where we used to chew gum and study arithmetic is as devoid of paint as if it had been built by the patriarch, Moses. Nine years isn't very long, but works a mighty change in a new country.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

The folks of District 123 were before the commissioners Monday. Mr. Harmon has Rock Creek between him and the schoolhouse and he wants to be cut off into another district. The commissioners took the matter under advisement.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

This is the season of Prof. Story's itinerary. He will visit the schools in the east part of the county next week and keep on around until the winter schools close. Mr. Story is a most indefatigable worker and to him much of our success in educational matters is due. His work is effective and he infuses new life into the schools wherever he goes.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

A novel debate has been going on at Upper Timber Creek Schoolhouse in Harvey Township between Revs. Firestone and Younger. The subject under discussion was "the final perseverance of the saints in the true doctrine of the Bible." Rev. Firestone upheld the affirmative and Rev. Younger the negative. The debate began on Tuesday and lasted till Saturday. They also discussed the question of infant baptism. There was a very large attendance. Rev. Firestone carried off the honors.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

The following are the names of pupils in the Vernon school, district No. 68, whose average term examination grade was above 90. Laura Skinner, Grace Steinhour, Nevada Steinhour, Maud Corson, Estelle Corson, Villa Corson, Nettie Case, Clara Case, Flora Painter, Willie Painter, Ferdie Painter, Effie Painter, Parker Martin, Mary Werden, Sadie Medus [? LAST NAME ALMOST COMPLETELY OBLITERATED.]

ANNA HARMONS [?], Teacher.

[LAST NAME OF TEACHER ALSO ALMOST OBLITERATED BY BLACK SPLOTCHES ON PAPER.]

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

The first quarterly meeting of Winfield city charge, church of the United Brethren in Christ, will be held at the Victor schoolhouse January 14th and 15th, 1882. Rev. P. B. Lee, the presiding elder, will be present and conduct the services. A cordial invitation is extended to all. J. H. SNYDER, Pastor.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

The high school desire to thank the many kind friends who assisted so materially in making their entertainment a success. They desire, especially, to thank the school board for the unanimity with which they stayed away and the encouragement this action gave the class.

BY THE COMMITTEE.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

PRAIRIE GROVE, KANSAS, Dec. 30, 1881.

EDS. COURIER: Please announce there will be a grand circle wolf hunt in this locality Thursday, Jan. 12, 1882. Everybody and their dogs are invited to meet at 9 o'clock at the following places: South division will meet at Fair View Schoolhouse, near Limbocker's, under command of Capt. George Stalter. West division will meet at the Walnut Valley Center Schoolhouse, commanded by Uncle Jimmie Hanlin. North Division will meet at Green Valley Schoolhouse, commanded by Capt. John Stalter. East division, by James O. Vanorsdal, will meet at the McHendrick's place. Each commander will march promptly at 10 o'clock and endeavor to arrive at the center about 12 o'clock. Prairie Grove Schoolhouse is designated as the center and place of forming a complete ring. No parties will be allowed to break the ring or fire any gun or revolver in the ring. Let the dogs finish the work.

By order of J. O. VANORSDAL, Major Com.

Excerpt from Burden Enterprise...

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

The Enterprise Says That

School has been in session three months and two weeks, and will continue five months and two weeks longer. The school is in excellent condition, the pupils in both grades learning very rapidly. Mr. Millard and Miss West deserve great credit for the excellent management of our schools.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

Valley View.

Last Thursday evening, in company with County Attorney Jennings, we attended an entertainment given by the Sabbath school at Valley View Schoolhouse in Vernon Township. Mr. Jennings was invited to deliver an address, and we went along as a kind of an "amanuensis" to do the editing. The drive out through the bright moonlight with the crisp, cool air blowing in our faces was delightful. Arriving at the schoolhouse, we found it crowded with the best and happiest lot of people it has ever been our good fortune to meet. We have often heard of the generous hospitality of the folks up there, but are now ready to affirm that the half of it has never been told. Everybody seemed to have brought enough for themselves and five others, and as Jennings and I were the only ones who had not brought anything, the prospects for a bountiful feast were most flattering. There was pound cake and ten-pound cake embellished with frosting and confectionery, chickens and turkeys, fried and roasted, in about the ratio of one chicken and half a turkey for every person present, and pies and other edibles enough to have fed St. John's battery. The exercises were opened with an organ solo, "St. Paul's March," by Miss E. Martin, followed by a song, "Young Pilgrims, by the school. Master Robert Craig declaimed "Our Country's Flag," and rendered it nicely for such a little boy. Master Lee Snyder recited "Mother Eve," a beautiful selection, in a very creditable manner. Pearl Martin told about "Dropping Corn," and drew from it many moral and social precepts that we would all be better by following. Next came a song, "Holy Trinity," by the school, and then Miss Emma Martin read "A Noble Revenge," and sang a beautiful and touching piece, "Home is Sad Without a Mother," in a way that brought tears to the eyes of many. The sentiment contained in this song is very fine and was admirably brought out by Miss Martin. After the song T. A. Blanchard, master of ceremonies, introduced Mr. Jennings, who delivered a ten minute address. Just when we were beginning to console ourself with the idea that Jennings was about through and we would soon be able to assist in the destruction of the fowl and cake so temptingly displayed, he made the startling announcement that he did not intend to make a speech, but that "his friend, Mr. Greer, was fully prepared and he felt sure would do justice to the occasion." In about a minute we discovered that we were being "led like a lamb to the slaughter," and when Tom Blanchard got up with a smile all over his face and announced that "they would now listen to an address by the Hon., etc." we felt that Mother Shipton's prophecy couldn't be fulfilled any too soon. We spoke--and we'll give $2.50 for a comprehensive report of the speech. The tempting visions of fried chicken and frosted cake vanished away into thin air and our oratorical powers went with them. The audience discovered this at the same time we did, and we sat down amid impressive silence. We have charged Tom Blanchard and Frank Jennings with this conspiracy and some day we'll get a chance to get even. Elder Snyder then delivered a short address, congratulating the Sunday school on its success and cheering them up to renewed work and greater exertion. Mr. Snyder is putting his whole soul into the work and is meeting with abundant success. Messrs. Geo. Conner, C. F. Martin, and W. Millspaugh sang a laughable piece entitled "All the World's a Barber Shop," the last verse of which told about lawyers shaving their clients and giving them "the meanest shave of all." It was our laugh then.

The feature of the evening, of course, was the supper and the kind ladies who served the plates filled them up till each one looked like the apex of Pikes Peak. It was an absolute shame the way Jennings ate, and were it not that his voracity on that occasion is likely to reflect upon the fair name and fame of our city, we would let it go unnoticed. The fact is he thought he was expected to eat all that was set before him, but if anybody should tell us that "the wish was father to the thought," we wouldn't try to refute it. After supper an hour was spent in greeting friends and just as we were about to depart, the house was called to order and the chairman, in behalf of the Sunday school, presented Mr. Jennings and the writer with two beautiful cakes. To say we were surprised would not express it. In behalf of Mr. Jennings and on our own account, we wish to extend to the school our hearty thanks for this kind token of their esteem. The generous, home-like hospitality of the people; the kindnesses showered upon us from every side; the many new acquaintances formed and old ones renewed; all tend toward making this one of the pleasantest evenings we have ever spent.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

School seats for sale, 8 school seats of the best manufacture for sale at a bargain. Apply to or address John Mentch, Winfield, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

Prof. and Mrs. Trimble and Miss Clute returned from the meeting of the State teachers association Monday. They returned with State teachers certificates.

Excerpt...

[CORRESPONDENT FROM ORCHARD COTTAGE: "MORE ANON."]

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

On last Tuesday morning I mounted my horse and turning his head northward, found the bracing breezes till I landed in the vicinity of Udall. Nearing a country schoolhouse, I stopped to warm my tingling fingers. In answer to my rap, rap, the door opened and I found "Fritz" teaching the young ideas how to shoot. (But there! Fritz, I did not mean to "preach.") He thinks he is getting along nicely, only he thinks he will try and teach in Vernon next winter, where there are lots of weddings, sociables, etc. Where the boys blow up shot-guns charivariing, and have lively times. Come along, Fritz, we need good teachers, have good schools, and lots of saucy maidens with as sparkling eyes as your own.

Excerpts...

[CORRESPONDENT FROM LITTLE DUTCH: "L. E. DUTCH."]

Winfield Courier, January 5, 1882.

The teachers of the Northwestern Association district will meet at Valley Center Schoolhouse January 7th. Come out teachers, we expect to have a good meeting.

The children of the Little Dutch public school are taking a rest this week for the purpose of enjoyable holidays. The pupils of the school who are making the best markings in their deportment and recitations, and as a consequence, are reaping the best rewards, are Kate Weimer, Clem Schock, and Mary Taylor of the fifth grade. Louie Fletcher and Vergir [?] Taylor of the third grade. The above named pupils have made an average standing of 90 percent and upwards. L. E. DUTCH.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 11, 1882.

School commenced last Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 11, 1882.

Important to Parents.

In view of the fact of the prevalence of Small Pox in the north and eastern part of the State, and its rapid development in hitherto unaffected localities, the parents of children attending our public school are requested to have them vaccinated without delay. Parents should give this their immediate attention. SCHOOL BOARD.

Cowley County Courant, January 12, 1882.

EMPORIA STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. Miss Hila Smith, of Winfield, has been unable to attend school for some time on account of ill health, and contemplates returning home.

Winfield Courier, January 12, 1882.

An entertainment was held at the schoolhouse in district 50 Friday evening, December 30th, to raise funds with which to buy reference books for the school. The people took hold of it in a way that made the teacher, Mr. T. J. Rude, and other promoters of the scheme feel good and made the effort a towering success. The net proceeds were $50.10, and the school will hereafter draw knowledge from a Webster's unabridged and a first-class Encyclopedia. The exercises were also somewhat abridged so as to give everyone an opportunity to have a grand old time--and they had it. It was one of the most enjoyable occasions that has visited District 50 for many a day, and the generosity of those who attended will long be remembered by the school. Much credit is due Mr. Rude for this successful effort to benefit his pupils. He is one of the most energetic young teachers in the county on general principles.

Winfield Courier, January 12, 1882.

At the entertainment at District 50 the boys had a mammoth stick of candy, about three feet long and eight inches around. It was put up and voted to the handsomest lady present. The competition was lively and the candy brought $25.50. Miss Anna Stone, one of the brightest pupils of the school, carried off the honors and the confection.

Winfield Courier, January 12, 1882.

In our notice of the Valley View entertainment last week, we neglected to mention the presentation of an elegant cake to Mr. J. F. Martin by the school as a recognition of his valuable services to the Sabbath school and the general esteem to which he is held by the people of Valley View. Mr. Martin's energy and the hearty manner in which he takes hold of anything of public interest makes him a most valued citizen.

[ROUGHS: SHERIDAN SCHOOLHOUSE.]

Winfield Courier, January 12, 1882.

A party of roughs amused themselves Sunday night at Sheridan Schoolhouse during religious services by stealing the collars from horses, taking bolts from buggies, crossing lines, cutting harnesses, and such like deviltry. Hereafter they will be watched as they are not unknown.

Winfield Courier, January 12, 1882.

On the fourth page will be found a carefully prepared directory of all the teachers in the County, where they are teaching, and the salaries per month which they receive. Some of them are most wretchedly low. Let school officers read this and then go and see if something cannot be done to better the condition of Cowley's teachers.

[TEACHERS DIRECTORY: 1881-1882.]

Winfield Courier, January 12, 1882.

Teachers Directory: 1881-82. WINFIELD. MONTHLY SALARY.

Prof. E. T. Trimble, city schools: $90.00

Sarah J. Clute, city schools: $40.00

Mattie Gibson, city schools: $40.00

Allie Klingman, city schools: $40.00

E. L. Crippen, city schools: $40.00

Alice E. Dickle, city schools: $40.00

Alpha Hardin, city schools: $40.00

Lena Bartlett, city schools: $40.00

Mary Hamill, city schools: $40.00

Mary Bryant, city schools: $40.00

Mrs. W. B. Caton, city schools, $40.00

Celina Bliss, District 9: $40.00

Anna Harden, District 68: $35.00

Finnie Harden, District 116: $30.00

Mattie E. Minnihan, District 1: $30.00

Ella Freeland, District 12: $30.00

Lillie M. Gregory, District 127: $30.00

Nettie O. Wanner, District 41: $35.00

Anna F. Cuppage, District 82: $30.00

Jennie R. Lowry, District 37: $30.00

Fannie E. Pontious, District 168: $25.00

E. L. Merriam, District 52: $34.00

Prof. E. P. Hickok, District 43: $40.00

C. W. Armstrong, District 30: $40.00

R. S. White, District 21: $40.00

J. A. Hilsabeck, District 10: $40.00

F. H. Burton, District 106: $50.00

M. H. Marckum, District 75: $40.00

D. J. Brothers, District 45: $35.00

Frank Akers, District 99: $35.00

J. S. Baker, District 48: $40.00

John Bower, District 65: $40.00

A. D. Stuber, District 31: $35.00

W. M. Coe, District 77: $35.00

T. J. Rude, District 50: $40.00

A. Gridley, Sr., District 57: $36.50

Teachers Directory 1881-82. ARKANSAS CITY. MONTHLY SALARY.

Prof. C. T. Atkinson, city schools: $75.00

Jennie Peterson, city schools: $35.00

Mary Theaker, city schools: $30.00

Susie Hunt, city schools: $30.00

Alice D. Herbert, District 35: $30.00

May Benedict, District 32: $25.00

Linda Christian, District 33: $30.00

Sadie E. Pickering, District 34: $30.00

Jessie Sankey, District 51: $35.00

Rose L. Sample, District 80: $30.00

F. M. Goodwin, District 93: $30.00

E. W. Coulson, District 44: $33.33

L. C. Brown, District 53: $40.00

W. M. Henderson, District 89: $35.00

G. W. Crawford, District 96: $40.00

C. F. Cunningham, District 69: $37.00

J. B. Curry, District 36: $40.00

N. J. Waterbury, District 79: $35.00

C. G. Furry, District 6: $36.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. BURDEN. MONTHLY SALARY.

E. A. Millard, District 78: $35.00

Mattie L. West, District 28: $28.00

Nannie A. Crum, District 90: $30.00

Thirza E. Dobyns, District 19: $40.00

R. O. Stearns, District 76: $40.00

Emma Burden, District 113: $35.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. DEXTER. MONTHLY SALARY.

Nellie A. Aldrich, District 5: $45.00

Etta B. Robinson, District 5: $30.00

Emma Elliott, District 49: $30.00

Ollie L. Keyes, District 70: $30.00

Elda Thayer, District 111: $28.00

Anna L. Hunt, District 56: $30.00

A. P. Cochran, District 40: $32.00

Kate L. Ward, District 88: $30.00

Luther Nellis, District 38: $27.50

Hattie Taplin, District 54: $22.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. ROCK. MONTHLY SALARY.

A. H. Limerick, District 24: $40.00

R. B. Hunter, District 29: $40.00

Albert Brookshire, District 26: $33.00

J. C. Martindale, District 73: $32.00

Alice G. Limerick, District 122: $30.00

Maggie Stansbury, District 23: $32.50

Teacher Directory 1881-82. TORRANCE. MONTHLY SALARY.

Laura Elliott, District 97: $35.00

Arvilla Elliott, District 14: $30.00

T. A. Mercer, District 7: $30.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. CAMBRIDGE. MONTHLY SALARY.

Howard F. Albert, District 16: $34.00

D. W. Ramage, District 117: $33.33

Maud Leedy, District 15: $30.00

H. T. Albert, District 15: $_____

Teacher Directory 1881-82. TISDALE. MONTHLY SALARY.

Jennie Davy, District 119: $27.50

S. A. Smith, District 46: $40.00

Wm. H. Funk, District 47: $31.66

Teacher Directory 1881-82. POLO. MONTHLY SALARY.

Mrs. S. Hollingsworth, District 60: $30.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. MULVANE. MONTHLY SALARY.

R. A. Hall, District 92: $37.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. RED BUD. MONTHLY SALARY.

Villa M. Combs, District 114: $25.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. WILMOT. MONTHLY SALARY.

Mary A. Tucker, District 22: $32.50

Lizzie Palmer, District 105: $30.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. OXFORD. MONTHLY SALARY.

William Wycoff, District 8: $40.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. NEW SALEM. MONTHLY SALARY.

Ettie Johnson, District 97: $25.00

E. L. Cook, District 30: $35.00

E. J. Hall, District 55: $45.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. BALTIMORE. MONTHLY SALARY.

Maggie C. Seabridge, District 109: $27.00

E. W. Woolsey, District 103: $35.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. MAPLE CITY. MONTHLY SALARY.

Ada Overman, District 28: $30.00

S. F. Overman, District 102: $33.33

A. H. Havens, District 86: $35.00

W. E. Ketcham, District 85: $36.00

R. H. Overman, District 58: $30.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. TANNEHILL. MONTHLY SALARY.

L. P. King, District 4: $33.33

Teacher Directory 1881-82. BOX. MONTHLY SALARY.

S. P. Firestone, District 94: $40.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. UDALL. MONTHLY SALARY.

Jennie E. Hicks, District 11: $36.75

George Wright, District 81: $40.00

Mrs. Minnie Bleakmore, District 71: $30.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. SEELEY. MONTHLY SALARY.

Mrs. Lizzie Turner, District 13: $37.50

L. McKinley, District 91: $37.50

Nannie McKinley, District 25: $30.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. LITTLE DUTCH. MONTHLY SALARY.

R. B. Corson, District 125: $42.50

Porter Wilson, District 26: $40.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. CONSTANT. MONTHLY SALARY.

J. E. Grimes, District 115: $35.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. GLEN GROUSE. MONTHLY SALARY.

Emma Brills, District 17: $30.00

Teacher Directory 1881-82. CEDARVALE. MONTHLY SALARY.

G. W. Bartgis, District 63: $30.00

J. R. Marsh, District 66: $35.00

Excerpt...

[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: CAESAR.]

Winfield Courier, January 12, 1882.

A very affecting incident occurred at our school a few days ago. There was scarcely a dry eye in the room--cause, a smoky stove. The directors should see that the stove is put in proper condition for use, as its present condition renders it very unpleasant for the school.

Excerpts...

[GREEN VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: "FRITZ."]

Winfield Courier, January 12, 1882.

The Green Valley School after a week's vacation is again in session.

County Superintendent Story deserves the highest praise for the earnest endeavors he is putting forth to secure for the teachers of this county the benefit of a permanent standing in the branches in which they are required to be examined. This is a move in the right direction, and the teachers will fully appreciate the efforts put forth in their behalf.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

To Bolton Tax Payers.

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Township Board, of Bolton Township, will be held at the Bland Schoolhouse, on Saturday, January 28th, 1882, for the purpose of auditing the accounts and ascertaining the financial condition of the township. The matter of the Arkansas River Bridge will come before the meeting, and it is hoped that all interested will attend. By order, WM. TRIMBLE, Trustee.

Cowley County Courant, January 19, 1882.

TO THE VOTERS OF WALNUT TOWNSHIP. There will be a people's convention held Saturday evening, January 21st, 1882, at Olive schoolhouse, three-fourths of a mile north of John Mentch's, for the purpose of putting in nomination township officers, and selecting a people's ticket, independent of party politics. C. A. ROBERTS.

Cowley County Courant, January 19, 1882.

PRAIRIE GROVE, KANSAS, JANUARY 12, 1882. Owing to bad weather the grand wolf hunt was postponed until Thursday, January 26, 1882, commanded as follows:

1st division, Captain Frank Limbocker, meets on the hill at Curfman's.

2nd division, Captain R. B. Pratt, meets at his house.

3rd division, Captain Jimmie Hanlin, Valley Center schoolhouse.

4th division, Captain E. Rogers, meets at Darien.

5th division, Captain John Stalter, Green Valley schoolhouse.

6th division, Captain L. Hardy, at his house.

7th division, Captain T. Carson, Richland schoolhouse.

8th division, Captain R. Stevens, at Dicken's cross roads.

9th division, Captain Conrad, meets at S. Stevens.

10th division, Captain Henry Curns, at his house.

11th division, Captain P. McIntire, at his house.

All commands will meet as above designated at 9 o'clock, and march at 10 o'clock, sharp. The ring will be formed at Prairie Grove, and a color line, designated by eleven stand of colors, will also be formed. All captains will halt when they arrive at the colors, and advance at a signal given by the Major commanding, said signal being two shots, one following the other. At the signal, all will advance in good order to the center, which will be designated by a large flag. No shooting will be allowed in the ring, and everybody is expected to be at the center by noon. All officers should see that the above orders are carried out. By order of JAMES O. VANORSDAL, Commanding.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

"CHURCH ADVERTISING."

EDS. COURIER: In the COURIER of last week was the first attempt I ever saw to put schools and churches on the same level with traveling shows. Please allow me to differ with you. I do not know which church you like the best--I shall not ask, it is the principle that I care for.

I had always supposed a local paper desired to publish local news. I have frequently been asked for items of news by editors, about the church of which I had charge. I believe Winfield editors are as anxious to please their subscribers as editors in other places. Yet, during the past month I have heard a great deal of complaint that Winfield papers did not speak about the churches. Some have said that if there was not a change in the papers, they would change their subscription, they could hear more about Winfield from some other county papers than from those published at Winfield.

I do not know how much advertising for churches and schools was done before I came here, but I know that since I came here but little has been done for the church I represent, as we have had but little that called for advertising. When the Methodist camp meeting advertised, they paid for their work, at the COURIER office, from a third to one-half more than they would have paid for the same work done elsewhere. This was paid, and no complaint made. A short time since, the COURIER published a manuscript of mine, which, had I given it to another paper, I could have received $10. I gave it to the COURIER because it was the desire of the people--it was what they wanted, and I gave it to them. Then when I wanted a few copies of the paper, I paid full price for them, I did not ask for complementaries nor grumble that they were not given. The Tennesseans came to Winfield under the auspices of the church. Three dollars worth of tickets were given to the COURIER office, and not a line of advertisement, except a little note from Mrs. Adams. This may have been a mistake or intentional. However that may be, ladies who usually get up church entertainments, are so occupied with the entertainment that they frequently forget to send complementaries where they had intended to send them, besides they often do not have tickets to send.

If schools and churches were money making institutions then you might grumble. If they get money it is for some public good which makes the town better, to buy libraries or improve churches. If it were not for schools and churches, I do not know who would read the papers. Every advance to schools and churches increases the circulation of papers and books.

Many of the businessmen of Winfield are either members of one of the different churches, or closely connected with one of them. Their names are found in the advertising columns of your paper each week, for which you say you are well paid. These men have a common interest in the welfare of the school where their children attend, and of the church to which they belong. Any news about the school or church is what they want; they are willing to pay you well for their advertising that you may live and be of public benefit. You and they are well aware that the more of education, and the more of christianity there is in any community, the better is society, and the better is business and the wider circulation do newspapers have. You owe your existence to schools and churches, and no man ought to grumble about speaking well of his mother.

I think it would be well to remember that churches and schools are not traveling shows. They are a permanent institution, a local benefit, and the people of the county who read your paper are anxious to know how they come on. If you are obliged to crowd out any paid advertising to notice the schools and churches, then you can complain; but I am quite sure most of your readers would be more pleased and benefitted by a notice of church or school work than they are by some of the unpaid matter that now appears in your paper.

Respectfully, H. A. TUCKER.

The writer of the above seems to misapprehend the purport of the editorial to which he alludes. Let us be understood. We have a high respect for the Methodist Church. It is a mighty engine for good in this community. Many of our valued advertising patrons, a great many of our subscribers, and many of our most intimate friends are members of that church. We have the kindest feelings for it and its members, and particularly for Rev. Mr. Tucker, whom we respect for his fearless energy and stalwart work for his church, for temperance, and other interests of this community. We are always happy to meet him, and if he would call oftener and stay longer, it would please us more. He has always treated us with kindness and courtesy, and we have endeavored to treat him in the same way. There are a great variety of items of news connected with churches which we are always glad to get for publication, and are thankful when members or others hand them in, but it cannot be expected that we can be everywhere at the same time, and know all that is going on in each of the churches, so if we fail to get some of these items, it is because no one present has furnished them. Clergymen are not bound to furnish us with marriage notices and a great many other items which they have opportunities to pick up, but when they do so, we esteem it as a favor.

It is none of these to which we allude. We referred to cases in which church societies and others get up lectures, concerts, entertainments, or suppers for the purpose of raising money for some particular object. In such cases ladies and members of the church society often contribute, each for his own church, time and money to prepare the entertainment, and expect to get returns from the general public by selling tickets. The publisher of a newspaper should be considered as one of that general public, and might be expected to attend with his wife and pay for his tickets like others, but should not be expected to contribute his time and money in the preparation as though he was a leading member of each and all these churches, for this would be five times, to the most liberal churchman once. Much of the success of these schemes depends upon liberal advertising in the newspapers, and it would certainly be just to pay the publishers for it at the same rates that others pay. We do not see the impropriety in putting "churches on the same level with traveling shows" in this matter. But as we don't do so, but give the amount outright, we don't like to be squeezed any farther in the matter, and those who recognize this fact get credit with us for courtesy.

Mr. Tucker is mistaken in the statement that we did not give the Tennessean "a kube if advertisement" except a little note from Mrs. Adams. We gave them 20 lines in the issue of the 5th and 8 in that of the 12th, making 28 lines, which at regular rates make $5.60, which is pretty good pay for six tickets. When we wrote the editorial in question, we were not aware that any church was interested in that show, but our local was, and had prepared several local notices of it for the last issue, but being short of hands, his attention was so absorbed on the mechanical work of the paper that he did not observe that they were omitted until too late, a circumstance which we deeply regret.

In regard to the poster job for the camp meeting to which Mr. Tucker alludes, our regular rates would have been $22, and we do not know where he could have got the work done for less, but we charged only $18, and received only $12. It is claimed, however, that the balance should be paid by the temperance branch of the meeting.

If the fact that churches and schools are public benefits and create a demand for newspapers, books, pictures, preachers, teachers, buildings, and goods of all kinds is a reason that newspapers should work for them without pay, why should not preachers, teachers, builders, and other persons do the same thing? Why does not Mr. Tucker refuse his salary? Why did you pay men for building churches?

Mr. Tucker is unjust to himself in putting on this coat, for of course it would pinch, and we will add that we shall take pleasure in assisting him and the Methodist Church, as far as we can reasonably afford, in every good work.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

Our abbreviation of the school report of district 75, week before last, brought a storm down upon the head of our friend, M. H. Marckum. Give it to us, but don't blame Marckum. As he sent it in, it was one of the neatest reports ever received at this office, but we attempted to summarize it and made the figures so confoundedly that we don't blame the scholars for raising the old Harry. We expect to be called to account for our wrong doing by two or three rosy cheeked school girls--and we hope they won't disappoint us.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

A. B. Taylor is teaching in district 30.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

Pleasant Valley Republicans will meet at the Odessa schoolhouse January 30th at 7 o'clock p.m., to nominate candidates for the various township offices.

V. B. MEYER, Chairman, Committee.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

The Republicans of Rock Creek Township will meet at Rock Schoolhouse, on Saturday, January 28, at 7 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of selecting candidates for the various township offices. S. P. STRONG, Chairman, Township Committee.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

The first quarterly meeting of Winfield city charge, church of the United Brethren in Christ, will be held at the Victor Schoolhouse January 14th and 15, 1882. Rev. P. B. Lee, the presiding elder, will be present and conduct the services. A cordial invitation is extended to all. J. H. SNYDER, Pastor.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

Walnut Township.

There will be a peoples' caucus at the Olive Schoolhouse north of John Mentch's, on Saturday, the 21st, at 7:30 p.m., to put in nomination a people's ticket for township officers of Walnut Township. MANY CITIZENS.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

District Fifty.

The following is a report of the Kellogg School, district 50, for the month ending January 10. Average enrollment 53, attendance 51; pupils neither absent or tardy, 15.

Pupils having an average of 83 percent and upwards in deportment, recitation, and examination.

Fifth Grade, Anna Stone 92, Dell Stone 88, Charles Smith 95, Marion Clark 87, and Jacob Ward 85.

Fourth grade, Frank Evans 88, and Arch Ward 85.

Second grade, Laura Waite 855, Alice Evans 80, Preston Gault 88, and Eva Overly 85.

[GAULT...WONDER IF THIS SHOULD BE GAULT?]

Many pupils of the school standing high in recitation and examination are debarred from this list of honor by bad deportment or tardiness. T. J. RUDE, Teacher.

[TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION: CENTRAL DIVISION.]

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

EDITORS COURIER: Please announce that the Teachers' Association of the Central Division will meet in Winfield school building, Saturday, January 28th, at 10 o'clock a.m.

The following programme indicates the teachers of the Central Division, and the work assigned them for the next meeting.

1. Manners and Morale: How Best Taught. F. H. Burton, Anna Hardin, and A. P. Cochran.

2. How to Study. S. A. Smith, S. P. King, and Emma Elliott.

3. Public Spelling. E. P. Hickock, A. H. Stuber, and Celina Bliss.

4. Lessons on the Use of the Globe. R. S. White, W. M. Coe, and Ella Grimes.

5. How to Study Literature in the Common School. M. H. Marckum, John Bower, and Nettie Wanner.

6. Spelling Classes--their Uses and Abuses. A. J. Brothers, Jennie R. Lowry, Fannie Harden, and Laura Elliott.

7. Ventilation. A. P. Cochran, Ella Little, Lillie M. Gregory, and Frank Akers.

It is hoped that the meeting will be largely attended by the intelligent, energetic teachers of this and the adjoining divisions. ELLA FREELAND, Secretary. T. J. RUDE, President.

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

Liberty Township.

The Republicans of Liberty Township will meet at Rose Valley Schoolhouse on Saturday, February 4th, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of selecting candidates for the various township offices. JUSTUS FISHER, Chairman, Township Committee.

[EDITORIAL PAGE. ARKANSAS CITY SCHOOLS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

The following people of Intermediate Department of the Arkansas City Schools, were neither absent nor tardy during the past month: Flora Kreamer, Maggie Ford, Clara Ford, Grace Houghton, Lizzie Garris.

Senior Department of Arkansas City Schools: those receiving above 90 were Stella Swarts, 99.8; Mollie Christian, 98.8; Sarah Randall, 98.5; Hannah Gilbert, 98.5; Emma Theaker, 98.3; Etta Barnett, 96; Charles Randall, 95; Jessie Norton, 93; Cora Pettit, 93; Alvan Sankey, 92.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

A Literary Entertainment will be given Friday evening, February 23rd, 1882, at the M. E. Church, by the L. L. Society of the Arkansas City Schools, for the benefit of the Library.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Bolton Township.

Notice is hereby given by the voters of Bolton Township, that a caucus meeting will be held at the Bland Schoolhouse on the 28th day of January, A. D., 1882, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of nominating candidates for the several township officers, to-wit: One Justice, one trustee, one treasurer, one clerk, two constables, and seven road overseers.

By order of TRUSTEE.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

To Bolton Tax Payers.

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Township Board, of Bolton Township, will be held at the Bland Schoolhouse on Saturday, January 28th, 1882, for the purpose of auditing the accounts and ascertaining the financial condition of the township. The matter of the Arkansas River Bridge will come before the meeting, and it is hoped that all interested will attend. By order. WM. TRIMBLE, Trustee.

Excerpts...

[CORRESPONDENT STAR VALLEY: "HUNGMA."]

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

Our school is progressing finely under the supervision of R. B. Hunter. R. B. is a live man, and is in the right place.

We also have a Sunday school; Mr. Mendenhall is superintendent, Albert Brookshire, secretary, and Miss Lane chorister. Besides there is Singing school every Friday evening, and bookkeeping school every Tuesday evening; both taught by our friend, Mr. Hunter.

Excerpts...

[CORRESPONDENT NEW SALEM: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

Our school will close at the end of this week, and some of the studious ones are very sorry and wish they could keep Miss Merriam a few weeks or months longer. But all good things end at last, they will find.

Our Prairie home friends have their schoolhouse almost ready for school. Will have S. S. there on next Sabbath at 3 p.m.

Rev. Graham has closed his meetings at Walnut Valley and a series of meetings are now in progress at the Salem schoolhouse. A full house is desired, as a good time is anticipated.

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

Walnut Township.

EDS. COURIER: It has been said that a Bourbon never learns anything. All rules, however, have their exceptions. The "People" of Walnut met in mass convention at Olive schoolhouse on Saturday, the 21st inst. The "People" were nine straight democrats and one to three sore head republicans. The audience outnumbered the "People." After a bit, steam was turned on and the mill started to grind out an honest candidate for trustee. When the sack was opened, lo and behold! Out popped the Boston 3 score with weekly baby show and all, and honest Farmer Alonzo pronounced xxxx horny handed son of toil. For Clerk the mill did grind, and again the sack was opened. "O glorious thought!" "Oh happy day!" Our son-in-law, brother-in-law et sequa came out like Caesar's wife, above suspicion, also marked xxxx. "Let's make it strong," says one, and forthwith out came a Weakly to hold the filthy lucre. The Judicial ermine will now lie suspended in air. Surely it will fall on some transcendent demo--ah! No, here it comes hovering over a republican. Shades of Jackson and Buchanan! Will it dare? Yes, here it fell on the shoulders of Mr. Youle who will unquestionably--well, we will see what we shall see. The mill again brought forth and Democracy was herself again, for D. W. Ferguson and he of the imperial Roman de Teutonic name were marked "right side up with care," for constable. This exhausted the list of honest men in Walnut Township, except one for road overseer, and the "People" adjourned until after the spring immigration. Three more honest men wanted to complete the official roll of Walnut. Surely we are living in degenerate times when out of 300 voters, there cannot be found 10 righteous ones. No wonder Ben Butler wrote, "Ah, Honesty, thou art a jewel whose price is above rubies--neither are the diamonds of 'gold ore' equal to O. O. (Which means Olive Oil.)

Excerpts...

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

Burden Buntings.

The Burden school report shows an average attendance of 95 for the month ending January 13th.

The Lyceum is in splendid condition. We had a splendid time last Saturday night.

PNEUMA.

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

There will be a meeting of the Republicans of Vernon Township at Vernon Center schoolhouse Saturday, Feb. 4th, at 6 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of nominating candidates for township offices. P. M. WAITE, Chairman.

Excerpt...

[SHERIDAN CORRESPONDENT: "P. A. & P. I."]

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

Protracted meeting is going on at this place. Rev. Mr. Ferguson is in the lead. Quite an interest is being manifested. Sunday night there was scarcely standing room in the schoolhouse. May the work go on and great good be accomplished to our Heavenly Father's honor and glory.

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

Report of Winfield City Schools for fourth month ending Jan. 13, 1882.

E. W.: East Ward. W. W.: West Ward. Number admitted.

High School: 2

Grammar department: 8

2nd Intermediate E. W.: 1

2nd Intermediate W. W.: 0

1st intermediate E. W.: 9

1st Intermediate W. W.: 8

Second primary E. W.: 4

Second primary W. W.: 8

First primary E. W.: 13

First primary E. W.: 17

First primary W. W.: 19

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

Report of Fairview School, District 21, for the Month Ending January 13, 1882.

Enrollment 87. Average attendance 20. Name and standing of pupils who made a general average in attendance, deportment, and scholarship of 85 or above.

Jennie Baird 90, Ida Orr 89, Hattie Orr 96, Louie Howard 87, Minnie Larimer 89, Emma McKee 96, Viola McKee 94, Annie Orr 88, Mary Curfman 93, Rosetta Isom 94, Carrie Orr 96, Lillie Wilson 98, Laura David 89, James Craig 94, Oliver Craig 90, Courtney McKee 98, Isaac Curfman 87, Frank Curfman 90, Fred Limbocker 87, Albert Curfman 88, John Wilson 89, Verdan David 92, John Baird 85, Elmer Curfman 89, Joseph Johnson 86, Irven Scofield 85. Number of visitors during month, 3. E. S. WHITE, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

The Republicans of Fairview Township will meet at Little Dutch schoolhouse on Saturday, Feb. 4th, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of nominating candidates for the various township offices. By order of the committee. WILLIAM WHITE, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, January 26, 1882.

PLEASANT VALLEY REPUBLICANS will meet at the Odessa schoolhouse January 30th at 7 o'clock p.m., to nominate candidates for the various township offices.

V. B. MEYER, Chairman, Committee.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Col. E. C. Manning, formerly of Kansas, is figuring around the New Mexican Legislature, and proposes to have a bill introduced favoring a public school system for that Territory.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Entertainment Friday evening, February 3rd, 1882, at the M. E. Church, for benefit of School Library.

NAMES ONLY OF PARTICIPANTS GIVEN...

Glee Club, Frank Gammel, Miss Nellie Swarts, F. C. McLaughlin, W. M. Blakeney, Miss Minnie McIntire, W. M. Henderson, Fannie Vaughn, Miss Etta Barnett, J. R. L. Adams, Harry Finley, W. D. Mowry, C. L. Swarts, C. T. Atkinson, E. S. Donnelly, Miss Mary Theaker, Miss Anna Norton, Miss Mollie Christian.

Admission 25 cents, doors open at 7 p.m., commence at 8 p.m. All are cordially invited. Tickets can be had at the post office and drug stores.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

NOTICE. There will be a political meeting, at the East Centennial School House, in Silverdale Township, on Saturday, February 4th, 1882, for the purpose of organizing a Greenback club. Speakers are engaged. An invitation is extended to all, especially to the ladies. By order of Committee. J. M. FELTON, J. N. FLEHARDY, T. W. GANT.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Report of Rose Valley School, District No. 34, for the month ending January 27th, 1882.

No. of pupils enrolled: 48. No. of visitors: 7.

LISTING NAMES OF PUPILS ONLY:

Nannie Maxwell, Emma Locke, Howard Warren, Lillie Purdy, Maggie Guyer, Theo. Tucker, John Drennan, Aaron Purdy, Frank Hughes, John Sankey, Jas. Hughes, Nora S. Drennan, Maggie Kirkpatrick, Henry Burt, Willie Purdy, Willie Maxwell.

SADIE E. PICKERING, Teacher.

Cowley County Courant, February 2, 1882.

Will Ferguson, son of Cal. Ferguson, has returned from Emporia where he has been going to school.

Extract...

[FLORAL CORRESPONDENT: "B."]

Winfield Courier, February 2, 1882.

The Baptist Church, under the pastorate of Rev. Mr. Gregory, is holding a series of meetings at the new schoolhouse. Considerable interest has been manifested.

Excerpt...

[BALTIMORE CORRESPONDENT: "DAD."]

Winfield Courier, February 2, 1882.

Our district school is advancing nicely under the leadership of Mrs. R. O. Stearns as teacher.

Winfield Courier, February 2, 1882.

[Comments by Courier Concerning Article about Cowley Teachers.]

Wretchedly Low.

"Let us whisper to your ear the cause of low wages in Cowley County and the source from whence the cause must come. Your County Superintendent has an itching for the State Superintendency. He spends much more time in writing, or having written, long-winded articles on education than he does in attending to the interests of Cowley's schools. Further, in pursuance of his plan to go higher in politics, he must be popular at home. In order to be popular at home, he must grant certificates to all who ask an examination for them and some of Cowley's teachers have never 'syphered' through the 'Rule of Three,' have no accurate knowledge of even the elements of grammar, they spell by guess, and read without understanding. They are not qualified to teach because they know nothing of how to teach. The 'steadiness' characteristic only of an age, many of them have not yet reached, renders their government faulty or worthless. You want to weed out the boys and girls, put to the men and women, and drive away or kill the drones and the numbskulls. Book knowledge is much in favor of a teacher, but the man or woman of good, sound sense, thinking and energetic, with judgment matured, will accomplish ten times what your book worm will, with no guide but his theories." El Dorado Times.

We quote the above for the purpose of making some corrections of matters which the Times knows nothing about, but makes guesses which do great injustice, not only to our Superintendent, but to the teachers of this county. The usual way to answer such articles is to charge the writer with slander and falsehood, but we prefer merely a statement of facts. Though we may think the wages paid teachers in this county are too low, the fault is not peculiar to this county. Probably no county in the state pays on an average, higher wages to teachers.

In this county are employed 119 teachers; 56 males and 63 females. The lowest wages is $22 per month to a female, and the highest is $90 to a male. The average of wages is $32.18 to females and $37.67 to males. If Butler County can make a better showing, bring on your figures.

If it is a fact that Supt. Story has an itching for the state superintendency, he has the merit of being as well qualified for the position as any man in the state. It is true that he writes many articles on education for publication, and it is equally true that they are among the best that are written, but it is not true that he spends more time in writing than he does in attending to the interests of the schools. On the contrary, he spends nearly all his time in visiting schools in all parts of the county and in work at his office, and no superintendent in the state does more work or does it more efficiently. It is not true that he and the examining board grant certificates which are not fully merited. The only complaints heard of here are from persons who did not get certificates, or as high grade certificates as they believed they merited. We believe the certificates issued in this county stand for as high orders of merit as the same grade certificates in any county in the state, higher than in Butler County, and that the teachers in this county rank as high in all that makes efficient teachers as those of any county in the state.

The writer of the above from the Times was superintendent of Butler County for the four years ending January, 1881. During that four years, according to his own reports, he visited schools as follows: 19, 102, 33, 73, total 289. Supt. Story during the same four years visited schools: 26, 97, 134, 160, total 417. Will the Times man take some of his criticisms to himself?

Winfield Courier, February 2, 1882.

Master Will Ferguson is home from Emporia, where he has been attending school.

[TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION: NORTHWESTERN ASSOCIATION DISTRICT.]

Winfield Courier, February 2, 1882.

Teachers' Association.

EDS. COURIER: Please announce that the teachers of the Northwestern Association District, will hold their next meeting at Udall, Friday, February 3, and continuing through the next day. The following is the program for Friday evening.

1. Song by Anna and Maggie Martin.

2. Address of welcome: P. W. Smith.

3. Response: A. H. Limerick.

4. Music by R. B. Hunter.

5. Declamation: Jennie E. Hicks.

6. Music.

7. Essay: Fannie McKinley.

8. Declamation: R. A. Hall.

9. Address: R. C. Story.

10. Music.

The following is the program for Saturday.

1. Mistakes in teaching: Porter Wilson.

2. Troubles in Ireland; cause and cure: A. H. Limerick.

3. Comparison of Longfellow and Tennyson: R. B. Hunter.

4. Dinner.

5. Digestion: L. McKinley.

6. Teachers' aids: Mrs. Alice G. Limerick.

7. Rainfall: Jennie E. Hicks.

8. Report of critics.

9. Business of the Association.

Teachers, be there.

PORTER WILSON, JENNIE E. HICKS, GEORGE WRIGHT, COMMITTEE.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

There will be a meeting held at the Schoolhouse next Monday evening at 7 o'clock to consider the providing of more school accommodations. There are now 450 children of school age in this district.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Receipts of entertainment given at M. E. Church, Friday evening, for the benefit of the Library.

Received at door: $18.50

Received at Central Drug Store: $2.00

Received at Kellogg & Mowry's: $3.00

Received at Post Office: $2.00

Received at E. D. Eddy's: $1.50

Total: $27.00

Expenditures:

Printing bills and tickets: $2.50

Rent of Church unsettled:

Lumber: $1.15

Music: $.85

Mucilage: $.10

Nails: $.10

Sub Total: $4.70

To those who, unconnected with the school, aided us, we extend our hearty thanks. Great credit is especially due the young men actively engaged in business. The proceeds will be promptly applied to the purchase of books for the School Library. Thanks are also due to those who aided us with their presence and their money, and we trust they will derive benefit from the perusal, by their children, of good books obtained. C. T. A.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "E. Mc."--WILMOT.]

Cowley County Courant, February 9, 1882.

WILMOT, February 7th, 1882.

Miss Lizzie Palmer's term of school at Summit, closed last Friday, February 3rd. Miss Lizzy has given entire satisfaction as a teacher in our school.

Excerpt...

[GROUSE CREEK CORRESPONDENT: "A WELL WISHER."]

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

Star Valley School closed last Friday. Mr. Terry Mercer was teacher, and although it was his first school, he has given good satisfaction.

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

Central Division Association of Teachers.

The Central Division Association of teachers met in the high school building in Winfield, on Saturday, January 28. President T. J. Rude was promptly at his post of honor. The Secretary being absent, M. H. Marckum was appointed secretary pro tem. The inclemency of the weather prevented quite a number of the fair portion of the members of the Association from attending. However, a sufficient number of the stalwarts assembled to constitute a quorum, and make an interesting time. The subjects that were particularly and thoroughly discussed were as follows:

Spelling classes, which was championed by Miss Celina Bliss.

Use of globes found a strong advocate in the personage of Wm. White.

How to study English literature was elucidated by M. H. Marckum.

Miss Etta Johnson handled the subject of moral training, while our worthy president ably defended phonic spelling.

The above topics awakened an enthusiastic discussion, pro and con, by the whole body of teachers present, which made a very pleasant entertainment, and profitable time for those pedagogues who were fortunate enough to participate in the exercises of the day. Not a little of the credit of the success of the Central Association is due to its energetic and enthusiastic president, who ranks among the most able educators of this county.

The next meeting of the Association will occur at the regular time, on the last Saturday of February, and it is hoped that every member of the Central division will make a determined effort to be present, though it be necessary to make a sacrifice of some kind to do so. SECRETARY.

Excerpt...

[NORTH FAIRVIEW CORRESPONDENT: "RALPH."]

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

Fairview's teachers go to Udall Saturday, where the association for the district meets.

Excerpts...

[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: "GRANGER."]

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

The protracted meeting at the Enterprise Schoolhouse, under the superintendence of the Rev. Henninger, pastor of the United Brethren Church, closed on Friday night. The meeting was a success. It resulted in some twenty conversions, and eleven accessions to the church. Seven were baptized by immersion on Saturday. The meeting broke up with love and harmony among the different branches of the church who participated in the same. Rev. Henninger has many warm friends in this community.

The singing school at Beaver Center, under the leadership of Professor Anderson, is progressing finely and will prove a blessing to the neighborhood if it continues. The Professor deserves great credit for his untiring efforts in the management of the school.

Our day schools in the township are all in fine condition, especially at Enterprise. The efficient labors of Miss Goodwin, our teacher, will long be remembered by the patrons of the school.

Excerpts...

[ROCK TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: "ARTAXERXES."]

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

STAR VALLEY, ROCK TOWNSHIP.

Rev. Hopkins is holding a series of meetings at Star, but he failed to put in an appearance on Monday evening, for some unknown reason.

One month of school gone since the holidays, and two more to go yet. Friday last was examination, but I failed to get the standing of the pupils.

Excerpts...

[SHERIDAN CORRESPONDENT: "P. A. & P. I."]

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

There are three or four young chaps who come to the Sheridan schoolhouse quite regularly that need taking down a trifle just to show them how insignificant and little they really are. You would attract far more attention, boys, if you would come to church and behave like gentlemen, and the whole neighborhood would have a far better opinion of you. Being a rowdy never made a true man out of anyone.

Newton Hall showed his smiling countenance at the schoolhouse last Wednesday evening after an absence of several weeks.

Mr. Funk's school closes in four or five weeks. Parents who have not visited the school during this term should do so before its close.

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

Professor E. T. Trimble's Reading class of 1881-2 (including the A class of the High school and James Lorton, graduate of 1880), surprised him on Tuesday evening of last week. According to previous arrangements, the class assembled and proceeded to the Professor's. Arriving at the place designated, they walked in, led by the president of the class, and Jas. Lorton in behalf of the class presented him with a very beautiful set of Dickens complete works. After the presentation speech had been ably delivered, Prof. Trimble responded, thanking the class heartily for their kindness shown in his behalf. The evening passed off very pleasantly, the Professor taking an active part in all their amusements. About 9:30 p.m., the company dispersed and went to their several homes, realizing that the evening had been profitably spent and would ever be fresh in their memory.

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

A Card.

I am informed that a report is circulated, that I am forced to leave Winfield on account of the withdrawal of patronage. I therefore inform the public that:

1. During the past four years I have had and have today the largest music class in Winfield.

2. I have the best paying and most advanced class.

3. I have the most complete outfit in Southern Kansas--three music rooms and a Concert Hall, the greatest variety of instruments, the largest musical library, and experienced teachers, whose numerous musical compositions are published by the leading music houses in the U. S.

4. Although I wish to remove to a location more suitable for a professional, I shall have to remain and teach until I have disposed of property on corner of Main street and twelfth Avenue, Pianos, Organs, Furniture, etc., and am therefore, more permanently located than teachers who are ready for a move as soon as their trunks are packed. C. FARRINGER.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

School is out and from all indications an excellent time was had by those that were fortunate enough to be there. The pupils all agreed to bring something good in the way of dinner and all would dine together. A few were invited in and all fared sumptuously off the many dainty nic nacs. There was chicken, pickles, bread, biscuits, butter, jelly, pies, tarts, cookies, and eleven kinds of cake, and tea for the old maids and bachelors. A short address by Miss Meriam, the teacher, the same by Rev. Graham, then all went to their homes, we trust, happier and wiser than when they came.

Our Prairie Home friends dedicated their new schoolhouse last Friday evening by a regular feast of delicious viands that would tickle the palate of a king or suit the modern epicure, but Olivia was left out in the cold and never got a crumb; that is all right, we don't get hungry lately. We understand they had a large concourse of people and there are piles of good things left. We are glad to know there are so many happy and good people in this district and we bid them welcome to the Salem festivities, Sunday school, etc.

Miss Mary Dalgarn will board with Mrs. Joe Hoyland and attend the Prairie Home school. Mr. John Shaughnessy and his partner will also board there and feed their sheep.

Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd are holding a series of meetings in Pleasant Hill schoolhouse. The meetings are well attended and all that have been present seem to be favorably impressed with the speakers. May their work be crowned with success.

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

Bonds Wanted.

The undersigned desires to invest $1,200 in school bonds. Will pay the market price. Bonds and interest payable at Winfield, Kansas. Inquire or write to G. L. RINKER, Executor of the estate of Judge Baily deceased, or JENNINGS & TROUP, Attorneys.

Excerpt...

[CRAB CREEK CORRESPONDENT: "NELLIE GRAY."]

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

Fairview schoolhouse is prospering finely this winter under the management of Miss Hattie Taplin. Our young folks like her splendid.

Excerpts...

[VERNON CORRESPONDENT: "HORATIUS."]

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

Ye pedagogue, of District 50, has been off duty this week. However, this might have been expected from the recreation he was apparently enjoying with one of Winfield's fair charmers in viewing the natural scenery of this locality. If our fascinating young widower had not allowed his attention to become too much absorbed in the beauties of nature, that little catastrophe of a runaway might have been avoided.

Prof. Anderson has organized a class of thirty-two in vocal music, at the Easterly schoolhouse, and now sweet melodies tickle the ears of the citizens of this neighborhood Monday and Wednesday evenings.

A literary is now in full blast in District No. 75. President, Jno. Bowers; secretary, Miss Cordie Kimble; marshal, Joe. Poor; treasurer, Philo Kent. The way the Ciceros and Demosthenes of modern times air their eloquence, is, to put it mildly, refreshing in the extreme. Question discussed last evening: "Resolved, That the press has exerted a greater influence for good than the pulpit." Decided in favor of the affirmative.

Prof. Story gave the patrons of the Tannehill school district a practical talk on school matters last Tuesday evening. The relations existing between patrons of schools and teachers should be more thoroughly understood than is at present among the masses. The Prof. will have accomplished a great deal of good for the cause of education in this county if he succeeds in making matters pertaining to school more closely understood by the people.

Excerpt...

[NINNESCAH CORRESPONDENT: "LADY MADGE."]

Winfield Courier, February 9, 1882.

Our school is not considered successful and one of the wonders is how the teacher succeeded in getting a certificate. The Seeley folks are feeling very badly on account of school drawing so near the close. The teacher, Mrs. Turner, intends leaving our part of the country. We regret that they are going. May success and happiness go with them.

Excerpts...

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, February 15, 1882. Front Page.

ABOUT KANSAS.

Some Remarkable Facts and Figures From the

Auditor of State.

[Topeka Capital, January 29.]

EDUCATIONAL.

The following shows the progress of common schools since 1861. In 1861, 217 districts, 4,901 children. In 1870, 2,068 districts, 100,242 children, 1,501 schoolhouses, valued at $1,520,041. In 1880, 6,134 districts, 340,647 children, 5,315 schoolhouses, valued at $4,632,044.

The common school fund of the state amounts to $2,227,602. The annual income upon which added to the interest on school land sales amounts to $247,725.19.

The state yet owns in trust for the common school fund 2,000,000 acres of land, which, when sold and the proceeds added to the fund on hand, will furnish an endowment fund for common schools of $10,000,000.

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS.

Under the control of the state, educational institutions have not been neglected. The state university at Lawrence was erected at a cost of $200,000, and has a capacity for 600 students. The state agricultural college, at Manhattan, erected and equipped at a cost of $100,000, has a capacity for 500 students. The state normal school, at Emporia, cost $65,000 and has a capacity for 500 students.

All these institutions are endowed with large land-grants, and aided biennially by the legislature.

Excerpts...

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882. Editorial Page.

From East Bolton.

The young folks of this vicinity are carrying on an interesting Literary and Debating Society at the Bland Schoolhouse.

The settlers of this School District are agitating the question of dividing the district, as their school is getting too much crowded.

A singing school is being carried on at the Stony Point Schoolhouse on Monday evening of each week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

At the school meeting held last Monday night it was decided to erect another permanent school building. Messrs. J. T. Shepard, T. H. McLaughlin, and L. Finley were appointed a committee to make estimates, select site, etc., to report at an adjourned meeting to be held Feb. 28th, 1882, at 7 p.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

The following are the names of pupils neither absent nor tardy during the last school month: Ella Wilson, Hattie Sipes, Dean McIntire, Etta Wilson, Emma Pettit, Willie Fleming, Morse Hutchison. SUSIE HUNT, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Mr. C. H. Sylvester, who for two years, has been reading law in the office of Messrs. Hazelton & Provis, was admitted to the bar of the Circuit Court this week. "Herb" will, before many years, be a prominent light in the legal fraternity, and wherever he may "tack up his shingle," will prove a valuable member to society, and an honor to the profession he has adopted. Boscobel (Wisconsin) Dial.

We, in common with the host of friends "Herb" made here during his sojourn of two years, as our School Principal, congratulate him upon his success, and hope that wherever he tacks up the "shingle" aforesaid, he may achieve distinction. Our bashfulness prevents any suggestions as to the advantages possessed by Arkansas City as a place for location.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

The following pupils in the Intermediate Department of the Arkansas City Schools were neither absent nor tardy during the past month: Ella Pettit, Clara Ford, Annie Wagstaff, Maggie Ford, Minnie Wilson, Belle Johnson, Charlie Rarick, Henry Mott, James White, Flora Kreamer.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

A. C. Schools.

HISTORY, A: J. W. Warren, 97; Emma Theaker, 93.5; F. C. McLaughlin, 96; Sarah Randall, 91.

HISTORY, B: Alvan Sankey, 98; Hannah Gilbert, 91; S. E. Fitch, 93; W. C. Edwards, 90.

GRAMMAR, B: Hannah Gilbert, 93; J. W. Warren, 93; Etta McConn, 92; Jessie Norton, 93; Anna Bowen, 92; Alvan Sankey, 91; Cora Pettit, 90.

GEOGRAPHY, A: Alvan Sankey, 99.5; Charley Randall, 97.5; Fannie Peterson, 96.5; Jessie Norton, 95.5; Hannah Gilbert, 95; Joseph Bell, 93. C. T. ATKINSON, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Cowley County has 118 teachers employed the present winter, and but three cases of unpleasantness have come to our hearing. One of these, the teacher was dismissed for whipping a scholar; another was dismissed because he would not agree to whip his scholars. His patrons were evidently from Posy Co., Indiana, and doubtless related to the Means family, who thought that where there was "no lickin there was no larnin." The third district must have some Irish settlers in it, as they had a little "Donney-Brook Fair," growing out of a love affair.

Excerpt...

[OMNIA CORRESPONDENT: "NASBY."]

Winfield Courier, February 16, 1882.

The new schoolhouse in the northeast corner of Omnia will soon be done. There are three weeks more of school in district 109.

Excerpts...

[PRAIRIE GROVE CORRESPONDENT: "ROY."]

Winfield Courier, February 16, 1882.

School has commenced at Floral, A. Limerick, teacher.

By the way, if you want to visit the best school in the county, call at district 108.

Literary every Friday afternoon. ROY.

Winfield Courier, February 16, 1882.

From A Bright Winfield Boy.

I believe I can get my living without hard work, my father sweat over the furnace in a blacksmith shop since he was twelve years old, and now, at the age of fifty-three, he would be rich if he could sell his thirteen children for as much as the slave holders in Georgia did. The girls don't amount to much, it is the men who work from seven to six to support women, though to be sure they get us pretty good grub and patch the knees of our pants to keep them out of sight, but their work is indoors, except to pick up wood sometimes and feed the pigs in the pen, and milk when father is too tired after his days work; he gets awfully used up, and when noon comes he is glad to throw himself upon the lounge for a nap. Mother never complains nor never lies down. I don't believe she is ever tired; women's work is very easy anyway, and they need not scold if we do leave our hats and coats on the table, and our boots on the stairs. Father says girls were made to be helpmates, and I believe it, for it seems to come natural for them to keep things tidy after their eight brothers. This is not what I started to write, and if Phebe hadn't said I had better go out to the shop to work, I never would have let on how mean they were.

They say that Byron and Burns, and all the rest of those old writers of grand thoughts, came through the quill. I have been reading a good deal about them, and have come to the conclusion that I can write as well as any of them. Father used to teach school up in Vermont--at least he took a school, but the boys were so large that he only kept it part of one month, so he showed me how to make quill pens, and I have ten now, or had when I began this, but like Count Fesco, I toss them over my shoulder, as he did his sheets of paper. My dictionary is open before me, and I shall endeavor to spell like Webster, and if anything readable comes through my quill, I can safely imagine I am on the high road to fame. I am thirteen years old, have never been drunk in my life, and confine myself to three cigars a day--unless I am treated to more. If I could raise the wind, and get some TIN, I know I would make my mark before I am twenty. It don't pay to be too good; besides I want to be like other men, but the desire to become an author is paramount to all else, so I shall from time to time express my ideas on the subject of temperance, always trying to do so mildly, and on woman's rights, negatively, for they are getting altogether too smart now-a-days. My sister Phebe is always telling what she will do when women can vote, and how they will reform boys, to make them understand that they can't rule the world. Little "skeery," this woman voting business, they all work on the sly, and if they should once be admitted to the polls to vote, I believe it would knock whiskey, playing poker, and houses with glass fronts higher than Jacob's ladder.

But I am fast growing to be a man, and shall be large enough at eighteen to vote; so if they will encourage me, I will help all I can to put the women down, you bet,--there, excuse me. I haven't half expressed myself, because I have had to fight with my quill to keep these genteel phrases back--I mean my pen, for my quills are all gone up.

THIRTEEN YEARS OLD.

Winfield Courier, February 16, 1882.

Mrs. M. L. Robinson, accompanied by her son, Frank, has returned from Burlington, Iowa, where Frank has been attending school. Their many friends welcome them home again.

Winfield Courier, February 16, 1882.

Odessa School is closed for the present. Another case of a little boy who couldn't tell a lie. He should have a hatchet. Maybe his teacher will give him a hatchet?

Winfield Courier, February 16, 1882.

A horse came tearing around the East ward schoolhouse Monday afternoon with a young lady clinging to the side saddle and yelling for help. She was thrown off near Mr. Bliss' residence, but sustained no serious injuries.

[NORTHWESTERN TEACHERS' MEETING.]

Winfield Courier, February 16, 1882.

Teachers' Association.

EDS. COURIER: In accordance with instructions, the following report of the fifth Northwestern Teachers' meeting is submitted for publication.

The teachers met at Udall Friday evening, Feb. 30. Udall's school mistress, as usual, had fled to parts unknown; but there were a goodly number of teachers and people present. President Wilson failed to put in an appearance, leaving the teachers like sheep without a shepherd, but Vice President Corson made a very good "hireling." A part of the teachers had not seen the program in time to prepare the work assigned them, but impromptu exercises from them and some of Udall's citizens supplied the deficiency. The welcoming address by P. W. Smith was full of characteristic wit and energy. The response by A. Limerick showed a good comprehension of the educational question. In addition to other exercises the following were given.

Declamation, P. W. Smith; Recitation, Smith, P. W.; Prof. P. W. Smith, five minute speech; debate, "Duties of patrons to schools." Affirmative, R. A. Hall. Negative, P. W. Smith (ex-teacher).

At the Saturday meeting the attendance was much better than last November. A lively interest was manifested by all present. Some very good thoughts were suggested by an ex-teacher. The following are some of the conclusions reached by the association on the subjects discussed.

First, "Troubles in Ireland," cause--religious oppression, the monopolizing of wealth and power by the few, and ecclesiastical education. Cure: ecclesiastical education must not take the place of secular, and the planting and maintaining of such social and political systems as exist in the United States at present.

Second, "Teachers' aids." We learn from the mistakes of others, and from visiting their schools. It is better to use an author's key to get a clear explanation than to give a poorer explanation without help. Compare notes with neighboring teachers and render mutual aid. Teachers may read professional books and papers, but there must be careful thought and study to apply the new ideas to their own schools.

Third, Digestion. The principles of digestion of food (and thought) should be taught in schools, especially the laws of health of the organs of digestion.

Fourth, Mistakes in teaching. Teachers should in school be quiet, but firm; dignified but condescending and kind. Do not assume to know everything. Be sure that a statement is correct before it is left. Do not meddle with all the trivial affairs of scholars that come incidentally to notice. No set of rules can be made at the beginning of a school where the teacher is not acquainted that will apply to its special needs. Be careful at first to impress upon the pupils your ideas of right and wrong, and a few general rules; then make others as necessities arise.

Fifth, Rainfall. The subject is already understood (?).

It was resolved to hold the next session at Darien schoolhouse, March 3rd and 4th. Friday evening's program is as follows. Music; Welcoming address, Miss Fannie McKinley; Response, Miss Jennie Hicks; Essay, Mrs. A. Limerick; Declamation, George Wright; Recitation, Mrs. Normie Wilson; Music, B. B. Hunter; Exercises by Darien school; Declamation, L. McKinley; Select reading, R. B. Corson. Question drawer. Topics for Saturday were assigned to the following: Mrs. A. Limerick, Porter Wilson, A. Limerick, R. B. Hunter, Miss J. E. Hicks, L. McKinley, and George Wright.

Teachers, the next meeting will be the last of the season, and let us make it the best. District Boards are especially invited. The Association returns its thanks to the citizens of Udall and suburbs for the kind entertainment received. L. McKinley, Secretary pro tem.

IN MEMORIAM. It becomes our painful duty to chronicle the departure of our late lamented President, Porter Wilson. About dark Friday evening he was seen wending his way toward Udall, musing on Mistakes in Teaching. Coming to the Dunkard mill-dam, Luna's rays cast a silvery gleam on the sheet of water. Mistaking the reflection for ice, our honored president ran plump into the water and sank, to rise no more. When last seen he was sweeping over the mill dam. May his good deeds follow him, and his spirit hover around at the next meeting. L. M.

Winfield Courier, February 16, 1882.

I wish to express my thanks to those who so kindly favored me with a present of Dickens complete works. The work of a teacher is laborious and sometimes seems but a thankless task. Events like this form the Oasis in the memory of both teacher and pupils. While it is the duty of the teacher always to do the best he can for those under his care, yet it is a great encouragement to him to know that his efforts are appreciated. E. T. TRIMBLE.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Theaker School.

Report for the month ending Feb. 10, 1882.

No. of names of pupils enrolled, boys, 20; girls, 17; total 37. Average daily attendance, boys 16; girls 13; total 29. Average daily absence, boys, 2; girls, 2; total 4. Average daily membership, boys, 2; girls, 6; total, 8. Percentage of daily attendance, boys, 80; girls, 81. Percentage of absence, boys, 10; girls, 13. Percentage of non-membership, boys, 10; girls, 6; making a percentage of 100 for each, boys and girls. General deportment good. The following named pupils were present each day during the month: Gramlie [?] Armstrong, Alice Scott, Agnes Collinson, and John D. Armstrong; also those who received meritorious praise for their punctuality in school: Annie Pruett, Maggie Armstrong, Cora Milton, Ella Johnson, and Addison Annis. J. B. CURRY, Teacher.

Cowley County Courant, February 23, 1882.

Cowley County has 118 teachers employed the present winter, and but three cases of unpleasantness have come to our hearing. One of these: the teacher was dismissed for whipping a scholar. Another teacher was dismissed because he would not agree to whip his scholars. His patrons were evidently from Posey County, Indiana, and doubtless related to the Means family, who thought that where there was "no lickin' ther was no larning." The third district must have some Irish settlers in it, as they had a little "Donney-Brook Fair," growing out of a love affair.

Cowley County Courant, February 23, 1882.

The Supreme Court has affirmed the ruling of Judge Torrance in the case of G. P. Aikman vs. School District No. 16, Butler County, that teachers cannot be hired except at regularly called meetings of the board.

Cowley County Courant, February 23, 1882.

At a school meeting held last Monday, it was decided to erect another permanent school building. Messrs. J. T. Shepard, T. H. McLaughlin, and L. Finley were appointed a committee to make estimates, select site, etc., to report at an adjourned meeting to be held Feb. 28th, 1882, at 7 p.m. Arkansas City Traveler.

Excerpts...

[LOOKOUT VALLEY: CORRESPONDENT UNKNOWN.]

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

There is a protracted meeting going on at the Centennial schoolhouse, conducted by Santee L. Hill of the Seventh Day Baptists. The meetings are well attended and many have covenanted to keep the seventh, or Sabbath day, as well as all the commandments of God. They propose organizing a church at the centennial, also a Sabbath school.

The Baptists are holding a series of meetings at Valley schoolhouse, conducted by Elder H. S. Henderson, with good results. Our valley seems destined to a speedy reformation. So mote it be.

Excerpt...

[BEAVER CORRESPONDENT: "GRANGER."]

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

There is now a protracted meeting in progress at Beaver Center schoolhouse conducted by Elder Torbett and Rev. Harry Brown, both of the M. E. Church South. The prospects are favorable for good results from their labors.

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

Report from Fairview School.

The following is a report of Fairview School, district 21, for the month ending Feb. 9, 1882.

Following are the names and standing of pupils whose average standing in attendance, scholarship, and deportment is 85 or higher.

Jennie Baird, 87; Effie David, 91; Ida Orr, 88; Hettie Orr, 95; Minnie Larimer, 90; Eary Orr, 85; Erma McKee, 94; Viola McKee, 95; Annie Orr, 91; Mary Curfman, 88; Rosetta Isom, 96; Carrie Orr, 96; Maggie Wilson, 92; Laura David, 91; Oliver Craig, 85; Courtney McKee, 94; Isaac Curfman, 89; Frank Curfman, 99; Fred Limbocker, 86; Albert Curfman, 92; John Wilson, 86; Verdan David, 92; Oscar Curfman, 90; Elmer Curfman, 91; Wesley Johnson, 86; Joseph Johnson, 87.

Enrollment 35, average attendance 27, number of visitors during month, 2.

R. S. WHITE, Teacher.

Excerpts...

[CRAB CREEK CORRESPONDENT: "G. B. H."]

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

The teacher of the Fairview school is still ill and there has been no school this week.

There is some talk of a new schoolhouse in district No. 124, but talk is cheap.

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

Whiskey Versus Schools.

The County Superintendent has just completed his apportionment of the state and county school funds, and the amounts due each district will be found in another column.

[Skipped Amounts Due.]

The amount of state fund due is 39 cents for each pupil in the county and the amount of county fund is 20 cents for each pupil in the county. This county fund is composed principally of the fines assessed against violators of the prohibition law. Under local option the school fund received no benefit from the liquor business. Under prohibition it will either have to stop or pay heavily toward educating the children of the county. Each pupil in Cowley County can consider that it has received twenty cents worth of schooling out of the refractory liquor dealers, and when the law gets through with the doctors, they may have twenty cents more.

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

A. B. Taylor's school was the scene of a matinee one day last week, which occurred thusly: A smart Alex paid a visit to the school and proceeded to raise Cain in the most approved fashion. He was invited to take a seat on the rostrum, which he refused to do, and found himself on the broad of his back in a "jiffy," with the teacher's hand on his throat like a vise. He pleaded for mercy and was marched to the rostrum, where he quietly remained until school was dismissed. Visitors should behave when they visit that school.

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

The High School will give an entertainment anniversary of the birth of Longfellow, at the Opera House next Monday evening. An admittance fee of 25 cents will be charged. The program is very fine, being selections of verse and song from Longfellow's works. The entertainment will be the best yet given by the High School, and as the proceeds will go toward purchasing books and apparatus for the school, it will be liberally patronized by our people.

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

School Report.

The following is a list of the pupils in Dist. 95, whose general average in examination was above 80 percent for the term closing Feb. 3rd, 1882.

GRADE A. Lula Burden 96, Joe Henderson 955, Lena Leach 96, Charley Burden 88.

GRADE B. Nancy Page 87, William Leach 87, Mary Flottman 88, Albert Leach 87, Lottie Page 82, Carrie Leach 91, James Chandler 87, Frank Leach 90, Grant Page 85, Freddie Harris 88.

GRADE C. Hattie Flottman 92, Albert Page 87, Andrew Jackson 80, Serville Riley 82, Henry Flottman 88, Elmer Leach 90, Bertha Savage 83, Luella Riley 84, Lena Northcutt 83, Lizzie Gildhouse 90. LAURA ELLIOTT, Teacher.

Excerpt...

[UDALL CORRESPONDENT: "FRITZ."]

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

County Superintendent Story was in this vicinity this week, visiting schools. He favored ye pedagogue with a short visit.

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

School Report.

The following is a report of the school in district 93 for the month ending Feb. 3, 1882.

A. CLASS.

Ella King, Arithmetic 96, History 95, Geography 90, Language 95, Drawing 98.

Carrie Roseberry, Arithmetic 95, History 90, Geography 100, Language 98, Drawing 99. Jefferson Davis, Arithmetic 95, History 100, Geography 90, Language 90, Drawing 80. Sarepta Abrams, Arithmetic 90, Geography 80, Language 80, Drawing 80.

Ada Jones, Arithmetic 80, History 79, Language 85, Drawing 80.

George Rogers, Arithmetic 90, Reading 90, Geography 65, Language 75, Drawing 80.

Albert Fuller, Arithmetic 80, Reading 90, Geography 65, Language 73, Drawing 90.

B. CLASS.

Arthur Green, Arithmetic 99, Geography 90, Language 75, Drawing 80.

Allie Davis, Arithmetic 85, Geography 80, Language 80, Drawing 80.

Cora Rogers, Arithmetic 60, Geography 60, Language 80, Drawing 70.

Delay Roseberry, Arithmetic 85, Geography 98, Language 95, Drawing 90.

Jessie Mumaw, Arithmetic 65, Geography 80, Language 70, Drawing 80.

C. CLASS.

Miles Fuller, Arithmetic 70, Language 80, Reading 80.

Monroe Rambo, Arithmetic 75, Language 85, Reading 80.

Sammie Roseberry, Arithmetic 78, Language 90, Reading 95.

Calvin Passmore, Arithmetic 755, Language 80, Reading 85.

Abe Mumaw, Arithmetic 90, Language 90, Reading 90.

Delbert Green, Arithmetic 100, Language 75, Reading 80.

Cora Gates, Arithmetic 85, Language 79, Reading 70.

FLORENCE GOODWIN, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, February 23, 1882.

SKIPPED THE STATISTICAL DATA ON WINFIELD CITY SCHOOLS FOR THE FIFTH MONTH ENDING FEBRUARY 13, 1882.

"The prize for least tardiness for the month was gained by the First Primary, W. W., Miss Hamill, teacher. The A Grade in the High School have purchased $50 worth of philosophical apparatus, the money being earned by their own efforts. On the evening of the 27th inst., the High School will give an entertainment in Manning's Hall. The exercises will consist of recitations and songs from the writings of Longfellow. This being the 75th anniversary of the birth of the Poet, the school proposes to publicly celebrate it by rendering some of his best and most familiar poems. We would invite all who desire to spend an evening with Longfellow to be present, and encourage the pupils in their work.

E. T. TRIMBLE, Supt."

[KANSAS NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, March 1, 1882. Front Page.

Arkansas City will erect another school building this spring.

[REPORT FROM ROSE VALLEY SCHOOL, DISTRICT NO. 34.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Report of Rose Valley School, Dist. No. 34, for the month ending Feb. 28th, 1882.

Number of visitors, 2.

Names of those neither absent nor tardy: Emma Locke, Calvin Burt, Walter Burt, Willie Maxwell.

Names of those perfect in deportment: Maggie Guyer, Nannie Maxwell, Walter Burt, Willie Maxwell, Cal. Burt, John Warren, Willie Purdy, John Sankey, Bettie Maxwell, Roscoe Hamilton, Aaron Purdy, Hiram Tucker.

Names of those in the A grade who received an average of 80, or more, grading on a scale of 100: Ollie Kirkpatrick, 80; Maggie Guyer, 96; Aaron Purdy, 90; John Drennan, 91; Howard Maxwell, 88; Lillie Purdy, 95; John Sankey, 88; Theo. Tucker, 89.

Grade B, averaging 75 or more: Nannie Maxwell, 93; Hiram Tucker, 76; Hannah Drennan, 94; Willie Purdy, 86; Calvin Burt. 78; B. Kirkpatrick, 80; William Maxwell, 100.

SADIE E. PICKERING, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

A literary entertainment for the benefit of the Lyceum will be given at the Guthrie schoolhouse in Bolton Township on Tuesday eve., March 7th, 1882, at 7:30 p.m. Admission 10 cents.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

The S. P. U.'s, of South West Bolton, will hold their annual meeting in the Mercer Schoolhouse, on Saturday next, at which officers will be elected for the ensuing year. A large attendance of members is desired.

Excerpts...

[PLEASANT VIEW JOTTINGS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Prayer meeting every Thursday night at Pleasant View Schoolhouse.

Probably some of my readers would like to know where Pleasant View is. I will say that it is to be found in School district No. 36, commonly known as Theaker school district. It will hereafter be known as Pleasant View on account of its scenery.

LEAN CONTRIBUTOR.

[EDITORIAL.]

Cowley County Courant, March 2, 1882.

Not content with the false statements made by Saint John, the Courier must, of course, do as its candidate does and indulge in some lightning calculating on its own account. In last week's issue in a short editorial under the head of "Whisky vs. Schools" and speaking of the recent distribution of the county school fund, the following appeared in the Courier. "The amount of county fund is 20 cents for each pupil in the county. This county fund is composed principally of the fines assessed against violators of the prohibitory law. Under local option the school fund received no benefit from the liquor business. Each pupil in Cowley County can consider that it has received twenty cents worth of schooling out of the refractory liquor dealers."

It would be hard to crowd into another article of that space as many false statements. For the sake of the common cause of truth and honesty, we will state the facts. The county school fund apportioned was 20 cents for each pupil and amounted to $1,438.80. Of course, this comes from fines. The fines in this amount, assessed under the prohibitory law, amounts to just exactly $300. ($200 paid by Fleming and $100 paid by Manny.) The number of pupils under which the apportionment was made was 7,194. This would make to each pupil between four and five cents.

"Each pupil in Cowley County can consider that it has received twenty cents worth of schooling out of the refractory liquor dealers." They may consider as the Courier states, but they will consider one of the most monumental pieces of ignorance we ever had brought to our notice. The statement that "under the local option law the school fund received no benefit from the liquor business" is fully as true as the other. Of the school fund apportioned about $187 was for fines under the old local option law. This county school fund consisted of fines for gambling arising out of the action of the last grand jury.

It may be that ignorance caused the Courier to make this awful break, but such ignorance is more criminal than deliberate prevarication. No person who would spend five minutes investigating the matter would make such statements and a newspaper that shows so little care in its utterances and such a disregard for any approach toward facts isn't to be given common credence.

The Courier, intoxicated with vanity, and straining every nerve like a man pulling himself up by his boot straps, sees nothing but its own glorification and sacrifices nothing to secure the object of its sight.

[REPORT FROM "OMNIA"--SOME OF IT OBSCURED!]

Cowley County Courant, March 2, 1882.

Within the past two years probably seven eighths of the land has been entered, much the largest part of it by a good class of settlers, who have come to stay. The four districts who are in the township have each a schoolhouse...but district 121 has just completed the best finished and most comfortable house in the township, furnished to its full capacity from the Novelty works of Sterling, Illinois, and will have a school commenced as soon as they can engage a competent teacher. Number 121, the last district organized in the township, occupying the northeast corner, has now in course of construction a house 18 x 24 feet, which is to be finished in the best and most substantial manner, including three coats of paint outside and inside, and think when finished they will be entitled to the banner for the best house of its size in the county. They propose to have it ready for occupancy in time to get in a sufficient term to enable them to share in the next allotment of the school fund. By the way, Mr. Editor, don't you think the policy forbidding, the apportionment of the state fund among the new districts until they have paid the expense of a three months term out of their own pockets, a short sighted and narrow one? Of course, it is law and constitution and all that, but it is withholding the helping hand from those most in need of assistance, a sort of going by on the other side, not consistent with my ideas of generosity or justice. A newly organized district, composed almost entirely of newcomers, most of whom have come here because they were too poor to stay anywhere else, who have struggled to organize and build and propose to give their children the benefits of a school, it seems to me they should be encouraged in their undertaking, instead of being treated as though they were the citizens of another state or a foreign country.

I have another item--you will think me as full of inspirations as the arch assassin himself--which is this: The people of Cowley County have voted a large amount of bonds for the two lines of railroad running through its territory, on which, from the County seat to the uttermost limits of the County, they are taxed to pay the interest, and will ultimately be more heavily taxed to pay the principal. Now should not every child in the county share equally in the benefits of those roads; or should the few townships and school districts through which the roads are located, absorb all the benefits of an assessment of several thousand dollars per mile, and leave us with only the satisfaction of seeing them enjoy the dance and assisting them to pay the fiddler? It strikes me that there is a radical wrong in this state of affairs, that should be corrected.

To come back to Omnia, the spring emigration has commenced, and several families have already arrived and located on the head of Dutch Creek. A large proportion of the plowing is done and the ground ready for the seed, and all signs are favorable for early planting and a consequent crop boom, that will make those who have been in the habit of sneezing at Kansas as an agricultural state open their eyes. CLODHOPPER.

[The law keeping new districts from a portion of the school fund until they have had three months of school is intended to encourage school districts to maintain a school. It is not the policy or intention to make school districts dependent on the school fund for their life. Each district should be strong enough in itself to educate its children and the law contemplates this. The correspondent's suggestions in relation to the school tax on railroad property are pertinent and have been mentioned often, and are evidently reasonable. There are arguments however that could be used to sustain the law. While there seems to be injustice in the law, it would be difficult to obtain a remedy as it would materially alter our laws of taxation. ED.]

Cowley County Courant, March 2, 1882.

The following applicants were in attendance at the examination for teachers' certificates Friday and Saturday.

F. H. Burton, J. A. Hilsabeck, L. P. King, A. D. Stuber, Miss Villa M. Combs, Jennie Davy, Clara Green, Fannie Harden, Anna Hunt, Allie L. Keyes, Maggie R. Linn, Mattie M. Linn, Lutie Newman, Fannie McKinley, Lizzie Lawson, Lilly Perrin, Rose A. Rounds, Anna E. Rowland, Haidee A. Trezise, and Nettie O. Wanner.

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[NINNESCAH CORRESPONDENT: "LADY MADGE."]

Winfield Courier, March 2, 1882. Front Page.

A portion of Mr. McKinley's family are still from home. How glad their many friends will be when their schools close, as they have been missed so much. We have so few young folks in this neighborhood that we cannot afford to spare any of them.

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[NINNESCAH CORRESPONDENT: "MINNIE MENTOR," SEELEY.]

Winfield Courier, March 2, 1882.

Our people are already grieving over the loss they are about to sustain in the moving to the eastern part of the state, of both friend and teacher, Mrs. Turner. May she win many friends and much pleasure in her new home is the wish of all who know her here.

Blue schoolhouse, or rather, its scholars think themselves the best spellers of the county. Would it not be pleasant for them to invite them here and let them find out, by trial, that they cannot win the palm from "our city school."

Mr. Cubberson has moved on the farm south of the Blue schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, March 2, 1882.

AD. FARM FOR SALE. I offer for sale my farm 7 miles North of Winfield, in the Walnut Valley (320 acres) best stock and grain farm in the county. 200 acres in cultivation, 5 miles of hedge, 100 acres in fine growing wheat, 60 acres choice timber, finest place in the state for wintering stock, never failing water, ¼ mile from schoolhouse, store and P. O.; 3 miles from stone church. Price $10,000, half cash, balance 3 years. Will sell half. Call on or address G. N. FOWLER, Winfield, Kansas. March 1, 1882.

Winfield Courier, March 2, 1882.

Deputy Treasurer Wilson has called our attention to an error in last week's paper relative to the source from which the county school fund came. We stated that it was derived "principally from fines for violations of the prohibitory law." Only about one-third was derived from violations of this law. Most of the remainder came from the grand jury indictments for gambling and liquor selling. We published the item of the amount apportioned as an important news matter, which it was. We also secured, after considerable delay, its publication in the Daily. As it takes time to get news into the other paper, we hope its readers will not find fault with us for publishing these interesting matters first in the COURIER. We will still continue to furnish the most important matters for the Daily--after the COURIER has published them.

Winfield Courier, March 2, 1882.

We took occasion to visit Miss Melville's room in the public school last Monday afternoon. The pupils had arranged some exercises in commemoration of the birth of Longfellow. The entertainment consisted of essays, recitations, and songs which were composed by that poet. We have not space to mention all, but some of the best recitations were given by Misses Ella Trezise, Nora Greer, Abbie Rowland, Cora Denning, and Master Charlie Edwards.

Winfield Courier, March 2, 1882.

Longfellow's Birthday.

The pupils of the high school have for a long time been preparing an exhibition to celebrate the anniversary of the birthday of the renowned poet, Henry W. Longfellow, and on Monday evening the 27th a large audience assembled at the Opera House to witness the result of their efforts. A fine entertainment was afforded. Those who were in attendance heard songs and recitations composed by Longfellow and several essays upon his life.

Entertainment began with the song, "The Hemlock Tree," by Miss Anna Hyde, which was well rendered. The greater part of the evening was given to the rendition of the Courtship of Miles Standish, recited by Miss Hattie Andrews, Mate Lynn, Bertie Stebbins, Anna Hyde, Josie Pixley, Ella Roberts, Minnie Stewart, Lizzie McDonald, and Rosa Rounds. "The Death of Minnehaha," a duet, was sung by Misses Josie Bard and Lutie Newman and was highly appreciated. The recitation of "Hiawatha's wooings," was given by Carrie Cronk and was well rendered. James Cairns, Will Hodges, and Alvah Graham also gave recitations, which were excellent.

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[BEAVER TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: "GRANGER."]

Winfield Courier, March 2, 1882.

TANNEHILL ITEMS.

Prof. Anderson is still engaged in teaching vocal music; he now has three singing classes, to wit: Beaver Center, Centennial, and Easterly schoolhouses. The Professor's equal is hard to find in teaching vocal music.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, March 2, 1882.

The Christians are holding services in Pleasant Hill schoolhouse, and we learn that they are having a very good time. May many be added to their roll of membership, is our wish.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

The next regular meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, of Cowley County, will be held at the Courthouse, in Winfield, on the first Monday after the first Tuesday in April, at which time, among other things, we learn that an application will be made to divide the School District in Bolton Township known as "Stony Point."

Cowley County Courant, March 9, 1882.

We have before us a neat and dainty publication called "The Visitor" published monthly for the First Baptist Church of this city, and devoted to our church and school interests. We think we recognize the guiding spirit of James McDermott on its pages.

Cowley County Courant, March 9, 1882.

We are progressing slowly. The Courier has arrived at the conclusion that Saint John was not "strictly accurate" in his statement about the showing on the police docket of this city, and is also aware that it made a bad break in relation to the county school fund. There is nothing like calling attention to these little things.

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[CRAB CREEK CORRESPONDENT: "SISTER KATE."]

Winfield Courier, March 9, 1882.

Miss Hattie Taplin's school has closed.

Miss Emma Elliott has bought an Organ. Her school closed last week.

Miss Mary Turney has stopped her school at Dexter. She talks some of going to her old home, in Missouri.

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[NORTHWEST CRESWELL CORRESPONDENT: "NOVUS HOMO."]

Winfield Courier, March 9, 1882.

Mr. Callison closes his term of school in three weeks. He seems to have given good satisfaction.

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[SEELEY CORRESPONDENT: "MORE ANON."]

Winfield Courier, March 9, 1882.

One of the most pleasant events of the season occurred last night at the residence of N. J. Johnson. Mrs. L. C. Turner, who had just closed a term of four months' school at this place, was invited to join her pupils at Mr. Johnson's in a social union, and by 8 o'clock a more jolly crowd never was assembled under any roof, and it did one good to see the bright eyes and hear the joyous laugh of the little ones. At 9 o'clock order was maintained, and Mr. Jackson stepped forward and addressed Mrs. Turner as follows.

"You cannot but have been mindful of the friendship we as pupils have felt toward you as teacher in your earnest efforts in our behalf. I have the pleasure of representing the school in presenting this cup as a slight token of our friendship, and may it represent your cup of happiness in after life, and may it even be full to overflowing, is the wish of all your pupils."

Mr. J. Lewis then presented Mrs. Turner with a very nice gold-lined silver cup with her name beautifully engraved thereon. Mrs. Turner was very much overcome, as it was wholly a surprise. She thanked the pupils for their kindness, and in a very appreciative manner. The affair was a grand success. MORE ANON.

Winfield Courier, March 9, 1882.

There will be a school exhibition at the schoolhouse in District No. 50 in Vernon Township near D. D. Kellogg's, on Saturday evening, Mach 11th, under the direction of T. J. Rude, teacher. The small fee of ten cents admission will be charged, the proceeds to go for the benefit of the school. A general invitation is extended.

Winfield Courier, March 9, 1882.

The pupils of the High School adopted the following resolutions in honor of all those who aided them in the entertainment held at the Opera House on Monday evening the 27th ult.

Resolved, That we tender our sincere thanks to the editors of the COURIER and Courant for their assistance and encouragement.

2nd. To all who by their presence at the entertainment, stimulated and encouraged us to renewed efforts of improvement.

(Signed by Committee) SADA E. DAVIS,

ALICE M. CARSON,

CLAUDIUS RINKER.

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[TISDALE CORRESPONDENT: "PEDRO."]

Winfield Courier, March 9, 1882.

Our school closed Saturday.

Several couples of our young folks visited the literary at Burden Saturday night, and report having a good time.

Mr. Newton Hall and wife were present at our literary Friday night. A grand Indian dance was given. Mr. Levi Fluke, "as it is reported," was so scared that he jumped out of the window and had the horses hitched up ready to flee before he realized the joke.

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[TISDALE CORRESPONDENT: "X."]

Winfield Courier, March 9, 1882.

S. A. Smith closed his winter term of school on the 4th. Had pleasant exercises in the afternoon. His scholars presented him a beautiful album as a token of respect and esteem. Sol broke completely down under the eloquent presentation speech by Feriss Fluke, but rallied sufficiently to acknowledge it in his usual happy style.

A delegation of five Indians from the Hairlips treated our literary with a war dance last Friday night. They were resplendent with paint and feathers. As I cannot remember the pronunciation of their Indian names, I will give the interpretation: Heart-smasher, Not-afraid-of-a-nail-keg, Boxer, Duck-killer, Okmulgee "Big medicine from Snake Creek."

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[CORRESPONDENT FROM QUEEN VILLAGE: "W. L. R."]

Winfield Courier, March 9, 1882.

The members of the Christian Church are holding a protracted meeting at our schoolhouse, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Shively, of Butler County, Kansas, and we think are doing good work.

On the 27th of last month, the people of Queen Village were treated to a literary entertainment given by our kind teacher, Miss Thirza E. Dobyns, and her school, in commemoration of Longfellow's birth. The entertainment was by all pronounced a decided success in all its appointments. Without an exception the exercises were well committed and rendered with expression. Those present were well pleased, judging from appearances, and we think were well paid for coming. District 19 has certainly been very fortunate in securing the services of so efficient a teacher. I think Miss Dobyns as a teacher, is second to none in the county. W. L. R.

Excerpt...

[PLEASANT VIEW JOTTINGS: LEAN CONTRIBUTOR.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Pleasant View Jottings.

J. B. Curry's school will close, at this place, on Tuesday, Feb. 14th.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

S. P. U. The Stock Protective Union will meet at the Bland Schoolhouse, East Bolton, on the last Saturday in March (25th) at 7 o'clock p.m. Election of officers and other business will come before the meeting. AL. MOWRY, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

BONDS WANTED.

The undersigned desires to invest $1,200 in School Bonds. Will pay the highest market price. Bonds and interest will be payable at Winfield, Kansas. Write, or inquire personally, of G. L. Rinker, Executor of estate of Judge Bailey, deceased, or Jennings & Troup, Attorneys, Winfield, Kansas.

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[COMMUNICATION: "WILLIAM J." - NORTH FAIRVIEW INTELLIGENCE.]

Cowley County Courant, March 16, 1882.

The Valley Center school closes next week. R. B. Corson has taught a good school, and is held in high esteem by all of his scholars.

The singing done by the Darien school at the Teachers' Association was excellent, when the size of the scholars are taken into consideration.

Cowley County Courant, March 16, 1882.

The scholars in the west ward are having their natural rights whittled down to a pretty fine point. The boys have been forbidden to bring their sleds to school and they are not allowed to engage in that grandest of all sports, snowballing. The girls are not allowed to play "keep house," and the future looks pretty dark for the little folks. When we went to school a restriction of our right to snowball would have been as good cause for mutiny as the abuses of the American colonies by King George was cause for the declaration of independence. We expect the scholars will, before long, be restricted to the privilege of gazing idiotically at the ceiling and twirling their thumbs.

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882. Front Page.

TEACHERS' INSTITUTE.

The design of teachers' meetings and institutes is general improvement of teachers and making them feel a lively concern in the welfare of their profession; also to show the public (parents and guardians especially) what the teacher's opposition is, to enlist their sympathy and cooperation with him and to engage every influence that will promote the success and respectability of the work of education. This is to be accomplished by lectures, essays, discussions, and such other exercises as the ingenuity of true and live education may conjecture.

Such persons always regard it as a labor of love to engage in any enterprise that looks to the accomplishment of this design.

From the report of the Fifth Northwestern teachers' meeting, the writer gleaned the following: "The mistress of the Udall school had, as usual, left for parts unknown. President Wilson failed to put in an appearance, leaving the teachers like sheep without a shepherd. A part of the teachers had not seen the program in time to prepare the work assigned them."

Now then, just such failures on the part of the managers of teachers' meetings as set forth in the above report, are some of the main causes that hinder the success of teachers' meetings and institutes are the following.

1. Dry and prosy addresses and other exercises that often amount to but little more than a play upon words, even when they come from persons who have great reputation as scholars and teachers.

2. The indiscretion of committees of arrangement in making business for the meeting, failing to provide in time a program of exercises that will afford matter for thought, that will be both interesting and edifying.

3. Persons attending such meetings merely to take some of the honors and to solicit fame for some kind of performances that will not interest teachers in this work, nor show to parents and school boards their duty to teachers and schools.

4. Lack of professional courtesy among teachers; some feeling as if they had attained the acme of proficiency in the business, and then being too proud to aid in elevating others to the same standard.

5. Not naturally considering what benefit may arise from such assemblies, and that when a teacher strives to promote a higher standard in his profession, and aid his fellow laborers, he greatly benefits himself, and sometimes gains a greater advantage than those for whom he labors.

All topics presented at teachers' meetings should come from practical educators, and they should have a direct bearing on the policy needed in common schools. Displays of sublime oratory and flowery composition are much less appropriate than pertinent and common-sense disquisitions on that kind of school management which will answer the wants of the coming generation.

Some of the most appropriate subjects, men of extensive learning may deem trite and commonplace; but those who would be instructors of the young must condescend to their capacity, take them as they find them, and lead them onward and upward. Young learners need a kind of intellectual food that is not known to men of profound erudition; and young teachers may be much benefitted by the knowledge and experience of veterans in the profession. When teachers' meetings are wisely conducted, and appropriate and edifying exercises therein held, teachers will go from them nerved anew for their work, as well as better informed; and their influence may easily be made to reach parents and guardians, and show them what are their duties to the young, and their duties toward teachers and schools.

Vernon Township. J. S. BAKER.

[Yes, the paper had "nerved anew for their work."]

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

Miss Mollie Majors is home again after having spent the winter attending school in Topeka.

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

Mr. J. A. Hilsabeck, who has been teaching school at the Holland schoolhouse, was arrested last week, charged with being one of those who stoned the train. He will be tried Thursday and probably acquitted, as it seems that he had nothing to do with it.

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

Teachers' Association.

According to appointment, the teachers of the Northwestern Division met at Darien schoolhouse on the evening of March 3rd. The night was beautiful, and the attendance larger than at any previous time. Little Dutch, Valley Center, and Darien schools were well represented, and the evening was occupied very pleasantly with exercises from the different schools. The attendance at the Saturday meeting was small; but the program was taken up, and the different subjects discussed. Most of the work was retrospective, and the teachers all agreed that our monthly meetings had been beneficial to both schools and teachers. As an evidence of that fact, on motion it was decided to adjourn to meet again at Valley Center schoolhouse, on the first Friday evening of October, 1882. The vice president and secretary pro tem, were appointed to arrange a program for that time. The following is a list of teachers and patrons of the N. W. Division, who have attended one or more of the six Saturday meetings.

Messrs. Porter Wilson, A. H. Limerick, R. B. Corson, J. Martindale, R. B. Hunter, Geo. Wright, Albert Brookshire, L. McKinley, and J. E. Hicks; and Misses Villa M. Combs, Fannie M. McKinley, Mrs. A. Limerick, and Nannie Wilson. Patrons: G. L. Gale, Rock Township, and Mr. Meece, Ninnescah Township. The Association wishes also to express its thanks to P. W. Smith for the interest he has manifested in its welfare.

I almost forgot to say that the account of President Wilson and the mill-dam was false. We were rejoiced to meet him again this side of the flood.

L. McKINLEY, Secretary pro tem.

Excerpts...

[TANNEHILL ITEMS: "GRANGER."]

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

Some of our peaceable citizens of Beaver and Pleasant Valley Townships were grossly insulted on Saturday night last by a set of night marauders going from the literary held at the Holland schoolhouse. Several pistol shots were fired as they passed houses on the road. No particular damage was done, only the shooting of a cat belonging to Mr. Samuel Hughes. How long those lawless chaps will be suffered to carry firearms and shoot in peaceable citizens' dooryards without being handled by the strong hand of the law we cannot tell, but we are inclined to think the County Attorney will soon be engaged in handling them without gloves.

The boys at Easterly schoolhouse ran out of mischief the other night and destroyed a wagon shed belonging to Mr. Baker of Vernon Township, who informed them that if they did not pay for the same, there would be some business for Esquire Hammond to attend to. I guess they will ante up.

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[BOLTON CORRESPONDENT: "CAESAR."]

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

School closed at Theaker Friday, the 3rd last, and the Bland, Friday the 10th.

Our school closes in two weeks. Our teacher very unexpectedly made a visit to his father, who lately returned from Mexico. It is thought that L. C. will go with him when he returns, but I think it is hardly probable, for he is too much in love with Cowley for that.

The Sunday school at Mercer schoolhouse was re-organized last Sunday.

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[PRAIRIE GROVE CORRESPONDENT: "R."]

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

Miss Hattie Pontious is at home and will remain during vacation. R.

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

School Exhibition in Vernon Township.

EDS. COURIER: The school in District 50 closed Friday, and Saturday evening we witnessed the final blowout, which was an exhibition given by the school, assisted by a party from Valley View. Our school has been a grand success. Much credit is due Mr. Rude for the interest he has manifested in our school, for his successful efforts to supply the school with suitable references, and for the success of his methods of discipline and instruction. Tom is a thorough, energetic and successful young teacher, and his short acquaintance in Vernon Township has made him many friends and well-wishers. In a grand Republic like this if there are any whom we should gladly encourage and assist, it is the honest, intelligent young men who have begun life at the lowest round of the ladder and are endeavoring by patient, faithful labor, to ascend. A PATRON.

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

School Report, District 91.

Term report: Average enrollment 18, average daily attendance 13, number of cases of tardiness 398, number of months taught, 5. The pupils who stood highest in deportment and scholarship are the following: Chas. E. Daugherty, Fielda Daniels, Leon A. Jacobus, Mattie L. Daniels, Gertrude E. McKinley, Willie P. Jacobs. L. McKINLEY, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, March 16, 1882.

School Report, Dist. 93, for the Month Ending March 3rd, 1882.

A GRADE.

Ella King, Arithmetic 100, Geography 100, Language 100, General Information 95, History 90, Neatness 100.

Carrie Roseberry, Arithmetic 100, Geography 100, Language 100, General Information 90, History 85, Neatness 100.

Sarepta Abrams, Arithmetic 95, Geography 90, Language 90, General Information 80, Neatness 100.

Albert Fuller, Arithmetic 99, Geography 90, Language 90, General Information 85, Neatness 100.

George Rogers, Arithmetic 80, Geography 80, Language 80, General Information 70, Neatness 100.

B GRADE.

Abie Davis, Arithmetic 80, Language 100, Geography 100, Neatness 100.

Daisy Roseberry, Arithmetic 75, Language 100, Geography 100, Neatness 100.

Cora Rogers, Arithmetic 100, Language 100, Geography 70, Neatness 100.

Abbie Wright, Arithmetic 80, Language 100, Geography 75, Neatness 100.

Miles Fuller, Arithmetic 90, Language 80, Neatness 90.

Monroe Rambo, Arithmetic 80, Language 80, Neatness 98.

Sammie Roseberry, Arithmetic 80, Language 80, Neatness 99.

Abe Mumaw, Arithmetic 90, Language 95, Neatness 90.

Clara Walton, Arithmetic 90, Language 90, Neatness 100.

Cara Gates, Arithmetic 80, Language 75, Neatness 99.

Christie Rick, Arithmetic 99, Language 80, Neatness 100.

Orrie Rambo, Arithmetic 80, Reading 96, Neatness 100.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Miss Linda Christian stole away from the laborious duties of teaching a country school, last Saturday, and rusticated in the city during Sabbath day.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The following pupils of the Intermediate Department of the Arkansas City schools were neither absent nor tardy during the past month: Clara Ford, Annie Wagstaff, Hattie Franey, Minnie Wilson, and Ella Pettit.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Union Sabbath School Organization at the Parker Schoolhouse next Sabbath at 12 m. Everybody invited. A. SPRAY.

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[PLEASANT VIEW JOTTINGS: LEAN CONTRIBUTOR.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

There was a spelling bee the last night of J. H. Curry's school, and all passed off as merry as a marriage bell.

Cowley County Courant, March 23, 1882.

School district 122 has voted $200 of bonds to refund other indebtedness.

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[NINNESCAH CORRESPONDENT: "LADY MADGE."]

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882. Front Page.

The Ninnescah school closed last week. Miss Hicks gave the best of satisfaction, and all are anxious to have her again next winter.

The United Brethren have closed their meeting at Blue. Rev. Henegar conducted the meeting and was successful in forming a class of 20 members.

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[COMMUNICATION FROM "MUNROE" - BETHEL ITEMS.]

Cowley County Courant, March 23, 1882.

Miss Jennie Lowry, of your city, was visiting friends at Bethel Saturday and Sunday. Miss Lowry taught the winter term of school at Bethel and was much liked by all the scholars.

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Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

BALTIMORE ITEMS.

EDS. COURIER: It has been a long time since any of the productions of CAESAR have appeared in the columns of the COURIER; but, as I am at Baltimore for a day or two only, "Dad" has prevailed upon me to send you a few notes.

R. S. Thompson was taken severely ill on Friday, March 3rd, with inflammation of the spleen, and for some time his life was despaired of. His sons, George and Orator, who were at the agricultural college, were sent for, and arrived on last Friday night. George had been away about eighteen months, and finds things changed but little since he left. Orator began attending the college in January, and was well satisfied with the institution; but as the father will not be able to do any work this spring, he will have to remain at home.

Miss Alice Stolp, who has been attending the graded school at Burden, has returned home for a two week's vacation.

The lyceum at Baltimore has adjourned sine die.

Geo. F. Thompson returned to his post at the college on Tuesday last.

The COURIER is a welcome exchange at the college, and the writer takes great pleasure in reading it there. X. Y. CAESAR.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Miss Amy Buck is now home from school and will be our organist in Sunday school. We bid her welcome most heartily.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

R. B. Corson has closed his term of school in district 125.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Miss Emma Gridley winds up her term of school Friday in district 128.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Doctor A. Gridley has finished his school in district 57; and is now at home.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Miss Thirza Dobyns closes her school this week in district 19, Tulin Village.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

A new schoolhouse is going up in district 120, L. S. Cogswell being chief architect.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

E. A. Millard and Miss Mattie West, the Burden teachers, are enjoying a vacation.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

District 121, Omnia Township, now boasts of a new, neat, and convenient schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

The Floral school, under the management of A. Limerick, opens work this week with new books.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Miss Ada Overman has closed school in district 28, and expects to open work soon in district 102.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Saturday we were gratified to receive a call from Miss Anna D. Martin. She is the teacher of District No. 61 [?] and is a very pleasant and intelligent lady.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Superintendent Story expects to hold public meetings next week in Vernon Township. On Monday night, in district 48; Tuesday night in district 12; and Wednesday night in district 63. The patrons of these schools, and the citizens of Vernon Township, will please bear in mind these appointments.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

The present term of school closes in April. There will be no school this summer, as there is no money in the treasury with which to pay expenses. This is a very bad state of affairs, but there seems to be no way to get around it.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Elder Gans, of Winfield, will preach at the school hall in this city on Saturday evening, April 8th, and also at 11 a.m., and evening, on the following day. Mulvane Herald.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Miss Celina Bliss has finished her school in district 9, but the patrons want her to go on with the work.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

We overheard two prominent teachers of Cowley County naming over the prospective candidates for County Superintendent, and caught the following names: S. A. Smith, H. T. Albert, Tom Rude, Frank Werden, P. B. Lee, E. A. Millard, R. B. Hunter, B. B. Limerick, and Prof. Atkinson. We failed to catch onto any more names and are unable to say how many candidates there will be. Burden Enterprise.

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[VALLEY VIEW CORRESPONDENT: "BOBOLINK."]

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Our literary closed Thursday evening, March 9th, in full blast. Quite a number of the younger members were unwilling that it should be so, but the older and wiser thought best as spring is rapidly approaching. It is astonishing how well it has been attended during the fall and winter, and how the majority have done their best in contributing, and the good order that has generally prevailed.

The young folks of the literary gave a dramatic entertainment at the schoolhouse some three weeks ago. The house was crowded notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, and many were heard to say it was worth twice the admission fee. One week later the club visited Seeley and the "each and everyone" did credit to themselves. On Saturday evening of March 11th they gave one play (gratis) at the schoolhouse of district 50. They combined with the school entertainment that was given on that same evening, and we heard they impersonated the characters they represented almost to perfection.

Our Sabbath school under the superintendency of J. F. Martin is prospering finely, and we think another addition of twelve feet ought to go on our schoolhouse to make room for the people. Another presentation last Sabbath week to Mrs. Craig, teacher of Infant class. The little folks worked hard to raise the money among themselves to purchase the little memento their worthy teacher received.

We are expecting the new organ before long.

Winfield Courier, March 23, 1882.

Report of Rain Bow Bend School, District 61, for the term ending March 17th, 1882.

Enrollment 41, average attendance 71.

Name and standing of pupils who made a general average in attendance, deportment, and scholarship of 85 or above.

Rachel Fawcett 97, Willie Riggs 97, John Coller 95, Maud Westman 93, Flemma Crabtree 92, Laura Wertman 92, Charley Brian 87, Eddie Riggs 90, Bertie Coller 90, Nettie Nelson 86, Arthur Riggs 94, Carrie Brian 90, Anna Riggs 87, Tommy Fawcett 87, Luella Spence 86, Williard Brian 95, Nettie Corbin 91, May Spence 86, Everett Crabtree 90, Henry Snyder 81, Otis Coller 90, Sadie Glasgow 92. Flemma Crabtree and Everett Crabtree were present all of the term without being tardy. ANNA D. MARTIN, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 29, 1882.

East Bolton is convulsed with a school fight.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 29, 1882.

AN OUTRAGE.

On last Saturday night some young blackguards in the shape of boys shot three pistol shots into the schoolhouse in District 96, two of them through the windows. The boys are known and will more than likely have to pay the penalty for such conduct.

Excerpt...

[NORTH CRESWELL ITEMS: "B. C."]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 29, 1882.

The school in Dist. No. 6 closed last week after a pleasant and profitable term under our popular teacher.

[WEST BOLTON LYCEUM: "REPORTER."]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 29, 1882.

Editor Traveler:

It was my good fortune to be at the closing exercises of the Lyceum at the Guthrie schoolhouse in Bolton Tp., on Tuesday eve, March 21st. The entertainment was a decided success, both financially and artistically. The dialogues were excellent, showing that the performers had given them frequent rehearsals. The essay by Miss Blanche Marshall, "A Visit to Dist. No. 96 in 1890," was a masterly effort and elicited cheer after cheer during the reading.

The court trial in which Mr. W. J. Conway was the prisoner, was tried before a jury consisting of Messrs. Ed. Donnelly, Ed. Gates, and Zane Bland. The legal talent employed in this case (the charge being, "Fined for Misconduct,") was Mr. A. H. Clark as pros., and Mr. Amos Walton and Wm. Clark for Defendant. At 11:30 p.m. the Society adjourned to meet the first Tuesday evening of November next at 6:30 p.m. REPORTER.

Cowley County Courant, March 30, 1882.

I will commence a mixed grade private school in the east ward school house April 10th. In connection with this, will take up the study of German. MRS. WILL B. CATON.

Cowley County Courant, March 30, 1882.

The Little Dutch School of Fairview township was closed today, the 24th of March. The patrons of the school, and friends from surrounding districts, gathered at the schoolhouse and spread a very tempting dinner in honor of the occasion, after which came the exercises of the afternoon, which consisted of declarations interspersed with singing. Then followed short speeches from the gentlemen. Prominent among them was one from Mr. Limerick, in which he set forth the ill looked after school fund. And it certainly is the most poorly looked after of any public money. The exercises closed with the presentation of a photograph album in behalf of the school by Mr. W. B. Wimer, one of our honored school board, with a few appropriate remarks. Mr. Wilson has made an excellent teacher, doing all in his power to make the school attractive and instructive. L.

Excerpt...

[COMMUNICATION FROM "MUNROE" - CHIMES FROM BETHEL.]

Cowley County Courant, March 30, 1882.

R. W. White and wife, at Fairview, were visiting friends at Bethel last Saturday and Sunday. R. W. teaches the Fairview school.

Cowley County Courant, March 30, 1882.

The high school has provided itself with electric apparatus, and the scholars are taking lessons in practical electricity. The girls say it is quite shocking.

Cowley County Courant, March 30, 1882.

Prof. R. A. Tappan, of Independence, a dancing master who bears the marks of a gentleman and comes recommended as one of the most skillful teachers in the west, is in our city, with a fair prospect of working up a good class.

Excerpts...

[PRAIRIE GROVE CORRESPONDENT: "ROY'S BETTER HALF."]

Winfield Courier, March 30, 1882.

Miss Fannie Pontious begins to smile when she thinks of its only being one more month till she can leave the children, as her school will then be out. She can then visit some of her old-time friends.

There was a spelling school at Prairie Grove last Friday night. As the roads were very muddy, there was not a very large attendance.

Excerpts...

[BALTIMORE CORRESPONDENT: "DAD."]

Winfield Courier, March 30, 1882.

One more month of school; scholars will then be turned out on the summer range.

Mr. George Thompson made a short visit to Baltimore during his father's sickness, but has returned to his post at Manhattan. DAD.

Excerpt...

[ORCHARD COTTAGE CORRESPONDENT AT VERNON: "M. LEWIS."]

Winfield Courier, March 30, 1882.

Vernon is being considerably shook up over new school districts and relocation of schoolhouses.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 5, 1882.

H. P. Farrar has rented Haywood's building to the school board. The joyful yell of the boys and girls during the day and the gentle soliloquy of the tom cats at night will lend another charm to that neighborhood.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 5, 1882.

From West Bolton.

Our "LEAN CONTRIBUTOR" has stirred matters up somewhat as will be seen by reading the following from the pen of an "OLD RESIDENT."

Ed. Traveler:

Having for some weeks past noticed little items, headed "Pleasant View Jottings," alias The Theaker, we object to the change. Neither do we think it meet for newly located citizens to exercise quite so much authority over those who have borne the burden of laying out districts, voting bonds (and paying them to a great extent), building schoolhouse, etc. Our schoolhouse was named in honor of the man who first frames the district, Mr. Theaker, our first assessor, and his estimable wife, who taught her first schools, and helped us so bravely to have what we have, a good schoolhouse with three acres of ground for it to stand upon. Then, I repeat it, Sir; we object, and don't let them persuade you Jamie to write such things again, for "they" can't come it. OLD RESIDENT.

Cowley County Courant, April 6, 1882.

The state school fund was last week increased to the amount of $39,612, from the proceeds of sales of government lands within the former Indian reservations in this state, according to the terms of the act of admission to the Union.

Cowley County Courant, April 6, 1882.

 

As intimated in our last, the people in the southwest corner of district 113, who were deprived of their privileges by the removal of the schoolhouse, are, in connection with others in the corners of Mt. Vernon and Baltimore districts, petitioning for a new district, lapping around on the south and east of 126, which territory will all be contained in about three sections, and propose to build a schoolhouse on the southeast corner of 126.

Cowley County Courant, April 6, 1882.

 

An Otto correspondence who signs himself "New Subscriber," gives vent to his feelings in the following manner.

Pretty much all the farmers' faces we have seen look glad and joyous at the prospects for an excellent crop this year. They say we have had rain enough to make a crop, if no more should fall. The wheat looks oh, so utter, too nice for anything. The cattle look so happy and contented as they roam over our thousand hills, nipping the first green shoots of the tender herbage as it comes forth to gladden nature. The ground for the corn crop is nearly all prepared for planting, in which business many are now engaged. One gentleman planted eight acres of corn three or four weeks ago, and so far as we know, it is doing well. Otto post office has been moved up to Virgil schoolhouse, district 102, eight miles due south of Dexter, on the township line. E. P. Miller is the gentlemanly and accommodating postmaster. Mr. Miller also keeps a store, hotel, and a feed stable, to all of which he seems to be doing a thriving business. Mr. Gooch is the village blacksmith, has a good business, and gives satisfaction. We call the town Otto after the post office. It is a good business point, being removed quite a distance from any town of importance. In the few post offices we have visited during the distribution of the mails in this eastern part of the County, we have been astonished at the immense number of COURANTS, one being dropped in nearly every box in the office. Our citizens like good papers and choice intellectual literature.

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

CAN'T DO WITHOUT IT.

E. I. Johnson answers "Taxpayer" in your last, and favors repeal of the herd law. That mighty bulwark of prosperity! The protection of the poor from the rich; the weak from the strong. He says: "Two dollars and an ounce of energy will fence a farm in five years." My experience in this county of nearly twelve years, proves this a trifling fling, "light as air," having in the above time set with my own hands, over seven miles of hedge. He further says: "Cowley County is not wholly an agricultural country, and every farmer should turn his attention partly to stock." They have done this on a grand scale; the hundreds of cars of fat hogs shipped affirm this, also the thousands of fine sheep and cattle seen in the county, and all this accomplished "under the nose" of the herd law. He says: "Every man should utilize what Nature has provided for his happiness, and we cannot do this until we abolish the herd law." Shades of Nemeses! Who has been preventing this man from "utilizing nature?" Perhaps his stock has eaten up a poor neighbor's crop, and he has been asked to pay for it. But few quarter sections remain untaken, not one in fifty but has an occupant. This much of nature (according to this glorious law) each one is allowed to "utilize," and right well have they done it; for flesh and blood could do no more than the people of this county have done, after all this trustee's slur of "borrowed capital." This trustee is undoubtedly affected with the big I, as that pronoun only occurs twenty-one times in his little communication. The magnificent growth of this country in the last ten years is the admiration of every beholder. Abolish this law, and you open up the flood-gate of avarice. Men who have spent their last dollar and a greater part of their muscle building a home, could not fence, and would be compelled to "evacuate," as this trustee is pleased to term it. We boast of the millions of bushels of corn we raise; if we had never had this herd law, a few dozen twenty acre patches "fenced in" along the creeks, would be the only showing. We boast of our hundred schoolhouses, but for this law we could number them on the fingers of one hand. We boast of good society; if this law had never been known here, good society would also be a stranger.

Now, Mr. Editor, allow me to name thirty years from this date as the time for the herd law to expire, and who with prophetic vision, can look down these coming years and foretell half the grand and glorious prosperity and happiness ushered in for those who shall inherit the future? Give this county prohibition and the herd law for thirty years, and it will defy the world. Respectfully, G. N. FOWLER.

Excerpts...

[NINNESCAH TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: "C. S. S."]

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

The United Brethren have organized a church and Sunday School at what is known as the Blue schoolhouse. Sunday school meets at 10 a.m. every Sabbath, and once in two weeks there is preaching by the Rev. Henegar. The weekly prayer meetings of Thursday evening are well attended as are also the church and Sabbath school.

Report says we are to welcome Miss Jennie Hicks as teacher in the Blue district. Be it so, I guess we can stand it. The school is to begin the first of April.

Excerpt...

[PLEASANT VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: "SCHUYLERIUS."]

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

Only two more weeks of school at the Holland schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

Miss Clute, one of the teachers in the public schools, left for a visit to friends in another state. She will then go to Oakland, California.

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

The city schools close Friday. There will be no summer term, but we understand that several select schools will be taught during the vacation.

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

If any school district near Winfield desires an excellent teacher for a summer term of school, we can refer them to one. Drop us a postal.

Excerpts...

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

City Election.

The City election last Tuesday passed off pleasantly and quietly, but there was strenuous work done. As usual, the successful candidates are happy and the unsuccessful feel a little sore. There were no party nominations and the contest, so far as there was a contest, was mainly on the prohibition issue. The anti-prohibitionists on Monday evening made up a good strong ticket largely of prohibition candidates with the evident main object of beating Buckman for Justice, Siverd for Constable, and whoever might be nominated in the first ward for councilman by their opponents. The prohibitionists accepted their nominations so far as suited them, but substituted other names for five principal offices, as appears below, to make up a complete ticket. The long and short term candidates for school board happened to get reversed on the two tickets, which occasioned the votes for full term and vacancy for the same candidates. Every man on the prohibitionist's ticket was elected by majorities ranging from 55 to 180. The average vote on contested candidates in the whole city was 245 prohibition to 145 anti, or 100 majority. This is the way we look at the matter, but others may view it differently. Those names prefixed by * are elected.

SCHOOL BOARD.

[FIRST WARD, FULL TERM.]

*J. C. FULLER: 140

Geo. Emerson: 71

J. E. Platter: 5

B. F. Wood: 3

A. H. Doane: 2

S. Bard: 1

[FIRST WARD: TO FILL VACANCY.]

*GEO. EMERSON: 144

J. C. Fuller: 68

A. H. Doane: 3

J. E. Platter: 1

John Wilson: 1

[SECOND WARD, FULL TERM]

*B. F. WOOD: 95

A. H. Doane: 72

W. J. Hodges: 2

[SECOND WARD: TO FILL VACANCY]

*A. H. DOANE: 93

W. H. Smith: 71

B. F. Wood: 4

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

School Matters.

S. A. Smith will teach the Torrance school this spring.

The Dexter schools close this week.

Superintendent Story has appointed April 14 "Arbor Day."

State Superintendent Bloss, of Indiana, says "It is probable that there is no one cause which so much cripples the public schools of Indiana as the irregular attendance of pupils."

Miss Annie Hunt has begun teaching in District 1.

Miss T. Dobyns will teach the Tisdale school this spring.

Porter Wilson will teach a term of school in district 27, beginning in a short time.

Miss Sadie E. Pickering has taken the school in district 131.

Miss Celina Bliss will teach a spring school in district 9.

R. B. Hunter has closed school in Star Valley.

A. B. Taylor is teaching in district 30, Silver Creek.

Miss Rosa Rounds will teach the New Salem school this spring.

Miss Allie E. Dickie will open school in district 50, Vernon Township, April 16.

Miss Jennie Davy has begun a term of twelve weeks in district 45.

J. S. Baker has finished his school in district 48.

J. A. Hilsabeck has begun a second term of school in district 10.

Iowa has just apportioned $118,946 of school fund. The February disbursement in California was $1,482,883.74. In Kansas it was $125,382.

The Hon. J. J. Burns, Ex-State Commissioner of Ohio, says: "The greatest extravagance is the employment of poor teachers, even if they work without wages. No state or community can afford it."

An essential feature of a complete school system is that every school be under the inspection of a skilled expert or superintendent.

Excerpt...

[BEAVER TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: "A. RUPP."]

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

L. P. King was compelled to adjourn his school at Centennial on account of illness.

Excerpt...

[FAIRVIEW TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: "TOP NOT."]

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

T. J. Rude is the choice in this part of the moral vineyard for County Superintendent provided Prof. Story refuses to be a candidate. At all events, let's have a practical teacher to fill the position.

Excerpts...

[TANNEHILL CORRESPONDENT: "GRANGER."]

Winfield Courier, April 6, 1882.

Our winter schools are all out. Miss Goodwin's, the last, closed Friday at Enterprise. She taught the term of six months with good satisfaction to both scholars and patrons.

Dr. Marsh is still running the Sabbath schools at Beaver Center at half past 9 o'clock a.m., and at the Enterprise at 2 o'clock p.m. Both schools are growing in interest, especially at Beaver Center. We have few such Sabbath school workers as the Doctor.

The United Brethren will hold their quarterly meeting at Enterprise schoolhouse on next Saturday and Sunday under the superintendency of Presiding Elder Lee.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 12, 1882.

INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT OF THE A. C. SCHOOL.

The following is a list of the names of pupils neither absent nor tardy during the last school month.

Lillie Barrick, Lillie Lupin, Rosa Garris, Luna Ware, Mattie Kirtley, Mary Hutchison, May Monroe, Hattie Sipes, Dean McIntire, Sherman Coulson.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 12, 1882.

The following taken from a private letter from a young man is too near the truth to be lost.

"Are there any Government lands handy to town that can be bought for $1.25 per acre in your county?"

Great guns, old man, wake up. Read something. Look at the map of Cowley County, with railroads running east and west, north and south, through the entire length of the county. See the towns marked out every few miles, with schoolhouses dotted all over the prairies. Hunt up the statistics published in our agricultural reports of our million bushels of wheat and two million bushels of corn raised yearly to say nothing of our fruits, sheep, cattle, hogs, etc., and then ask yourself if you are not a fool.

You are just ten years behind the age, if I have to inform you of these facts; you will be asking me next, what is a telephone, or is President Garfield dead? Do try and brush up a little. If you can't read a newspaper, get someone to read one for you, or if you are deaf, why--go and drown yourself, but don't come to Kansas--there's no room for you here!

Cowley County Courant, April 13, 1882.

The Board of County Commissioners met in regular session Monday morning, and have been busy transacting the usual routine of business. All three members of the Board were in attendance.

The appeal of Thomas Parvin in a matter from school district eighty-nine was rejected, and the action on the County Superintendent sustained.

Cowley County Courant, April 13, 1882.

The school boys' kites are already beginning to ornament the telephone wires.

Excerpts...

[FLORAL CORRESPONDENT: "BUCKEYE."]

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

I want to mention a generous act by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio, who gave to the Floral school district a complete set of new school books. They are valued at $175 and are donated on account of our loss by the cyclone. They were not given as an exchange, but as a direct gift. The thanks of our people are due to this generous publishing company and also to Mr. R. C. Story, our county superintendent.

A public library association was organized at Floral on the 4th inst. It is founded on principles of equity and intelligence and cannot fail to pay well on the investment. In these progressive times youth and age digest a vast amount of reading matter; and in no other way except by individual purchase can such certain results be obtained except by a circulating library. Donation of books will be thankfully received.

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

The High school will celebrate "Class Day" by a basket picnic at Riverside Park Saturday. We are in receipt of a neat invitation and program of the exercises.

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

Prof. Story has named the 14th of April as "Arbor Day" for the schools and has issued a circular to that effect. The planting of trees around the schoolhouses would be an excellent thing, and about the only way to make a success of it is to work in concert.

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

Contrast now:

Population of Creswell Township in 1870, nominal: 1878, 1,082; 1881, 2,908.

Population in Bolton in 1870, nominal; 1878, 1,838; 1881, 1,429.

The improvements in the values and products in the surrounding country has increased at even a larger percent than the population. Fifteen schoolhouses dot the prairie in the townships surrounding the city. One of the best evidences of the material and intellectual progress of the surrounding country. Arkansas City Democrat.

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

Article About Belle Plaine Schoolhouse.

Messrs. G. A. Hamilton, Wm. Carter, and S. A. Broadhead came over from Belle Plaine last week as a committee to examine our Cowley County stone with the view to using it in the erection of a large schoolhouse. They visited the Schmidt quarries, conferred with several of our leading mechanics, and as a result of their investigations the Belle Plaine schoolhouse will probably be built of Winfield material by Winfield men.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

County Commissioners.

The Commissioners have been in session since Monday and have got through with a large amount of business. In the school district appeal from district 89, Bolton Township, the Board sustained the action of the County Superintendent.

Excerpt...

[NINNESCAH CORRESPONDENT: "LADY MADGE."]

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

I had the pleasure of attending one of the most interesting Sabbath schools last Sunday I ever attended in Kansas. After the school closed, the Rev. W. A. Lindsey held the large congregation spellbound by his manner and delivery of one of the best sermons that was ever preached in old Ninnescah schoolhouse.

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

Select School.

I will commence a select school for primary and intermediate grades at the West Ward schoolhouse on Monday, April 17. Terms $1.00 per month. MRS. HAMILTON.

Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

Mrs. W. B. Caton will teach a mixed grade school, including German, in the East Ward schoolhouse, commencing the Monday following the close of the public schools.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 19, 1882.

School opened last Monday after the spring vacation of one week.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 19, 1882.

Messrs. Wolfe and Harnley secured the contract for putting the seats in the new schoolroom on southeast Summit Street.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 19, 1882.

In the school district appeal from District 89, Bolton Township, the Board of Commissioners sustained the action of the County Superintendent.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 19, 1882.

Mr. John B. Walker is renovating the James Benedict property, west of the Schoolhouse. This will make one of the neatest little homes in the city.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 19, 1882.

Mr. J. B. Curry, who has been teaching a term of school in Bolton Township, will now be found behind the counters of F. L. Davis' grocery at Geuda Springs.

Excerpt...

[CHIMES FROM BETHEL: "Pr."]

Cowley County Courant, April 20, 1882.

R. W. White, of Bethel, who taught a six months term of school in Fairview district, No. 21, closed his school last Saturday. Mr. White is one among the ablest teachers in the county, all because he lives at Bethel.

Excerpts...

[FROM "CLODHOPPER" - OMNIA GLEANINGS.]

Cowley County Courant, April 20, 1882.

School districts number 121 and 126 are in the market for teachers for a spring and summer term. Any idle teacher would do well to correspond with their clerks at Baltimore.

Still another change is called for in the laws regulating the management of our state school fund. In this section proceedings to foreclose mortgages on several farms have been instituted, said mortgages being given to secure the payment of money borrowed at twelve percent, per annum. At the same time hundreds of thousands of dollars of the common school fund are invested in Government bonds drawing three and a half and four percent. This money should be loaned to the people at four or five percent, and secured by mortgages based on the assessment of real estate, and save the hard-pushed, poor settler from the greedy extortions of the heartless loan agents. Certainly laws can be so framed as to make the fund safe and at the same time benefit a deserving and needy class of our population.

Cowley County Courant, April 20, 1882.

The lack of funds to run the public schools does not stop the schools by any means. Four teachers are at work in the East Ward, and have all the scholars they can manage, the parents paying $1.25 and $1.50 per month each pupil. In the West Ward Miss Klingman is the only one holding school at present, but next Monday Miss Alice Dunham, a young lady who has been very successful as a teacher in Nebraska, will open another subscription school for mixed grades. This will furnish schooling for forty or fifty more of our "young Americans." Those who entrust their children's schooling to Miss Dunham will secure most satisfactory results, as she is an accomplished teacher and used to conducting mixed schools. She will occupy one of the rooms in the West Ward school house, and will charge $1.00 per month for each pupil.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, April 20, 1882.

The Misses Julia Bovee and Nannie Jackson visited their former teacher, Mr. Floyd, and wife, of Burden, last week. The old horse that don't get tired took them, and they enjoyed their short trip on the train and the visit immensely.

Miss Mary Dalgarn is home from attending Prairie Home school.

Winfield Courier, April 20, 1882.

About thirty schools will be in session in Cowley County this spring.

Winfield Courier, April 20, 1882.

Miss Emma Crippen, who has been teaching in our schools during the past winter, left Monday for her home in Illinois.

Winfield Courier, April 20, 1882.

School district boards should look out for a fraud in the shape of agents selling a mathematical chart. These fellows are on the wing in this state, and they should be watched.

Winfield Courier, April 20, 1882.

The first picnic of the season was held at Riverside Park Saturday, it being the annual class-day for the public schools. About two hundred parents, scholars, and teachers were present. After the picnic dinner, the class favored the audience with music, declamations, and other exercises.

Winfield Courier, April 20, 1882.

The private schools, which take the place of the public schools for the summer, are prospering and seem to be quite popular with the people. In the east ward Prof. Trimble, Mrs. Caton, Miss Gibson, and Miss Mariam have all they can do. In the west ward Miss Allie Klingman, Miss Dunham, and Mrs. Hamilton are at work and will soon have full schools. With these schools at work there is no reason why the lack of funds to run the public schools should cripple education. Most any parent can better afford to pay $1.00 a month for the tuition of his children than to allow them to run at large for seven months.

Excerpt...

[PLEASANT VIEW JOTTINGS: "LEAN CONTRIBUTOR."]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 26, 1882.

"Old Resident" quotes "that which was eternal was from the beginning." and so argues that Dist. 36 should be still known as the Theaker." The work he quotes from has been lately revised however, and District 32 now appears as Pleasant View. Sela!

[STATE NEWS.]

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

Of the million people in Kansas, 348,000 are of school age; 210,000 are enrolled, and 130,000 attend school.

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

Professor Story is visiting schools in Bolton Township this week.

Excerpts...

[VALLEY VIEW CORRESPONDENT: "BOBOLINK."]

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

Prof. R. C. Story visited our school on last Thursday and remained until evening, giving a little talk to the people on the benefit of having a central high school. It meets our approbation and we believe the majority, if not all, are in favor of it. Our school under the tutorage of Miss Ella Freeland is getting along nicely. Many of the larger pupils have left, it being the busy season of the year.

Some of the young misses of our neighborhood are receiving instructions in music from Prof. Farringer, of Winfield.

Sabbath school at 2 o'clock every Sabbath afternoon at Valley View schoolhouse. The school continues the year around with a full and regular attendance. We welcome anybody and everybody, as it is union and not denominational, at least it is understood so.

Inserts...

[TORRANCE CORRESPONDENT: "CERES."]

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

Our school, under the management of Mr. S. Smith, is running quite nicely.

The young people have organized a prayer meeting, and meet every Thursday evening. This speaks well for our community religiosity. We also have a prayer meeting every Sunday evening when there is no preaching. Bro. Knight, as a preacher, meets the wants of the people in being an old fashioned Methodist and preaching Holy Ghost religion. Bro. Brown, of the M. E. Church South, will begin a series of meetings at the schoolhouse Sunday evening, April 23rd. The Sunday following Quarterly meeting will be held, at which time the Presiding Elder will be present. We are praying for a glorious outpouring of the Spirit on the meeting.

Excerpts...

[UDALL CORRESPONDENT: "FRITZ."]

Winfield Courier, April 27, 1882.

Our school registers forty-eight pupils this spring. A new schoolhouse is among our necessities.

O. W. Jones has organized a singing class here.

Superintendent Story paid our school a visit last Wednesday.

Insert...

[CAMBRIDGE.]

Cowley County Courant, April 27, 1882.

This little place is also blessed with a neat and commodious schoolhouse, used also for church services. It is built of stone and is 25 x 60 feet and two stories high. School is now in progress with H. T. Albert and Miss Maud Leedy as teachers. There are about forty scholars in attendance.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 3, 1882.

Prof. R. C. Story, our county superintendent, was in the city last week, and paid a visit to our schools, which he reports in a flourishing condition under the supervision of the efficient principal, Prof. Atkinson.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 3, 1882.

The S. W. S. P. U. will hold a meeting at the Mercer schoolhouse in West Bolton on Saturday, May 6th, 1882, at 7:30 p.m. An attendance of all members is desired, business of importance being on hand. F. LORRY, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 3, 1882.

The Republicans of Bolton Township are requested to meet at the Bland Schoolhouse on Thursday, May 11th, at 7:30 p.m. to choose three delegates and three alternates to attend the Co. Convention at Winfield on Saturday, May 13. J. D. GUTHRIE, Chairman Tp. Com.

Cowley County Courant, May 4, 1882.

The whiskey cases have been dragging their tiresome lengths through the District court now in session here, since Tuesday of last week, and up to the present writing (Wednesday afternoon) four cases have been disposed of and the case of Dr. Wells is pending. The two cases against Dr. Fleming came up Tuesday, one was thrown out of court after the jury had been empaneled, and the other was tried up to the time for the jury to retire, when the Judge instructed the foreman of the jury to sign a verdict of not guilty, which he did, and the defendant was discharged. The case against McRorey was dismissed without going to trial. The costs accumulated up to the present time are something like $500 or $600, and still there is no money added to the school fund in the way of fines. The taxpayers may murmur a little after awhile when these bills are to be paid, but then they will have the consolation of knowing that the Saint John agents at this place have had that much fun. We shall endeavor to furnish a full account of the trials in due time.

[REPORT FROM E. T. TRIMBLE - SUPT., WINFIELD CITY SCHOOLS.]

Cowley County Courant, May 4, 1882.

Report of Superintendent of the City Schools.

To the School Board of Winfield.

The school year just ended has generally been one of progress, though the short term last year followed by one but little longer this year has rendered it impossible to perform the amount of work necessary, yet the advancement of the various grades has been generally satisfactory; indeed, better than could have been expected under the circumstances.

The grading of the schools has caused a better attendance and consequently more interest than was formerly shown by the pupils, yet it has required time to bring about this change and the prospects are that if the term can be lengthened to the average, the school will enter upon a term of prosperity far in advance of what they have heretofore enjoyed.

In order that you may understand the advancement made in the last three years, I here present a comparative statement of the years: 1879-80, whole number enrolled, 623; average attendance, 247; percent of attendance, 84; 1880-81, whole number enrolled, 726; average attendance, 452; percent of attendance, 92; 1881-82, whole number enrolled, 891; average attendance, 533; percent of attendance, 93.

The above comparison shows that while there has been a gain in the whole number enrolled, yet the average attendance and percent of attendance has increased at a greater ratio.

This gain is shown more particularly in the High School Department as may be seen from the following statement of attendance. 1879-80, number that attended three months, 36; average attendance, 23; percent of attendance, 80; 1880-81, number that attended three months, 40; average attendance, 36; percent of attendance, 93; 1881-82, number that attended three months, 54; average attendance, 46; percent of attendance, 90.

The gains shown by the above is but an index of interest shown by the pupils. In earnestness and application, I can say that the High School is 100 percent better than it was in 1879-80. As a further evidence of the progress made in this department, I may mention that the number who completed the course in 1880 and received certificates of graduation was two, in 1881 there were five, and this year there is a class of fourteen; and the prospects are that the class next year will be still larger.

The course of study which was arranged three years ago although then in advance of the grades is unsuited to the present advancement of the schools and should be arranged before the commencement of the next term.

All the schools have suffered because of a lack of apparatus and library of reference, but more especially has this been the case in the High School where apparatus and books of reference are, if possible, more necessary than in the lower grades.

By voluntary contributions and by giving entertainments, the teachers and pupils have this year purchased books to the amount of $50.00 and the present graduating class by giving a supper during the holidays raised over $50,00, which was expended for Philosophical apparatus.

If possible, a fund should be provided to be expended for additions to the nucleus of a library and apparatus thus gained.

I would also call your attention to the conditions of the school grounds. There should be an effort made to ornament and improve the grounds by planting trees. Driving and riding across the grounds should be prohibited and strictly enforced as the schools are not only annoyed during study hours, but when the pupils are at play, their lives are endangered. It is also necessary that walks be provided. As the grounds are at present when it rains, the pupils and teachers are obliged to wade through mud and water often over the shoe top in order to get to the school house.

Probably most of the sickness of pupils and teachers has been caused by getting their feet wet in going to and from school. In addition to this, the mud carried into the school rooms dries; and by sweeping, the dust settles on the walls, desks, and seats, and accumulating, is breathed by the pupils, thus causing disease.

The windows of the buildings have never been so that they could be lowered and raised to secure proper ventilation. I have been unable to get them properly adjusted though I have several times called attention to the fact. The lack of curtains at some of the windows has no doubt caused much injury to the pupils as they have been compelled to use their eyes in a strong glare of light; as a result, some have been compelled to leave school for a time until their eyes improved and some perhaps have received injuries from which they will never fully recover.

At present there is no well on the school grounds of the west ward; and though there is a well in the east ward, there is no pump so that the schools are entirely deprived of water except what can be secured from wells not on the school grounds.

The outhouses in the east ward are old and unfit for the uses of the schools, and new buildings are an absolute necessity. I would recommend that all teachers who have given satisfaction and wish to remain be retained and that the selection of teachers for the coming year be made as early as possible.

Respectfully submitted, E. T. TRIMBLE.

Cowley County Courant, May 4, 1882.

Emporia seems to be very much pleased with the working of the Kindergarten at the State Normal Schools. Why can't Winfield have a Kindergarten school? It is the best school in the world for children. Let us have Kindergarten by all means.

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[PLEASANT VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: "SCHUYLERIUS."]

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

Holland school closed with an exhibition on the evening of the 14th. The house was well filled and the exercises were good.

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[PLEASANT VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: "HORATIUS."]

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

MARRIED. On the 13th inst., the holy bonds of wedlock were welded around Mr. Simeon Beech and Miss Ella Grimes by Rev. Morehead, at Arkansas City. Sim is an exceptionally model young man and worthy of the affections of a good, true, loving hearted school ma'am. It is sad to think that the pedagogical fraternity loses one of its fair lights, but such is fate.

Miss Florence Goodwin, having closed a successful term of school at Enterprise, has opened a spring term at the Centennial. Miss Goodwin has made an excellent start in the profession of her choice, but it is feared that her enthusiasm for the work may have a tendency to undermine her health.

Successful and interesting Sabbath schools are in progress in districts 116 and 93. Mr. George Teter superintends the former and Dr. Marsh the latter. The simple fact that these gentlemen are at the helms is sufficient assurance of a pleasant and profitable time.

Mr. Hilsabeck closed a satisfactory term of school in district 10 a week ago. Jud is a pedagogue "to the manner born."

Each alternate Sabbath, Rev. Morehead commands the gospel artillery at Enterprise schoolhouse. He is an entertaining speaker, and thereby attracts a large congregation.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

W. M. Christopher opens school this week in district 97, New Salem.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

Miss Florence Goodwin rides seven miles every morning to her school in Beaver Township.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

Miss Mollie Dale, of Cedarvale, will teach the spring term of school in district 63, Otter Township.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

The new School Board met Monday evening and organized by electing Dr. Emerson, President of the Board, and Fred C. Hunt, Clerk. The Board meets again Thursday evening, and desires that all applicants for positions in the schools fill such applications in writing at an early date. It was thought that the schools would be opened about September first.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

A party of swindlers are now circulating through Kansas, defrauding district school boards by selling them Wood's mathematical charts. They take in the board with a long speech, and then agree to deliver the goods at some future date, but take a school order at once, which they take to some broker and get cashed. They sell the charts at from $25 to $40, when anyone can buy them in the east at $3 per set. Country boards will do well to look out for these gentry. So says the Leavenworth Times.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

James Hutchinson has opened school in district 112, Windsor Township.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

District 126 has completed its schoolhouse, and school will open in charge of J. M. Terry, lately from Illinois.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

The school land of the county is being taken up pretty generally. One piece sold the other day at forty dollars per acre.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

Three more of Cowley's teachers have gone to the mountains: S. F. Overman, R. B. Overman, and L. C. Brown.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

J. M. Mercer, W. M. Christopher, Miss Mary Christopher, and Miss Mollie Dale were applicants for teachers' certificates at the examination Saturday.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

Miss E. L. Merriam is starting a class in Landscape painting in oil. All who desire instruction will please call upon her at the residence of G. L. Eastman, corner of 7th Avenue and Millington Streets, after school hours during the week, or on Saturdays.

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

The primary of the Republicans of Richland Township will be held on Thursday, May 11th, at 2 o'clock p.m., at the Summit schoolhouse, for the purpose of electing delegates to attend County convention to be held at Winfield on Saturday, May 13th, 1882.

LEWIS STEPHENS, Chairman, Township Committee.

[HIGH SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES.]

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

High School Commencement.

The third annual commencement exercises of the Winfield High School will be held in the Opera House Friday evening. The exercises will commence promptly at 8 o'clock, after which the doors will be opened only during music. Those who desire reserved seats can have them marked on the chart by calling at Goldsmith's.

Program given...am giving names only of participants.

Rev. J. E. Platter, Rosina Ann Frederick, William Elmer Hodges, Leni Leota Gary, Charles Israel Klingman, Ida Geneva Trezise, Hattie Eva Andrews, Anne Electa Rowland, Charles Francis Ware, Haidee Augusta Trezise, Lizzie M. McDonald, Rose Amelia Rounds, Mary Lottie Randall, James Alexander Cairns, Minnie Francis Sumpter, Rev. P. F. Jones.

[SCHOOL REPORT.]

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

Report of Superintendent of City Schools.

WINFIELD, KANSAS, APRIL 29, 1882.

To the members of the School Board.

GENTLEMEN: The school year just closed has generally been one of progress, though the short term last year followed by one but little longer this year, has made it impossible to perform the amount of work necessary, yet the advancement of the various grades has been generally satisfactory, indeed better than could have been expected under the circumstances. The grading of the schools has brought about a better attendance, and consequently the pupils have been more interested and have made more satisfactory progress. Yet it has required time to bring about this change, and the prospects are that if the term can be lengthened to the average, the schools will enter upon a term of prosperity far in advance of what they have heretofore enjoyed.

In order that you may understand the advancement made in the last three years, I here present a comparative statement of the years.

1879-80 1880-81 1881-82

Whole No. Enrolled 621 726 891

Average attendance 247 452 533

Percent of attendance 84 92 93

The above comparison shows that while there has been a gain in the whole number enrolled, yet the average attendance and percent of attendance has increased at a greater ratio.

The gain is shown more particularly in the High School department, and may be seen from the following statement of attendance in that department.

1879-80 1880-81 1881-82

No. that attended three months or more 36 40 54

Average attendance 23 36 46

Percent of attendance 80 93 98

The gains shown by the above is but an index of the interest shown by the pupils. In earnestness and application I can say that the High School is 100 percent better than it was in 1879-80. As a further evidence of the progress made in this department, I may mention that the number who completed the course in 1880 and received certificates of graduation, was two, in 1881 there were five, and this year there is a class of fourteen, and the prospects are that the class next year will be still larger. The course of study which was arranged three years ago, although then in advance of the grades, is unsuited to the present advancement of the schools and should be re-arranged before the commencement of another term.

All the schools have suffered because of a lack of apparatus and library of reference; but more especially has this been felt in the High school, where apparatus and books of reference are if possible more necessary than in the lower grades. By voluntary contributions and by giving entertainments the teachers and pupils have this year purchased books to the amount of $50., and the present graduating class by giving a supper during Holidays raised over $50, which was expended for Philosophical apparatus. If possible a fund should be provided to be expended for additions to the nucleus of a library and apparatus thus gained.

I would also call your attention to the condition of the school grounds.

There should be an effort made to ornament and improve the school grounds by planting trees. Driving and riding across the grounds should be prohibited and strictly enforced as the schools are not only annoyed during study hours but when the pupils are at play their lives are endangered. As the grounds are at present, when it rains the pupils and teachers are obliged to wade through mud and water often over their shoe-tops, in order to get to the schoolhouse.

Probably most of the sickness of pupils and teachers has been caused by getting their feet wet in going to and from school. In addition to this the mud carried into the school rooms dries, and by sweeping the dust settles on the walls, desks, and seats, and accumulating, is breathed by the pupils, thus causing disease.

The windows of the buildings have never been so that they could be lowered and raised to secure ventilation. I have been unable to get them properly adjusted, though I have several times called attention to the fact.

The lack of curtains at some of the windows has no doubt caused much injury to pupils, as they have been compelled to use their eyes in a strong glare of light. As a result, some have been obliged to leave school for a time until their eyes improved, and some perhaps have received injuries from which they will never fully recover.

At present there is no well on the school grounds of the West Ward, and though there is a well in the East Ward, there is no pump, so that the schools are entirely deprived of water except what can be secured from wells not on the school grounds.

The out houses in the East Ward are old and unfit for the uses of the schools, and new buildings are an absolute necessity.

I would recommend that all teachers who have given satisfaction and wish to remain be retained, and that the selection of teachers for the coming year be made as soon as possible.

Respectfully submitted. E. T. TRIMBLE.

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[NORTHWEST CRESWELL CORRESPONDENT: "NOVUS HOMO."]

Winfield Courier, May 4, 1882.

Some of the correspondents of the COURIER have been naming the men they would like as Superintendent of schools. There are many who could fill the office with credit, but what we want is the best man for the place, a true worker, and one who has had long experience in the art of teaching. I think that Prof. Atkinson of Arkansas City would be the best man we could find in the county to fill the office. In order to have good schools and good teachers, we must remember to be very careful and choose the best men for school officers.

The spring crop of babies has been very large. I will not attempt to name them for fear I miss some. At the present increase we will have a large number of scholars in school in a few months. NOVUS HOMO.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, May 11, 1882.

A few Salemites attended Sunday school and Mr. E. Service of Prairie Home schoolhouse on last Sunday and report their school in a flourishing condition and they appreciated the kindly way in which they were entertained. They expect to be favored with the presence of Rev. Cairns of Winfield on the 30th.

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[ORCHARD COTTAGE CORRESPONDENT: "M. LEWIS."]

Winfield Courier, May 11, 1882.

The Disciples or Christian and Baptist have organized and are conducting a union Sunday school very successfully at Vernon Center schoolhouse, and in the language of Mr. Millspaugh, "If the Bible is taught in its simplicity, christians will be the harvest reward."

Excerpt...

[PLEASANT VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: "HORATIUS."]

Winfield Courier, May 11, 1882.

Candidates for county superintendent of public instruction appear to be looming up thick and fast. Among the brilliant galaxy of names mentioned, I am pleased to note that of T. J. Rude of Dexter. Should R. C. Story, the present incumbent, decline positively to enter the field again, no one perhaps could fill the position more efficiently and satisfactorily than Mr. Rude. Tom is a successful teacher of long experience, and is possessed of a polite and pleasant address, accommodating and approachable disposition, enthusiastic and progressive in educational matters, and a happy faculty of imparting his spirit of enthusiasm, vim, push, and energy to others for the advancement of the profession. With his abilities and qualifications, the good work already accomplished in the county would continue to progress. It is to be hoped that if we are to lose Mr. Story, that his aspirations for a higher superintendency may be realized, thereby extending his field of usefulness to the boundaries of our broad young State, which is destined to soon lead all other states of the Union in the education of the masses. If Story must go, give us Tom Rude.

[WINFIELD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION EXERCISES.]

Winfield Courier, May 11, 1882.

Graduating Exercises.

The Graduating exercises of the Winfield High school, on last Friday evening, were well attended and the program was very interesting. Each member of the class did well, and altogether it was a highly creditable affair. The opening prayer, by Rev. Platter, was followed by a "Greeting Song" by the class, after which the Salutatory, "Is Our Destiny in Our Own Hands?" was rendered in an excellent manner by Rose Frederick. Next was a well delivered address, "Nobility of Industry," by William Hodges, and then Leonta Gary's "Tablets of Memory," which sparkled all over with bright thoughts, left us in a pleasing frame of mind to enjoy the music which followed. Charlie Klingman's "Electricity" showed careful thought and was succeeded by a rendition rich in sentiment, "Beyond the Alps Lies Our Italy," by Ida Trezise. Hattie Andrews' "Watch" was excellently delivered as was Anna Rowland's neat rendition of "Character is Power." After music, that "Storms Strengthen the Oak," was demonstrated by Charles Ware, and then in a clear, distinct voice Haidee Trezise showed the consequences of being "Weighed and Found Wanting." Lizzie McDonald proved the necessity of constructing our characters of substantial material in "We Build Our Own Monuments." The results of "Home Influence," were shown by Rose Rounds. Then came more music, and after that "Delve Deeper," by Mary Randall, and "The Value of Books," by James Cairns. Then came the Valedictory: the farewell to school-mates and teacher, the severing of the final link that bound the class together, which was rendered in a creditable manner by Minnie Sumpter. After music was the presentation of diplomas, accompanied by words of advice and commendation, by Prof. E. T. Trimble, and with the farewell song by the class and the benediction by Rev. P. F. Jones, the exercises were ended and the class of 1882 had passed from the happy days of school life into the busy, active life of the outside world. Each member received a profusion of bouquets from appreciative friends, and deserved all the praise bestowed upon them as eager ones gathered around and congratulated them.

NAMES MENTIONED:

1. ROSE FREDERICK.

2. WILLIAM HODGES.

3. LEOTA GARY.

4. CHARLIE KLINGMAN.

5. IDA TREZISE.

6. HATTIE ANDREWS.

7. ANNA ROWLAND.

8. CHARLES WARE.

9. ANNA ROWLAND.

10. HAIDEE TREZISE.

11. LIZZIE McDONALD.

12. ROSE ROUNDS.

13. MARY RANDALL.

14. JAMES CAIRNS.

15. MINNIE SUMPTER.

Winfield Courier, May 11, 1882.

The School Board, at an adjourned meeting Monday night, passed a resolution employing Prof. Trimble as superintendent of schools for the ensuing year at the same terms as last year. The Board also decided to put down sidewalks around the school buildings at once. They meet this (Wednesday) evening to select the other teachers.

Winfield Courier, May 11, 1882.

The following is a report of Tisdale school for first month, ending May 5th, 1882. Number of pupils enrolled 38, number of pupils not tardy 25, average daily attendance 29.5 percent, of attendance 92.5. Names of pupils neither absent nor tardy: Mina Conrad, Lottie Moore, Sammie Shorter, Fred Wycoff. THIRZA DOBYNS, Teacher.

Cowley County Courant, May 11, 1882.

The Saint John school fund theory is not panning out very flattering at the present term of District Court in Cowley County. Whether it is the fault of the Governor's pet law he talks so much about, or the fault of his agents here, we are not prepared to say at present, but it is a fact out of fourteen criminal cases which have come up for trial, the fines assessed cannot yield more than about $500.00 to the school fund, while the costs which will have to be paid by the county will not be less than $1,500.00 or $2,000.00. The balance seems to be on the wrong side this whirl.

Cowley County Courant, May 11, 1882.

The school board met last Monday evening at the office of the president, Dr. Emerson. Present: George Emerson, president; J. C. Fuller, vice president; A. H. Doane, B. F. Wood, and Fred C. Hunt, clerk. A communication from County Superintendent Story was read and filed. Bill of T. B. Myers for hall rent for commencement exercises rejected, the board holding that it had nothing to do with the matter.

Cowley County Courant, May 11, 1882.

The third annual commencement of the Winfield High School was well attended last evening, the opera house being crowded to its utmost capacity, and a goodly number had to go home, not being able to get inside of the building.

The exercises opened with music, and a prayer by Rev. J. E. Platter, followed by the greeting song by the whole class. The salutatory, "Is our destiny in our own hands?" by Miss Rosina Frederick, was splendid. "Nobility of Industry," by W. E. Hodges, was good and was followed with "Tablets of Memory," by Miss Leni Gary, which was excellent. Charlie Klingman came next and his "Electricity" seemed to take the whole audience. This was followed by "Beyond the Alps lies our Italy," by Miss Ida G. Trezise and "Watch," by Miss Hattie E. Andrews, both of which were rendered clearly and distinctly, and were very good. Miss Anna E. Rowland fully demonstrated that "Character is Power," and Charles F. Ware told us how "Storms strengthen the oak." May Charlie have to pass through few storms, but yet be able to compare his strength with that of the sturdy old oak. "Weighed and found wanting," by Miss Haidee A. Trezise, was splendid. Miss Trezise has a fine voice and rendered her part very clearly and distinctly, as did Miss Lizzie McDonald in her rendition of "We build our own mountains." "Home Influence," by Miss Rose A. Rounds, was excellent, as well as "Delve Deeper," by Miss Mary L. Randall. James A. Cairns taught us "The value of books," and was followed with the Valedictory, by Miss Minnie F. Sumpter, which was fine and well delivered.

The presentation of diplomas by Professor Trimble made each graduate's heart glad and the Professor proved that his class of 1882 had done so well. The exercises were interspersed with music, and last came the "Farewell song" by the whole class, in which every heart and voice joined. The benediction was pronounced by Rev. P. F. Jones and the audience dismissed. Each one was fairly showered with bouquets and richly deserved the honors. In one minute after the dismissal, the stage was crowded with proud and joyous friends who were eager to congratulate the class of 1882 for having done so nicely. May their troubles and difficulties through life be surmounted as easily as those of their school days, is the wish of THE COURANT.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 17, 1882.

The following named pupils were neither absent nor tardy during the last school month, in the Intermediate Department of the A. C. Schools: Lillie Rarick, Frank Pearson, Morse Hutchison, Marion Gilbert.

Cowley County Courant, May 18, 1882.

The following are the teachers employed for the next year in the city schools: Miss Klingman, Miss Bryant, Miss Hamill, Miss Crippen, Miss Gibson, Miss Ella Kelly, Mrs. Trimble, Miss Rosa Rounds, and Mrs. Will B. Caton. E. T. TRIMBLE, Principal.

Excerpt...

[OMNIA ITEMS.]

Cowley County Courant, May 18, 1882.

School District No. 126 [?] has dedicated its neat new school house, with Mr. J. M. Mercer, late of Johnson County, Illinois, at the call-bell, who exhibits a thorough knowledge of the theory and practice of teaching, by winning the good will of his pupils by his pleasant and agreeable manners and ability to assist them in making commendable progress in their studies.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

School Tax.

Under the law only eight mills on the dollar of assessment can be levied for school purposes, and it takes fully that amount to keep our city schools running seven months in the year. Two years ago we had nine months school and the district got in debt and is still in debt. Besides the ordinary expenses there is need of sidewalks and other improvements on the school grounds. But neither improvements nor debts can be paid except out of that 8 mill tax. If we could raise a tax of 10 mills, we could make the improvements, pay the debts, and still keep up the seven months school. There is only one way to do all this, which is to make the improvements by going into debt, bond the debts, and then raise a two mill tax to pay the bonds. This would be a round about way to raise a ten mill tax for school purposes, but it needs to be done.

[NOMINATIONS FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.]

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.

EDS. COURIER: Quite a number of persons both in the country and in Winfield, who are desirous of seeing the office of county superintendent filled by a competent person, are favorable to the nomination of Mrs. W. B. Caton. Mrs. Caton has been a very successful teacher in the Winfield schools for several years. Before this she had a wide experience as teacher both in country and city schools. All who know her recognize the fact that she possesses the decision of character and the administrative ability necessary for success and efficiency in this office. While we would not urge Mrs. Caton for this office because she is a woman, yet this ought not to stand in her way. When there are so few ways in which the public can reward the women who so nobly serve us as teachers and as public-spirited citizens, they ought to have at least an even chance for an office for which many of them are qualified, and which many women throughout the state are filling successfully. By far the largest part of our teachers are ladies, and the nomination of Mrs. Caton by our Republican convention would be a graceful recognition of their services by a party which is not in the habit of letting unreasonable prejudice stand in the way of doing a good thing. VERNON.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

Mr. Will Christopher is training young ideas in the Crooked Elm schoolhouse.

School closed in Prairie Home schoolhouse may 12th.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

Miss McCoy had a private parlor concert with her pupils Monday evening. A good many were present, and the performances fully sustained Miss McCoy's excellent reputation as a music teacher.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1882.

The Board of Education met last week and selected as teachers for the coming term the following persons: Misses Bryant, Gibson, Hamill, Klingman, Rose Rounds, Ella Kelly, and Mrs. Caton and Mrs. Trimble. There were several applications which were not acted upon but left over to the next meeting. The board will meet again next Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 24, 1882.

The initial number of the Redfield Courier; published at Redfield, Dallas County, Iowa, by J. T. Floyd, is before us. Its editor was formerly one of Cowley County's foremost school teachers, and we heartily wish him and his new enterprise a long life of prosperity.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 24, 1882.

NOTICE. There will be a Cemetery meeting held at the Parker Schoolhouse on Monday evening, May 29th, 1882, at 7 o'clock, p.m., for the purpose of a general settlement with the Treasurer and Secretary, and transacting all general business. The fence is about completed, and all are requested to attend without fail.

By order of G. H. SHEARER, J. COOK, M. LEWIS, Committee.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1882.

SUPERINTENDENCY.

Many persons interested in the welfare of our school system who highly appreciate the excellent qualities of Mrs. W. B. Caton have induced her to consent to be a candidate for county superintendent of public instruction before the Republican convention, and desire the COURIER to announce the fact. Mrs. Caton would feel highly complimented should she receive the nomination, and if elected would use her best endeavors to fill the office successfully; but she will not solicit support or make any canvas whatever. Mrs. Caton is a lady of high character, thoroughly educated, very energetic and successful, and as a teacher, pleasant, lady-like, and helpful, and the fact that she is a woman is not be considered a disqualification. Some of the best superintendents in the state are women.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1882.

The contract for building the sidewalks around the school building was let to Wise & Lundy, at 8-3/4 cents per square foot for the 4 foot walk and 10 cents per square foot for 8 foot walk.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1882.

A beautiful 12 stop mirror top parlor organ with two full set reeds for only $60.00. A liberal discount for cash. Inquire of Ed. Farringer at Conservatory of Music.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1882.

Lou. Zenor was appointed clerk of the School Board in place of Fred C. Hunt, resigned. It is rumored that Fred intends going to Florida.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1882.

The examination of teachers ordered by the Board of Education has been postponed until after the normal.

Winfield Courier, May 25, 1882.

The Board of Education met Monday evening and elected Miss Clute as one of the city teachers for the coming year.

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[TISDALE CORRESPONDENT: "X."]

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

I see some of your correspondents are presenting the claims of their friends for the position of County Superintendent, and I note that one is quite strong on Tom Rude. For information I would ask, what are Tom's qualifications? I've no doubt but that he is a good fellow, but is he capable? Does he stand high in grade? Has he plenty of good common sense? Is he a fair businessman? In regard to the lady recommended, I question the propriety of electing a lady to that office. I noticed quite a list of aspirants in the COURIER sometime since, among them are parties that are not competent to teach a primary and they fully expect to make a good race through their political friends. One of your correspondents says "the Republican party can afford to give the office to a certain candidate out of compliment." The Republican party may afford it, but the people cannot. At no time since the county has been organized has there been the need of a good thorough-going superintendent that there now is. As a people we are getting careless about our schools, and they are falling into the hands of soft pated sentimentalists that have conceived the idea that they are called to fill a high mission and spend the most of their time looking above the common duties of life. The result is, high toned teachers and poor schools. What we want is good square sense. We would not allow a person to train a colt simply because they held a No. 1 certificate--we would find out what they knew about colts. Yet we ask but one question about teachers, is the certificate all right? Of how much more value are our children than colts?

Sadie Davis, one of our Tisdale girls, is teaching near Denver, Colorado.

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

MRS. CATON FOR SUPERINTENDENT.

EDS. COURIER: I was much pleased to notice that our very efficient and talented Mrs. Caton was a candidate for County Superintendent of public instruction. While we would not in any way say one word in opposition to any of the candidates already announced, we feel constrained to say a few words unasked in favor of Mrs. Caton for our next County Superintendent. The writer of this was a resident of Peoria County, Illinois, for a number of years. The most efficient Superintendent, and one who did the most to advance the cause of education in that great and populous county during all our stay there, was a lady superintendent. Mrs. Caton is well known by our people, especially so by the citizens of Winfield. When I say that Mrs. Caton possesses all the qualifications of a first-class County Superintendent, one of whom all our people all over the county would justly be proud, I think I speak only the sentiments of every person who has had the privilege of becoming acquainted with her. She undoubtedly possesses eminent abilities and fair fitness to give increased character and lustre to the great educational interests of our county, for which our present superintendent, Mr. Story, has done so much, and so well. We speak for Mrs. Caton a hearty and unanimous endorsement by the good citizens of our great and rapidly growing county, who desire the broadest and largest educational culture for all the children, and that they see to it, that she is made by their votes our next County Superintendent of Public Instruction. THE PUBLIC GOOD.

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

SUPERINTENDENT.

We are glad to see so much interest manifested in the matter of candidates for county Superintendent, and hope it is all in the interest of the schools rather than personal interest of special candidates. On the outside one correspondent asks: "What are Tom Rude's qualifications?" While we are not a special advocate of Mr. Rude, we will answer that we know him well, that he is a good fellow, is capable, stands in high grade, has plenty of good common sense, is a fair businessman, and will get our most cordial support if nominated. We indorse all that has been said of Mrs. Caton in his paper and former numbers. There are other good candidates for the place whom we shall notice as they present themselves.

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

Railroad Taxation.

In another place we give the comments of the Topeka Capital on an article in the Kansas Educationist written by Prof. R. C. Story on the subject of the distribution of the taxes paid by railroads. We have for some time been fully impressed with the injustice of taxing the whole county equally to pay the interest and principle of railroad bonds and then giving the benefit of school and township taxes which are collected of the railroad, only to those school districts and townships through which the road passes, and we had determined to air this subject well during the coming canvass with the view of securing such legislation in relation to these matters as shall be just and fair to all the districts and townships in the county.

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

A NEW AMENDMENT.

In the last number of the Educationist, Prof. R. C. Story, superintendent of public instruction for Cowley County, discusses a new amendment proposed by him regarding the payment of taxes applied for the maintenance of the schools. His idea is that whenever a municipality, city, township, or county shall, by the voting of bonds, create a property upon which taxes are levied, such property shall be taxed for the benefit of the public schools; that all property now in counties, townships, or cities which has been brought into the same by reason of the voting of bonds shall be taxed for the benefit of the public schools of the corporation voting the bonds. An amendment to the State constitution embodying the above is what Prof. Story wants, and further than that, he would compel officials to turn all fines and forfeitures into the school fund of the county; he also favors the levy of a State tax of two mills for the support of these common schools.

Prof. Story gives some interesting figures, which are worth its inclusion. In February last, for example, California disbursed State school fund to the amount of $1,482,883, or over $7 per pupil. In the month following Kansas apportioned $125,882, being thirty-six cents to each pupil. California in 1880 spent $18.06 upon each scholar enrolled; Massachusetts, $16.86. In 1870 Kansas' expenditure for each scholar enrolled was $10.644; in 1875, $6.98; in 1880, $6.45; in 1881, $8.01. The writer wants to know, if in the light of these facts, Kansas is moving in the right direction, and intimates strongly that she is not. If the expenditure in either California or Massachusetts be taken as a standard, ours falls far below it. But then it should be remembered that the conditions differ in different states. From the old Bay State has often come the cry that education there was too costly; that other States who paid less secured for their children as good an education in every way. Then again, the question might be asked, how much better an education does the Massachusetts child get for $16.86 per year than the Kansas child for $6.45? The writer correctly says that taxes in Kansas are sufficiently high, and school taxes are generously levied by the people of the State. Our school fund, when it reaches the ten million period, will yield large returns; yet it should be remembered that at the same time the school population of the State will be proportionately larger. The question Prof. Story asks is, how can we secure an ample school fund without increasing the burdens of taxation and waiting fifty years to attain the results.

Another subject discussed in connection with the main question is the inequality of taxation, particularly as it effects the various townships in those counties which vote for railroad bonds. At the present time there is railroad property in Kansas valued at over $25,000,000, upon which taxes were paid to the amount of $740,786.57 in 1881. This money was distributed through sixty-three counties. While in many instances, the railroads were secured by the counties themselves voting bonds, in many other cases they were voted by townships and cities. On July 1st, 1880, the bonded indebtedness of the counties of the State, in the main created by the voting of railroad bonds, was $7,339,666. Here is brought forward the unjust feature in this matter, and the writer takes Cowley County as an example, which will do for all the other counties of the State where township bond voting has been the rule. In that county twenty-eight school districts secure the taxes on railroad property, while one hundred and thirty-four pay the bonds and the interest thereon. One-fourth of the districts of the county get the benefit of this property, while all help alike in bearing the burden of the bonds. Thirteen townships get taxes on his property, while eleven do not see a single cent of it. In nearly every railroad county in the State, therefore, one-fourth of the school districts reap a fruitful harvest from railroad property, while the other three-fourths help pay the bonds and get no benefit whatever therefrom. Prof. Story considers this to be a situation of affairs for which there is neither excuse nor justification and to remedy this is his idea in bringing forward the amendment quoted in the first part of this article. It is a subject that merits careful consideration. Topeka Capital.

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

The school at Excelsior schoolhouse, in district 9, closes a week from Friday, on June 9th. In the evening the young ladies of the district will have a concert and ice cream supper, to which all are invited.

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

Prof. R. C. Story, of Winfield, spent Thursday of last week visiting the Burden schools, and he reports them as doing good work in part. The lower grades, under Miss West, are too crowded, and are supplied with too little necessary apparatus to do work to the satisfaction of the teachers. Burden will do the right thing when a four or six room house is built for the accommodation of the children of the district. Burden Enterprise.

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

County Political Points.

The candidates for Superintendent of Schools seem to be numerously numerous. No new ones since our last issue.

Mr. Limerick's school closed week before last and Alex will begin to stir up the animals at once. He will have a large support in the north and northwest.

Tom Rude is gathering lots of friends around him and will succeed in making the race mighty interesting for the other fellows.

The candidacy of Mrs. Caton seems to have taken other aspirants by surprise.

Eugene Millard is still on deck and his friends are enthusiastic.

The representative question in the north district is getting active. S. M. Fall, R. F. Burden, John Wallace, John D. Maurer, and S. P. Strong are mentioned as possible timber, while E. A. Henthorn and J. W. Weimer are in the field.

Rumor says that Arkansas City will furnish a strong candidate for Clerk of the District Court.

Rev. P. B. Lee, of Vernon, is being urged by his friends to allow his name to be used in connection with the office of Probate Judge. Mr. Lee would make a strong race for the position.

The indications are that Hon. C. R. Mitchell will be returned to the House from the lower district without opposition.

Hon. T. R. Bryan is being pressed by friends to become a candidate for the legislature from this district. If he consents to make the race, he will have but little opposition. No better man can be found for the position.

Excerpt...

[FLORAL CORRESPONDENT: "BUCKEYE."]

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

The Floral public school closed on the 5th inst., after a four months term. The patrons of the school came en masse to see and hear, and to eat. Baskets and buckets were filled to the brim, but the contents were quickly displaced by the hungry crowd. Your correspondent was the fortunate possessor of a two story appetite, and did excellent service in sampling the goodies, after which he declared the dinner a success. I would that such things could occur six times a week. Mr. A. H. Limerick is a success as a teacher. He has labored under great disadvantages, but has done splendid work. As he is an aspirant for the office of County Superintendent, I would say that he is eminently fitted and qualified for the office. He is what you might call an educational enthusiast. He is practical in the full sense of the term, and does not depend entirely on theory. His qualification as an instructor is pronounced, and Cowley County will make no mistake if he is selected to be Mr. Story's successor.

Excerpt...

[TORRANCE CORRESPONDENT: "DAMON."]

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

Miss Emma Collins is attending school in Cambridge.

[OLD SOLDIERS.]

Winfield Courier, June 1, 1882.

Attention, Old Soldiers! The old soldiers of Fairview Township are requested to meet at the Little Dutch schoolhouse on Saturday, June 10, at 2 o'clock p.m., to make arrangements for the State reunion. All are urgently requested to be present, as matters of importance are to be considered. WILLIAM WHITE, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 7, 1882.

Library Benefit.

A literary, musical, and dramatical entertainment will be given Friday evening, June 9th, 1882, at the High School building, of Arkansas City, Kansas, by the members of the senior department of the City High School.

LISTING PARTICIPANTS ONLY: Miss Lida Whitney, C. T. Atkinson, C. L. Swarts, J. W. Warren, Miss Hannah Gilbert, Miss Myrtle McNelly, Miss Emma Theaker, H. G. Vaughn, Misses Sarah Hill, Ella DeBruce, E. S. Donnelly, H. L. Finley, W. D. Mowry, Charley Chapel, Miss Linnie Peed, Miss Mollie Christian.

Admission 25 cents. Children under 12: 15 cents.

Doors open at 7 p.m., performance to commence at 8. Proceeds for benefit of School Library.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 7, 1882.

The Entertainment for the benefit of the School Library, to be held in the Schoolhouse next Friday evening, bids fair to equal anything of its kind ever attempted here, and we recommend everyone to attend if possible.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 7, 1882.

Library Benefit.

A literary, musical, and dramatical entertainment will be given Friday evening, June 9th, 1882, at the High School building, of Arkansas City, Kansas, by the members of the senior department of the City High School.

LISTING PARTICIPANTS ONLY: Miss Lida Whitney, C. T. Atkinson, C. L. Swarts, J. W. Warren, Miss Hannah Gilbert, Miss Myrtle McNelly, Miss Emma Theaker, H. G. Vaughn, Misses Sarah Hill, Ella DeBruce, E. S. Donnelly, H. L. Finley, W. D. Mowry, Charley Chapel, Miss Linnie Peed, Miss Mollie Christian.

Admission 25 cents. Children under 12: 15 cents.

Doors open at 7 p.m., performance to commence at 8. Proceeds for benefit of School Library.

Excerpt...

[VALLEY VIEW CORRESPONDENT: "GRANGER."]

Winfield Courier, June 8, 1882.

Our school has now closed. BOBOLINK.

Winfield Courier, June 8, 1882.

Miss Ella Kelly, who has been an efficient teacher in the Anthony schools, has returned to Winfield and will remain, having been engaged to teach school here next winter.

Winfield Courier, June 8, 1882.

School Festival and Concert.

There will be held at the Excelsior schoolhouse in District No. 9, two and a half miles south of Winfield, on Friday evening, June 9th. It being the closing day of school, a concert and festival conducted by Miss Celina Bliss, the teacher. Every pains will be taken to make the affair a pleasant and enjoyable success, and friends from the city and other districts are invited to be present to encourage and enjoy.

Excerpt...

[OTTO CORRESPONDENT: "A. W. S."]

Winfield Courier, June 8, 1882.

Otto offers good advantages for the young, having a commodious school structure located in a prosperous district, and we are led to believe that others will follow the course suggested by Mr. Myers.

Excerpt...

[DEXTER CORRESPONDENT: "LIBERTY."]

Winfield Courier, June 8, 1882.

Hurrah for the COURIER! It knows what it is about to propose a woman for Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Mrs. Caton is the right one in the right place. Let every Republican turn out and do his best for this candidate; then will our schools be attended to, and visited oftener than they are now.

Cowley County Courant, June 8, 1882.

The teachers who will conduct the schools for the ensuing year have all been employed except two, at an average of forty dollars per month.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 14, 1882.

The school term ended last Friday.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 14, 1882.

Library Benefit.

The entertainment at the schoolhouse last Friday evening was well attended and the programme, though slightly varied from that announced, was very interesting. Miss Myrtle McNelly and Miss DeBruce favored the audience with well rendered vocal and instrumental music, while Miss Lida Whitney and Miss Emma Theaker recited selected pieces in a pleasing manner. Messrs. Warren and Vaughn favored the company with a reading and declamation, and Professor Atkinson gave the "Boys in Blue." The evening's enjoyment was terminated by the Drama "Once Upon a Time," all the characters in which were well supported, but Miss Mollie Christian in the sugar scene and Charlie Chapel's chicken scrape were simply immense, bringing down the house. The house was crowded to the utmost and the net proceeds of the evening amounted to about $24, which will be devoted to purchasing books for the school library.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 14, 1882.

Our Schools.

Reports of our teachers exhibit the following.

First Primary: 112 pupils.

Second Primary: 57 pupils.

Intermediate: 83 pupils.

Grammar: 71 pupils.

Senior: 97 pupils.

Total: 420 pupils.

The year has been one of general progress considering the classification at the commencement of the year, and the crowded condition of the departments. The supervision has not been what the Principal would desire, as he is required to teach the entire time, which renders personal supervision impossible. During the coming year it is believed the Board will grant one hour each day, to the Principal, for the supervision of the lower grades.

Physical Geography, Algebra, Book Keeping, U. S. History, and the common branches have been completed by the advanced pupils of the High School. To these branches will be added: Constitution of the U. S., Geometry, Latin Grammar, Latin Reader, Latin Prose, Composition, Philosophy, Botany, Physiology, Rhetoric, and Astronomy.

Twenty-nine volumes have been added to the Library, and sufficient money in the treasury for purchasing an equal number.

Material sufficient has been collected to establish a thorough grading, at the commencement of another year. It is believed that much work has been done, but the teachers are confidant that, with the full cooperation of the patrons, our schools can be placed at the head of Kansas' graded schools.

Such a result is desirable, and, if the earnest support of patrons and the regular attendance of pupils be secured, the teachers pledge that the object shall be accomplished.

Winfield Courier, June 15, 1882.

Richland Township.

QUEEN VILLAGE, MAY 26, 1882.

A meeting was called at the Queen Village schoolhouse for the purpose of making arrangements for holding an Anti-monopoly rally. Was called to order by W. L. Cottingham.

Mr. William Daggett was chosen chairman, and W. L. Heineken, secretary.

Owing to indications of rain the meeting adjourned to meet on Wednesday, May 31, 1882, at 3 o'clock p.m.

QUEEN VILLAGE, MAY 31, 1882.

Pursuant to adjournment about forty persons assembled at 3 o'clock p.m., and C. W. Hogue, of Burden, was chosen chairman and H. J. Sandfort, of Floral, secretary.

On motion it was agreed that an Anti-monopoly rally be held on Thursday, July 20th, in R. W. Stephens' grove on Timber Creek.

On motion the following were appointed an executive committee: H. J. Sandfort and

W. L. Cottingham, of Richland, and Fletch Teeter, C. W. Hogue, and Wm. Daggett, of Silver Creek.

R. W. Stephens was unanimously elected treasurer and H. J. Sandfort secretary of finance.

On motion the executive committee was authorized to appoint a committee on finance in each township in the county.

On motion it was ordered that the several committees on finance file with the secretary on finance a complete list of the names of the contributors and of the amount contributed by each, and that said lists be opened for inspection on the day of the rally.

The following were appointed a committee on grounds: Jacob Coe and W. H. Sparr of Silver Creek, and Theodore Heineken of Richland.

C. C. Crow of Tisdale, and W. L. Heineken of Richland, were appointed a committee to procure speakers.

C. W. Hogue and W. L. Heineken were appointed a committee on vocal music.

The following resolutions were unanimously adopted.

WHEREAS, Experience teaches that the capitalists of the country have through fraud, bribery, and corruption manipulated legislation in order to bring about a condition whereby the rich are enabled to absorb the hard earnings of labor, and,

WHEREAS, It is evident that the leaders of the two old parties are in the employ of monopoly and are constantly urging such legislation as will favor capital and oppress labor, thereby making the rich richer and the poor poorer, Therefore, be it

Resolved, 1st, That it is necessary for farmers, laborers, and wealth producing classes generally to organize against the oppression of consolidated capital and monopoly, and that in order to facilitate such organization an Anti-monopoly rally be held at the time and place agreed upon at this meeting, and that we and each of us put forth all honorable efforts to make said rally a success.

2nd, That we request the cooperation of all whose motto is "equal rights to all and special favors to none," and that we extend a hearty invitation to the public.

3rd, That the Winfield papers and Burden Enterprise be requested to publish the proceedings of this meeting.

Adjourned to meet at the Queen Village schoolhouse on Saturday, June 17th, 1882, at 9 o'clock p.m. H. J. SANDFORT, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, June 15, 1882.

Miss Celina Bliss, of Winfield, closed her summer term of school at Excelsior, about three miles south of here, last Friday, and in the evening the teacher and pupils gave a concert and ice cream social in honor of the occasion, and also to raise money to finish paying for a handsome organ which the Sunday school in that district has recently purchased. A number of Miss Bliss' friends in this city went out to share the enjoyment of the evening and have a good time generally. There was a very large crowd present, so large indeed that the ice cream was exhausted before near all had been supplied; but the scarcity of cream was entirely made up by the excellent concert, which was highly appreciated by all in attendance, and was very entertaining. Miss Bliss has taught four terms in this district, and the people are so well pleased with her labors that it will be with great reluctance that she is ever given up.

Winfield Courier, June 15, 1882.

School Concert and Festival.

EDS. COURIER: On last Friday evening I had the pleasure of attending an ice cream festival at the Excelsior schoolhouse three miles south of Winfield. The citizens of that district had purchased a very fine organ for the use of the public school, and also for the Sunday school which meets there, and the proceeds of the entertainment were to go toward liquidating a balance due on said organ. Everything passed off very pleasantly, and the occasion seemed to be enjoyed by all present. To a stranger spending a few days in the neighborhood such a gathering, and so well conducted, is a very high recommendation, as it is a good index to the social, as well as the intellectual qualities, of the people.

We were treated to some excellent music, both vocal and instrumental, with Miss Bliss, the teacher of the school, as organist, and Mr. Jacob Miller and Geo. Nawman, violinists. The singing was excellent, but the writer being a stranger and not being able to obtain all of the names, will mention none lest injustice may be done.

I am informed the proceeds amounted to over thirty dollars, which will place the society out of debt. I did not learn the name of the party who furnished the ice cream, but would simply say he understands his business, and others contemplating a festival would do well to give him a call. VISITOR.

Cowley County Courant, June 15, 1882.

The Clerk and Treasurer of District 120 seem to be running a school at their own expense and educating their neighbors' children.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 21, 1882.

Of the Intermediate Department of the Arkansas City Schools, the following pupils were neither absent nor tardy during the last month of school: Mattie Kirtley, Maud Benedict, Hattie Sipes, Alvin Clifton, Mattie Dixon, Clara Hoyt, Luna Ware, Morse Hutchison, Sherman Coulson.

Winfield Courier, June 22, 1882.

Work on the sidewalk around the school buildings has begun, and by fall the school houses will be in first-class condition.

Winfield Courier, June 22, 1882.

Limerick for Superintendent.

EDS. COURIER: Inasmuch as Mr. Limerick is a prospective candidate for the position of County Superintendent of Public Instruction, some of his soldier comrades want the public to know what his record is from youth to manhood. We do not appeal to the public simply from the fact that Mr. Limerick was a faithful soldier and did his duty like a brave man, for he has superior qualifications fitting for the office to which he aspires. But all other things being equal, there are no persons on the continent to whom we should pay tribute and honor as the private soldiers. They sacrificed everything that made life enjoyable, and stood strong in their country's time of danger to battle for what they believed to be right and true, and how seldom has merit been recognized and the high private advanced to a position of trust and profit.

I heard a man say that it was time this talk for the soldier should cease. Now we do not crave honors for ourselves, but our comrades saved this government from going into the breakers during the storm, and if the people ever forget them and their welfare, it had been better that the old ship of state had been left to the mercy of the wreckers. To the crew who saved surely belongs the right of salvage. We are glad that our friend, Mr. Limerick, has a record above reproach. Loyalty and good sense has made him a sound upright citizen. He is equal to the occasion and if necessity ever demands it, he would again give his time and shed his blood for the cause of loyalty and justice. Of his social and intellectual qualities we need not speak except to say that they are of the highest orders. This is written without the knowledge or consent of our old comrade, neighbor, and friend; it is only a tribute to his sterling worth.

The following is an outline of his past life.

A. H. Limerick entered the army at the age of 17 in the 93rd Illinois Volunteers. In the bloody engagement of Allatoona Pass, he was wounded and taken prisoner. He was alternately confined in the prison pens of Milan, Savannah, Charleston, and Florence, and was subjected to all the indignity and misery that could be offered by a brutal foe, escaping only with his life when released on March 1, 1865. The money earned in the service he used in obtaining an education in an institution of learning in Illinois, after which he taught school the same state from 1867 to 1871. Came to Cowley County and entered a claim in Rock Township, which he still occupies.

He taught the first school and organized the first Sunday school in Rock Township in 1872, then went back to Illinois, his native state, and taught school three years. Came back to Cowley County in 1876 and has been teaching ever since. Mr. Limerick holds an "A" grade certificate.

Please publish this and oblige his many old comrades and Republican friends.

Excerpt...

[MAPLE CITY CORRESPONDENT: "J. BALDHEAD."]

Winfield Courier, June 22, 1882.

Mr. W. E. Ketcham expects to teach our school this coming winter. He has a wonderful faculty of teaching, and never fails to get the good will of his pupils.

Winfield Courier, June 22, 1882.

SHEEP FOR SALE. The undersigned will sell about 100 2 year old wethers. The sheep can be seen on the Osborne place near the Loan Tree schoolhouse, Richland Township, Cowley County, Kansas. S. J. SMOCK.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 28, 1882.

Annual School Board Meeting today at 3 p.m.

Excerpts...

[ARKANSAS CITY CORRESPONDENT: "JUNIUS."]

Winfield Courier, June 29, 1882.

Mr. Harry Hill has returned from Baldwin University, where he has been attending school.

Chas. Chapel will teach the "infant class" the coming fall--at least he is taking "lessons."

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, June 29, 1882.

There is much talk of a new schoolhouse near the station. It will be a very nice addition to our neighborhood if it is built as commodious and imposing as the committees are planning for. We only hope that it may be built ere long and the Salemites who are away attending school come back and learn all that is necessary in the home school.

Cowley County Courant, July 6, 1882.

ATTENTION, OLD SOLDIERS: The old soldiers of Fairview township will meet at the Little Dutch schoolhouse on Wednesday, July 13th, at 3 o'clock p.m. All are urgently requested to be present, as the field officers of the regiment will be in attendance.

WILLIAM WHITE, Capt.

Excerpt...

[OMNIA CORRESPONDENT: "GLEANER."]

Winfield Courier, July 6, 1882.

We, the Republicans of this part of the county, have agreed that there are certain measures that must be carried into effect by our representatives--an equal distribution of the railroad tax in the school district according to assessed value or number of pupils.

Some of the reasons why we exact this, the remote parts from the road helped build the road. While the road helped to advance the price of land near it, it did not affect that which was 8 to 20 miles away. To illustrate: Mr. Jackson, on Silver Creek, sold 160 acres for $4,000 cash. A farm on Timber Creek, seven miles from the road, of 320 acres, much better than Jackson's, has been in the market and won't sell for $3,000. The parties living near the road are benefitted in a two-fold sense. Their property has advanced and their taxes lessened. To illustrate this further: the district that Burden is in, the assessed value of the road and road property amounts to over $18,000, while other districts off of road, assessed value amounts to from $5,000 to $12,000; and such districts have to vote the extent of the law; 1 percent for teachers, and 1/4 of 1 percent, for incidentals--then can scarcely support 3 or 4 months, which always demands a poor teacher.

Is this fair and just when we have paid as much for the building of the roads, according to our wealth, as they? Must our children in the remote districts grow up in ignorance, while our neighbors who were fortunate enough to be thrown into a railroad district, can educate their children, and give them a start in life; our's must grope their way in ignorance. This is giving the strong district the advantage at the expense of the weak district. There are a great many people who borrow money and put it into stock. The assessor comes around and assesses the land, then the stock. Now we are not finding fault with the loaner or borrower, the fault is, the man that borrows pays tax on the land and tax on the stock and interest on the money, treble; the man that loans the money records his mortgage, sends it east, and sits back and draws his usury, pays no tax, and wonders why everybody isn't smart. Now what we want is this, that every mortgage shall be assessed from the recorder's office at their face value, and taxes paid where the mortgage is recorded that will help to pay this three-fold tax on the borrower; there is a law, I think, that persons living in other states holding property in this must pay tax where the property is held, but does not refer to mortgages.

We want our representative to look after the above and further another enactment. All property given in mortgage shall be the security and only security. I will not argue the reasons of this last clause for fear of being too lengthy. I want the people of every township to set forward resolving in every primary what they want and what they must have, and make the aspirants pledge to carry out their wishes or elect them to stay at home.

Winfield Courier, July 6, 1882.

Miss Lena Bartlett started Tuesday morning for Fort Scott, to spend a few weeks with her sister. Miss Bartlett has been for a few years one of the best teachers in Cowley County. Her many friends wish her prosperity in her new field.

Winfield Courier, July 6, 1882.

There is but one county paper taken in District No. 3, this county, Grand Prairie Schoolhouse. Mr. Daugherty takes the COURIER. A school district with only one county paper in Kansas is certainly a rarity.

Winfield Courier, July 6, 1882.

Candidates for Office of School Superintendent.

A. J. Werden, Vernon Township. Excellent Qualifications.

H. T. Albert, of Cambridge in Windsor Township.

"He has been a resident of and a successful teacher in this county for the last five years. For twelve years he was principal of the public schools of Maytown, Pennsylvania, and Lazette and Cambridge schools in this county for the last four years. His services have met with the highest commendations and his experience and education place him in the front rank in his vocation. He has always been a staunch Republican, but has been crippled from boyhood so as to unfit him for the physically laborious avocations of life, though not so as to interfere with his efficiency as a teacher or superintendent of schools. There can be no doubt of his faithfulness and efficiency in that position."

Alexander H. Limerick, of Rock Township.

"He is a native of Illinois. In the spring of 1863 he enlisted in Company B. [?H.?], 93rd Ill. Infantry, was one of the heroes in the famous defense of Allatoona Pass, where he was severely wounded and maimed for life, and was taken prisoner and was confined at West Point, Milan, Andersonville, Savannah, and Charleston. He has taught schools in Cowley County for the last five years with eminent success and holds an "A" grade certificate. He is an amiable, energetic gentleman of retiring deportment and high moral character, and is well qualified for the position he seeks. . . ."

Winfield Courier, July 6, 1882.

A Lady for Superintendent.

EDS. COURIER: As candidates for the office of county superintendent of schools of the male persuasion and numerously circulating around soliciting votes and blowing their own horn, allow me to say a few words in favor of the lady candidate. Everyone acquainted with Mrs. Caton knows that she is pre-eminently fitted for the office educationally. Women in promoting education are more directly interested than men, as her status in society depends on the literary advance of the masses. In uneducated countries woman is a slave and often treated worse than the domestic animals. But the great lever being used by Mrs. Caton's opponents and their friends is that she lacks muscle and endurance--could not visit the schools in cold weather. Now I would ask the urgers of these objections if they ever went sleigh riding with the girls; if they have, they can easily recall to mind how near they were frozen to death many times, and would have backed out and gone home if it had not been for very shame, as the cheery laugh of the girls told how keen was their enjoyment of the ride. Whoever heard of a woman failing to make a visit on account of the weather? Then women are more reliable than men and have done more to refine, reform, and elevate society. Men had formed Anti-slavery societies, but were making slow progress when women came to the front and Harriet B. Stowe sent Uncle Tom's Cabin out, which like an irresistible force overwhelmed all the advocates of slavery and made the United States free in deed as well as in name.

This has been repeated in the temperance reform now in progress. Men had charged the ranks of intemperance and fallen back in disorder. Whiskey was triumphant. But hark! A shout comes from Ohio, the women have come to the rescue, and seizing the weapons thrown away by the men on their route have charged home on hosts of iniquity, every fort is taken, every barrier swept, and seen the whole Nation take up the refrain. Kansas like a young giant girds on her armor and sweeps the evil from her territory. Staunch Iowa follows suit. And still the hosts of women keep the field, no faltering or falling back to the rear, no furlough asked for until the flag of intemperance is struck down in every state of the Union. Every soldier of the late war knows what they owe to the noble women of this nation, in furnishing sanitary supplies and acting as nurses in the hospitals. Thousands of soldiers today owe their lives to these angels of mercy who, without any compensation or hope of reward, so nobly attended to the sick and wounded soldier.

None of Mrs. Caton's opponents charge her with incompetency, and her ladylike deportment whilst visiting schools would have an elevating tendency; on the other hand, her male opponents on entering school would have to get rid of a quid or cigar stump, and on leaving beg leave of the school marm to light a cigar. Think of it, fathers, what a stimulating example for your boys, whom you are trying to keep from using the filthy weed. In conclusion, I would say that though Mrs. Caton never could be Rude, yet she would assert with quiet dignity the rights of her office and with firmer words than a Warden could use. She would make come to Limerick all teachers who failed in their duties in the schoolroom, thus combining all the qualities of the other candidates. TISDALE.

Winfield Courier, July 6, 1882.

SHEEP FOR SALE. The undersigned will sell about 100 2 year old wethers and 350 Good Grade Merino Ewes. The sheep can be been on the Osborne place near the Loan Tree schoolhouse, Richland Township, Cowley County, Kansas. S. J. SMOCK.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 12, 1882.

We call attention to the announcement of Alex H. Limerick of Rock Township, as a candidate for the office of County Superintendent. Mr. Limerick is an old timer in the county, having taken a claim in 1871, and has taught in our schools for the past five years, holding an A Grade certificate. He is an old soldier, an amiable gentleman, and in every way competent of the office he seeks.

Excerpts...

[COWLEY COUNTY: HISTORY & DESCRIPTION.]

Winfield Courier, July 13, 1882.

(From Green's Real Estate News.)

CHURCHES.

There is a church organization in nearly every neighborhood in the county. Most of these hold their services in schoolhouses. A few have built excellent church edifices and others are "talking the matter up." There are already some very fine and large church edifices in the county. Many denominations are represented. The leading are the Baptist, Presbyterian, and Methodist. The ministers are up to the average anywhere. Some of them are men of great talent and culture. The man who preaches to the keen, shrewd, thinking people of the west, or who teaches their children, must have brains, education, and grit.

SCHOOLS.

The county contains 131 school districts, 119 of which have good comfortable school-houses built; 53 of this number have been entirely paid for, while 40 more are very nearly paid for in full. Districts usually issue bonds to get money to build their schoolhouses on short time, making them run not longer as a rule than from five to seven years. But a few years more and the balance will be paid for and the several districts out of debt. The people tax themselves freely for the support of common schools, and keep them open the greater part of each year. We have a large number of thoroughly educated and efficient teachers, and the schools are noted for their good work. In but few instances do our children have to go very far to school.

SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

The city of Winfield is divided into two wards, first and second, and each having school buildings. That in the first ward is 45 x 56 feet with an addition 40 x 40 and basement under the whole structure, while that of the second ward is 30 x 50 with two wings each 18 x 32 and basement. Each of these buildings are two story, built of magnesia limestone, well finished and furnished, and heated with hot air. The first mentioned contains eight rooms and the latter four. The first ward building cost $12,000, while the other cost $6,000. They are both situated on beautiful plats of ground and are an ornament to the town. We usually have about 9 months public school each year. The number of scholars enrolled during the last term was over 800. Both wards were under the supervision of one man, Prof. E. T. Trimble, one of the leading educators of the age, who was assisted by a corps of competent and experienced teachers, each of whom did their duty to the entire satisfaction of all parents.

Excerpts...

Winfield Courier, July 13, 1882.

RECAP ON MORE CANDIDATES.

T. J. RUDE, Candidate for Supt. of Public Instruction.

"He is a "rustler" as well as a gentleman and an accomplished teacher. We have heretofore spoken more fully of his excellent qualifications for the office he seeks. . . ."

Mrs. W. B. Caton, Candidate for Supt. of Public Instruction.

"She is a thoroughly educated and accomplished lady, with large experience in conducting schools, in which she has proved herself a most successful and accomplished teacher. Her essays and addresses have been marked with clear cut sense, chaste and expressive language, and have been delivered with grace and effect. Her kind heart and true womanly sympathies are always with the children, and she is their confidant and assistant. She has sufficient health and energy to attend thoroughly to all the duties of the office and will make a faithful and efficient officer if elected."

Winfield Courier, July 13, 1882.

Remember the annual school meeting on August 10th at 2 p.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 19, 1882.

Mrs. W. B. Caton is a candidate for the office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. She is thoroughly educated and accomplished, with large experience in conducting schools. She has sufficient health and energy to attend thoroughly to all the duties of the office and will make a faithful and efficient officer if elected.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 19, 1882.

The Annual School meeting will take place Thursday, August 10th, at 2 p.m. A clerk is to be elected for three years. Vacancies should be filled for unexpired terms, taxes should be levied, and arrangements for Arbor Day should be made.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 19, 1882.

Fred McLaughlin will leave on today's train for the East. During his absence he will visit his former teacher, Mr. Sylvester, who is now practicing law at Boscobel, Wisconsin.

[SCHOOLHOUSE: IMPROVEMENTS.]

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

The School Board is having some long-needed improvements put on the schoolhouse grounds, in the way of stone sidewalks. The grounds are also being nicely graded and will be fenced. A part of the grounds in front of both schoolhouses will be fenced off and set to trees and bluegrass. Our public schools are the bulwark of the commonwealth and the attention and care bestowed upon them is the best index by which a community can be judged.

[WINFIELD NEEDS TO WAKE UP TO OPPORTUNITIES.]

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

Wake Up!

Winfield needs to wake up. For some reason or other the enterprise and interest in public improvement that once characterized this community is dying out. While other towns about us are pushing out for new railroads, encouraging manufacturing enterprises, or fostering educational institutions, Winfield is calmly looking on, seeming to say that she has all she ever expects to hope for. This is suicidal policy, and the sooner we find it out the better. There are several things Winfield needs and must have. One is an extension of the Missouri Pacific railroad from Le Roy. It is within our reach and we can get it by a long and strong pull. Another is the end of a division on the K. C., L. & S. This also may be secured by the right kind of an effort. We also need a woolen mill, which can be secured if we wake up sufficiently to realize its importance. The magnificent water power afforded by the Walnut River should be utilized by two or three more grist mills. Another enterprise, and one which would be of more lasting benefit to Winfield and vicinity than any other, is the building up of a good educational institution here--a school higher than our high school and one from which scholars could take the junior course in any college. There are several such institutions in the state, and there is no reason why Winfield may not be able to sustain one. Our plan would be to raise say ten thousand dollars for building and furnishing. Then secure some good educator, such as Prof. Williams or Prof. Wheeler, to take charge of the school, guarantee him $1,000 per year and the tuition fees, providing that certain branches be taught and certain fees charged. This would secure the manager's hearty cooperation in making the academy a success. An academy located on the east end of 12th Avenue, with a magnificent boulevard extending to it, lined with shade trees, would be a source of pride to our city and of profit to the youth of Cowley and adjoining counties. This scheme is feasible. Who will take hold of it?

[CORRESPONDENCE FROM MULVANE.]

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

Can't Trust 'Em.

Mulvane, Kansas, July 14, 1882.

EDS. COURIER: In your issue of July 6th you say, "There is but one county paper taken in District No. 3, Grand Prairie schoolhouse." That statement is a mistake and consequently not true. W. H. Keller, G. C. Edgar, and myself all take the COURIER, to my certain knowledge, and one man, of whom I know, takes the Courant, and we all live in District No. 3 and within a mile of Grand Prairie schoolhouse. Yours very truly, W. G. WEBSTER.

We're in for it again. We got our information from a good Presbyterian, and it was volunteered. It is the first time we have been led astray by a Presbyterian, which makes it all the worse. However, we have a chance to get even with our informant by publishing an original poem of twenty-one six line stanzas, now in our possession.

[NOTICES.]

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

Notice. The Republicans of Dexter Township will meet at the Dexter Schoolhouse Thursday, July 27, 1882, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of electing delegates to attend the county convention at Winfield, August 5th. Also delegates to the representative convention at Burden, August 10th. J. V. HINES, Chairman Committee.

[ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING.]

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

The Annual School Meeting.

Will be held Thursday, August 10, 2 o'clock p.m. At that time a clerk should be elected for three years, and vacancies should be filled. Taxes for school purposes should be levied, and districts should take steps for fall and winter schools, and for putting trees around school property. The County Superintendent has mailed all necessary blanks for use of school officers.

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT.

EDS. COURIER: In regard to this office let me say a word or two. Much has been written and printed in favor of different candidates, while but little has been said concerning the demands of the office. This office, next to the office of sheriff, calls for nerve, decision, energy, resolution, inflexible principles, successful experience, education, and growing mind. The schools of the county, the teachers, and people want all these qualifications for one thousand dollars a year. What candidate has the most of these qualities to offer to the people? Last fall a young man came into district No. 50, and secured the school. He taught primary, intermediate, and advanced classes with marked success. He was skillful in handling uncouth and rough boys, successful in opening the minds and awakening the interests of the little folks. He was able to deal vigorously with knotty questions that came up in school. He created an interest in music and he laid the foundation of a good school library. He was earnest, untiring, devoted, industrious in all his labors, leaving nothing undone that would advance the school and help along the pupils and people with whom he was laboring. That teacher was Thomas J. Rude, a candidate for the position of County Superintendent. If the people want that applicant who can do the most good to the greatest number, who will make himself felt in every school district in Cowley County, who will be equal for any and all emergencies, who is rising, building, growing as all true teachers should be, let them take Thomas J. Rude and they will never be disappointed. I know the man and most heartily endorse him. M. W.

District No. 50, Vernon Township.

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

For the COURIER.

Our Lady Superintendent.

Most people in the county are only acquainted with Mrs. Caton through her essays, addresses, and general good reputation. I wish they one and all knew her personally. I would not have the least doubt of her nomination. She combines all the qualifications of an efficient officer with the graces of a true lady. Her ability to work is marvelous, displaying an energy and power of endurance which has been the wonder of all who know her. When I hear the weak complaints of those who fear her opposition, that she cannot endure the work of visiting all the schools in the county, or that she will not be able to brave the wintry weather, I cannot help but smile as I recall how for years she has successfully managed her school with an average daily attendance of eighty little ones, and at the same time attended to her family cares, doing all her own housework, and providing for the wants of her husband and children. Besides this she has during this time taken an active part in the social world as well, writing essays, delivering addresses, furnishing music, and frequently training others for a similar service. Do you after reading these few lines still doubt her ability or want of energy to carry out this work?

It is my candid opinion that she will work all around any male candidate in the field. Then her health is simply splendid. Mrs. Caton has not been absent from her school a single day since teaching in this county, and what is more, although it will not have much weight with any except teachers, she has never in all that time been tardy, either at her own school or while attending Normal. Her example of punctuality is very commendable. . . .

CRESSWELL.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

ARKANSAS CITY AND HER SURROUNDINGS.

CHURCHES.

In churches Arkansas City is well represented, Presbyterians and Methodists having three fine church buildings and a large membership. The Baptist, free Methodists, and Christians have organizations and expect to build. In schools and school buildings she has always taken the lead having now the finest school building in southern Kansas, and is making preparation to erect two more when the larger building will be made a first class graded school, giving facilities for education found in but few cities in Kansas.

Winfield Courier, July 20, 1882.

A Free Lecture. Friday night, in the Baptist Church, Dr. Geo. W. Hoss, of Topeka, will address the teachers and citizens. Turn out and hear a good lecture.

Excerpt...

[RICHLAND TOWNSHIP CORRESPONDENT: "BUCKEYE."]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 26, 1882. Editorial Page.

FLORAL, KANSAS, July 20th, 1882.

For Superintendent of Public Instruction, Mr. A. H. Limerick, with whom your correspondent has had the privilege of enjoying the most intimate and unreserved relations and always found him manly and intelligent, a dutiful citizen, and a true and sympathetic friend. The gentleman is also on record as a loyal soldier and a first-class school teacher, and will doubtless receive the recognition from the people that his qualifications merit.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 26, 1882.

Republicans of Bolton Township please meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday, August 3rd, at 2 p.m. for the purpose of electing delegates to the County Convention at Winfield, Aug. 5th; also to the 67th Representative Convention, which will be held at Arkansas City Aug. 12th. J. D. GUTHRIE, Chairman Com.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 26, 1882.

Mr. T. J. Rude is announced in this issue as a candidate for the office of Superintendent of Public Instruction subject to the choice of the county convention. Mr. Rude is well known in this county, where he has been actively engaged as a teacher for several years past, and he has, by his diligence and perseverance made for himself a prominent place among the educators of this county. Beside being thoroughly conversant with the practical details of our common school work, Mr. Rude is a rising man, and possesses the ambition, zeal, and scholarship necessary to the successful discharge of the duties of this laborious office.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 26, 1882.

Bolton Veterans.

The veterans of Bolton Township who wish to attend the Re-Union of Old Soldiers at Topeka on Sept. 10, 1882, are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse in the above township on August 3rd, 1882, at 2 o'clock p.m., with a view to making the necessary arrangements therefor. P. A. LORRY, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 26, 1882.

S. P. U.

A regular meeting of the South West Bolton Stock Protective Union will be held at the Mercer schoolhouse in West Bolton on Friday, July 28, at 7 o'clock p.m. A full attendance is requested. F. LORRY, Capt.

Winfield Courier, July 27, 1882.

MRS. CATON.

The position of the COURIER on the matter of School Superintendent has been and is, to give all the candidates a hearing through our columns and be the partisan of neither. We would readily, however, dispute and correct any story injurious to the candidacy of either if we knew it to be untrue. In order to contradict some things which have been said against Mrs. Caton's candidacy, we here assert:

That she is and always has been in full and intelligent sympathy with the Republican party and the Union cause; that she when a mere girl worked enthusiastically for the relief of Union Soldiers; that her father was a commissioned officer in the Union army, an earnest friend and supporter of Abraham Lincoln and lived and died an enthusiastic Republican; that her husband and his father were Union soldiers for four years in the war and did brave service and suffered much for the Union; that her husband enlisted at the age of thirteen and has since the war been a warm Republican, always voting the straight Republican ticket and never voted any other. We will add that she is a sensible woman and does not make any of the remarks disparaging our public school system which have been attributed to her.

Winfield Courier, July 27, 1882.

The Richland Township primary will be held at Summit Schoolhouse on Thursday, August 3rd, at 2 o'clock, to elect delegates to the County convention; also to elect delegates to the convention to be held at Burden August 10th, to nominate a candidate for representative. LEWIS STEVENS, Chairman.

[SCHOOL GROUNDS BEING IMPROVED.]

Winfield Courier, July 27, 1882.

Our Schools.

The school board are showing commendable zeal in the manner in which they are improving the school grounds. The grounds are already graded and before school commences good and substantial walks will be laid to and around the buildings. The course of study will be revised and one year added to the High School Course. Superior advantages will thus be offered to all who may desire to gain a good educational foundation. Persons who expect to teach can have practical instruction in methods and grade work in the schools. The schools will open on the 18th day of September. Pupils living in the country who may desire to attend will do well to correspond with the Superintendent, E. T. Trimble.

Winfield Courier, July 27, 1882.

Mrs. Caton.

The people of Arkansas City have appointed a meeting in their schoolhouse on Monday evening next and have invited and urged Mrs. Caton to be present and give them a ten minute talk. She hesitates, but her friends say she must, and she will be present.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 2, 1882.

Bolton Veterans.

The veterans of Bolton Township who wish to attend the Re-Union of Old Soldiers at Topeka on Sept. 10, 1882, are requested to meet at the Bland schoolhouse in the above township on August 3rd, 1882, at 2 o'clock, p.m., with a view to making the necessary arrangements therefor. P. A. LORRY, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 2, 1882.

Republicans of Bolton township please meet at the Bland schoolhouse on Thursday, August 3rd, at 2 p.m., for the purpose of electing delegates to the County Convention at Winfield, Aug. 5th, also to the 67th Representative Convention, which will be held at Arkansas City Aug. 12th. J. D. GUTHRIE, Chairman Com.

Winfield Courier, August 3, 1882.

"Rally Round the Flag, Boys!"

Old soldiers of Richland and adjoining townships throughout the county, you and yours are most cordially invited to attend the old vets meeting to be held August 12th at Summit schoolhouse at 2 p.m. The object of this meeting is to rally every old soldier in the township. Soldiers, this may be the last reunion we will ever have the opportunity of enjoying. Addresses will be delivered each day by prominent ex-soldiers and citizens whose names will be announced at an early day. Rations and tents will be furnished for the small sum of 26 cents per day. The latch string hangs out, and all old soldiers are cordially invited to turn out.

Let us once more hear the tip of the long roll echo over the top of Lookout Mountain, and the rattling of sabers cutting their way through rebel lines.

This reunion is to be a state affair. There is no regiment or battalion that did duty in the war of the rebellion but what has its representative in Kansas. Kansas is peopled with soldiers who were with Farragut at Mobile, who charged the hell at Petersburgh, and who were prisoners at Andersonville and Libby.

Comrades, we will see men who were in the Wilderness with Grant, men who were with Thomas at Franklin, and men from every battle field of the world. The land is at peace and the reunion is on the basis of a restored union. We want to hear from the rest of our old comrades. H. H. H.

Winfield Courier, August 3, 1882.

Notice to Contractors. We will receive bids for building a schoolhouse in district 55, Cowley County, until August 10, 1882. Plans and specifications may be seen at the New Salem post office. We reserve the right to reject any or all bids.

NICHOLAS, J. J. JOHNSON, THOMAS WALKER.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, August 3, 1882.

SILVER CREEK BREVITIES.

By the way, Burden has voted $3,500 in bonds to build a schoolhouse, and this is the way they did it. They got up a petition asking Mr. Story to annex five or six valuable farms to their district just in time to catch the bonds. The owners of three of these farms are absent, so there was no opposition from them. The others could not help themselves, so on the day appointed to vote the bonds, the "big four" of Burden got all the livery force they could muster, went out into the highways and hedges, brought in the halt, the lame, and the blind; and so great was the rush that some of the board had to go head and shoulders out of the windows to receive the votes. Now, Mr. Editor, is this as it should be, is all this law? If so, we say amen. A TAXPAYER.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1882.

The various school districts of the county will hold their annual meetings next Thursday, the 10th inst. Care should be taken to provide for a sufficient school term, taught by a first-class teacher.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

The annual school meeting will take place Thursday.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

The County Superintendent has organized school district 137.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

The Teachers' Association will meet Friday afternoon, August 28, and 29.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

Union Services were held in the Baptist Church Sunday evening, and Prof. Trimble delivered an able sermon on the parable of the two builders. Mr. Trimble is a minister of sound practical ideas and his teachings are of an order that will undoubtedly leave a sincere impression upon the mind.

Winfield Courier, August 10, 1882.

The commissioners met Tuesday to make the tax levy, but adjourned till August 29th, owing to the fact that many school districts had not reported. The School district fight in Bolton was settled, the commissioners sustaining the action of the county superintendent.

Excerpts...

Arkansas City Traveler, August 16, 1882. Editorial Page.

Representative Convention.

Pursuant to call therefore the delegates to the 67th Representative District Convention met in McLaughlin's Hall in Arkansas City, Kans. Convention was called to order by J. B. Nipp. On motion, J. R. Sumpter, of Beaver, and R. J. Maxwell, of Creswell, were elected respectively Chairman and Secretary.

On motion the following committees were appointed, to-wit.

COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS: H. C. Williams, G. H. McIntire, and S. H. Sparks.

The committee on resolutions then reported resolution endorsing those passed by the State Convention at Topeka, also reported, and be it further resolved that we instruct our Representative to the Legislature of this State to use all honorable means to pass such laws as will more equally distribute the railroad taxes among the school districts of the State.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 16, 1882.

TO TEACHERS. The Teachers association will meet in Winfield on Friday and Saturday of next week. The examination will follow on Monday and Tuesday, 28 and 29.

Winfield Courier, August 17, 1882.

During the school year that has just closed, there were 135 winter schools and 42 spring schools in session in Cowley County. Nearly one hundred and fifty teachers will be needed for schools next fall and winter.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, August 17, 1882.

RECAP OF ARTICLE POINTING OUT IMPROVEMENTS IN WINFIELD.

In addition to all these private enterprises, the county is improving the courthouse block, the two districts are spending about four thousand dollars in the improvement of the schoolhouse grounds, and the city is putting down sidewalks and crossings to an extent greater than ever before.

Winfield Courier, August 17, 1882.

PROCEEDINGS OF OLD SOLDIERS.

The old soldiers met pursuant to call of the chairman at Summit schoolhouse, Richland Township. Called to order by J. W. Weimer, and the object stated to be to reorganize and make arrangements to go to the reunion of old soldiers at Topeka. J. W. Weimer was then elected captain; J. M. Bair 1st Lieutenant, and T. R. Shuman 2nd Lieutenant. It was then voted to get uniforms with military caps. Names of those wishing to attend the reunion were enrolled. Quite a number were taken down. It was then voted to put the drums in complete repair and take them along. A collection was taken up for the purpose. The finance commit-tee was continued for another term. Addresses were made by Colonel Steuven, Adjutant Wells, J. M. Bair, and others. Adjourned for drill by Col. Steuven. The old soldiers have not forgotten the drill movements, which were well executed. Ordered that a copy of proceeding be furnished the COURIER. J. W. WEIMER, Chairman.

N. J. LARKIN, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 23, 1882.

TO TEACHERS. The Teachers association will meet in Winfield on Friday and Saturday of next week. The examination will follow on Monday and Tuesday, 28 and 29.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 23, 1882.

NOTICE. The city schools will commence Monday, Sept. 4th. Non-resident pupils may enter at the rate of $1 per month, paid in advance. No pupil will be allowed to enter until all tuition due is paid. By order of the Board.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 23, 1882.

Mass Convention.

We publish today a call signed by D. B. McCollum, as chairman of committee for what purports to be a Mass Convention, believing in certain principles, most of which have been advocated and enforced by the Republican Party for years. We predict you can count on finding sore heads, and nihilists in abundance in attendance at this meeting. Respectable Democrats and Republicans will scarcely attend and participate, as the call indicates a motley crew of the dissatisfied. They want to destroy sectional strife, so does every good Republican and Democrat, and the only question is, how it shall be done. They want to pay promptly the bonded debt, and so do we, as promptly as it can be done honorably. They want to reduce taxes and expenditures. Well, why not? But the idiot who howls about the taxes of the general government seldom ever pays a nickel, and the only taxes that trouble us are school, township, county, and State, and most of that can be corrected at home. They want to have unlimited coinage of silver and gold. And in order to interest the southern democracy they want to secure a free ballot and a fair count, together with several other glittering generalities. The main trouble however in this case is, there are a few old grandmothers who cannot run everything their own way and think they will try something new. This is not a new dodge, gentlemen. We remember a farmers' convention called some years ago by some old political hulks at Winfield, and the farmers turned out en masse, and after they got there mashed the political roosters so flat that they were never heard of afterward. Take timely warning now, gentlemen, for if you get the masses out at this, you, that are the movers of it, will be so small in number that you will feel, oh! so sick.

Excerpt...

[REPORT FROM "MARK" - CONSTANT CHIMES.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 23, 1882.

At Washington schoolhouse the Followers of Christ are conducting a series of meetings with unfavorable results thus far.

Winfield Courier, August 24, 1882.

The State school fund has been received and apportioned, and is ready for payments to the districts. Prof. Story informs us that the portion of this county is $3,102.54, which amounts to 44 cents per scholar.

Winfield Courier, August 24, 1882.

Mrs. Olds will give the teachers a reception at the Olds House this evening.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 30, 1882.

School commences next Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 30, 1882.

The corps of teachers of the Arkansas City Graded School, the fall term of which will commence on Monday, September 4th, are Prof. Atkinson, as Principal, assisted by Misses Jennie Peterson, Annie Norton, and Susie Hunt.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 30, 1882.

SILVERDALE CEMETERY.

At a meeting held Aug. 21st, 1882, at the Silverdale schoolhouse, the citizens of Silverdale township decided to enclose their cemetery with a fence. The following were appointed to solicit funds therefor:

John Splawn, S. H. Living, Wm. Herbert, J. P. Musselman, John Fleharty, and A. D. Edwards. The fence will be of stone four feet in height, with provisions for adding a wire netting eighteen inches in height.

If the necessary funds can be obtained at once, the fence will be finished according to this plan; if not, the stone-work will be laid with intention of finishing when the money can be raised.

All persons interested in the cemetery, and who are willing to assist in the work, are requested to pay their contributions before Nov. 1st next, as the contract will be let about that time. This is a movement which will certainly be commended by all.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 30, 1882.

Take Notice.

The B. and C. grades of the public schools will commence on Monday morning, Sept. 4th, in the department immediately below that in which they have attended the past year. The names of the pupils of the High school and Grammar departments will be placed in the lower hall. Parents and patrons are requested, earnestly, to enter their pupils at the commencement of the term, as delay may place them in lower classes. The Teachers will please meet the Principal at 4 o'clock, Friday evening, Sept. 1st, at the schoolhouse and receive their list of pupils and order of work. By order of the Board.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 30, 1882.

NOTICE TO CARPENTERS AND PLASTERERS.

The Directors of School District Thirty-two (32) Creswell township, Cowley Co., will meet at the Parker Schoolhouse on Saturday, Sept. 2nd, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of receiving sealed or opened bids for the re-plastering of said house, and for the erection of two out houses, and repairs on Schoolhouse. We would like all bidders to be present. Right reserved to reject any or all bids. F. M. Vaughn, Clerk of said Dist.

Winfield Courier, August 31, 1882.

Miss Elma Crippen returned from the East last week, having enjoyed her summer vacation immensely, and gained fresh energy for arduous work in the school room this fall and winter.

Winfield Courier, August 31, 1882.

Mrs. Olds gave the teachers a social last Thursday evening. The lawn was covered with seats and filled with handsome school ma'ams, who were in turn filled with ice cream and sliced watermelon until everyone felt as happy as a "holiness" preacher. To such citizens as had the good fortune to be present, it was one of the nicest entertainments of the season. The COURIER BAND was present and helped with the music and the ice cream devastation.

Winfield Courier, August 31, 1882.

Our Schools.

The revision of the course of study of the Winfield schools has been completed and printed. Our schools are now in a prosperous condition and offer good opportunities for any who may desire a good education. There are now three distinct courses of study in the High School: a High School, Latin, and Normal course. The latter offers inducements to teachers and to those who desire to become teachers. In addition to the study of methods, students in this course will have an opportunity to observe the teaching in the various grades, and if desired, can have practice in teaching. With our substantial and comfortable school buildings and the improvements now in progress, there is no reason why the schools of Winfield may not rival any of the state.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 6, 1882.

School commenced last Monday, with an attendance of 275 pupils.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 6, 1882.

NOTICE. The School Library Association will elect officers for the ensuing year at the schoolhouse, Monday, Sept. 11, at 4 o'clock p.m. Every member is requested to be present and assist in the work. JERRY ADAMS, Pres.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 6, 1882.

Mr. Lane, of Maple township, was a caller at the TRAVELER office Monday. Mr. Lane is an extensive stock dealer and farmer and is looking at Arkansas City with the expectation of locating here, to enjoy the advantage of our schools and the facilities for the stock business within town.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 6, 1882.

W. E. Ketchum, of Maple City, one of the oldest and best teachers in the county, passed through town on his way home from the Normal last Wednesday.

Excerpt...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, September 7, 1882.

The picnic is the latest effort in the social line, and owing to the drizzling weather, it was almost a failure. The Salem school were mostly there, as they were the entertainers, but the other schools were not out in full. The Floral and Queen Village schools entertained us with some good singing, and Mr. Jennings of Winfield made some excellent remarks that were fully appreciated. Mr. Holloway talked to the little ones and drew them out in answering questions. They seemed to be pleased. The dinners were all that could be desired in that line. The people seemed well provided with wraps and umbrellas, but a picnic cannot be a success upon a damp day. Our Moscow neighbors ate their goodies and sang their songs, we presume, in their homes, and we would all have felt better had we done likewise.

Excerpt...

[UDALL CORRESPONDENT: "WE'LL GO."]

Winfield Courier, September 7, 1882.

Miss West was duly elected principal of the Udall schools for the coming year.

Winfield Courier, September 7, 1882.

The "Tisdale Anti-Monopoly Club," organized at the Tisdale schoolhouse Thursday evening and passed very war-like resolutions.

Winfield Courier, September 7, 1882.

Miss Fields, who was expected to take charge of the select school formerly taught by Mrs. Rains, has notified us that her health will not permit of her doing so this year. Instead, Miss Oldham, a graduate of Daughters College, and a lady of high intellectual and moral qualifications, will be present and conduct the school. A. D. MARIS.

Excerpts...

[CONSTANT CHIMES: REPORT FROM "MARK."]

Arkansas City Traveler, September 13, 1882.

Our locality last week was favored by a visit from one of the distinguished dignitaries of the State Agricultural College, E. A. Popenoe, professor of botany, etymology, horticulture, and zoology. The Professor is perhaps the best informed man on these special sciences in the State, and I speak from the practical experiences of a pupil, in the days of yore.

Another representative of our State College, in the person of Geo. F. Thompson, Supt. of the College printing department, also spent a portion of his vacation in our midst. While the writer cherishes pleasant memories of George as a genial chum during his life at the above named institution, still he does not heartily approve of the object of such visits; for George, unlike the Arab, after securing as bosom companion one of Cowley's fairest charmers, very quickly hied himself back to headquarters. However, we succeeded in drugging him with Geuda mineral water, which had the desired effect of wrecking his gastronomical apparatus.

With your permission, Mr. Editor, I would like to impress upon the minds of all ambitious young men and women desirous of obtaining a sound, sensible, and practical education the fact that our State college, located at Manhattan, Riley County, has excellent facilities for imparting instructions in the practical, and therefore valuable sciences, together with a thorough and extensive course in history, rhetoric and English literature.

In addition to these, it is one of the few similar institutions in the United States that is successful in teaching the industrial arts whereby sufficient skill and dexterity may be acquired as to enable one to master some of the many useful trades thereby making of him an honorable, independent, and useful citizen. There are also ample facilities for the teaching of vocal and instrumental music, by efficient instructors on the most reasonable terms to be found in the State.

Young women who pursue a course at this institution of learning acquire a vast fund of valuable knowledge beneficial to them in all the details of practical every day life, and do not have their heads crammed with the cumbersome and worthless lore of "Ladies' Seminaries," but become useful members of society instead of useless butterflies of fashion. The capacity of the college has been increased by the completion of a fifty-two thousand dollar addition to the main building the past summer, making it one of the pleasantest as well as the best and cheapest institutions of learning in the State. Fall term opens the 14th of this month. For catalogue address Pres. Geo. T. Fairchild, Manhattan, Kansas, or further information will be cheerfully given to any addressing the undersigned at Constant, this county. MARK.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 13, 1882.

Miss Linnie Peed will commence a winter's school in the Centennial Dist. the first Monday in October.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 13, 1882.

Judge Tipton will speak at the Centennial schoolhouse Sept. 15th at 2 p.m., and at Estus' schoolhouse in the evening. An earnest invitation is extended to all, regardless of politics.

Winfield Courier, September 14, 1882.

COWLEY COUNTY TEACHERS.

The following persons hold valid certificates in this county, and can make legal contracts with school boards.

WINFIELD CITY.

Professor E. T. Trimble.

Mrs. E. T. Trimble.

Mrs. W. B. Caton.

Miss S. J. Clute.

Miss A. E. Dickie.

Miss Mattie Gibson.

Miss Rose Rounds.

Miss Mary Bryant.

Miss Allie Klingman.

Miss Etta S. Kelly.

Miss Emma Crippen.

Miss Mary E. Hamill.

Miss Nellie A. Aldrich, grade 1.

Miss Allie E. Dickie, grade 1.

Miss Alpha Harden, grade 1.

Miss Anna Harden, grade 1.

Miss E. L. Cook, grade 1.

Miss Fannie Pontious, grade 2.

Miss Maggie C. Seabridge, grade 2.

Miss Maggie Stansbury, grade 2.

Miss Celina Bliss, grade 2.

Miss Jennie Davy, grade 2.

Miss Jennie Lowry, grade 2.

Miss Rosa A. Frederick, grade 2.

Miss Florence M. Goodwin, grade 2.

Miss Emma Gridley, grade 2.

Miss Fannie Harden, grade 2.

Miss Rose Rounds, grade 2.

R. S. White, grade 2.

J. A. Hilsabeck, grade 2.

W. P. Beaumont, grade 2.

C. W. Steward, grade 2.

C. J. Brothers, grade 2.

H. D. Stuber, grade 2.

J. H. Crotsley, grade 2.

L. P. King, grade 2.

A. Gridley, Sr., grade 2.

E. H. Burton, grade 2.

Miss Alice Dunham, grade 3.

Miss Leoti Gary, grade 3.

Miss Anna Kuhn, grade 3.

Miss Anna E. McClung, grade 3.

Miss M. L. Page, grade 3.

Miss Hattie Pontious, grade 3.

Miss Haidee Trezise, grade 3.

Will Tremor, grade 3.

C. F. Ware, grade 3.

ARKANSAS CITY.

C. T. Atkinson, grade 1.

Miss Jennie Peterson, grade 1.

Miss Jessie A. Sankey, grade 1.

Miss Sadie E. Pickering, grade 1.

Miss Maggie E. Sample, grade 1.

Miss Rose L. Sample, grade 1.

George E. Wright, grade 1.

Miss Maggie J. Burrows, grade 2.

Miss Linda Christian, grade 2.

Miss Flora M. Finley, grade 2.

Miss Linnie Peed, grade 2.

Miss Susie L. Hunt, grade 2.

Miss Nona L. Morton, grade 2.

C. F. Cunningham, grade 2.

W. E. Gilbert, grade 2.

W. M. Henderson, grade 2.

Miss Emma Rhodes, grade 3.

Miss Minnie F. Turner, grade 3.

J. W. Warren, grade 3.

BURDEN.

E. A. Millard, grade 1.

R. O. Stearns, grade 2.

Miss Lizzie Burden, grade 3.

DEXTER.

S. A. Smith, grade 1.

R. B. Hunter, grade 1.

Miss Anna Vaught, grade 1.

Miss Emma Elliott, grade 2.

R. B. Overman, grade 2.

J. R. Smith, grade 2.

AKRON.

Porter Wilson, grade 1.

R. B. Corson, grade 1.

ROCK.

A. H. Limerick, grade 1.

Mrs. Alice G. Limerick, grade 2.

J. C. Martindale, grade 2.

J. C. Bradshaw, grade 3.

OTTO.

S. F. Overman, grade 1.

SEELEY.

L. McKinley, grade 1.

Fannie McKinley, grade 1.

Gertrude McKinley, grade 2.

Lilly Perrin, grade 3.

Clara V. Pierce, grade 3.

L. T. Maddux, grade 3.

CAMBRIDGE.

Miss Lizzie Palmer, grade 2.

Miss Jennie E. Hicks, grade 2.

Miss Allie Wheeler, grade 2.

H. T. Albert, grade 2.

Jas. H. Hutchison, grade 2.

C. W. Ramage, grade 2.

J. S. Tull, grade 3.

Grant Wilkins, grade 3.

TISDALE. Mrs. E. Kephart, grade 2.

MAPLE CITY. W. E. Ketcham, grade 2.

GEUDA SPRINGS. Ida M. Hamilton, grade 2.

CLOVERDALE. Bertha Hempy, grade 3.

CEDARVALE. J. R. Marsh, grade 2.

OXFORD. Anna C. Martin, grade 2.

UDALL. Kate A. Martin, grade 3.

UDALL. Mattie L. West, grade 1.

BALTIMORE. Charles Messenger, grade 3.

GRENOLA. Lizzie Young, grade 3.

[NOTE: VERY HARD TO READ...PROBABLY HAVE SOME INITIALS WRONG!]

Winfield Courier, September 14, 1882.

The city schools open the 18th inst.

Winfield Courier, September 14, 1882.

On Monday morning, Sept. 18, the Winfield Select School will be opened by Miss Oldham, a graduate and former teacher of Daughters College, Kentucky.

Winfield Courier, September 14, 1882.

Teacher Items.

At the examination of teachers in August, 78 certificates were issued, making 107 now in force in the county. Of these 19 are first grade, 49 are second grade, and 27 are third grade. As there will be about 140 schools needing teachers this fall and winter, the supply is below the demand.

E. A. Millard has contracted for the school in district 90.

R. C. Stearns has engaged the school in district 14, Torrance.

T. J. Rude has engaged the Burden school.

S. A. Smith has contracted for the school in district 7.

Miss Anna Vaught and Miss Emma Elliott have engaged the Dexter schools.

The Arkansas City schools opened Monday of last week.

S. F. Herriott has taken the school in 68, Vernon Township.

Miss Celina Bliss will teach in 115, Pleasant Valley.

Lincoln McKinley will teach in district 50, Vernon Township.

Miss Sadie E. Pickering will teach in 9, Pleasant Valley.

W. P. Beaumont will give his labors to 41, Pleasant Valley.

Miss Mattie L. West has engaged the Udall school.

H. T. Albert will continue his labors in Cambridge.

J. R. Marsh will teach in 66, Cedar Township.

R. B. Hunter has engaged the school in 56, Dexter Township.

Miss Lizzie Palmer goes to Summit, 105, this fall.

Miss Emma Gridley will teach in 27, Ninnescah.

Ansel Gridley, Sr., will teach in 57, Windsor.

Miss Lizzie Gridley has contracted to teach the school in 124, Walnut.

D. T. Crotsley has engaged the school in district 21, Walnut.

James H. Hutchison has the school in 30, Silver Creek.

D. W. Ramage has the school in 39, Tisdale.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 20, 1882.

Parties having wood for sale should read the notice of the school board of District No. 2.

NOTICE. WOOD WANTED. Bids will be received by the School Board, of Dist. No. 2, for supplying hard wood for use in the public schools. Bids must be presented on or before Thursday, Oct. 6th, 1882, at 12 m. The Board reserve the right to reject any or all bids. Bids may be made for 4 ft. or 2 ft. wood, and it is estimated about 40 cords will be needed.

By order of the Board. O. INGERSOLL, Clerk.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 20, 1882.

On Monday last Miss Maggie Burrows left Osceola, Iowa, for Arkansas City, in southern Kansas, where she is engaged as a teacher in the primary department of the public schools for the coming year. She will be greatly missed in Osceola society, where she is an especial favorite, and her return will be anticipated with pleasure. Osceola (Iowa) Sentinel.

Winfield Courier, September 21, 1882.

Winfield has one of the best high schools in the state.

Winfield Courier, September 21, 1882.

The teachers of the Northwest Association District will meet at Valley Center schoolhouse on Friday evening, October 6th. L. McKINLAY, Secretary.

FIRST SCHOOLHOUSES IN COWLEY COUNTY.

Winfield Courier, September 21, 1882.

The first schoolhouse built in Cowley County was at Arkansas City, District 2, in 1871. District 9, in Pleasant Valley Township, was the second district in the county to erect a schoolhouse. It is called "Excelsior," and was built in March, 1872. Dexter school, district 15, built in 1872; also district 8 and 42. In 1873 schoolhouses sprang up like jimpson weeds all over the county, and now we have one hundred and forty good, comfortable schoolhouses, well furnished and equipped with every appliance. Cowley's free schools are her greatest glory, and jealously and carefully should their interests be guarded.

Winfield Courier, September 21, 1882.

The privy vault at the Brettun House has completely ruined all the wells in the immediate vicinity. This is a matter that should be carefully looked after by our citizens. If the vaults are too deep or closer than seventy feet from a well, the water becomes impure. We are afraid the school boards have not carefully considered this matter in the location of the wells and out-houses on the school grounds. It would have been safer to have placed them on the side of the building away from the out-houses, although they are now over a hundred feet from the vaults.

Winfield Courier, September 21, 1882.

From the Cambridge News..

P. H. Albright, of Winfield, was in town Friday and made the News a call.

Miss Ella Bosley is the name of the Cowley County novelist who is writing a serial for the COURIER under the title of "Ambition Crowned."

Report says that the Torrance school is still without a teacher, and may be left vacant during the coming term, unless the school officers see quickly to their interest. According to Prof. Story's report during the teachers' institute at Winfield, some of the schools of the county may be without teachers, unless there be an accession to the list already examined.

Winfield Courier, September 28, 1882.

MARRIED. T. J. Rude surprised his many friends Sunday evening by appearing at the Christian Church with Miss Mary Gentry, and they were then and there united in marriage. T. J. and his bride have both engaged the Burden school, and will double team on the young folks. We congratulate them.

Excerpt...

[UDALL CORRESPONDENT: "TOM."]

Winfield Courier, September 28, 1882.

Miss West has passed through the first week of her school with an average attendance of thirty-five.

[KANSAS NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 4, 1882. Front Page.

Cowley County has 140 good, comfortable schoolhouses.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 4, 1882.

Cowley County has 140 good, comfortable schoolhouses. The fear entertained by G. Washington Glick that he will not poll the full vote of his party in that part of the State seems to be well founded. Emporia News.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 4, 1882.

Linnie Peed has been engaged to take charge of a school near Newton, Kansas, where she goes this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 4, 1882.

In the first Primary department of the Arkansas City schools, the following pupils were neither absent nor tardy during the last school month: Willie Davis, Eddie Mott, Arthur Ware, Purley Clifton, and Ida Beecham.

Excerpts...

[COMMUNICATION FROM "MARK" - CONSTANT CHIMES]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 4, 1882.

School will commence next week in Dist. No. 10. Miss Sadie Pickering, of Arkansas City, will preside over the obstreperous urchins.

A week ago Monday, Miss Bliss, of Winfield, corralled a score of youths in Dist. 115 for the purpose of teaching them the whys and wherefores of a multiplicity of things. Miss Celina is a teacher of excellent repute, and under her supervision the cause of education in this district will be accelerated with an impetus characteristic of the lady.

Two of Mrs. Henry Harbaugh's old schoolmates, Mrs. Henry Endicott, of Arkansas City, and Mrs. Nancy Buford, of Illinois, have been visiting her this week, reciting reminiscences of girlhood days and comparing their respective success in life since they ceased annoying the master with their girlish pranks in the school room.

The school board of Dist. 41 have been very fortunate in securing the services of Will Beaumont as teacher for the ensuing year. Will, who is one of the most genial and intelligent young men in the county, has been in attendance at the State normal school at Emporia for the past two years, and therefore possesses the requisite ability to scientifically purge the disobedient and unruly kids of this district of their chronic meanness. Although they have succeeded in "running off" several teachers, and last winter had no school at all, the writer would mildly and kindly suggest that they show due respect toward Will, and not irritate his feelings or incur his animosity, for fear the consequences may be very unpleasant.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

Death of a Valued Citizen: Samuel W. Greer.

Died at his residence in Winfield on Saturday morning, September 30th, of consumption, Samuel W. Greer, in the fifty-seventh year of his age. He had been suffering from this dread disease for twelve years or more and for the last year he has been so feeble as to scarcely be able to be out of doors but a short time. His death was not unexpected, indeed, he lived much longer than his friends had reason to hope for. He preserved his clear reason and intelligence to the last and made directions for the funeral and burial.

Samuel W. Greer was born in Alleghany County, Pennsylvania, near West Newton, June 2nd, 1826. In 1853 he moved to Oskaloosa, Iowa, where in 1855 he was married to Clotilda Hilton. He came to Leavenworth, Kansas, in October 1856. In October, 1858, he was elected Territorial Superintendent of Public Instructions. That campaign was the first free state triumph at the polls. This office he held for three years, till 1861, by reason of the time of election being altered by the legislature. During this time he made three reports. The recommendations of his second report are almost literally carried out in the formation of our present school system.

[SILVERDALE CORRESPONDENT: "REPORTER.]

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

EDS. COURIER: We attended the Greenback speaking at the Centennial schoolhouse in this township on the eve of Sept. 26th. W. A. Tipton and H. D. Kellogg were the principal speakers although our local advocates of the cause made a very able effort. Judge Tipton occupied about two hours' time in abusing the two old parties, being particularly severe on the Republican party. His speech was fully up to the average of his party and I think he had committed his lesson well as it was nothing more nor less than a repetition of Gen. Weaver's speeches. He accused our party with having enacted laws favoring the rich man and ignoring the poor; with having deliberately robbed the poor soldier by only paying him $5.00 per month and giving the difference to the Shylocks. Now we most assuredly thank the Judge for his sympathy, but assure him that it was not a money consideration which caused us to enter the army in October, 1861. It was for the union of the states that caused us to put ourselves up for a target on nearly every battlefield from Louisville, Kentucky, to the Gulf. When we enter suit against the government for an equalization of pay, we will be glad to have the Judge take our case. He told us further our party had depreciated our greenbacks. Now we always thought it was Gen. Lee's democratic army that did it; and if we had only had a few more thousand men to prevent his success, we would probably have been able to maintain them nearer on a par with gold, notwithstanding Seymore, Hendricks, Vallandingham, and Voorhees persisted in saying they were unconstitutional and worthless, and we have no doubt but what Judge Tipton voted with these worthies all the time. I shall refrain from following him through his entire speech for it would be a great waste of printer's ink, but anyone who desires may read his speech by getting one of Weaver's; except the part referring to Representative Ryan, who he accused of building the finest residence in the state on a salary of $5,000 a year, but said Ryan was a Republican, which accounted for it. He also assailed the public career of Mr. Jennings, and said if we would elect him, he should do the business of attorney much cheaper to the county, for he would not make a smelling committee of himself, besides the old women of Winfield could not control him. We know who will control him. The seven or eight hundred Republican majority will do it, and we regret to think it, too, as he is a stranger and it is his first effort to secure an office. I mean his first effort here, but it is

"Sweet to run, but oh, how bitter,

For an office and then not git'er."

Doctor Kellogg followed and his effort at speech making was not equal to Blaine or Conkling, and we do not think the Greenback party committed much waste of talent by nominating the doctor. He made it his chief point to favor the recording of a certain road. A few nights ago when he spoke in this township he was going to have the Arkansas River opened for navigation, which is of much importance to Southern Kansas. About the next time the Doctor comes he will be in favor of the legislature making an appropriation to buy pipes for all the old women, but he will hardly succeed in this as the State Treasury will be severely taxed to buy pants for the small members of the legislature who are trying to straddle the Republican, Democratic, and Greenback parties, prohibition, and anti-prohibition. The doctor says when he goes to the legislature he will not accept a pass from the Santa Fe road. It occurs to us that he is going by water, up "Salt River," for he is sounding his political fog horn now but it will avail him nothing. His political aspirations are forever wrecked, as they should be for deserting his party.

When an opportunity presents itself, your reporter will always be present to chronicle the speeches of such illustrious men. REPORTER.

Excerpts...

[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

One and then another leave our circle for a while at least. Miss Etta Johnson and McClelland Dalgarn are in Winfield attending school. Miss Nellie Buck is spending a few weeks in the city.

There was a festival at the schoolhouse on Friday evening last, and although the weather turned out strong, a merry set assembled, and the supper was not one to be criticized. Everything that fell to my lot was delicious. There was some excellent music, both vocal and instrumental. May the fair banner of peace always float out over the good people of our vicinity.

School will begin on Monday. Miss Merriam will again wield the scepter and help the young Salemites dig up knowledge from the inexhaustible mine.

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

Miss Alice Dunham opened school Monday at Fairview, three miles southwest of Winfield.

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

Miss Leota Gary commenced a term of school Monday at Centennial, seven miles southwest of the city.

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

Hon. T. H. Soward and Hon. H. E. Asp will speak at Rose Valley schoolhouse in Pleasant Valley township on Saturday evening, October 7th, at 7-1/2 o'clock. The ladies as well as gentlemen are expected to be present.

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

Winfield select school taught in the Christian Church gives thorough instructions at reasonable rates.

Winfield Courier, October 5, 1882.

Notice! The Walnut Valley Anti-Monopoly Club was organized with ten members on Saturday night, Sept. 30th. The club will meet every Saturday night at 7 o'clock at the Walnut Valley schoolhouse. All citizens in the neighborhood are invited to attend and assist in making the meeting pleasant and profitable. DAVID BEAUMONT, President.

F. A. A. WILLIAMS, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 11, 1882.

District 35, in Silverdale township, wants a school teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 11, 1882.

School teachers are in demand. District 35, in Silverdale township, is in need of one, and any teacher wishing employment should call upon the school Board.

Excerpt...

[EAST BOLTON ITEMS: "MORE ANON."]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 11, 1882.

School in Dist. 80 began last Monday. And now after a long vacation we hope the children will begin another school year with more energy than ever before. We are informed that a compulsory school law is in existence in Kansas. If such be the case, school boards should make it their business to inform themselves in regard to their duty in this matter. I have in my own knowledge instances where children were kept from school last year, through neglect on the part of the parents.

Excerpts...

[PLEASANT VALLEY CORRESPONDENT: "HORATIUS."]

Winfield Courier, October 12, 1882.

School in district 115 has been in session two weeks. Miss Celina Bliss presides as teacher. She is energetic and efficient.

Today the United Brethren minister, Rev. J. H. Snyder, preached his farewell sermon to his class at Victor schoolhouse. Mr. Snyder is a cultured gentleman, possessing rare social qualities and fine abilities. His many friends will regret his transfer to other fields of labor.

The genial, sociable, and handsome Will Beaumont, for the past two years a Cowley County representative in the State Normal at Emporia, will tomorrow offer himself as a sacrifice to the naughty youths in number 41. Will has the sympathies of the writer, who will hope and pray that his good looks and usefulness may not be impaired during his stay in this district. HORATIUS. Oct. 1st, 1882.

Winfield Courier, October 12, 1882.

Winfield select school taught in the Christian Church gives thorough instructions at reasonable rates.

Winfield Courier, October 12, 1882.

Dr. D. E. Taylor, president of Wooster University, Ohio, delivered a very able sermon at the Presbyterian Church Sunday evening.

Winfield Courier, October 12, 1882.

TO BE MARRIED. Miss Jennie Melville has engaged another school, with only one pupil this time. He is William Kellerman, of Parsons, Kansas. The contract will be signed on the 18th at the residence of her sister in Parsons. We wish her boundless joy in her new relations.

Winfield Courier, October 12, 1882.

Rev. Fred Otte, German Lutheran minister, will preach next Sabbath (15th inst.), at Udall schoolhouse. All are invited.

Winfield Courier, October 12, 1882.

Teachers' Directory.

The following teachers have notified the County Superintendent of their school contracts.

WINFIELD.

Miss Anna L. Hunt, District 1.

Miss Leota Gary, District 4.

Miss Jennie Davy, District 119.

Miss Anna Kuhn, District 28.

Miss Hattie Pontious, District 22.

Miss Emma Grifley, District 57.

Miss Rosa Frederick, District 49.

Miss Annie E. McClung, District 133.

Will Tremor, District 8.

A. Staggers, District 12.

R. W. Shite, District 19.

J. H. Crotsley, District 21.

Chas. F. Ware, District 48.

D. D. Stuber, District 65.

S. L. Herriott, District 68.

F. H. Burton, District 75.

D. J. Brothers, District 97.

ARKANSAS CITY.

C. T. Atkinson, city schools.

Miss Emma Rhodes, District 64.

Mrs. E. Kephart, District 62.

J. W. Arren, District 53.

C. F. Cunningham, District 69.

R. L. Balyeat, District 80.

S. J. Gilbert, District 79.

BURDEN.

Miss Lizzie Burden, District 113.

Mrs. Mary A. Rude, District 78.

T. J. Rude, District 78.

E. A. Millard, District 90.

James H. Hutchison, District 30.

NEW SALEM.

Mary Christopher, District 92.

W. M. Christopher, District 44.

D. W. Ramage, District 39.

DEXTER.

Miss Anna Vaught, District 5.

Miss Emma Elliott, District 5.

J. R. Smith, Jr., District 88.

CAMBRIDGE.

James S. Tull, District 16.

Grant Wilkins, District 65.

Kate A. Martin, Floral, District 20.

Porter Wilson, Akron, District 26.

S. F. Overman, Otto, District 86.

ROCK.

Fannie McKinlay, District 72.

Lilly Perrin, District 81.

L. T. Maddux, District 13.

MAPLE CITY.

W. R. Ketcham, District 85.

Miss M. L. Page, District 58.

[KANSAS NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 18, 1882. Front Page.

Teachers for the public schools are scarce.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 18, 1882.

Frank Jennings passed through our city yesterday on his way to Spring Side School House, to attend the Republican rally.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 18, 1882.

Hon. T. H. Soward will speak at the Estus Schoolhouse in Silverdale township upon the political issues of the day on Saturday, October 28th, 1882. Turn out and hear home truths ably set forth.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, October 19, 1882.

Miss May Christopher, we hear, is teaching in Moscow. Mr. W. M. Christopher is training the young ideas in Dexter.

Winfield Courier, October 19, 1882.

Major J. W. Powell, of the U. S. Survey and topographical engineers, made us a call on Saturday. He is the officer who explored the great Colorado Canon and is the most energetic, capable, and scientific officer of the government surveys. His description of his work and geological researches are among the best in the government records, and are read by scientists with great interest. He came to Winfield to purchase a house and lots for his sister, Mrs. Eliza D. Garlick, for a residence and a Kindergarten school. As soon as she can arrange matters, she will become a permanent resident here and will introduce the kind of school for children so famous as the best, most pleasing, and effective. Winfield will receive her with cordial enthusiasm.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 25, 1882.

The Burden schools opened with eighty-six scholars. The Enterprise says there will be twice that number before the season closes.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 25, 1882.

An East Bolton Farmer says if Dr. Kellogg desires the farmers' votes, he had better stay at home in his drug store, and not go around giving himself away like he did at Spring Side schoolhouse on the 17th inst.

Winfield Courier, October 26, 1882.

The Winfield division of the County Teachers' Association met Saturday last in the high school building. W. P. Beaumont was elected president; Charles Ware, vice president; S. S. Herriatt, secretary; and L. McKinlay, assistant secretary. The next meeting will be Nov. 18.

Winfield Courier, October 26, 1882.

The excavation for the basement of the new Kindergarten is being made, and the building will be pushed forward to completion as rapidly as possible. Maj. Powell, of the U. S. Army, is building it for the use of his sister, Mrs. Garlick, who will open the kindergarten school as soon as it is finished. A kindergarten is one of the finest institutions of modern times and will be hailed with joy by the children who are so fortunate as to be able to attend.

Winfield Courier, October 26, 1882.

DIED. Miss Lou. Sizemore, who is well known in Winfield, died last Thursday of typhoid fever at her home in Richland Township. The funeral services will be held at Richland schoolhouse on the first Sunday in November at 11 a.m. She was twenty-six years old. Miss Bell Wood, of Richland Township, has been quite ill with what appeared to be typhoid fever, but is now recovering.

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[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: "CAESAR."]

Winfield Courier, October 26, 1882.

L. C. Brown is training the young olive branches in Dist. No. 10, Holland schoolhouse.

Miss Edith Holland is attending school in Winfield.

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[REPORT FROM JETTA JAY, SOUTH BEND.]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 1, 1882. Editorial Page.

Both teacher and pupils of District 42 suffer from want of water to drink. This should not be.

School is progressing finely, with an attendance of twenty-six pupils. Miss Jessie Sankey wields the switch this winter.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 1, 1882.

Hon. W. P. Hackney will speak at Fisher's schoolhouse Nov. 4th, at 7:30 p.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 1, 1882.

Henry Asp will address the citizens of South Bend schoolhouse tomorrow evening at 7:30 p.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 1, 1882.

Winfield will shortly have a Kindergarten school presided over by Mrs. Garlick. This will be a great boon to both parents and children.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 1, 1882.

The following pupils were neither absent nor tardy without an excuse during the past school month: Annie Wagstaff, Ida Lane, Fanny Forrester, Ethel Clifton, Clara Ford, Belle Johnson, Hatty Franey, Nettie Franey, Annie Speers, Emma Mann, Renna Grubbs, Laura Jones, Laura Ware, Lillie Rarick, Gertie Peterson, Sam Cleveland, Eddie Scott.

ANNIE L. NORTON, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 1, 1882.

GRAMMAR DEPARTMENT.

The following were neither absent nor tardy during the past month: Angie Small, Flora Gould, Nina Pickering, Maggie Ford, Edna Worthley, Katie Warren, Myrtle McNelly, Thaddeus Jones, Nellie Patterson, Belle Hart, Guy West, Robert Warren.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 1, 1882.

The following pupils were neither absent nor tardy during the last school month: Willie Davis, Lorenzo Gilbert, Purley Clifton, Arthur Ware, Nettie Jordan, Carry Fairclo, Ida Beecham, Allie Davis, Eddie Mott, Byron Hubbard, Cliff Hardy, Cora McIntire, Maggie Sleeth, Willie Barnett. SUSIE L. HUNT, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, November 2, 1882.

Uncle Wesley Paris has removed from Maple Township to Winfield, where he will stay during the winter in order to give his children the benefit of our schools.

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Winfield Courier, November 2, 1882.

Otter Creek.

School will begin next Monday with S. C. Harden, teacher.

Preaching at the schoolhouse next Sunday at 7 o'clock p.m., by J. B. Hunter, United Brethren. Come out and hear the new preacher.

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1882.

FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS.

TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION.

The Teachers' Association of the northwestern division met at Valley Center schoolhouse, Oct. 20 at 7 p.m. House called to order by R. B. Corson. The first on the program was a song. Next an address of welcome by Miss Clara Green. Response by C. M. Leavett, which was followed by quite a number of very interesting recitations. Adjourned to meet at 9 a.m., Oct. 21.

Saturday, Oct. 21st, the Association met pursuant to adjournment. House called to order by C. M. Leavett. Minutes of the previous meeting read and approved. After which the following program was very profitably carried out.

1. The organization of a school, including gradation, classification, seating, program, branches of study, and extent of term's work for each pupil.

2. How to prepare a reading lesson.

3. Methods of spelling.

4. Model lesson in practical language.

The next was reorganization, which resulted as follows: President, R. B. Corson; Vice President, C. M. Leavett; Secretary and Treasurer, L. T. Maddux; Corresponding Secretary, P. Wilson; Executive committee, Mattie West, Clara Green, and J. C. Martindale.

The following resolution was passed.

WHEREAS, Our Association districts being large, many teachers are of necessity remote from the place of meeting, and in consequence great difficulty is encountered in attending the meetings; therefore,

Resolved, That we ask the school boards of our respective districts to allow us the privilege of closing school at noon on Friday preceding the meetings of our Association.

Association adjourned to meet at Udall Nov. 18, 1882. R. B. CORSON, President.

L. T. MADDUX, Secretary.

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[OTTER CORRESPONDENT: "OTTERITE."]

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1882.

EDS. COURIER: We will drop you a few lines from the southeast of Cowley, adjoining Chautauqua.

On last evening, at our schoolhouse, we listened to a very able address, delivered by Hon. Ben. Henderson of Sedan, on the live issues of the day. He maintains that prohibition is paramount to all other issues of the day. He showed conclusively that the use and abuse of intoxicating liquors were a greater burden on the people than all the bonds, banks, and railroads were. One point he made more forcibly than was relished by our Democratic friends, was this: He said "they" (the Democratic party) were in favor of keeping four millions of human beings in servitude; but when we pass a law shutting off their whiskey, they shout with one accord, "That's taking away our liberty!" The Democracy has a nice idea of liberty and freedom, indeed. OTTERITE.

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1882.

SKIPPED THE STATISTICAL PART OF REPORT OF THE WINFIELD SCHOOLS FOR THE MONTH ENDING OCTOBER 13, 1882. "The teachers' meeting on Saturday, Oct. 28th, was both interesting and profitable. Miss Clute gave a class exercise in reading and Miss Dickie one in arithmetic. The methods of teaching these branches were discussed by the teachers. Miss Hamill read an interesting paper, 'The Life and Works of Pestalozzi.'

These meetings are held once a month. Parents and citizens are cordially invited to be present. The next one will be held on Saturday, Nov. 25, commencing at 9:30 a.m."

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1882.

School Report.

Report of Excelsior school, district No. Nine, for the month ending Oct. 27, 1882. No. Of pupils enrolled 21. Names of those neither absent nor tardy: Annie Crawford, Metta Byers, Mary Smith, Maisie Sherrard, Welden Crawford. Names and standing of pupils in the advanced and intermediate grades: Flory Smith, 99; Harry Pierce, 86; Katie Robertson, 92; Dora Smith, 88; Welden Crawford, 85; Annie Crawford, 85; Ora DeWitt, 69. Graded on a scale of 100. SADIE E. PICKERING, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1882.

The pupils of the High School are editing a semi-monthly paper, called The Eclipse. It was read before the school on last Friday afternoon by Miss Ella Johnson, and really does eclipse anything of the kind generally presented. There were also some very creditable essays and recitations given. One can be finely entertained by dropping in on the High School Friday afternoon, though it somewhat bewilders a young fellow to be surrounded by as many pretty, rosy-cheeked Misses as there are in the Winfield High School. The pupils seem to be progressing rapidly, and they express themselves well pleased with the present management.

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1882.

Teachers' Association.

The Burden Division of the Teachers' Association met at Burden, Oct. 28, 1882, and agreed upon the following organization.

President, E. A. Millard.

Vice president, R. O. Stearns.

Secretary, J. H. Hutchison.

Assistant Secretary, T. J. Rude.

Treasurer, C. I. Walch.

It was decreed that the present corps of officers should constitute the executive committee and that said committee should meet at Burden on Saturday, Nov. 18, 1882, at 6 o'clock p.m., to arrange matters and assign topics for next meeting. But few teachers were present, however the meeting was spirited and enthusiastic, and a determination was shown on the part of those present to make the Association a success. The meeting adjourned to meet Nov. 18, 1882. The teachers of this division are respectfully invited to attend. Remember "those resolutions" passed at the Normal. JAMES H. HUTCHISON, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1882.

Teachers' Meeting.

The next meeting of the Winfield division of Teachers' Association will be held Saturday, Nov. 18th, promptly at 10 o'clock a.m., in the High School building at Winfield. The committee on program has assigned the following topic to the several teachers herein mentioned.

MORNING SESSION, 10 A.M.

1st subject. The organization of a school, including gradation, classification, seating, program, branches of study, and extent of term's work for each pupil--R. C. Story.

2nd subject. Model lesson in practical language--Miss E. L. Cook, Miss A. E. Dickie, and Mr. A. Staggers.

3rd subject. How to prepare a reading lesson--Miss Emma Gridley, Miss S. J. Clute, and Mr. J. H. Crotsley.

AFTERNOON SESSION, 1:30 P.M.

1st subject. A lesson on the use of the globe and maps of the world--Prof. Trimble, Miss Sadie Pickering, and Mr. T. H. Burton.

2nd subject. The best method of teaching notation--Miss Lizzie Gridley, Mrs. W. B. Caton, and Mr. R. S. White.

3rd subject. Longfellow and Tennyson--Miss Rose Frederick, Miss Mattie Gibson, and Mr. D. G. Brothers.

4th subject. Miscellaneous business.

We hope that every teacher in the Winfield Division will feel an interest in this work and will come prepared to discuss any and all topics that are brought up. COMMITTEE.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, November 9, 1882.

DIED. A large concourse of sympathizing friends assembled at the Prairie Home Schoolhouse on Sunday, Oct. 29th, to hear the funeral sermon of Mrs. Brooking.

Miss Jennie Wells is boarding with Mrs. Edgar and attending our school.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 15, 1882.

An Italian, Professor DeBona, gave an entertainment at the Schoolhouse Friday and Saturday evenings, with the understanding that one-fourth of the proceeds should be given to the Library Fund. The Professor departed this morning, Nov. 13th, on the 5 o'clock train, forgetting to mention the situation of his palace or pay the promised sum to the Library. Kansas papers will please copy in order that an imposter may not deceive worthy citizens.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 15, 1882.

REPORT OF ROSE VALLEY SCHOOL FOR THE MONTH ENDING NOV. 10. The following pupils have been neither absent nor tardy within the last school month: Bertie Maxwell, Perry Grey, Willie Maxwell, Howard Maxwell, Ross Sankey, John Sankey, Joseph Maxwell, Newt. Kirkpatrick, Mary Fees, Nannie Maxwell, Bessie Kirkpatrick, Mable Kirkpatrick, Emma Locke, John Drennan, Etta Kirkpatrick, Maggie Guyer, Ollie Kirkpatrick, Lillie Purdy, Maggie Kirkpatrick, Johnnie Warren. GEORGE E. WRIGHT, Teacher.

Winfield Courier, November 16, 1882.

We were surprised to receive a call Friday from Mr. J. W. Browning, a former citizen of Cowley. He had just returned from Missouri--this time probably to stay. He says Missouri is no place for a man to raise a family; has no schoolhouses and the people take no pride in their schools. He says Cowley is the best place he can find.

Winfield Courier, November 16, 1882.

There will be an examination of teachers Saturday, November 18, at 9 o'clock a.m., in the Winfield High School building. R. C. STORY, Co. Supt.

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[CONSTANT CORRESPONDENT: "CAESAR."]

Winfield Courier, November 23, 1882.

The lyceum at the Holland schoolhouse was reorganized Saturday night. It promises to be a success. Question for debate: Resolved, That allowing the Indians rations is a drawback to their civilization. CAESAR.

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[PRAIRIE GROVE CORRESPONDENT: "R. J."]

Winfield Courier, November 23, 1882.

Mrs. Limerick is teaching us a good school.

Miss Fannie Pontious is teaching on Rock Creek, and her sister Hattie at Richland.

A literary society was organized last week, with J. O. Vanorsdol president. It will meet every Friday evening.

Our Sunday school is progressing finely with A. Limerick, superintendent; J. W. Douglass, assistant superintendent, and Miss Mattie Vanorsdol, secretary.

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[TISDALE CORRESPONDENT: "X."]

Winfield Courier, November 23, 1882.

Our literary is well attended and is quite interesting. We propose to decide the tariff question next Friday night.

Our school is quite large already. About 60 scholars are enrolled, making an assistant a necessity. Mrs. Green, our teacher, is in many respects a superior woman. She can "keep school" and no mistake.

Winfield Courier, November 23, 1882.

The Sheridan school is prospering finely under the management of E. I. Johnson.

Winfield Courier, November 23, 1882.

Teachers are making inquiries about Thanksgiving day and other holidays. While there are no legal holidays in Kansas, school boards frequently give Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years day to the teachers in the public schools. This is right as well as generous.

Winfield Courier, November 23, 1882.

We were pleased to receive a call from Professor M. J. Stimson, late of San Francisco, California, last Friday. The Professor is an old friend of Geo. H. Crippen, and George and others are trying to prevail upon him to locate here. He is one of the most thorough musicians and music teachers in the country, and an intelligent and cultivated gentleman. We hope he will conclude to stop with us.

Winfield Courier, November 23, 1882.

Prof. M. J. Stimson, late of San Francisco, California, where he has been actively engaged in teaching music, and as Director of Music in the Metropolitan Temple for the past eight years, has located permanently in Winfield and will immediately engage in his profession. Mr. Stimson comes to us highly recommended from the people of the Pacific slope and from different portions of our own state, and is well and favorably known by several of our resident ladies and gentlemen. He has been a teacher of large experience for several years, of the piano, organ, and voice culture; also singing and sight reading. We ask for him the liberal patronage and hearty cooperation of our citizens.

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[NEW SALEM CORRESPONDENT: "OLIVIA."]

Winfield Courier, November 23, 1882.

Miss Merriam was so ill one day this week that she could not teach, but she has recovered her usual health.

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